This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
d2db5ecba4e466118edf9dbb7714715c52f9cc3d
[perl5.git] / ext / Opcode / Opcode.pm
1 package Opcode;
2
3 require 5.002;
4
5 use vars qw($VERSION $XS_VERSION @ISA @EXPORT_OK);
6
7 $VERSION = "1.04";
8 $XS_VERSION = "1.03";
9
10 use strict;
11 use Carp;
12 use Exporter ();
13 use DynaLoader ();
14 @ISA = qw(Exporter DynaLoader);
15
16 BEGIN {
17     @EXPORT_OK = qw(
18         opset ops_to_opset
19         opset_to_ops opset_to_hex invert_opset
20         empty_opset full_opset
21         opdesc opcodes opmask define_optag
22         opmask_add verify_opset opdump
23     );
24 }
25
26 sub opset (;@);
27 sub opset_to_hex ($);
28 sub opdump (;$);
29 use subs @EXPORT_OK;
30
31 bootstrap Opcode $XS_VERSION;
32
33 _init_optags();
34
35 sub ops_to_opset { opset @_ }   # alias for old name
36
37 sub opset_to_hex ($) {
38     return "(invalid opset)" unless verify_opset($_[0]);
39     unpack("h*",$_[0]);
40 }
41
42 sub opdump (;$) {
43         my $pat = shift;
44     # handy utility: perl -MOpcode=opdump -e 'opdump File'
45     foreach(opset_to_ops(full_opset)) {
46         my $op = sprintf "  %12s  %s\n", $_, opdesc($_);
47                 next if defined $pat and $op !~ m/$pat/i;
48                 print $op;
49     }
50 }
51
52
53
54 sub _init_optags {
55     my(%all, %seen);
56     @all{opset_to_ops(full_opset)} = (); # keys only
57
58     local($_);
59     local($/) = "\n=cut"; # skip to optags definition section
60     <DATA>;
61     $/ = "\n=";         # now read in 'pod section' chunks
62     while(<DATA>) {
63         next unless m/^item\s+(:\w+)/;
64         my $tag = $1;
65
66         # Split into lines, keep only indented lines
67         my @lines = grep { m/^\s/    } split(/\n/);
68         foreach (@lines) { s/--.*//  } # delete comments
69         my @ops   = map  { split ' ' } @lines; # get op words
70
71         foreach(@ops) {
72             warn "$tag - $_ already tagged in $seen{$_}\n" if $seen{$_};
73             $seen{$_} = $tag;
74             delete $all{$_};
75         }
76         # opset will croak on invalid names
77         define_optag($tag, opset(@ops));
78     }
79     close(DATA);
80     warn "Untagged opnames: ".join(' ',keys %all)."\n" if %all;
81 }
82
83
84 1;
85
86 __DATA__
87
88 =head1 NAME
89
90 Opcode - Disable named opcodes when compiling perl code
91
92 =head1 SYNOPSIS
93
94   use Opcode;
95
96
97 =head1 DESCRIPTION
98
99 Perl code is always compiled into an internal format before execution.
100
101 Evaluating perl code (e.g. via "eval" or "do 'file'") causes
102 the code to be compiled into an internal format and then,
103 provided there was no error in the compilation, executed.
104 The internal format is based on many distinct I<opcodes>.
105
106 By default no opmask is in effect and any code can be compiled.
107
108 The Opcode module allow you to define an I<operator mask> to be in
109 effect when perl I<next> compiles any code.  Attempting to compile code
110 which contains a masked opcode will cause the compilation to fail
111 with an error. The code will not be executed.
112
113 =head1 NOTE
114
115 The Opcode module is not usually used directly. See the ops pragma and
116 Safe modules for more typical uses.
117
118 =head1 WARNING
119
120 The authors make B<no warranty>, implied or otherwise, about the
121 suitability of this software for safety or security purposes.
122
123 The authors shall not in any case be liable for special, incidental,
124 consequential, indirect or other similar damages arising from the use
125 of this software.
126
127 Your mileage will vary. If in any doubt B<do not use it>.
128
129
130 =head1 Operator Names and Operator Lists
131
132 The canonical list of operator names is the contents of the array
133 op_name defined and initialised in file F<opcode.h> of the Perl
134 source distribution (and installed into the perl library).
135
136 Each operator has both a terse name (its opname) and a more verbose or
137 recognisable descriptive name. The opdesc function can be used to
138 return a list of descriptions for a list of operators.
139
140 Many of the functions and methods listed below take a list of
141 operators as parameters. Most operator lists can be made up of several
142 types of element. Each element can be one of
143
144 =over 8
145
146 =item an operator name (opname)
147
148 Operator names are typically small lowercase words like enterloop,
149 leaveloop, last, next, redo etc. Sometimes they are rather cryptic
150 like gv2cv, i_ncmp and ftsvtx.
151
152 =item an operator tag name (optag)
153
154 Operator tags can be used to refer to groups (or sets) of operators.
155 Tag names always being with a colon. The Opcode module defines several
156 optags and the user can define others using the define_optag function.
157
158 =item a negated opname or optag
159
160 An opname or optag can be prefixed with an exclamation mark, e.g., !mkdir.
161 Negating an opname or optag means remove the corresponding ops from the
162 accumulated set of ops at that point.
163
164 =item an operator set (opset)
165
166 An I<opset> as a binary string of approximately 43 bytes which holds a
167 set or zero or more operators.
168
169 The opset and opset_to_ops functions can be used to convert from
170 a list of operators to an opset and I<vice versa>.
171
172 Wherever a list of operators can be given you can use one or more opsets.
173 See also Manipulating Opsets below.
174
175 =back
176
177
178 =head1 Opcode Functions
179
180 The Opcode package contains functions for manipulating operator names
181 tags and sets. All are available for export by the package.
182
183 =over 8
184
185 =item opcodes
186
187 In a scalar context opcodes returns the number of opcodes in this
188 version of perl (around 340 for perl5.002).
189
190 In a list context it returns a list of all the operator names.
191 (Not yet implemented, use @names = opset_to_ops(full_opset).)
192
193 =item opset (OP, ...)
194
195 Returns an opset containing the listed operators.
196
197 =item opset_to_ops (OPSET)
198
199 Returns a list of operator names corresponding to those operators in
200 the set.
201
202 =item opset_to_hex (OPSET)
203
204 Returns a string representation of an opset. Can be handy for debugging.
205
206 =item full_opset
207
208 Returns an opset which includes all operators.
209
210 =item empty_opset
211
212 Returns an opset which contains no operators.
213
214 =item invert_opset (OPSET)
215
216 Returns an opset which is the inverse set of the one supplied.
217
218 =item verify_opset (OPSET, ...)
219
220 Returns true if the supplied opset looks like a valid opset (is the
221 right length etc) otherwise it returns false. If an optional second
222 parameter is true then verify_opset will croak on an invalid opset
223 instead of returning false.
224
225 Most of the other Opcode functions call verify_opset automatically
226 and will croak if given an invalid opset.
227
228 =item define_optag (OPTAG, OPSET)
229
230 Define OPTAG as a symbolic name for OPSET. Optag names always start
231 with a colon C<:>.
232
233 The optag name used must not be defined already (define_optag will
234 croak if it is already defined). Optag names are global to the perl
235 process and optag definitions cannot be altered or deleted once
236 defined.
237
238 It is strongly recommended that applications using Opcode should use a
239 leading capital letter on their tag names since lowercase names are
240 reserved for use by the Opcode module. If using Opcode within a module
241 you should prefix your tags names with the name of your module to
242 ensure uniqueness and thus avoid clashes with other modules.
243
244 =item opmask_add (OPSET)
245
246 Adds the supplied opset to the current opmask. Note that there is
247 currently I<no> mechanism for unmasking ops once they have been masked.
248 This is intentional.
249
250 =item opmask
251
252 Returns an opset corresponding to the current opmask.
253
254 =item opdesc (OP, ...)
255
256 This takes a list of operator names and returns the corresponding list
257 of operator descriptions.
258
259 =item opdump (PAT)
260
261 Dumps to STDOUT a two column list of op names and op descriptions.
262 If an optional pattern is given then only lines which match the
263 (case insensitive) pattern will be output.
264
265 It's designed to be used as a handy command line utility:
266
267         perl -MOpcode=opdump -e opdump
268         perl -MOpcode=opdump -e 'opdump Eval'
269
270 =back
271
272 =head1 Manipulating Opsets
273
274 Opsets may be manipulated using the perl bit vector operators & (and), | (or),
275 ^ (xor) and ~ (negate/invert).
276
277 However you should never rely on the numerical position of any opcode
278 within the opset. In other words both sides of a bit vector operator
279 should be opsets returned from Opcode functions.
280
281 Also, since the number of opcodes in your current version of perl might
282 not be an exact multiple of eight, there may be unused bits in the last
283 byte of an upset. This should not cause any problems (Opcode functions
284 ignore those extra bits) but it does mean that using the ~ operator
285 will typically not produce the same 'physical' opset 'string' as the
286 invert_opset function.
287
288
289 =head1 TO DO (maybe)
290
291     $bool = opset_eq($opset1, $opset2)  true if opsets are logically eqiv
292
293     $yes = opset_can($opset, @ops)      true if $opset has all @ops set
294
295     @diff = opset_diff($opset1, $opset2) => ('foo', '!bar', ...)
296
297 =cut
298
299 # the =cut above is used by _init_optags() to get here quickly
300
301 =head1 Predefined Opcode Tags
302
303 =over 5
304
305 =item :base_core
306
307     null stub scalar pushmark wantarray const defined undef
308
309     rv2sv sassign
310
311     rv2av aassign aelem aelemfast aslice av2arylen
312
313     rv2hv helem hslice each values keys exists delete
314
315     preinc i_preinc predec i_predec postinc i_postinc postdec i_postdec
316     int hex oct abs pow multiply i_multiply divide i_divide
317     modulo i_modulo add i_add subtract i_subtract
318
319     left_shift right_shift bit_and bit_xor bit_or negate i_negate
320     not complement
321
322     lt i_lt gt i_gt le i_le ge i_ge eq i_eq ne i_ne ncmp i_ncmp
323     slt sgt sle sge seq sne scmp
324
325     substr vec stringify study pos length index rindex ord chr
326
327     ucfirst lcfirst uc lc quotemeta trans chop schop chomp schomp
328
329     match split
330
331     list lslice splice push pop shift unshift reverse
332
333     cond_expr flip flop andassign orassign and or xor
334
335     warn die lineseq nextstate unstack scope enter leave
336
337     rv2cv anoncode prototype
338
339     entersub leavesub return method -- XXX loops via recursion?
340
341     leaveeval -- needed for Safe to operate, is safe without entereval
342
343 =item :base_mem
344
345 These memory related ops are not included in :base_core because they
346 can easily be used to implement a resource attack (e.g., consume all
347 available memory).
348
349     concat repeat join range
350
351     anonlist anonhash
352
353 Note that despite the existance of this optag a memory resource attack
354 may still be possible using only :base_core ops.
355
356 Disabling these ops is a I<very> heavy handed way to attempt to prevent
357 a memory resource attack. It's probable that a specific memory limit
358 mechanism will be added to perl in the near future.
359
360 =item :base_loop
361
362 These loop ops are not included in :base_core because they can easily be
363 used to implement a resource attack (e.g., consume all available CPU time).
364
365     grepstart grepwhile
366     mapstart mapwhile
367     enteriter iter
368     enterloop leaveloop
369     last next redo
370     goto
371
372 =item :base_io
373
374 These ops enable I<filehandle> (rather than filename) based input and
375 output. These are safe on the assumption that only pre-existing
376 filehandles are available for use.  To create new filehandles other ops
377 such as open would need to be enabled.
378
379     readline rcatline getc read
380
381     formline enterwrite leavewrite
382
383     print sysread syswrite send recv
384
385     eof tell seek sysseek
386
387     readdir telldir seekdir rewinddir
388
389 =item :base_orig
390
391 These are a hotchpotch of opcodes still waiting to be considered
392
393     gvsv gv gelem
394
395     padsv padav padhv padany
396
397     rv2gv refgen srefgen ref
398
399     bless -- could be used to change ownership of objects (reblessing)
400
401     pushre regcmaybe regcomp subst substcont
402
403     sprintf prtf -- can core dump
404
405     crypt
406
407     tie untie
408
409     dbmopen dbmclose
410     sselect select
411     pipe_op sockpair
412
413     getppid getpgrp setpgrp getpriority setpriority localtime gmtime
414
415     entertry leavetry -- can be used to 'hide' fatal errors
416
417 =item :base_math
418
419 These ops are not included in :base_core because of the risk of them being
420 used to generate floating point exceptions (which would have to be caught
421 using a $SIG{FPE} handler).
422
423     atan2 sin cos exp log sqrt
424
425 These ops are not included in :base_core because they have an effect
426 beyond the scope of the compartment.
427
428     rand srand
429
430 =item :base_thread
431
432 These ops are related to multi-threading.
433
434     lock specific
435
436 =item :default
437
438 A handy tag name for a I<reasonable> default set of ops.  (The current ops
439 allowed are unstable while development continues. It will change.)
440
441     :base_core :base_mem :base_loop :base_io :base_orig
442
443 If safety matters to you (and why else would you be using the Opcode module?)
444 then you should not rely on the definition of this, or indeed any other, optag!
445
446
447 =item :filesys_read
448
449     stat lstat readlink
450
451     ftatime ftblk ftchr ftctime ftdir fteexec fteowned fteread
452     ftewrite ftfile ftis ftlink ftmtime ftpipe ftrexec ftrowned
453     ftrread ftsgid ftsize ftsock ftsuid fttty ftzero ftrwrite ftsvtx
454
455     fttext ftbinary
456
457     fileno
458
459 =item :sys_db
460
461     ghbyname ghbyaddr ghostent shostent ehostent      -- hosts
462     gnbyname gnbyaddr gnetent snetent enetent         -- networks
463     gpbyname gpbynumber gprotoent sprotoent eprotoent -- protocols
464     gsbyname gsbyport gservent sservent eservent      -- services
465
466     gpwnam gpwuid gpwent spwent epwent getlogin       -- users
467     ggrnam ggrgid ggrent sgrent egrent                -- groups
468
469 =item :browse
470
471 A handy tag name for a I<reasonable> default set of ops beyond the
472 :default optag.  Like :default (and indeed all the other optags) its
473 current definition is unstable while development continues. It will change.
474
475 The :browse tag represents the next step beyond :default. It it a
476 superset of the :default ops and adds :filesys_read the :sys_db.
477 The intent being that scripts can access more (possibly sensitive)
478 information about your system but not be able to change it.
479
480     :default :filesys_read :sys_db
481
482 =item :filesys_open
483
484     sysopen open close
485     umask binmode
486
487     open_dir closedir -- other dir ops are in :base_io
488
489 =item :filesys_write
490
491     link unlink rename symlink truncate
492
493     mkdir rmdir
494
495     utime chmod chown
496
497     fcntl -- not strictly filesys related, but possibly as dangerous?
498
499 =item :subprocess
500
501     backtick system
502
503     fork
504
505     wait waitpid
506
507     glob -- access to Cshell via <`rm *`>
508
509 =item :ownprocess
510
511     exec exit kill
512
513     time tms -- could be used for timing attacks (paranoid?)
514
515 =item :others
516
517 This tag holds groups of assorted specialist opcodes that don't warrant
518 having optags defined for them.
519
520 SystemV Interprocess Communications:
521
522     msgctl msgget msgrcv msgsnd
523
524     semctl semget semop
525
526     shmctl shmget shmread shmwrite
527
528 =item :still_to_be_decided
529
530     chdir
531     flock ioctl
532
533     socket getpeername ssockopt
534     bind connect listen accept shutdown gsockopt getsockname
535
536     sleep alarm -- changes global timer state and signal handling
537     sort -- assorted problems including core dumps
538     tied -- can be used to access object implementing a tie
539     pack unpack -- can be used to create/use memory pointers
540
541     entereval -- can be used to hide code from initial compile
542     require dofile 
543
544     caller -- get info about calling environment and args
545
546     reset
547
548     dbstate -- perl -d version of nextstate(ment) opcode
549
550 =item :dangerous
551
552 This tag is simply a bucket for opcodes that are unlikely to be used via
553 a tag name but need to be tagged for completness and documentation.
554
555     syscall dump chroot
556
557
558 =back
559
560 =head1 SEE ALSO
561
562 ops(3) -- perl pragma interface to Opcode module.
563
564 Safe(3) -- Opcode and namespace limited execution compartments
565
566 =head1 AUTHORS
567
568 Originally designed and implemented by Malcolm Beattie,
569 mbeattie@sable.ox.ac.uk as part of Safe version 1.
570
571 Split out from Safe module version 1, named opcode tags and other
572 changes added by Tim Bunce E<lt>F<Tim.Bunce@ig.co.uk>E<gt>.
573
574 =cut
575