This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Time::Local patch take 2
[perl5.git] / lib / Time / Local.pm
1 package Time::Local;
2
3 require Exporter;
4 use Carp;
5 use Config;
6 use strict;
7 use integer;
8
9 use vars qw( $VERSION @ISA @EXPORT @EXPORT_OK );
10 $VERSION   = '1.15';
11
12 @ISA       = qw( Exporter );
13 @EXPORT    = qw( timegm timelocal );
14 @EXPORT_OK = qw( timegm_nocheck timelocal_nocheck );
15
16 my @MonthDays = ( 31, 28, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31 );
17
18 # Determine breakpoint for rolling century
19 my $ThisYear    = ( localtime() )[5];
20 my $Breakpoint  = ( $ThisYear + 50 ) % 100;
21 my $NextCentury = $ThisYear - $ThisYear % 100;
22 $NextCentury += 100 if $Breakpoint < 50;
23 my $Century = $NextCentury - 100;
24 my $SecOff  = 0;
25
26 my ( %Options, %Cheat );
27
28 use constant SECS_PER_MINUTE => 60;
29 use constant SECS_PER_HOUR   => 3600;
30 use constant SECS_PER_DAY    => 86400;
31
32 my $MaxInt = ( ( 1 << ( 8 * $Config{intsize} - 2 ) ) -1 ) * 2 + 1;
33 my $MaxDay = int( ( $MaxInt - ( SECS_PER_DAY / 2 ) ) / SECS_PER_DAY ) - 1;
34
35 if ( $^O eq 'MacOS' ) {
36     # time_t is unsigned...
37     $MaxInt = ( 1 << ( 8 * $Config{intsize} ) ) - 1;
38 }
39 else {
40     $MaxInt = ( ( 1 << ( 8 * $Config{intsize} - 2 ) ) - 1 ) * 2 + 1;
41 }
42
43 # Determine the EPOC day for this machine
44 my $Epoc = 0;
45 if ( $^O eq 'vos' ) {
46     # work around posix-977 -- VOS doesn't handle dates in the range
47     # 1970-1980.
48     $Epoc = _daygm( 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 70, 4, 0 );
49 }
50 elsif ( $^O eq 'MacOS' ) {
51     $MaxDay *=2 if $^O eq 'MacOS';  # time_t unsigned ... quick hack?
52     # MacOS time() is seconds since 1 Jan 1904, localtime
53     # so we need to calculate an offset to apply later
54     $Epoc = 693901;
55     $SecOff = timelocal( localtime(0)) - timelocal( gmtime(0) ) ;
56     $Epoc += _daygm( gmtime(0) );
57 }
58 else {
59     $Epoc = _daygm( gmtime(0) );
60 }
61
62 %Cheat = ();    # clear the cache as epoc has changed
63
64 sub _daygm {
65
66     # This is written in such a byzantine way in order to avoid
67     # lexical variables and sub calls, for speed
68     return $_[3] + (
69         $Cheat{ pack( 'ss', @_[ 4, 5 ] ) } ||= do {
70             my $month = ( $_[4] + 10 ) % 12;
71             my $year  = $_[5] + 1900 - $month / 10;
72
73             ( ( 365 * $year )
74               + ( $year / 4 )
75               - ( $year / 100 )
76               + ( $year / 400 )
77               + ( ( ( $month * 306 ) + 5 ) / 10 )
78             )
79             - $Epoc;
80         }
81     );
82 }
83
84 sub _timegm {
85     my $sec =
86         $SecOff + $_[0] + ( SECS_PER_MINUTE * $_[1] ) + ( SECS_PER_HOUR * $_[2] );
87
88     return $sec + ( SECS_PER_DAY * &_daygm );
89 }
90
91 sub timegm {
92     my ( $sec, $min, $hour, $mday, $month, $year ) = @_;
93
94     if ( $year >= 1000 ) {
95         $year -= 1900;
96     }
97     elsif ( $year < 100 and $year >= 0 ) {
98         $year += ( $year > $Breakpoint ) ? $Century : $NextCentury;
99     }
100
101     unless ( $Options{no_range_check} ) {
102         if ( abs($year) >= 0x7fff ) {
103             $year += 1900;
104             croak
105                 "Cannot handle date ($sec, $min, $hour, $mday, $month, *$year*)";
106         }
107
108         croak "Month '$month' out of range 0..11"
109             if $month > 11
110             or $month < 0;
111
112         my $md = $MonthDays[$month];
113         ++$md
114             if $month == 1 && _is_leap_year($year);
115
116         croak "Day '$mday' out of range 1..$md"  if $mday > $md or $mday < 1;
117         croak "Hour '$hour' out of range 0..23"  if $hour > 23  or $hour < 0;
118         croak "Minute '$min' out of range 0..59" if $min > 59   or $min < 0;
119         croak "Second '$sec' out of range 0..59" if $sec > 59   or $sec < 0;
120     }
121
122     my $days = _daygm( undef, undef, undef, $mday, $month, $year );
123
124     unless ($Options{no_range_check} or abs($days) < $MaxDay) {
125         my $msg = '';
126         $msg .= "Day too big - $days > $MaxDay\n" if $days > $MaxDay;
127
128         $year += 1900;
129         $msg .=  "Cannot handle date ($sec, $min, $hour, $mday, $month, $year)";
130
131         croak $msg;
132     }
133
134     return $sec
135            + $SecOff
136            + ( SECS_PER_MINUTE * $min )
137            + ( SECS_PER_HOUR * $hour )
138            + ( SECS_PER_DAY * $days );
139 }
140
141 sub _is_leap_year {
142     return 0 if $_[0] % 4;
143     return 1 if $_[0] % 100;
144     return 0 if $_[0] % 400;
145
146     return 1;
147 }
148
149 sub timegm_nocheck {
150     local $Options{no_range_check} = 1;
151     return &timegm;
152 }
153
154 sub timelocal {
155     my $ref_t = &timegm;
156     my $loc_for_ref_t = _timegm( localtime($ref_t) );
157
158     my $zone_off = $loc_for_ref_t - $ref_t
159         or return $loc_for_ref_t;
160
161     # Adjust for timezone
162     my $loc_t = $ref_t - $zone_off;
163
164     # Are we close to a DST change or are we done
165     my $dst_off = $ref_t - _timegm( localtime($loc_t) );
166
167     # If this evaluates to true, it means that the value in $loc_t is
168     # the _second_ hour after a DST change where the local time moves
169     # backward.
170     if ( ! $dst_off &&
171          ( ( $ref_t - SECS_PER_HOUR ) - _timegm( localtime( $loc_t - SECS_PER_HOUR ) ) < 0 )
172        ) {
173         return $loc_t - SECS_PER_HOUR;
174     }
175
176     # Adjust for DST change
177     $loc_t += $dst_off;
178
179     return $loc_t if $dst_off > 0;
180
181     # If the original date was a non-extent gap in a forward DST jump,
182     # we should now have the wrong answer - undo the DST adjustment
183     my ( $s, $m, $h ) = localtime($loc_t);
184     $loc_t -= $dst_off if $s != $_[0] || $m != $_[1] || $h != $_[2];
185
186     return $loc_t;
187 }
188
189 sub timelocal_nocheck {
190     local $Options{no_range_check} = 1;
191     return &timelocal;
192 }
193
194 1;
195
196 __END__
197
198 =head1 NAME
199
200 Time::Local - efficiently compute time from local and GMT time
201
202 =head1 SYNOPSIS
203
204     $time = timelocal($sec,$min,$hour,$mday,$mon,$year);
205     $time = timegm($sec,$min,$hour,$mday,$mon,$year);
206
207 =head1 DESCRIPTION
208
209 This module provides functions that are the inverse of built-in perl
210 functions C<localtime()> and C<gmtime()>. They accept a date as a
211 six-element array, and return the corresponding C<time(2)> value in
212 seconds since the system epoch (Midnight, January 1, 1970 GMT on Unix,
213 for example). This value can be positive or negative, though POSIX
214 only requires support for positive values, so dates before the
215 system's epoch may not work on all operating systems.
216
217 It is worth drawing particular attention to the expected ranges for
218 the values provided. The value for the day of the month is the actual
219 day (ie 1..31), while the month is the number of months since January
220 (0..11). This is consistent with the values returned from
221 C<localtime()> and C<gmtime()>.
222
223 =head1 FUNCTIONS
224
225 This module exports two functions by default, C<timelocal()> and
226 C<timegm()>.
227
228 The C<timelocal()> and C<timegm()> functions perform range checking on
229 the input $sec, $min, $hour, $mday, and $mon values by default.
230
231 If you are working with data you know to be valid, you can speed your
232 code up by using the "nocheck" variants, C<timelocal_nocheck()> and
233 C<timegm_nocheck()>. These variants must be explicitly imported.
234
235     use Time::Local 'timelocal_nocheck';
236
237     # The 365th day of 1999
238     print scalar localtime timelocal_nocheck 0,0,0,365,0,99;
239
240 If you supply data which is not valid (month 27, second 1,000) the
241 results will be unpredictable (so don't do that).
242
243 =head2 Year Value Interpretation
244
245 Strictly speaking, the year should be specified in a form consistent
246 with C<localtime()>, i.e. the offset from 1900. In order to make the
247 interpretation of the year easier for humans, however, who are more
248 accustomed to seeing years as two-digit or four-digit values, the
249 following conventions are followed:
250
251 =over 4
252
253 =item *
254
255 Years greater than 999 are interpreted as being the actual year,
256 rather than the offset from 1900. Thus, 1964 would indicate the year
257 Martin Luther King won the Nobel prize, not the year 3864.
258
259 =item *
260
261 Years in the range 100..999 are interpreted as offset from 1900, so
262 that 112 indicates 2012. This rule also applies to years less than
263 zero (but see note below regarding date range).
264
265 =item *
266
267 Years in the range 0..99 are interpreted as shorthand for years in the
268 rolling "current century," defined as 50 years on either side of the
269 current year. Thus, today, in 1999, 0 would refer to 2000, and 45 to
270 2045, but 55 would refer to 1955. Twenty years from now, 55 would
271 instead refer to 2055. This is messy, but matches the way people
272 currently think about two digit dates. Whenever possible, use an
273 absolute four digit year instead.
274
275 =back
276
277 The scheme above allows interpretation of a wide range of dates,
278 particularly if 4-digit years are used.
279
280 =head2 Limits of time_t
281
282 The range of dates that can be actually be handled depends on the size
283 of C<time_t> (usually a signed integer) on the given
284 platform. Currently, this is 32 bits for most systems, yielding an
285 approximate range from Dec 1901 to Jan 2038.
286
287 Both C<timelocal()> and C<timegm()> croak if given dates outside the
288 supported range.
289
290 =head2 Ambiguous Local Times (DST)
291
292 Because of DST changes, there are many time zones where the same local
293 time occurs for two different GMT times on the same day. For example,
294 in the "Europe/Paris" time zone, the local time of 2001-10-28 02:30:00
295 can represent either 2001-10-28 00:30:00 GMT, B<or> 2001-10-28
296 01:30:00 GMT.
297
298 When given an ambiguous local time, the timelocal() function should
299 always return the epoch for the I<earlier> of the two possible GMT
300 times.
301
302 =head2 Non-Existent Local Times (DST)
303
304 When a DST change causes a locale clock to skip one hour forward,
305 there will be an hour's worth of local times that don't exist. Again,
306 for the "Europe/Paris" time zone, the local clock jumped from
307 2001-03-25 01:59:59 to 2001-03-25 03:00:00.
308
309 If the C<timelocal()> function is given a non-existent local time, it
310 will simply return an epoch value for the time one hour later.
311
312 =head2 Negative Epoch Values
313
314 Negative epoch (C<time_t>) values are not officially supported by the
315 POSIX standards, so this module's tests do not test them. On some
316 systems, they are known not to work. These include MacOS (pre-OSX) and
317 Win32.
318
319 On systems which do support negative epoch values, this module should
320 be able to cope with dates before the start of the epoch, down the
321 minimum value of time_t for the system.
322
323 =head1 IMPLEMENTATION
324
325 These routines are quite efficient and yet are always guaranteed to
326 agree with C<localtime()> and C<gmtime()>. We manage this by caching
327 the start times of any months we've seen before. If we know the start
328 time of the month, we can always calculate any time within the month.
329 The start times are calculated using a mathematical formula. Unlike
330 other algorithms that do multiple calls to C<gmtime()>.
331
332 The C<timelocal()> function is implemented using the same cache. We
333 just assume that we're translating a GMT time, and then fudge it when
334 we're done for the timezone and daylight savings arguments. Note that
335 the timezone is evaluated for each date because countries occasionally
336 change their official timezones. Assuming that C<localtime()> corrects
337 for these changes, this routine will also be correct.
338
339 =head1 BUGS
340
341 The whole scheme for interpreting two-digit years can be considered a
342 bug.
343
344 =head1 SUPPORT
345
346 Support for this module is provided via the datetime@perl.org email
347 list. See http://lists.perl.org/ for more details.
348
349 Please submit bugs to the CPAN RT system at
350 http://rt.cpan.org/NoAuth/ReportBug.html?Queue=Time-Local or via email
351 at bug-time-local@rt.cpan.org.
352
353 =head1 AUTHOR
354
355 This module is based on a Perl 4 library, timelocal.pl, that was
356 included with Perl 4.036, and was most likely written by Tom
357 Christiansen.
358
359 The current version was written by Graham Barr.
360
361 It is now being maintained separately from the Perl core by Dave
362 Rolsky, <autarch@urth.org>.
363
364 =cut