This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Upgrade to DB_File 1.838 from CPAN.
[perl5.git] / cpan / Scalar-List-Utils / lib / List / Util.pm
1 # Copyright (c) 1997-2009 Graham Barr <gbarr@pobox.com>. All rights reserved.
2 # This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
3 # modify it under the same terms as Perl itself.
4 #
5 # Maintained since 2013 by Paul Evans <leonerd@leonerd.org.uk>
6
7 package List::Util;
8
9 use strict;
10 require Exporter;
11
12 our @ISA        = qw(Exporter);
13 our @EXPORT_OK  = qw(
14   all any first min max minstr maxstr none notall product reduce sum sum0 shuffle
15   pairs unpairs pairkeys pairvalues pairmap pairgrep pairfirst
16 );
17 our $VERSION    = "1.42_02";
18 our $XS_VERSION = $VERSION;
19 $VERSION    = eval $VERSION;
20
21 require XSLoader;
22 XSLoader::load('List::Util', $XS_VERSION);
23
24 sub import
25 {
26   my $pkg = caller;
27
28   # (RT88848) Touch the caller's $a and $b, to avoid the warning of
29   #   Name "main::a" used only once: possible typo" warning
30   no strict 'refs';
31   ${"${pkg}::a"} = ${"${pkg}::a"};
32   ${"${pkg}::b"} = ${"${pkg}::b"};
33
34   goto &Exporter::import;
35 }
36
37 # For objects returned by pairs()
38 sub List::Util::_Pair::key   { shift->[0] }
39 sub List::Util::_Pair::value { shift->[1] }
40
41 1;
42
43 __END__
44
45 =head1 NAME
46
47 List::Util - A selection of general-utility list subroutines
48
49 =head1 SYNOPSIS
50
51     use List::Util qw(first max maxstr min minstr reduce shuffle sum);
52
53 =head1 DESCRIPTION
54
55 C<List::Util> contains a selection of subroutines that people have expressed
56 would be nice to have in the perl core, but the usage would not really be high
57 enough to warrant the use of a keyword, and the size so small such that being
58 individual extensions would be wasteful.
59
60 By default C<List::Util> does not export any subroutines.
61
62 =cut
63
64 =head1 LIST-REDUCTION FUNCTIONS
65
66 The following set of functions all reduce a list down to a single value.
67
68 =cut
69
70 =head2 $result = reduce { BLOCK } @list
71
72 Reduces C<@list> by calling C<BLOCK> in a scalar context multiple times,
73 setting C<$a> and C<$b> each time. The first call will be with C<$a> and C<$b>
74 set to the first two elements of the list, subsequent calls will be done by
75 setting C<$a> to the result of the previous call and C<$b> to the next element
76 in the list.
77
78 Returns the result of the last call to the C<BLOCK>. If C<@list> is empty then
79 C<undef> is returned. If C<@list> only contains one element then that element
80 is returned and C<BLOCK> is not executed.
81
82 The following examples all demonstrate how C<reduce> could be used to implement
83 the other list-reduction functions in this module. (They are not in fact
84 implemented like this, but instead in a more efficient manner in individual C
85 functions).
86
87     $foo = reduce { defined($a)            ? $a :
88                     $code->(local $_ = $b) ? $b :
89                                              undef } undef, @list # first
90
91     $foo = reduce { $a > $b ? $a : $b } 1..10       # max
92     $foo = reduce { $a gt $b ? $a : $b } 'A'..'Z'   # maxstr
93     $foo = reduce { $a < $b ? $a : $b } 1..10       # min
94     $foo = reduce { $a lt $b ? $a : $b } 'aa'..'zz' # minstr
95     $foo = reduce { $a + $b } 1 .. 10               # sum
96     $foo = reduce { $a . $b } @bar                  # concat
97
98     $foo = reduce { $a || $code->(local $_ = $b) } 0, @bar   # any
99     $foo = reduce { $a && $code->(local $_ = $b) } 1, @bar   # all
100     $foo = reduce { $a && !$code->(local $_ = $b) } 1, @bar  # none
101     $foo = reduce { $a || !$code->(local $_ = $b) } 0, @bar  # notall
102        # Note that these implementations do not fully short-circuit
103
104 If your algorithm requires that C<reduce> produce an identity value, then make
105 sure that you always pass that identity value as the first argument to prevent
106 C<undef> being returned
107
108   $foo = reduce { $a + $b } 0, @values;             # sum with 0 identity value
109
110 The remaining list-reduction functions are all specialisations of this generic
111 idea.
112
113 =head2 any
114
115     my $bool = any { BLOCK } @list;
116
117 I<Since version 1.33.>
118
119 Similar to C<grep> in that it evaluates C<BLOCK> setting C<$_> to each element
120 of C<@list> in turn. C<any> returns true if any element makes the C<BLOCK>
121 return a true value. If C<BLOCK> never returns true or C<@list> was empty then
122 it returns false.
123
124 Many cases of using C<grep> in a conditional can be written using C<any>
125 instead, as it can short-circuit after the first true result.
126
127     if( any { length > 10 } @strings ) {
128         # at least one string has more than 10 characters
129     }
130
131 =head2 all
132
133     my $bool = all { BLOCK } @list;
134
135 I<Since version 1.33.>
136
137 Similar to L</any>, except that it requires all elements of the C<@list> to
138 make the C<BLOCK> return true. If any element returns false, then it returns
139 false. If the C<BLOCK> never returns false or the C<@list> was empty then it
140 returns true.
141
142 =head2 none
143
144 =head2 notall
145
146     my $bool = none { BLOCK } @list;
147
148     my $bool = notall { BLOCK } @list;
149
150 I<Since version 1.33.>
151
152 Similar to L</any> and L</all>, but with the return sense inverted. C<none>
153 returns true only if no value in the C<@list> causes the C<BLOCK> to return
154 true, and C<notall> returns true only if not all of the values do.
155
156 =head2 first
157
158     my $val = first { BLOCK } @list;
159
160 Similar to C<grep> in that it evaluates C<BLOCK> setting C<$_> to each element
161 of C<@list> in turn. C<first> returns the first element where the result from
162 C<BLOCK> is a true value. If C<BLOCK> never returns true or C<@list> was empty
163 then C<undef> is returned.
164
165     $foo = first { defined($_) } @list    # first defined value in @list
166     $foo = first { $_ > $value } @list    # first value in @list which
167                                           # is greater than $value
168
169 =head2 max
170
171     my $num = max @list;
172
173 Returns the entry in the list with the highest numerical value. If the list is
174 empty then C<undef> is returned.
175
176     $foo = max 1..10                # 10
177     $foo = max 3,9,12               # 12
178     $foo = max @bar, @baz           # whatever
179
180 =head2 maxstr
181
182     my $str = maxstr @list;
183
184 Similar to L</max>, but treats all the entries in the list as strings and
185 returns the highest string as defined by the C<gt> operator. If the list is
186 empty then C<undef> is returned.
187
188     $foo = maxstr 'A'..'Z'          # 'Z'
189     $foo = maxstr "hello","world"   # "world"
190     $foo = maxstr @bar, @baz        # whatever
191
192 =head2 min
193
194     my $num = min @list;
195
196 Similar to L</max> but returns the entry in the list with the lowest numerical
197 value. If the list is empty then C<undef> is returned.
198
199     $foo = min 1..10                # 1
200     $foo = min 3,9,12               # 3
201     $foo = min @bar, @baz           # whatever
202
203 =head2 minstr
204
205     my $str = minstr @list;
206
207 Similar to L</min>, but treats all the entries in the list as strings and
208 returns the lowest string as defined by the C<lt> operator. If the list is
209 empty then C<undef> is returned.
210
211     $foo = minstr 'A'..'Z'          # 'A'
212     $foo = minstr "hello","world"   # "hello"
213     $foo = minstr @bar, @baz        # whatever
214
215 =head2 product
216
217     my $num = product @list;
218
219 I<Since version 1.35.>
220
221 Returns the numerical product of all the elements in C<@list>. If C<@list> is
222 empty then C<1> is returned.
223
224     $foo = product 1..10            # 3628800
225     $foo = product 3,9,12           # 324
226
227 =head2 sum
228
229     my $num_or_undef = sum @list;
230
231 Returns the numerical sum of all the elements in C<@list>. For backwards
232 compatibility, if C<@list> is empty then C<undef> is returned.
233
234     $foo = sum 1..10                # 55
235     $foo = sum 3,9,12               # 24
236     $foo = sum @bar, @baz           # whatever
237
238 =head2 sum0
239
240     my $num = sum0 @list;
241
242 I<Since version 1.26.>
243
244 Similar to L</sum>, except this returns 0 when given an empty list, rather
245 than C<undef>.
246
247 =cut
248
249 =head1 KEY/VALUE PAIR LIST FUNCTIONS
250
251 The following set of functions, all inspired by L<List::Pairwise>, consume an
252 even-sized list of pairs. The pairs may be key/value associations from a hash,
253 or just a list of values. The functions will all preserve the original ordering
254 of the pairs, and will not be confused by multiple pairs having the same "key"
255 value - nor even do they require that the first of each pair be a plain string.
256
257 B<NOTE>: At the time of writing, the following C<pair*> functions that take a
258 block do not modify the value of C<$_> within the block, and instead operate
259 using the C<$a> and C<$b> globals instead. This has turned out to be a poor
260 design, as it precludes the ability to provide a C<pairsort> function. Better
261 would be to pass pair-like objects as 2-element array references in C<$_>, in
262 a style similar to the return value of the C<pairs> function. At some future
263 version this behaviour may be added.
264
265 Until then, users are alerted B<NOT> to rely on the value of C<$_> remaining
266 unmodified between the outside and the inside of the control block. In
267 particular, the following example is B<UNSAFE>:
268
269  my @kvlist = ...
270
271  foreach (qw( some keys here )) {
272     my @items = pairgrep { $a eq $_ } @kvlist;
273     ...
274  }
275
276 Instead, write this using a lexical variable:
277
278  foreach my $key (qw( some keys here )) {
279     my @items = pairgrep { $a eq $key } @kvlist;
280     ...
281  }
282
283 =cut
284
285 =head2 pairs
286
287     my @pairs = pairs @kvlist;
288
289 I<Since version 1.29.>
290
291 A convenient shortcut to operating on even-sized lists of pairs, this function
292 returns a list of ARRAY references, each containing two items from the given
293 list. It is a more efficient version of
294
295     @pairs = pairmap { [ $a, $b ] } @kvlist
296
297 It is most convenient to use in a C<foreach> loop, for example:
298
299     foreach my $pair ( pairs @KVLIST ) {
300        my ( $key, $value ) = @$pair;
301        ...
302     }
303
304 Since version C<1.39> these ARRAY references are blessed objects, recognising
305 the two methods C<key> and C<value>. The following code is equivalent:
306
307     foreach my $pair ( pairs @KVLIST ) {
308        my $key   = $pair->key;
309        my $value = $pair->value;
310        ...
311     }
312
313 =head2 unpairs
314
315     my @kvlist = unpairs @pairs
316
317 I<Since version 1.42.>
318
319 The inverse function to C<pairs>; this function takes a list of ARRAY
320 references containing two elements each, and returns a flattened list of the
321 two values from each of the pairs, in order. This is notionally equivalent to
322
323     my @kvlist = map { @{$_}[0,1] } @pairs
324
325 except that it is implemented more efficiently internally. Specifically, for
326 any input item it will extract exactly two values for the output list; using
327 C<undef> if the input array references are short.
328
329 Between C<pairs> and C<unpairs>, a higher-order list function can be used to
330 operate on the pairs as single scalars; such as the following near-equivalents
331 of the other C<pair*> higher-order functions:
332
333     @kvlist = unpairs grep { FUNC } pairs @kvlist
334     # Like pairgrep, but takes $_ instead of $a and $b
335
336     @kvlist = unpairs map { FUNC } pairs @kvlist
337     # Like pairmap, but takes $_ instead of $a and $b
338
339 Note however that these versions will not behave as nicely in scalar context.
340
341 Finally, this technique can be used to implement a sort on a keyvalue pair
342 list; e.g.:
343
344     @kvlist = unpairs sort { $a->key cmp $b->key } pairs @kvlist
345
346 =head2 pairkeys
347
348     my @keys = pairkeys @kvlist;
349
350 I<Since version 1.29.>
351
352 A convenient shortcut to operating on even-sized lists of pairs, this function
353 returns a list of the the first values of each of the pairs in the given list.
354 It is a more efficient version of
355
356     @keys = pairmap { $a } @kvlist
357
358 =head2 pairvalues
359
360     my @values = pairvalues @kvlist;
361
362 I<Since version 1.29.>
363
364 A convenient shortcut to operating on even-sized lists of pairs, this function
365 returns a list of the the second values of each of the pairs in the given list.
366 It is a more efficient version of
367
368     @values = pairmap { $b } @kvlist
369
370 =head2 pairgrep
371
372     my @kvlist = pairgrep { BLOCK } @kvlist;
373
374     my $count = pairgrep { BLOCK } @kvlist;
375
376 I<Since version 1.29.>
377
378 Similar to perl's C<grep> keyword, but interprets the given list as an
379 even-sized list of pairs. It invokes the C<BLOCK> multiple times, in scalar
380 context, with C<$a> and C<$b> set to successive pairs of values from the
381 C<@kvlist>.
382
383 Returns an even-sized list of those pairs for which the C<BLOCK> returned true
384 in list context, or the count of the B<number of pairs> in scalar context.
385 (Note, therefore, in scalar context that it returns a number half the size of
386 the count of items it would have returned in list context).
387
388     @subset = pairgrep { $a =~ m/^[[:upper:]]+$/ } @kvlist
389
390 As with C<grep> aliasing C<$_> to list elements, C<pairgrep> aliases C<$a> and
391 C<$b> to elements of the given list. Any modifications of it by the code block
392 will be visible to the caller.
393
394 =head2 pairfirst
395
396     my ( $key, $val ) = pairfirst { BLOCK } @kvlist;
397
398     my $found = pairfirst { BLOCK } @kvlist;
399
400 I<Since version 1.30.>
401
402 Similar to the L</first> function, but interprets the given list as an
403 even-sized list of pairs. It invokes the C<BLOCK> multiple times, in scalar
404 context, with C<$a> and C<$b> set to successive pairs of values from the
405 C<@kvlist>.
406
407 Returns the first pair of values from the list for which the C<BLOCK> returned
408 true in list context, or an empty list of no such pair was found. In scalar
409 context it returns a simple boolean value, rather than either the key or the
410 value found.
411
412     ( $key, $value ) = pairfirst { $a =~ m/^[[:upper:]]+$/ } @kvlist
413
414 As with C<grep> aliasing C<$_> to list elements, C<pairfirst> aliases C<$a> and
415 C<$b> to elements of the given list. Any modifications of it by the code block
416 will be visible to the caller.
417
418 =head2 pairmap
419
420     my @list = pairmap { BLOCK } @kvlist;
421
422     my $count = pairmap { BLOCK } @kvlist;
423
424 I<Since version 1.29.>
425
426 Similar to perl's C<map> keyword, but interprets the given list as an
427 even-sized list of pairs. It invokes the C<BLOCK> multiple times, in list
428 context, with C<$a> and C<$b> set to successive pairs of values from the
429 C<@kvlist>.
430
431 Returns the concatenation of all the values returned by the C<BLOCK> in list
432 context, or the count of the number of items that would have been returned in
433 scalar context.
434
435     @result = pairmap { "The key $a has value $b" } @kvlist
436
437 As with C<map> aliasing C<$_> to list elements, C<pairmap> aliases C<$a> and
438 C<$b> to elements of the given list. Any modifications of it by the code block
439 will be visible to the caller.
440
441 See L</KNOWN BUGS> for a known-bug with C<pairmap>, and a workaround.
442
443 =cut
444
445 =head1 OTHER FUNCTIONS
446
447 =cut
448
449 =head2 shuffle
450
451     my @values = shuffle @values;
452
453 Returns the values of the input in a random order
454
455     @cards = shuffle 0..51      # 0..51 in a random order
456
457 =cut
458
459 =head1 KNOWN BUGS
460
461 =head2 RT #95409
462
463 L<https://rt.cpan.org/Ticket/Display.html?id=95409>
464
465 If the block of code given to L</pairmap> contains lexical variables that are
466 captured by a returned closure, and the closure is executed after the block
467 has been re-used for the next iteration, these lexicals will not see the
468 correct values. For example:
469
470  my @subs = pairmap {
471     my $var = "$a is $b";
472     sub { print "$var\n" };
473  } one => 1, two => 2, three => 3;
474
475  $_->() for @subs;
476
477 Will incorrectly print
478
479  three is 3
480  three is 3
481  three is 3
482
483 This is due to the performance optimisation of using C<MULTICALL> for the code
484 block, which means that fresh SVs do not get allocated for each call to the
485 block. Instead, the same SV is re-assigned for each iteration, and all the
486 closures will share the value seen on the final iteration.
487
488 To work around this bug, surround the code with a second set of braces. This
489 creates an inner block that defeats the C<MULTICALL> logic, and does get fresh
490 SVs allocated each time:
491
492  my @subs = pairmap {
493     {
494        my $var = "$a is $b";
495        sub { print "$var\n"; }
496     }
497  } one => 1, two => 2, three => 3;
498
499 This bug only affects closures that are generated by the block but used
500 afterwards. Lexical variables that are only used during the lifetime of the
501 block's execution will take their individual values for each invocation, as
502 normal.
503
504 =head1 SUGGESTED ADDITIONS
505
506 The following are additions that have been requested, but I have been reluctant
507 to add due to them being very simple to implement in perl
508
509   # How many elements are true
510
511   sub true { scalar grep { $_ } @_ }
512
513   # How many elements are false
514
515   sub false { scalar grep { !$_ } @_ }
516
517 =head1 SEE ALSO
518
519 L<Scalar::Util>, L<List::MoreUtils>
520
521 =head1 COPYRIGHT
522
523 Copyright (c) 1997-2007 Graham Barr <gbarr@pobox.com>. All rights reserved.
524 This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
525 modify it under the same terms as Perl itself.
526
527 Recent additions and current maintenance by
528 Paul Evans, <leonerd@leonerd.org.uk>.
529
530 =cut