This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Add possessive quantifiers to regex engine.
[perl5.git] / pod / perl595delta.pod
1 =head1 NAME
2
3 perldelta - what is new for perl v5.9.5
4
5 =head1 DESCRIPTION
6
7 This document describes differences between the 5.9.4 and the 5.9.5
8 development releases. See L<perl590delta>, L<perl591delta>,
9 L<perl592delta>, L<perl593delta> and L<perl594delta> for the differences
10 between 5.8.0 and 5.9.4.
11
12 =head1 Incompatible Changes
13
14 =head1 Core Enhancements
15
16 =head2 Regular expressions
17
18 =over 4
19
20 =item Recursive Patterns
21
22 It is now possible to write recursive patterns without using the C<(??{})>
23 construct. This new way is more efficient, and in many cases easier to
24 read.
25
26 Each capturing parenthesis can now be treated as an independent pattern
27 that can be entered by using the C<(?PARNO)> syntax (C<PARNO> standing for
28 "parenthesis number"). For example, the following pattern will match
29 nested balanced angle brackets:
30
31     /
32      ^                      # start of line
33      (                      # start capture buffer 1
34         <                   #   match an opening angle bracket
35         (?:                 #   match one of:
36             (?>             #     don't backtrack over the inside of this group
37                 [^<>]+      #       one or more non angle brackets
38             )               #     end non backtracking group
39         |                   #     ... or ...
40             (?1)            #     recurse to bracket 1 and try it again
41         )*                  #   0 or more times.
42         >                   #   match a closing angle bracket
43      )                      # end capture buffer one
44      $                      # end of line
45     /x
46
47 Note, users experienced with PCRE will find that the Perl implementation
48 of this feature differs from the PCRE one in that it is possible to
49 backtrack into a recursed pattern, whereas in PCRE the recursion is
50 atomic or "possessive" in nature.
51
52 =item Named Capture Buffers
53
54 It is now possible to name capturing parenthesis in a pattern and refer to
55 the captured contents by name. The naming syntax is C<< (?<NAME>....) >>.
56 It's possible to backreference to a named buffer with the C<< \k<NAME> >>
57 syntax. In code, the new magical hash C<%+> can be used to access the
58 contents of the buffers.
59
60 Thus, to replace all doubled chars, one could write
61
62     s/(?<letter>.)\k<letter>/$+{letter}/g
63
64 Only buffers with defined contents will be "visible" in the hash, so
65 it's possible to do something like
66
67     foreach my $name (keys %+) {
68         print "content of buffer '$name' is $+{$name}\n";
69     }
70
71 Users exposed to the .NET regex engine will find that the perl
72 implementation differs in that the numerical ordering of the buffers
73 is sequential, and not "unnamed first, then named". Thus in the pattern
74
75    /(A)(?<B>B)(C)(?<D>D)/
76
77 $1 will be 'A', $2 will be 'B', $3 will be 'C' and $4 will be 'D' and not
78 $1 is 'A', $2 is 'C' and $3 is 'B' and $4 is 'D' that a .NET programmer
79 would expect. This is considered a feature. :-)
80
81 =item Possessive Quantifiers
82
83 Perl now supports the "possessive quantifier" syntax of the "atomic match" 
84 pattern. Basically a possessive quantifier matches as much as it can and never
85 gives any back. Thus it can be used to control backtracking. The syntax is 
86 similar to non-greedy matching, except instead of using a '?' as the modifier
87 the '+' is used. Thus C<?+>, C<*+>, C<++>, C<{min,max}+> are now legal
88 quantifiers.
89
90 =back
91
92 =head1 Modules and Pragmas
93
94 =head2 New Core Modules
95
96 =head1 Utility Changes
97
98 =head1 Documentation
99
100 =head1 Performance Enhancements
101
102 =head1 Installation and Configuration Improvements
103
104 =head1 Selected Bug Fixes
105
106 =head1 New or Changed Diagnostics
107
108 =head1 Changed Internals
109
110 =head1 Known Problems
111
112 =head2 Platform Specific Problems
113
114 =head1 Reporting Bugs
115
116 If you find what you think is a bug, you might check the articles
117 recently posted to the comp.lang.perl.misc newsgroup and the perl
118 bug database at http://rt.perl.org/rt3/ .  There may also be
119 information at http://www.perl.org/ , the Perl Home Page.
120
121 If you believe you have an unreported bug, please run the B<perlbug>
122 program included with your release.  Be sure to trim your bug down
123 to a tiny but sufficient test case.  Your bug report, along with the
124 output of C<perl -V>, will be sent off to perlbug@perl.org to be
125 analysed by the Perl porting team.
126
127 =head1 SEE ALSO
128
129 The F<Changes> file for exhaustive details on what changed.
130
131 The F<INSTALL> file for how to build Perl.
132
133 The F<README> file for general stuff.
134
135 The F<Artistic> and F<Copying> files for copyright information.
136
137 =cut