This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
First steps of making builds outside the source
[perl5.git] / ext / Devel / Peek / Peek.pm
1 # Devel::Peek - A data debugging tool for the XS programmer
2 # The documentation is after the __END__
3
4 package Devel::Peek;
5
6 $VERSION = $VERSION = 0.95;
7
8 require Exporter;
9 require DynaLoader;
10
11 @ISA = qw(Exporter DynaLoader);
12 @EXPORT = qw(Dump mstat DeadCode DumpArray DumpWithOP DumpProg);
13 @EXPORT_OK = qw(SvREFCNT SvREFCNT_inc SvREFCNT_dec);
14 %EXPORT_TAGS = ('ALL' => [@EXPORT, @EXPORT_OK]);
15
16 bootstrap Devel::Peek;
17
18 sub DumpWithOP ($;$) {
19    local($Devel::Peek::dump_ops)=1;
20    my $depth = @_ > 1 ? $_[1] : 4 ;
21    Dump($_[0],$depth);
22 }
23
24 1;
25 __END__
26
27 =head1 NAME
28
29 Devel::Peek - A data debugging tool for the XS programmer
30
31 =head1 SYNOPSIS
32
33         use Devel::Peek;
34         Dump( $a );
35         Dump( $a, 5 );
36         DumpArray( 5, $a, $b, ... );
37         mstat "Point 5";
38
39 =head1 DESCRIPTION
40
41 Devel::Peek contains functions which allows raw Perl datatypes to be
42 manipulated from a Perl script.  This is used by those who do XS programming
43 to check that the data they are sending from C to Perl looks as they think
44 it should look.  The trick, then, is to know what the raw datatype is
45 supposed to look like when it gets to Perl.  This document offers some tips
46 and hints to describe good and bad raw data.
47
48 It is very possible that this document will fall far short of being useful
49 to the casual reader.  The reader is expected to understand the material in
50 the first few sections of L<perlguts>.
51
52 Devel::Peek supplies a C<Dump()> function which can dump a raw Perl
53 datatype, and C<mstat("marker")> function to report on memory usage
54 (if perl is compiled with corresponding option).  The function
55 DeadCode() provides statistics on the data "frozen" into inactive
56 C<CV>.  Devel::Peek also supplies C<SvREFCNT()>, C<SvREFCNT_inc()>, and
57 C<SvREFCNT_dec()> which can query, increment, and decrement reference
58 counts on SVs.  This document will take a passive, and safe, approach
59 to data debugging and for that it will describe only the C<Dump()>
60 function.  For format of output of mstats() see
61 L<perldebug/Using C<$ENV{PERL_DEBUG_MSTATS}>>.
62
63 Function C<DumpArray()> allows dumping of multiple values (useful when you
64 need to analize returns of functions).
65
66 The global variable $Devel::Peek::pv_limit can be set to limit the
67 number of character printed in various string values.  Setting it to 0
68 means no limit.
69
70 =head1 EXAMPLES
71
72 The following examples don't attempt to show everything as that would be a
73 monumental task, and, frankly, we don't want this manpage to be an internals
74 document for Perl.  The examples do demonstrate some basics of the raw Perl
75 datatypes, and should suffice to get most determined people on their way.
76 There are no guidewires or safety nets, nor blazed trails, so be prepared to
77 travel alone from this point and on and, if at all possible, don't fall into
78 the quicksand (it's bad for business).
79
80 Oh, one final bit of advice: take L<perlguts> with you.  When you return we
81 expect to see it well-thumbed.
82
83 =head2 A simple scalar string
84
85 Let's begin by looking a simple scalar which is holding a string.
86
87         use Devel::Peek;
88         $a = "hello";
89         Dump $a;
90
91 The output:
92
93         SV = PVIV(0xbc288)
94           REFCNT = 1
95           FLAGS = (POK,pPOK)
96           IV = 0
97           PV = 0xb2048 "hello"\0
98           CUR = 5
99           LEN = 6
100
101 This says C<$a> is an SV, a scalar.  The scalar is a PVIV, a string.
102 Its reference count is 1.  It has the C<POK> flag set, meaning its
103 current PV field is valid.  Because POK is set we look at the PV item
104 to see what is in the scalar.  The \0 at the end indicate that this
105 PV is properly NUL-terminated.
106 If the FLAGS had been IOK we would look
107 at the IV item.  CUR indicates the number of characters in the PV.
108 LEN indicates the number of bytes requested for the PV (one more than
109 CUR, in this case, because LEN includes an extra byte for the
110 end-of-string marker).
111
112 =head2 A simple scalar number
113
114 If the scalar contains a number the raw SV will be leaner.
115
116         use Devel::Peek;
117         $a = 42;
118         Dump $a;
119
120 The output:
121
122         SV = IV(0xbc818)
123           REFCNT = 1
124           FLAGS = (IOK,pIOK)
125           IV = 42
126
127 This says C<$a> is an SV, a scalar.  The scalar is an IV, a number.  Its
128 reference count is 1.  It has the C<IOK> flag set, meaning it is currently
129 being evaluated as a number.  Because IOK is set we look at the IV item to
130 see what is in the scalar.
131
132 =head2 A simple scalar with an extra reference
133
134 If the scalar from the previous example had an extra reference:
135
136         use Devel::Peek;
137         $a = 42;
138         $b = \$a;
139         Dump $a;
140
141 The output:
142
143         SV = IV(0xbe860)
144           REFCNT = 2
145           FLAGS = (IOK,pIOK)
146           IV = 42
147
148 Notice that this example differs from the previous example only in its
149 reference count.  Compare this to the next example, where we dump C<$b>
150 instead of C<$a>.
151
152 =head2 A reference to a simple scalar
153
154 This shows what a reference looks like when it references a simple scalar.
155
156         use Devel::Peek;
157         $a = 42;
158         $b = \$a;
159         Dump $b;
160
161 The output:
162
163         SV = RV(0xf041c)
164           REFCNT = 1
165           FLAGS = (ROK)
166           RV = 0xbab08
167         SV = IV(0xbe860)
168           REFCNT = 2
169           FLAGS = (IOK,pIOK)
170           IV = 42
171
172 Starting from the top, this says C<$b> is an SV.  The scalar is an RV, a
173 reference.  It has the C<ROK> flag set, meaning it is a reference.  Because
174 ROK is set we have an RV item rather than an IV or PV.  Notice that Dump
175 follows the reference and shows us what C<$b> was referencing.  We see the
176 same C<$a> that we found in the previous example.
177
178 Note that the value of C<RV> coincides with the numbers we see when we
179 stringify $b. The addresses inside RV() and IV() are addresses of
180 C<X***> structure which holds the current state of an C<SV>. This
181 address may change during lifetime of an SV.
182
183 =head2 A reference to an array
184
185 This shows what a reference to an array looks like.
186
187         use Devel::Peek;
188         $a = [42];
189         Dump $a;
190
191 The output:
192
193         SV = RV(0xf041c)
194           REFCNT = 1
195           FLAGS = (ROK)
196           RV = 0xb2850
197         SV = PVAV(0xbd448)
198           REFCNT = 1
199           FLAGS = ()
200           IV = 0
201           NV = 0
202           ARRAY = 0xb2048
203           ALLOC = 0xb2048
204           FILL = 0
205           MAX = 0
206           ARYLEN = 0x0
207           FLAGS = (REAL)
208         Elt No. 0 0xb5658
209         SV = IV(0xbe860)
210           REFCNT = 1
211           FLAGS = (IOK,pIOK)
212           IV = 42
213
214 This says C<$a> is an SV and that it is an RV.  That RV points to
215 another SV which is a PVAV, an array.  The array has one element,
216 element zero, which is another SV. The field C<FILL> above indicates
217 the last element in the array, similar to C<$#$a>.
218
219 If C<$a> pointed to an array of two elements then we would see the
220 following.
221
222         use Devel::Peek 'Dump';
223         $a = [42,24];
224         Dump $a;
225
226 The output:
227
228         SV = RV(0xf041c)
229           REFCNT = 1
230           FLAGS = (ROK)
231           RV = 0xb2850
232         SV = PVAV(0xbd448)
233           REFCNT = 1
234           FLAGS = ()
235           IV = 0
236           NV = 0
237           ARRAY = 0xb2048
238           ALLOC = 0xb2048
239           FILL = 0
240           MAX = 0
241           ARYLEN = 0x0
242           FLAGS = (REAL)
243         Elt No. 0  0xb5658
244         SV = IV(0xbe860)
245           REFCNT = 1
246           FLAGS = (IOK,pIOK)
247           IV = 42
248         Elt No. 1  0xb5680
249         SV = IV(0xbe818)
250           REFCNT = 1
251           FLAGS = (IOK,pIOK)
252           IV = 24
253
254 Note that C<Dump> will not report I<all> the elements in the array,
255 only several first (depending on how deep it already went into the
256 report tree).
257
258 =head2 A reference to a hash
259
260 The following shows the raw form of a reference to a hash.
261
262         use Devel::Peek;
263         $a = {hello=>42};
264         Dump $a;
265
266 The output:
267
268         SV = RV(0xf041c)
269           REFCNT = 1
270           FLAGS = (ROK)
271           RV = 0xb2850
272         SV = PVHV(0xbd448)
273           REFCNT = 1
274           FLAGS = ()
275           NV = 0
276           ARRAY = 0xbd748
277           KEYS = 1
278           FILL = 1
279           MAX = 7
280           RITER = -1
281           EITER = 0x0
282         Elt "hello" => 0xbaaf0
283         SV = IV(0xbe860)
284           REFCNT = 1
285           FLAGS = (IOK,pIOK)
286           IV = 42
287
288 This shows C<$a> is a reference pointing to an SV.  That SV is a PVHV, a
289 hash. Fields RITER and EITER are used by C<L<each>>.
290
291 =head2 Dumping a large array or hash
292
293 The C<Dump()> function, by default, dumps up to 4 elements from a
294 toplevel array or hash.  This number can be increased by supplying a
295 second argument to the function.
296
297         use Devel::Peek;
298         $a = [10,11,12,13,14];
299         Dump $a;
300
301 Notice that C<Dump()> prints only elements 10 through 13 in the above code.
302 The following code will print all of the elements.
303
304         use Devel::Peek 'Dump';
305         $a = [10,11,12,13,14];
306         Dump $a, 5;
307
308 =head2 A reference to an SV which holds a C pointer
309
310 This is what you really need to know as an XS programmer, of course.  When
311 an XSUB returns a pointer to a C structure that pointer is stored in an SV
312 and a reference to that SV is placed on the XSUB stack.  So the output from
313 an XSUB which uses something like the T_PTROBJ map might look something like
314 this:
315
316         SV = RV(0xf381c)
317           REFCNT = 1
318           FLAGS = (ROK)
319           RV = 0xb8ad8
320         SV = PVMG(0xbb3c8)
321           REFCNT = 1
322           FLAGS = (OBJECT,IOK,pIOK)
323           IV = 729160
324           NV = 0
325           PV = 0
326           STASH = 0xc1d10       "CookBookB::Opaque"
327
328 This shows that we have an SV which is an RV.  That RV points at another
329 SV.  In this case that second SV is a PVMG, a blessed scalar.  Because it is
330 blessed it has the C<OBJECT> flag set.  Note that an SV which holds a C
331 pointer also has the C<IOK> flag set.  The C<STASH> is set to the package
332 name which this SV was blessed into.
333
334 The output from an XSUB which uses something like the T_PTRREF map, which
335 doesn't bless the object, might look something like this:
336
337         SV = RV(0xf381c)
338           REFCNT = 1
339           FLAGS = (ROK)
340           RV = 0xb8ad8
341         SV = PVMG(0xbb3c8)
342           REFCNT = 1
343           FLAGS = (IOK,pIOK)
344           IV = 729160
345           NV = 0
346           PV = 0
347
348 =head2 A reference to a subroutine
349
350 Looks like this:
351
352         SV = RV(0x798ec)
353           REFCNT = 1
354           FLAGS = (TEMP,ROK)
355           RV = 0x1d453c
356         SV = PVCV(0x1c768c)
357           REFCNT = 2
358           FLAGS = ()
359           IV = 0
360           NV = 0
361           COMP_STASH = 0x31068  "main"
362           START = 0xb20e0
363           ROOT = 0xbece0
364           XSUB = 0x0
365           XSUBANY = 0
366           GVGV::GV = 0x1d44e8   "MY" :: "top_targets"
367           FILEGV = 0x1fab74     "_<(eval 5)"
368           DEPTH = 0
369           PADLIST = 0x1c9338
370
371 This shows that 
372
373 =over
374
375 =item
376
377 the subroutine is not an XSUB (since C<START> and C<ROOT> are
378 non-zero, and C<XSUB> is zero);
379
380 =item
381
382 that it was compiled in the package C<main>;
383
384 =item
385
386 under the name C<MY::top_targets>; 
387
388 =item
389
390 inside a 5th eval in the program;
391
392 =item
393
394 it is not currently executed (see C<DEPTH>);
395
396 =item
397
398 it has no prototype (C<PROTOTYPE> field is missing).
399
400 =over
401
402 =head1 EXPORTS
403
404 C<Dump>, C<mstat>, C<DeadCode>, C<DumpArray>, C<DumpWithOP> and
405 C<DumpProg> by default. Additionally available C<SvREFCNT>,
406 C<SvREFCNT_inc> and C<SvREFCNT_dec>.
407
408 =head1 BUGS
409
410 Readers have been known to skip important parts of L<perlguts>, causing much
411 frustration for all.
412
413 =head1 AUTHOR
414
415 Ilya Zakharevich        ilya@math.ohio-state.edu
416
417 Copyright (c) 1995-98 Ilya Zakharevich. All rights reserved.
418 This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
419 modify it under the same terms as Perl itself.
420
421 Author of this software makes no claim whatsoever about suitability,
422 reliability, edability, editability or usability of this product, and
423 should not be kept liable for any damage resulting from the use of
424 it. If you can use it, you are in luck, if not, I should not be kept
425 responsible. Keep a handy copy of your backup tape at hand.
426
427 =head1 SEE ALSO
428
429 L<perlguts>, and L<perlguts>, again.
430
431 =cut