This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Refactoring to Sv*_set() macros - patch #5
[perl5.git] / ext / threads / threads.pm
1 package threads;
2
3 use 5.008;
4 use strict;
5 use warnings;
6 use Config;
7
8 BEGIN {
9     unless ($Config{useithreads}) {
10         my @caller = caller(2);
11         die <<EOF;
12 $caller[1] line $caller[2]:
13
14 This Perl hasn't been configured and built properly for the threads
15 module to work.  (The 'useithreads' configuration option hasn't been used.)
16
17 Having threads support requires all of Perl and all of the XS modules in
18 the Perl installation to be rebuilt, it is not just a question of adding
19 the threads module.  (In other words, threaded and non-threaded Perls
20 are binary incompatible.)
21
22 If you want to the use the threads module, please contact the people
23 who built your Perl.
24
25 Cannot continue, aborting.
26 EOF
27     }
28 }
29
30 use overload
31     '==' => \&equal,
32     'fallback' => 1;
33
34 BEGIN {
35     warn "Warning, threads::shared has already been loaded. ".
36        "To enable shared variables for these modules 'use threads' ".
37        "must be called before any of those modules are loaded\n"
38                if($threads::shared::threads_shared);
39 }
40
41 require Exporter;
42 require DynaLoader;
43
44 our @ISA = qw(Exporter DynaLoader);
45
46 our %EXPORT_TAGS = ( all => [qw(yield)]);
47
48 our @EXPORT_OK = ( @{ $EXPORT_TAGS{'all'} } );
49
50 our @EXPORT = qw(
51 async   
52 );
53 our $VERSION = '1.06';
54
55
56 # || 0 to ensure compatibility with previous versions
57 sub equal { ($_[0]->tid == $_[1]->tid) || 0 }
58
59 # use "goto" trick to avoid pad problems from 5.8.1 (fixed in 5.8.2)
60 # should also be faster
61 sub async (&;@) { unshift @_,'threads'; goto &new }
62
63 sub object {
64     return undef unless @_ > 1;
65     foreach (threads->list) {
66         return $_ if $_->tid == $_[1];
67     }
68     return undef;
69 }
70
71 $threads::threads = 1;
72
73 bootstrap threads $VERSION;
74
75 # why document 'new' then use 'create' in the tests!
76 *create = \&new;
77
78 # Preloaded methods go here.
79
80 1;
81 __END__
82
83 =head1 NAME
84
85 threads - Perl extension allowing use of interpreter based threads from perl
86
87 =head1 SYNOPSIS
88
89     use threads;
90
91     sub start_thread {
92         print "Thread started\n";
93     }
94
95     my $thread  = threads->create("start_thread","argument");
96     my $thread2 = $thread->create(sub { print "I am a thread"},"argument");
97     my $thread3 = async { foreach (@files) { ... } };
98
99     $thread->join();
100     $thread->detach();
101
102     $thread = threads->self();
103     $thread = threads->object( $tid );
104
105     $thread->tid();
106     threads->tid();
107     threads->self->tid();
108
109     threads->yield();
110
111     threads->list();
112
113 =head1 DESCRIPTION
114
115 Perl 5.6 introduced something called interpreter threads.  Interpreter
116 threads are different from "5005threads" (the thread model of Perl
117 5.005) by creating a new perl interpreter per thread and not sharing
118 any data or state between threads by default.
119
120 Prior to perl 5.8 this has only been available to people embedding
121 perl and for emulating fork() on windows.
122
123 The threads API is loosely based on the old Thread.pm API. It is very
124 important to note that variables are not shared between threads, all
125 variables are per default thread local.  To use shared variables one
126 must use threads::shared.
127
128 It is also important to note that you must enable threads by doing
129 C<use threads> as early as possible in the script itself and that it
130 is not possible to enable threading inside an C<eval "">, C<do>,
131 C<require>, or C<use>.  In particular, if you are intending to share
132 variables with threads::shared, you must C<use threads> before you
133 C<use threads::shared> and C<threads> will emit a warning if you do
134 it the other way around.
135
136 =over
137
138 =item $thread = threads->create(function, LIST)
139
140 This will create a new thread with the entry point function and give
141 it LIST as parameters.  It will return the corresponding threads
142 object, or C<undef> if thread creation failed. The new() method is an
143 alias for create().
144
145 =item $thread->join
146
147 This will wait for the corresponding thread to join. When the thread
148 finishes, join() will return the return values of the entry point
149 function. If the thread has been detached, an error will be thrown.
150
151 The context (scalar or list) of the thread creation is also the
152 context for join().  This means that if you intend to return an array
153 from a thread, you must use C<my ($thread) = threads->new(...)>, and
154 that if you intend to return a scalar, you must use C<my $thread = ...>.
155
156 If the program exits without all other threads having been either
157 joined or detached, then a warning will be issued. (A program exits
158 either because one of its threads explicitly calls exit(), or in the
159 case of the main thread, reaches the end of the main program file.)
160
161
162 =item $thread->detach
163
164 Will make the thread unjoinable, and cause any eventual return value
165 to be discarded.
166
167 =item threads->self
168
169 This will return the thread object for the current thread.
170
171 =item $thread->tid
172
173 This will return the id of the thread.  Thread IDs are integers, with
174 the main thread in a program being 0.  Currently Perl assigns a unique
175 tid to every thread ever created in your program, assigning the first
176 thread to be created a tid of 1, and increasing the tid by 1 for each
177 new thread that's created.
178
179 NB the class method C<< threads->tid() >> is a quick way to get the
180 current thread id if you don't have your thread object handy.
181
182 =item threads->object( tid )
183
184 This will return the thread object for the thread associated with the
185 specified tid.  Returns undef if there is no thread associated with the tid
186 or no tid is specified or the specified tid is undef.
187
188 =item threads->yield();
189
190 This is a suggestion to the OS to let this thread yield CPU time to other
191 threads.  What actually happens is highly dependent upon the underlying
192 thread implementation.
193
194 You may do C<use threads qw(yield)> then use just a bare C<yield> in your
195 code.
196
197 =item threads->list();
198
199 This will return a list of all non joined, non detached threads.
200
201 =item async BLOCK;
202
203 C<async> creates a thread to execute the block immediately following
204 it.  This block is treated as an anonymous sub, and so must have a
205 semi-colon after the closing brace. Like C<< threads->new >>, C<async>
206 returns a thread object.
207
208 =back
209
210 =head1 WARNINGS
211
212 =over 4
213
214 =item A thread exited while %d other threads were still running
215
216 A thread (not necessarily the main thread) exited while there were
217 still other threads running.  Usually it's a good idea to first collect
218 the return values of the created threads by joining them, and only then
219 exit from the main thread.
220
221 =back
222
223 =head1 TODO
224
225 The current implementation of threads has been an attempt to get
226 a correct threading system working that could be built on, 
227 and optimized, in newer versions of perl.
228
229 Currently the overhead of creating a thread is rather large,
230 also the cost of returning values can be large. These are areas
231 were there most likely will be work done to optimize what data
232 that needs to be cloned.
233
234 =head1 BUGS
235
236 =over
237
238 =item Parent-Child threads.
239
240 On some platforms it might not be possible to destroy "parent"
241 threads while there are still existing child "threads".
242
243 This will possibly be fixed in later versions of perl.
244   
245 =item tid is I32
246
247 The thread id is a 32 bit integer, it can potentially overflow.
248 This might be fixed in a later version of perl.
249
250 =item Returning objects
251
252 When you return an object the entire stash that the object is blessed
253 as well.  This will lead to a large memory usage.  The ideal situation
254 would be to detect the original stash if it existed.
255
256 =item Creating threads inside BEGIN blocks
257
258 Creating threads inside BEGIN blocks (or during the compilation phase
259 in general) does not work.  (In Windows, trying to use fork() inside
260 BEGIN blocks is an equally losing proposition, since it has been
261 implemented in very much the same way as threads.)
262
263 =item PERL_OLD_SIGNALS are not threadsafe, will not be.
264
265 If your Perl has been built with PERL_OLD_SIGNALS (one has
266 to explicitly add that symbol to ccflags, see C<perl -V>),
267 signal handling is not threadsafe.
268
269 =back
270
271 =head1 AUTHOR and COPYRIGHT
272
273 Arthur Bergman E<lt>sky at nanisky.comE<gt>
274
275 threads is released under the same license as Perl.
276
277 Thanks to
278
279 Richard Soderberg E<lt>perl at crystalflame.netE<gt>
280 Helping me out tons, trying to find reasons for races and other weird bugs!
281
282 Simon Cozens E<lt>simon at brecon.co.ukE<gt>
283 Being there to answer zillions of annoying questions
284
285 Rocco Caputo E<lt>troc at netrus.netE<gt>
286
287 Vipul Ved Prakash E<lt>mail at vipul.netE<gt>
288 Helping with debugging.
289
290 please join perl-ithreads@perl.org for more information
291
292 =head1 SEE ALSO
293
294 L<threads::shared>, L<perlthrtut>, 
295 L<http://www.perl.com/pub/a/2002/06/11/threads.html>,
296 L<perlcall>, L<perlembed>, L<perlguts>
297
298 =cut