This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
[win32] merge changes#872,873 from maintbranch
[perl5.git] / lib / constant.pm
1 package constant;
2
3 $VERSION = '1.00';
4
5 =head1 NAME
6
7 constant - Perl pragma to declare constants
8
9 =head1 SYNOPSIS
10
11     use constant BUFFER_SIZE    => 4096;
12     use constant ONE_YEAR       => 365.2425 * 24 * 60 * 60;
13     use constant PI             => 4 * atan2 1, 1;
14     use constant DEBUGGING      => 0;
15     use constant ORACLE         => 'oracle@cs.indiana.edu';
16     use constant USERNAME       => scalar getpwuid($<);
17     use constant USERINFO       => getpwuid($<);
18
19     sub deg2rad { PI * $_[0] / 180 }
20
21     print "This line does nothing"              unless DEBUGGING;
22
23 =head1 DESCRIPTION
24
25 This will declare a symbol to be a constant with the given scalar
26 or list value.
27
28 When you declare a constant such as C<PI> using the method shown
29 above, each machine your script runs upon can have as many digits
30 of accuracy as it can use. Also, your program will be easier to
31 read, more likely to be maintained (and maintained correctly), and
32 far less likely to send a space probe to the wrong planet because
33 nobody noticed the one equation in which you wrote C<3.14195>.
34
35 =head1 NOTES
36
37 The value or values are evaluated in a list context. You may override
38 this with C<scalar> as shown above.
39
40 These constants do not directly interpolate into double-quotish
41 strings, although you may do so indirectly. (See L<perlref> for
42 details about how this works.)
43
44     print "The value of PI is @{[ PI ]}.\n";
45
46 List constants are returned as lists, not as arrays.
47
48     $homedir = USERINFO[7];             # WRONG
49     $homedir = (USERINFO)[7];           # Right
50
51 The use of all caps for constant names is merely a convention,
52 although it is recommended in order to make constants stand out
53 and to help avoid collisions with other barewords, keywords, and
54 subroutine names. Constant names must begin with a letter.
55
56 Constant symbols are package scoped (rather than block scoped, as
57 C<use strict> is). That is, you can refer to a constant from package
58 Other as C<Other::CONST>.
59
60 As with all C<use> directives, defining a constant happens at
61 compile time. Thus, it's probably not correct to put a constant
62 declaration inside of a conditional statement (like C<if ($foo)
63 { use constant ... }>).
64
65 Omitting the value for a symbol gives it the value of C<undef> in
66 a scalar context or the empty list, C<()>, in a list context. This
67 isn't so nice as it may sound, though, because in this case you
68 must either quote the symbol name, or use a big arrow, (C<=E<gt>>),
69 with nothing to point to. It is probably best to declare these
70 explicitly.
71
72     use constant UNICORNS       => ();
73     use constant LOGFILE        => undef;
74
75 The result from evaluating a list constant in a scalar context is
76 not documented, and is B<not> guaranteed to be any particular value
77 in the future. In particular, you should not rely upon it being
78 the number of elements in the list, especially since it is not
79 B<necessarily> that value in the current implementation.
80
81 Magical values, tied values, and references can be made into
82 constants at compile time, allowing for way cool stuff like this.
83 (These error numbers aren't totally portable, alas.)
84
85     use constant E2BIG => ($! = 7);
86     print   E2BIG, "\n";        # something like "Arg list too long"
87     print 0+E2BIG, "\n";        # "7"
88
89 =head1 TECHNICAL NOTE
90
91 In the current implementation, scalar constants are actually
92 inlinable subroutines. As of version 5.004 of Perl, the appropriate
93 scalar constant is inserted directly in place of some subroutine
94 calls, thereby saving the overhead of a subroutine call. See
95 L<perlsub/"Constant Functions"> for details about how and when this
96 happens.
97
98 =head1 BUGS
99
100 In the current version of Perl, list constants are not inlined
101 and some symbols may be redefined without generating a warning.
102
103 It is not possible to have a subroutine or keyword with the same
104 name as a constant. This is probably a Good Thing.
105
106 Unlike constants in some languages, these cannot be overridden
107 on the command line or via environment variables.
108
109 You can get into trouble if you use constants in a context which
110 automatically quotes barewords (as is true for any subroutine call).
111 For example, you can't say C<$hash{CONSTANT}> because C<CONSTANT> will
112 be interpreted as a string.  Use C<$hash{CONSTANT()}> or
113 C<$hash{+CONSTANT}> to prevent the bareword quoting mechanism from
114 kicking in.  Similarly, since the C<=E<gt>> operator quotes a bareword
115 immediately to its left you have to say C<CONSTANT() =E<gt> 'value'>
116 instead of C<CONSTANT =E<gt> 'value'>.
117
118 =head1 AUTHOR
119
120 Tom Phoenix, E<lt>F<rootbeer@teleport.com>E<gt>, with help from
121 many other folks.
122
123 =head1 COPYRIGHT
124
125 Copyright (C) 1997, Tom Phoenix
126
127 This module is free software; you can redistribute it or modify it
128 under the same terms as Perl itself.
129
130 =cut
131
132 use strict;
133 use Carp;
134 use vars qw($VERSION);
135
136 #=======================================================================
137
138 # Some of this stuff didn't work in version 5.003, alas.
139 require 5.003_96;
140
141 #=======================================================================
142 # import() - import symbols into user's namespace
143 #
144 # What we actually do is define a function in the caller's namespace
145 # which returns the value. The function we create will normally
146 # be inlined as a constant, thereby avoiding further sub calling 
147 # overhead.
148 #=======================================================================
149 sub import {
150     my $class = shift;
151     my $name = shift or return;                 # Ignore 'use constant;'
152     croak qq{Can't define "$name" as constant} .
153             qq{ (name contains invalid characters or is empty)}
154         unless $name =~ /^[^\W_0-9]\w*$/;
155
156     my $pkg = caller;
157     {
158         no strict 'refs';
159         if (@_ == 1) {
160             my $scalar = $_[0];
161             *{"${pkg}::$name"} = sub () { $scalar };
162         } elsif (@_) {
163             my @list = @_;
164             *{"${pkg}::$name"} = sub () { @list };
165         } else {
166             *{"${pkg}::$name"} = sub () { };
167         }
168     }
169
170 }
171
172 1;