This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
9be4b6a9c41b8837413845f1174276dcaf825c8d
[perl5.git] / lib / perl5db.pl
1
2 =head1 NAME
3
4 perl5db.pl - the perl debugger
5
6 =head1 SYNOPSIS
7
8     perl -d  your_Perl_script
9
10 =head1 DESCRIPTION
11
12 C<perl5db.pl> is the perl debugger. It is loaded automatically by Perl when
13 you invoke a script with C<perl -d>. This documentation tries to outline the
14 structure and services provided by C<perl5db.pl>, and to describe how you
15 can use them.
16
17 =head1 GENERAL NOTES
18
19 The debugger can look pretty forbidding to many Perl programmers. There are
20 a number of reasons for this, many stemming out of the debugger's history.
21
22 When the debugger was first written, Perl didn't have a lot of its nicer
23 features - no references, no lexical variables, no closures, no object-oriented
24 programming. So a lot of the things one would normally have done using such
25 features was done using global variables, globs and the C<local()> operator
26 in creative ways.
27
28 Some of these have survived into the current debugger; a few of the more
29 interesting and still-useful idioms are noted in this section, along with notes
30 on the comments themselves.
31
32 =head2 Why not use more lexicals?
33
34 Experienced Perl programmers will note that the debugger code tends to use
35 mostly package globals rather than lexically-scoped variables. This is done
36 to allow a significant amount of control of the debugger from outside the
37 debugger itself.
38
39 Unfortunately, though the variables are accessible, they're not well
40 documented, so it's generally been a decision that hasn't made a lot of
41 difference to most users. Where appropriate, comments have been added to
42 make variables more accessible and usable, with the understanding that these
43 I<are> debugger internals, and are therefore subject to change. Future
44 development should probably attempt to replace the globals with a well-defined
45 API, but for now, the variables are what we've got.
46
47 =head2 Automated variable stacking via C<local()>
48
49 As you may recall from reading C<perlfunc>, the C<local()> operator makes a
50 temporary copy of a variable in the current scope. When the scope ends, the
51 old copy is restored. This is often used in the debugger to handle the
52 automatic stacking of variables during recursive calls:
53
54      sub foo {
55         local $some_global++;
56
57         # Do some stuff, then ...
58         return;
59      }
60
61 What happens is that on entry to the subroutine, C<$some_global> is localized,
62 then altered. When the subroutine returns, Perl automatically undoes the
63 localization, restoring the previous value. Voila, automatic stack management.
64
65 The debugger uses this trick a I<lot>. Of particular note is C<DB::eval>,
66 which lets the debugger get control inside of C<eval>'ed code. The debugger
67 localizes a saved copy of C<$@> inside the subroutine, which allows it to
68 keep C<$@> safe until it C<DB::eval> returns, at which point the previous
69 value of C<$@> is restored. This makes it simple (well, I<simpler>) to keep
70 track of C<$@> inside C<eval>s which C<eval> other C<eval's>.
71
72 In any case, watch for this pattern. It occurs fairly often.
73
74 =head2 The C<^> trick
75
76 This is used to cleverly reverse the sense of a logical test depending on
77 the value of an auxiliary variable. For instance, the debugger's C<S>
78 (search for subroutines by pattern) allows you to negate the pattern
79 like this:
80
81    # Find all non-'foo' subs:
82    S !/foo/
83
84 Boolean algebra states that the truth table for XOR looks like this:
85
86 =over 4
87
88 =item * 0 ^ 0 = 0
89
90 (! not present and no match) --> false, don't print
91
92 =item * 0 ^ 1 = 1
93
94 (! not present and matches) --> true, print
95
96 =item * 1 ^ 0 = 1
97
98 (! present and no match) --> true, print
99
100 =item * 1 ^ 1 = 0
101
102 (! present and matches) --> false, don't print
103
104 =back
105
106 As you can see, the first pair applies when C<!> isn't supplied, and
107 the second pair applies when it is. The XOR simply allows us to
108 compact a more complicated if-then-elseif-else into a more elegant
109 (but perhaps overly clever) single test. After all, it needed this
110 explanation...
111
112 =head2 FLAGS, FLAGS, FLAGS
113
114 There is a certain C programming legacy in the debugger. Some variables,
115 such as C<$single>, C<$trace>, and C<$frame>, have I<magical> values composed
116 of 1, 2, 4, etc. (powers of 2) OR'ed together. This allows several pieces
117 of state to be stored independently in a single scalar.
118
119 A test like
120
121     if ($scalar & 4) ...
122
123 is checking to see if the appropriate bit is on. Since each bit can be
124 "addressed" independently in this way, C<$scalar> is acting sort of like
125 an array of bits. Obviously, since the contents of C<$scalar> are just a
126 bit-pattern, we can save and restore it easily (it will just look like
127 a number).
128
129 The problem, is of course, that this tends to leave magic numbers scattered
130 all over your program whenever a bit is set, cleared, or checked. So why do
131 it?
132
133 =over 4
134
135 =item *
136
137 First, doing an arithmetical or bitwise operation on a scalar is
138 just about the fastest thing you can do in Perl: C<use constant> actually
139 creates a subroutine call, and array and hash lookups are much slower. Is
140 this over-optimization at the expense of readability? Possibly, but the
141 debugger accesses these  variables a I<lot>. Any rewrite of the code will
142 probably have to benchmark alternate implementations and see which is the
143 best balance of readability and speed, and then document how it actually
144 works.
145
146 =item *
147
148 Second, it's very easy to serialize a scalar number. This is done in
149 the restart code; the debugger state variables are saved in C<%ENV> and then
150 restored when the debugger is restarted. Having them be just numbers makes
151 this trivial.
152
153 =item *
154
155 Third, some of these variables are being shared with the Perl core
156 smack in the middle of the interpreter's execution loop. It's much faster for
157 a C program (like the interpreter) to check a bit in a scalar than to access
158 several different variables (or a Perl array).
159
160 =back
161
162 =head2 What are those C<XXX> comments for?
163
164 Any comment containing C<XXX> means that the comment is either somewhat
165 speculative - it's not exactly clear what a given variable or chunk of
166 code is doing, or that it is incomplete - the basics may be clear, but the
167 subtleties are not completely documented.
168
169 Send in a patch if you can clear up, fill out, or clarify an C<XXX>.
170
171 =head1 DATA STRUCTURES MAINTAINED BY CORE
172
173 There are a number of special data structures provided to the debugger by
174 the Perl interpreter.
175
176 The array C<@{$main::{'_<'.$filename}}> (aliased locally to C<@dbline>
177 via glob assignment) contains the text from C<$filename>, with each
178 element corresponding to a single line of C<$filename>. Additionally,
179 breakable lines will be dualvars with the numeric component being the
180 memory address of a COP node. Non-breakable lines are dualvar to 0.
181
182 The hash C<%{'_<'.$filename}> (aliased locally to C<%dbline> via glob
183 assignment) contains breakpoints and actions.  The keys are line numbers;
184 you can set individual values, but not the whole hash. The Perl interpreter
185 uses this hash to determine where breakpoints have been set. Any true value is
186 considered to be a breakpoint; C<perl5db.pl> uses C<$break_condition\0$action>.
187 Values are magical in numeric context: 1 if the line is breakable, 0 if not.
188
189 The scalar C<${"_<$filename"}> simply contains the string C<<< _<$filename> >>>.
190 This is also the case for evaluated strings that contain subroutines, or
191 which are currently being executed.  The $filename for C<eval>ed strings looks
192 like C<(eval 34).
193
194 =head1 DEBUGGER STARTUP
195
196 When C<perl5db.pl> starts, it reads an rcfile (C<perl5db.ini> for
197 non-interactive sessions, C<.perldb> for interactive ones) that can set a number
198 of options. In addition, this file may define a subroutine C<&afterinit>
199 that will be executed (in the debugger's context) after the debugger has
200 initialized itself.
201
202 Next, it checks the C<PERLDB_OPTS> environment variable and treats its
203 contents as the argument of a C<o> command in the debugger.
204
205 =head2 STARTUP-ONLY OPTIONS
206
207 The following options can only be specified at startup.
208 To set them in your rcfile, add a call to
209 C<&parse_options("optionName=new_value")>.
210
211 =over 4
212
213 =item * TTY
214
215 the TTY to use for debugging i/o.
216
217 =item * noTTY
218
219 if set, goes in NonStop mode.  On interrupt, if TTY is not set,
220 uses the value of noTTY or F<$HOME/.perldbtty$$> to find TTY using
221 Term::Rendezvous.  Current variant is to have the name of TTY in this
222 file.
223
224 =item * ReadLine
225
226 if false, a dummy ReadLine is used, so you can debug
227 ReadLine applications.
228
229 =item * NonStop
230
231 if true, no i/o is performed until interrupt.
232
233 =item * LineInfo
234
235 file or pipe to print line number info to.  If it is a
236 pipe, a short "emacs like" message is used.
237
238 =item * RemotePort
239
240 host:port to connect to on remote host for remote debugging.
241
242 =item * HistFile
243
244 file to store session history to. There is no default and so no
245 history file is written unless this variable is explicitly set.
246
247 =item * HistSize
248
249 number of commands to store to the file specified in C<HistFile>.
250 Default is 100.
251
252 =back
253
254 =head3 SAMPLE RCFILE
255
256  &parse_options("NonStop=1 LineInfo=db.out");
257   sub afterinit { $trace = 1; }
258
259 The script will run without human intervention, putting trace
260 information into C<db.out>.  (If you interrupt it, you had better
261 reset C<LineInfo> to something I<interactive>!)
262
263 =head1 INTERNALS DESCRIPTION
264
265 =head2 DEBUGGER INTERFACE VARIABLES
266
267 Perl supplies the values for C<%sub>.  It effectively inserts
268 a C<&DB::DB();> in front of each place that can have a
269 breakpoint. At each subroutine call, it calls C<&DB::sub> with
270 C<$DB::sub> set to the called subroutine. It also inserts a C<BEGIN
271 {require 'perl5db.pl'}> before the first line.
272
273 After each C<require>d file is compiled, but before it is executed, a
274 call to C<&DB::postponed($main::{'_<'.$filename})> is done. C<$filename>
275 is the expanded name of the C<require>d file (as found via C<%INC>).
276
277 =head3 IMPORTANT INTERNAL VARIABLES
278
279 =head4 C<$CreateTTY>
280
281 Used to control when the debugger will attempt to acquire another TTY to be
282 used for input.
283
284 =over
285
286 =item * 1 -  on C<fork()>
287
288 =item * 2 - debugger is started inside debugger
289
290 =item * 4 -  on startup
291
292 =back
293
294 =head4 C<$doret>
295
296 The value -2 indicates that no return value should be printed.
297 Any other positive value causes C<DB::sub> to print return values.
298
299 =head4 C<$evalarg>
300
301 The item to be eval'ed by C<DB::eval>. Used to prevent messing with the current
302 contents of C<@_> when C<DB::eval> is called.
303
304 =head4 C<$frame>
305
306 Determines what messages (if any) will get printed when a subroutine (or eval)
307 is entered or exited.
308
309 =over 4
310
311 =item * 0 -  No enter/exit messages
312
313 =item * 1 - Print I<entering> messages on subroutine entry
314
315 =item * 2 - Adds exit messages on subroutine exit. If no other flag is on, acts like 1+2.
316
317 =item * 4 - Extended messages: C<< <in|out> I<context>=I<fully-qualified sub name> from I<file>:I<line> >>. If no other flag is on, acts like 1+4.
318
319 =item * 8 - Adds parameter information to messages, and overloaded stringify and tied FETCH is enabled on the printed arguments. Ignored if C<4> is not on.
320
321 =item * 16 - Adds C<I<context> return from I<subname>: I<value>> messages on subroutine/eval exit. Ignored if C<4> is is not on.
322
323 =back
324
325 To get everything, use C<$frame=30> (or C<o f=30> as a debugger command).
326 The debugger internally juggles the value of C<$frame> during execution to
327 protect external modules that the debugger uses from getting traced.
328
329 =head4 C<$level>
330
331 Tracks current debugger nesting level. Used to figure out how many
332 C<E<lt>E<gt>> pairs to surround the line number with when the debugger
333 outputs a prompt. Also used to help determine if the program has finished
334 during command parsing.
335
336 =head4 C<$onetimeDump>
337
338 Controls what (if anything) C<DB::eval()> will print after evaluating an
339 expression.
340
341 =over 4
342
343 =item * C<undef> - don't print anything
344
345 =item * C<dump> - use C<dumpvar.pl> to display the value returned
346
347 =item * C<methods> - print the methods callable on the first item returned
348
349 =back
350
351 =head4 C<$onetimeDumpDepth>
352
353 Controls how far down C<dumpvar.pl> will go before printing C<...> while
354 dumping a structure. Numeric. If C<undef>, print all levels.
355
356 =head4 C<$signal>
357
358 Used to track whether or not an C<INT> signal has been detected. C<DB::DB()>,
359 which is called before every statement, checks this and puts the user into
360 command mode if it finds C<$signal> set to a true value.
361
362 =head4 C<$single>
363
364 Controls behavior during single-stepping. Stacked in C<@stack> on entry to
365 each subroutine; popped again at the end of each subroutine.
366
367 =over 4
368
369 =item * 0 - run continuously.
370
371 =item * 1 - single-step, go into subs. The C<s> command.
372
373 =item * 2 - single-step, don't go into subs. The C<n> command.
374
375 =item * 4 - print current sub depth (turned on to force this when C<too much
376 recursion> occurs.
377
378 =back
379
380 =head4 C<$trace>
381
382 Controls the output of trace information.
383
384 =over 4
385
386 =item * 1 - The C<t> command was entered to turn on tracing (every line executed is printed)
387
388 =item * 2 - watch expressions are active
389
390 =item * 4 - user defined a C<watchfunction()> in C<afterinit()>
391
392 =back
393
394 =head4 C<$slave_editor>
395
396 1 if C<LINEINFO> was directed to a pipe; 0 otherwise.
397
398 =head4 C<@cmdfhs>
399
400 Stack of filehandles that C<DB::readline()> will read commands from.
401 Manipulated by the debugger's C<source> command and C<DB::readline()> itself.
402
403 =head4 C<@dbline>
404
405 Local alias to the magical line array, C<@{$main::{'_<'.$filename}}> ,
406 supplied by the Perl interpreter to the debugger. Contains the source.
407
408 =head4 C<@old_watch>
409
410 Previous values of watch expressions. First set when the expression is
411 entered; reset whenever the watch expression changes.
412
413 =head4 C<@saved>
414
415 Saves important globals (C<$@>, C<$!>, C<$^E>, C<$,>, C<$/>, C<$\>, C<$^W>)
416 so that the debugger can substitute safe values while it's running, and
417 restore them when it returns control.
418
419 =head4 C<@stack>
420
421 Saves the current value of C<$single> on entry to a subroutine.
422 Manipulated by the C<c> command to turn off tracing in all subs above the
423 current one.
424
425 =head4 C<@to_watch>
426
427 The 'watch' expressions: to be evaluated before each line is executed.
428
429 =head4 C<@typeahead>
430
431 The typeahead buffer, used by C<DB::readline>.
432
433 =head4 C<%alias>
434
435 Command aliases. Stored as character strings to be substituted for a command
436 entered.
437
438 =head4 C<%break_on_load>
439
440 Keys are file names, values are 1 (break when this file is loaded) or undef
441 (don't break when it is loaded).
442
443 =head4 C<%dbline>
444
445 Keys are line numbers, values are C<condition\0action>. If used in numeric
446 context, values are 0 if not breakable, 1 if breakable, no matter what is
447 in the actual hash entry.
448
449 =head4 C<%had_breakpoints>
450
451 Keys are file names; values are bitfields:
452
453 =over 4
454
455 =item * 1 - file has a breakpoint in it.
456
457 =item * 2 - file has an action in it.
458
459 =back
460
461 A zero or undefined value means this file has neither.
462
463 =head4 C<%option>
464
465 Stores the debugger options. These are character string values.
466
467 =head4 C<%postponed>
468
469 Saves breakpoints for code that hasn't been compiled yet.
470 Keys are subroutine names, values are:
471
472 =over 4
473
474 =item * C<compile> - break when this sub is compiled
475
476 =item * C<< break +0 if <condition> >> - break (conditionally) at the start of this routine. The condition will be '1' if no condition was specified.
477
478 =back
479
480 =head4 C<%postponed_file>
481
482 This hash keeps track of breakpoints that need to be set for files that have
483 not yet been compiled. Keys are filenames; values are references to hashes.
484 Each of these hashes is keyed by line number, and its values are breakpoint
485 definitions (C<condition\0action>).
486
487 =head1 DEBUGGER INITIALIZATION
488
489 The debugger's initialization actually jumps all over the place inside this
490 package. This is because there are several BEGIN blocks (which of course
491 execute immediately) spread through the code. Why is that?
492
493 The debugger needs to be able to change some things and set some things up
494 before the debugger code is compiled; most notably, the C<$deep> variable that
495 C<DB::sub> uses to tell when a program has recursed deeply. In addition, the
496 debugger has to turn off warnings while the debugger code is compiled, but then
497 restore them to their original setting before the program being debugged begins
498 executing.
499
500 The first C<BEGIN> block simply turns off warnings by saving the current
501 setting of C<$^W> and then setting it to zero. The second one initializes
502 the debugger variables that are needed before the debugger begins executing.
503 The third one puts C<$^X> back to its former value.
504
505 We'll detail the second C<BEGIN> block later; just remember that if you need
506 to initialize something before the debugger starts really executing, that's
507 where it has to go.
508
509 =cut
510
511 package DB;
512
513 use strict;
514
515 BEGIN {eval 'use IO::Handle'};  # Needed for flush only? breaks under miniperl
516
517 BEGIN {
518     require feature;
519     $^V =~ /^v(\d+\.\d+)/;
520     feature->import(":$1");
521 }
522
523 # Debugger for Perl 5.00x; perl5db.pl patch level:
524 use vars qw($VERSION $header);
525
526 $VERSION = '1.39_04';
527
528 $header = "perl5db.pl version $VERSION";
529
530 =head1 DEBUGGER ROUTINES
531
532 =head2 C<DB::eval()>
533
534 This function replaces straight C<eval()> inside the debugger; it simplifies
535 the process of evaluating code in the user's context.
536
537 The code to be evaluated is passed via the package global variable
538 C<$DB::evalarg>; this is done to avoid fiddling with the contents of C<@_>.
539
540 Before we do the C<eval()>, we preserve the current settings of C<$trace>,
541 C<$single>, C<$^D> and C<$usercontext>.  The latter contains the
542 preserved values of C<$@>, C<$!>, C<$^E>, C<$,>, C<$/>, C<$\>, C<$^W> and the
543 user's current package, grabbed when C<DB::DB> got control.  This causes the
544 proper context to be used when the eval is actually done.  Afterward, we
545 restore C<$trace>, C<$single>, and C<$^D>.
546
547 Next we need to handle C<$@> without getting confused. We save C<$@> in a
548 local lexical, localize C<$saved[0]> (which is where C<save()> will put
549 C<$@>), and then call C<save()> to capture C<$@>, C<$!>, C<$^E>, C<$,>,
550 C<$/>, C<$\>, and C<$^W>) and set C<$,>, C<$/>, C<$\>, and C<$^W> to values
551 considered sane by the debugger. If there was an C<eval()> error, we print
552 it on the debugger's output. If C<$onetimedump> is defined, we call
553 C<dumpit> if it's set to 'dump', or C<methods> if it's set to
554 'methods'. Setting it to something else causes the debugger to do the eval
555 but not print the result - handy if you want to do something else with it
556 (the "watch expressions" code does this to get the value of the watch
557 expression but not show it unless it matters).
558
559 In any case, we then return the list of output from C<eval> to the caller,
560 and unwinding restores the former version of C<$@> in C<@saved> as well
561 (the localization of C<$saved[0]> goes away at the end of this scope).
562
563 =head3 Parameters and variables influencing execution of DB::eval()
564
565 C<DB::eval> isn't parameterized in the standard way; this is to keep the
566 debugger's calls to C<DB::eval()> from mucking with C<@_>, among other things.
567 The variables listed below influence C<DB::eval()>'s execution directly.
568
569 =over 4
570
571 =item C<$evalarg> - the thing to actually be eval'ed
572
573 =item C<$trace> - Current state of execution tracing
574
575 =item C<$single> - Current state of single-stepping
576
577 =item C<$onetimeDump> - what is to be displayed after the evaluation
578
579 =item C<$onetimeDumpDepth> - how deep C<dumpit()> should go when dumping results
580
581 =back
582
583 The following variables are altered by C<DB::eval()> during its execution. They
584 are "stacked" via C<local()>, enabling recursive calls to C<DB::eval()>.
585
586 =over 4
587
588 =item C<@res> - used to capture output from actual C<eval>.
589
590 =item C<$otrace> - saved value of C<$trace>.
591
592 =item C<$osingle> - saved value of C<$single>.
593
594 =item C<$od> - saved value of C<$^D>.
595
596 =item C<$saved[0]> - saved value of C<$@>.
597
598 =item $\ - for output of C<$@> if there is an evaluation error.
599
600 =back
601
602 =head3 The problem of lexicals
603
604 The context of C<DB::eval()> presents us with some problems. Obviously,
605 we want to be 'sandboxed' away from the debugger's internals when we do
606 the eval, but we need some way to control how punctuation variables and
607 debugger globals are used.
608
609 We can't use local, because the code inside C<DB::eval> can see localized
610 variables; and we can't use C<my> either for the same reason. The code
611 in this routine compromises and uses C<my>.
612
613 After this routine is over, we don't have user code executing in the debugger's
614 context, so we can use C<my> freely.
615
616 =cut
617
618 ############################################## Begin lexical danger zone
619
620 # 'my' variables used here could leak into (that is, be visible in)
621 # the context that the code being evaluated is executing in. This means that
622 # the code could modify the debugger's variables.
623 #
624 # Fiddling with the debugger's context could be Bad. We insulate things as
625 # much as we can.
626
627 use vars qw(
628     @args
629     %break_on_load
630     @cmdfhs
631     $CommandSet
632     $CreateTTY
633     $DBGR
634     @dbline
635     $dbline
636     %dbline
637     $dieLevel
638     $evalarg
639     $filename
640     $frame
641     $hist
642     $histfile
643     $histsize
644     $ImmediateStop
645     $IN
646     $inhibit_exit
647     @ini_INC
648     $ini_warn
649     $line
650     $maxtrace
651     $od
652     $onetimeDump
653     $onetimedumpDepth
654     %option
655     @options
656     $osingle
657     $otrace
658     $OUT
659     $packname
660     $pager
661     $post
662     %postponed
663     $prc
664     $pre
665     $pretype
666     $psh
667     @RememberOnROptions
668     $remoteport
669     @res
670     $rl
671     @saved
672     $signal
673     $signalLevel
674     $single
675     $start
676     $sub
677     %sub
678     $subname
679     $term
680     $trace
681     $usercontext
682     $warnLevel
683     $window
684 );
685
686 # Used to save @ARGV and extract any debugger-related flags.
687 use vars qw(@ARGS);
688
689 # Used to prevent multiple entries to diesignal()
690 # (if for instance diesignal() itself dies)
691 use vars qw($panic);
692
693 # Used to prevent the debugger from running nonstop
694 # after a restart
695 use vars qw($second_time);
696
697 sub _calc_usercontext {
698     my ($package) = @_;
699
700     # Cancel strict completely for the evaluated code, so the code
701     # the user evaluates won't be affected by it. (Shlomi Fish)
702     return 'no strict; ($@, $!, $^E, $,, $/, $\, $^W) = @saved;'
703     . "package $package;";    # this won't let them modify, alas
704 }
705
706 sub eval {
707
708     # 'my' would make it visible from user code
709     #    but so does local! --tchrist
710     # Remember: this localizes @DB::res, not @main::res.
711     local @res;
712     {
713
714         # Try to keep the user code from messing  with us. Save these so that
715         # even if the eval'ed code changes them, we can put them back again.
716         # Needed because the user could refer directly to the debugger's
717         # package globals (and any 'my' variables in this containing scope)
718         # inside the eval(), and we want to try to stay safe.
719         local $otrace  = $trace;
720         local $osingle = $single;
721         local $od      = $^D;
722
723         # Untaint the incoming eval() argument.
724         { ($evalarg) = $evalarg =~ /(.*)/s; }
725
726         # $usercontext built in DB::DB near the comment
727         # "set up the context for DB::eval ..."
728         # Evaluate and save any results.
729         @res = eval "$usercontext $evalarg;\n";  # '\n' for nice recursive debug
730
731         # Restore those old values.
732         $trace  = $otrace;
733         $single = $osingle;
734         $^D     = $od;
735     }
736
737     # Save the current value of $@, and preserve it in the debugger's copy
738     # of the saved precious globals.
739     my $at = $@;
740
741     # Since we're only saving $@, we only have to localize the array element
742     # that it will be stored in.
743     local $saved[0];    # Preserve the old value of $@
744     eval { &DB::save };
745
746     # Now see whether we need to report an error back to the user.
747     if ($at) {
748         local $\ = '';
749         print $OUT $at;
750     }
751
752     # Display as required by the caller. $onetimeDump and $onetimedumpDepth
753     # are package globals.
754     elsif ($onetimeDump) {
755         if ( $onetimeDump eq 'dump' ) {
756             local $option{dumpDepth} = $onetimedumpDepth
757               if defined $onetimedumpDepth;
758             dumpit( $OUT, \@res );
759         }
760         elsif ( $onetimeDump eq 'methods' ) {
761             methods( $res[0] );
762         }
763     } ## end elsif ($onetimeDump)
764     @res;
765 } ## end sub eval
766
767 ############################################## End lexical danger zone
768
769 # After this point it is safe to introduce lexicals.
770 # The code being debugged will be executing in its own context, and
771 # can't see the inside of the debugger.
772 #
773 # However, one should not overdo it: leave as much control from outside as
774 # possible. If you make something a lexical, it's not going to be addressable
775 # from outside the debugger even if you know its name.
776
777 # This file is automatically included if you do perl -d.
778 # It's probably not useful to include this yourself.
779 #
780 # Before venturing further into these twisty passages, it is
781 # wise to read the perldebguts man page or risk the ire of dragons.
782 #
783 # (It should be noted that perldebguts will tell you a lot about
784 # the underlying mechanics of how the debugger interfaces into the
785 # Perl interpreter, but not a lot about the debugger itself. The new
786 # comments in this code try to address this problem.)
787
788 # Note that no subroutine call is possible until &DB::sub is defined
789 # (for subroutines defined outside of the package DB). In fact the same is
790 # true if $deep is not defined.
791
792 # Enhanced by ilya@math.ohio-state.edu (Ilya Zakharevich)
793
794 # modified Perl debugger, to be run from Emacs in perldb-mode
795 # Ray Lischner (uunet!mntgfx!lisch) as of 5 Nov 1990
796 # Johan Vromans -- upgrade to 4.0 pl 10
797 # Ilya Zakharevich -- patches after 5.001 (and some before ;-)
798 ########################################################################
799
800 =head1 DEBUGGER INITIALIZATION
801
802 The debugger starts up in phases.
803
804 =head2 BASIC SETUP
805
806 First, it initializes the environment it wants to run in: turning off
807 warnings during its own compilation, defining variables which it will need
808 to avoid warnings later, setting itself up to not exit when the program
809 terminates, and defaulting to printing return values for the C<r> command.
810
811 =cut
812
813 # Needed for the statement after exec():
814 #
815 # This BEGIN block is simply used to switch off warnings during debugger
816 # compilation. Probably it would be better practice to fix the warnings,
817 # but this is how it's done at the moment.
818
819 BEGIN {
820     $ini_warn = $^W;
821     $^W       = 0;
822 }    # Switch compilation warnings off until another BEGIN.
823
824 local ($^W) = 0;    # Switch run-time warnings off during init.
825
826 =head2 THREADS SUPPORT
827
828 If we are running under a threaded Perl, we require threads and threads::shared
829 if the environment variable C<PERL5DB_THREADED> is set, to enable proper
830 threaded debugger control.  C<-dt> can also be used to set this.
831
832 Each new thread will be announced and the debugger prompt will always inform
833 you of each new thread created.  It will also indicate the thread id in which
834 we are currently running within the prompt like this:
835
836         [tid] DB<$i>
837
838 Where C<[tid]> is an integer thread id and C<$i> is the familiar debugger
839 command prompt.  The prompt will show: C<[0]> when running under threads, but
840 not actually in a thread.  C<[tid]> is consistent with C<gdb> usage.
841
842 While running under threads, when you set or delete a breakpoint (etc.), this
843 will apply to all threads, not just the currently running one.  When you are
844 in a currently executing thread, you will stay there until it completes.  With
845 the current implementation it is not currently possible to hop from one thread
846 to another.
847
848 The C<e> and C<E> commands are currently fairly minimal - see C<h e> and C<h E>.
849
850 Note that threading support was built into the debugger as of Perl version
851 C<5.8.6> and debugger version C<1.2.8>.
852
853 =cut
854
855 BEGIN {
856   # ensure we can share our non-threaded variables or no-op
857   if ($ENV{PERL5DB_THREADED}) {
858         require threads;
859         require threads::shared;
860         import threads::shared qw(share);
861         $DBGR;
862         share(\$DBGR);
863         lock($DBGR);
864         print "Threads support enabled\n";
865   } else {
866         *lock  = sub(*) {};
867         *share = sub(*) {};
868   }
869 }
870
871 # These variables control the execution of 'dumpvar.pl'.
872 {
873     package dumpvar;
874     use vars qw(
875     $hashDepth
876     $arrayDepth
877     $dumpDBFiles
878     $dumpPackages
879     $quoteHighBit
880     $printUndef
881     $globPrint
882     $usageOnly
883     );
884 }
885
886 # used to control die() reporting in diesignal()
887 {
888     package Carp;
889     use vars qw($CarpLevel);
890 }
891
892 # without threads, $filename is not defined until DB::DB is called
893 foreach my $k (keys (%INC)) {
894         &share(\$main::{'_<'.$filename}) if defined $filename;
895 };
896
897 # Command-line + PERLLIB:
898 # Save the contents of @INC before they are modified elsewhere.
899 @ini_INC = @INC;
900
901 # This was an attempt to clear out the previous values of various
902 # trapped errors. Apparently it didn't help. XXX More info needed!
903 # $prevwarn = $prevdie = $prevbus = $prevsegv = ''; # Does not help?!
904
905 # We set these variables to safe values. We don't want to blindly turn
906 # off warnings, because other packages may still want them.
907 $trace = $signal = $single = 0;    # Uninitialized warning suppression
908                                    # (local $^W cannot help - other packages!).
909
910 # Default to not exiting when program finishes; print the return
911 # value when the 'r' command is used to return from a subroutine.
912 $inhibit_exit = $option{PrintRet} = 1;
913
914 use vars qw($trace_to_depth);
915
916 # Default to 1E9 so it won't be limited to a certain recursion depth.
917 $trace_to_depth = 1E9;
918
919 =head1 OPTION PROCESSING
920
921 The debugger's options are actually spread out over the debugger itself and
922 C<dumpvar.pl>; some of these are variables to be set, while others are
923 subs to be called with a value. To try to make this a little easier to
924 manage, the debugger uses a few data structures to define what options
925 are legal and how they are to be processed.
926
927 First, the C<@options> array defines the I<names> of all the options that
928 are to be accepted.
929
930 =cut
931
932 @options = qw(
933   CommandSet   HistFile      HistSize
934   hashDepth    arrayDepth    dumpDepth
935   DumpDBFiles  DumpPackages  DumpReused
936   compactDump  veryCompact   quote
937   HighBit      undefPrint    globPrint
938   PrintRet     UsageOnly     frame
939   AutoTrace    TTY           noTTY
940   ReadLine     NonStop       LineInfo
941   maxTraceLen  recallCommand ShellBang
942   pager        tkRunning     ornaments
943   signalLevel  warnLevel     dieLevel
944   inhibit_exit ImmediateStop bareStringify
945   CreateTTY    RemotePort    windowSize
946   DollarCaretP
947 );
948
949 @RememberOnROptions = qw(DollarCaretP);
950
951 =pod
952
953 Second, C<optionVars> lists the variables that each option uses to save its
954 state.
955
956 =cut
957
958 use vars qw(%optionVars);
959
960 %optionVars = (
961     hashDepth     => \$dumpvar::hashDepth,
962     arrayDepth    => \$dumpvar::arrayDepth,
963     CommandSet    => \$CommandSet,
964     DumpDBFiles   => \$dumpvar::dumpDBFiles,
965     DumpPackages  => \$dumpvar::dumpPackages,
966     DumpReused    => \$dumpvar::dumpReused,
967     HighBit       => \$dumpvar::quoteHighBit,
968     undefPrint    => \$dumpvar::printUndef,
969     globPrint     => \$dumpvar::globPrint,
970     UsageOnly     => \$dumpvar::usageOnly,
971     CreateTTY     => \$CreateTTY,
972     bareStringify => \$dumpvar::bareStringify,
973     frame         => \$frame,
974     AutoTrace     => \$trace,
975     inhibit_exit  => \$inhibit_exit,
976     maxTraceLen   => \$maxtrace,
977     ImmediateStop => \$ImmediateStop,
978     RemotePort    => \$remoteport,
979     windowSize    => \$window,
980     HistFile      => \$histfile,
981     HistSize      => \$histsize,
982 );
983
984 =pod
985
986 Third, C<%optionAction> defines the subroutine to be called to process each
987 option.
988
989 =cut
990
991 use vars qw(%optionAction);
992
993 %optionAction = (
994     compactDump   => \&dumpvar::compactDump,
995     veryCompact   => \&dumpvar::veryCompact,
996     quote         => \&dumpvar::quote,
997     TTY           => \&TTY,
998     noTTY         => \&noTTY,
999     ReadLine      => \&ReadLine,
1000     NonStop       => \&NonStop,
1001     LineInfo      => \&LineInfo,
1002     recallCommand => \&recallCommand,
1003     ShellBang     => \&shellBang,
1004     pager         => \&pager,
1005     signalLevel   => \&signalLevel,
1006     warnLevel     => \&warnLevel,
1007     dieLevel      => \&dieLevel,
1008     tkRunning     => \&tkRunning,
1009     ornaments     => \&ornaments,
1010     RemotePort    => \&RemotePort,
1011     DollarCaretP  => \&DollarCaretP,
1012 );
1013
1014 =pod
1015
1016 Last, the C<%optionRequire> notes modules that must be C<require>d if an
1017 option is used.
1018
1019 =cut
1020
1021 # Note that this list is not complete: several options not listed here
1022 # actually require that dumpvar.pl be loaded for them to work, but are
1023 # not in the table. A subsequent patch will correct this problem; for
1024 # the moment, we're just recommenting, and we are NOT going to change
1025 # function.
1026 use vars qw(%optionRequire);
1027
1028 %optionRequire = (
1029     compactDump => 'dumpvar.pl',
1030     veryCompact => 'dumpvar.pl',
1031     quote       => 'dumpvar.pl',
1032 );
1033
1034 =pod
1035
1036 There are a number of initialization-related variables which can be set
1037 by putting code to set them in a BEGIN block in the C<PERL5DB> environment
1038 variable. These are:
1039
1040 =over 4
1041
1042 =item C<$rl> - readline control XXX needs more explanation
1043
1044 =item C<$warnLevel> - whether or not debugger takes over warning handling
1045
1046 =item C<$dieLevel> - whether or not debugger takes over die handling
1047
1048 =item C<$signalLevel> - whether or not debugger takes over signal handling
1049
1050 =item C<$pre> - preprompt actions (array reference)
1051
1052 =item C<$post> - postprompt actions (array reference)
1053
1054 =item C<$pretype>
1055
1056 =item C<$CreateTTY> - whether or not to create a new TTY for this debugger
1057
1058 =item C<$CommandSet> - which command set to use (defaults to new, documented set)
1059
1060 =back
1061
1062 =cut
1063
1064 # These guys may be defined in $ENV{PERL5DB} :
1065 $rl          = 1     unless defined $rl;
1066 $warnLevel   = 1     unless defined $warnLevel;
1067 $dieLevel    = 1     unless defined $dieLevel;
1068 $signalLevel = 1     unless defined $signalLevel;
1069 $pre         = []    unless defined $pre;
1070 $post        = []    unless defined $post;
1071 $pretype     = []    unless defined $pretype;
1072 $CreateTTY   = 3     unless defined $CreateTTY;
1073 $CommandSet  = '580' unless defined $CommandSet;
1074
1075 share($rl);
1076 share($warnLevel);
1077 share($dieLevel);
1078 share($signalLevel);
1079 share($pre);
1080 share($post);
1081 share($pretype);
1082 share($rl);
1083 share($CreateTTY);
1084 share($CommandSet);
1085
1086 =pod
1087
1088 The default C<die>, C<warn>, and C<signal> handlers are set up.
1089
1090 =cut
1091
1092 warnLevel($warnLevel);
1093 dieLevel($dieLevel);
1094 signalLevel($signalLevel);
1095
1096 =pod
1097
1098 The pager to be used is needed next. We try to get it from the
1099 environment first.  If it's not defined there, we try to find it in
1100 the Perl C<Config.pm>.  If it's not there, we default to C<more>. We
1101 then call the C<pager()> function to save the pager name.
1102
1103 =cut
1104
1105 # This routine makes sure $pager is set up so that '|' can use it.
1106 pager(
1107
1108     # If PAGER is defined in the environment, use it.
1109     defined $ENV{PAGER}
1110     ? $ENV{PAGER}
1111
1112       # If not, see if Config.pm defines it.
1113     : eval { require Config }
1114       && defined $Config::Config{pager}
1115     ? $Config::Config{pager}
1116
1117       # If not, fall back to 'more'.
1118     : 'more'
1119   )
1120   unless defined $pager;
1121
1122 =pod
1123
1124 We set up the command to be used to access the man pages, the command
1125 recall character (C<!> unless otherwise defined) and the shell escape
1126 character (C<!> unless otherwise defined). Yes, these do conflict, and
1127 neither works in the debugger at the moment.
1128
1129 =cut
1130
1131 setman();
1132
1133 # Set up defaults for command recall and shell escape (note:
1134 # these currently don't work in linemode debugging).
1135 recallCommand("!") unless defined $prc;
1136 shellBang("!")     unless defined $psh;
1137
1138 =pod
1139
1140 We then set up the gigantic string containing the debugger help.
1141 We also set the limit on the number of arguments we'll display during a
1142 trace.
1143
1144 =cut
1145
1146 sethelp();
1147
1148 # If we didn't get a default for the length of eval/stack trace args,
1149 # set it here.
1150 $maxtrace = 400 unless defined $maxtrace;
1151
1152 =head2 SETTING UP THE DEBUGGER GREETING
1153
1154 The debugger I<greeting> helps to inform the user how many debuggers are
1155 running, and whether the current debugger is the primary or a child.
1156
1157 If we are the primary, we just hang onto our pid so we'll have it when
1158 or if we start a child debugger. If we are a child, we'll set things up
1159 so we'll have a unique greeting and so the parent will give us our own
1160 TTY later.
1161
1162 We save the current contents of the C<PERLDB_PIDS> environment variable
1163 because we mess around with it. We'll also need to hang onto it because
1164 we'll need it if we restart.
1165
1166 Child debuggers make a label out of the current PID structure recorded in
1167 PERLDB_PIDS plus the new PID. They also mark themselves as not having a TTY
1168 yet so the parent will give them one later via C<resetterm()>.
1169
1170 =cut
1171
1172 # Save the current contents of the environment; we're about to
1173 # much with it. We'll need this if we have to restart.
1174 use vars qw($ini_pids);
1175 $ini_pids = $ENV{PERLDB_PIDS};
1176
1177 use vars qw ($pids $term_pid);
1178
1179 if ( defined $ENV{PERLDB_PIDS} ) {
1180
1181     # We're a child. Make us a label out of the current PID structure
1182     # recorded in PERLDB_PIDS plus our (new) PID. Mark us as not having
1183     # a term yet so the parent will give us one later via resetterm().
1184
1185     my $env_pids = $ENV{PERLDB_PIDS};
1186     $pids = "[$env_pids]";
1187
1188     # Unless we are on OpenVMS, all programs under the DCL shell run under
1189     # the same PID.
1190
1191     if (($^O eq 'VMS') && ($env_pids =~ /\b$$\b/)) {
1192         $term_pid         = $$;
1193     }
1194     else {
1195         $ENV{PERLDB_PIDS} .= "->$$";
1196         $term_pid = -1;
1197     }
1198
1199 } ## end if (defined $ENV{PERLDB_PIDS...
1200 else {
1201
1202     # We're the parent PID. Initialize PERLDB_PID in case we end up with a
1203     # child debugger, and mark us as the parent, so we'll know to set up
1204     # more TTY's is we have to.
1205     $ENV{PERLDB_PIDS} = "$$";
1206     $pids             = "[pid=$$]";
1207     $term_pid         = $$;
1208 }
1209
1210 use vars qw($pidprompt);
1211 $pidprompt = '';
1212
1213 # Sets up $emacs as a synonym for $slave_editor.
1214 use vars qw($slave_editor);
1215 *emacs = $slave_editor if $slave_editor;    # May be used in afterinit()...
1216
1217 =head2 READING THE RC FILE
1218
1219 The debugger will read a file of initialization options if supplied. If
1220 running interactively, this is C<.perldb>; if not, it's C<perldb.ini>.
1221
1222 =cut
1223
1224 # As noted, this test really doesn't check accurately that the debugger
1225 # is running at a terminal or not.
1226
1227 my $dev_tty = '/dev/tty';
1228    $dev_tty = 'TT:' if ($^O eq 'VMS');
1229 use vars qw($rcfile);
1230 if ( -e $dev_tty ) {                      # this is the wrong metric!
1231     $rcfile = ".perldb";
1232 }
1233 else {
1234     $rcfile = "perldb.ini";
1235 }
1236
1237 =pod
1238
1239 The debugger does a safety test of the file to be read. It must be owned
1240 either by the current user or root, and must only be writable by the owner.
1241
1242 =cut
1243
1244 # This wraps a safety test around "do" to read and evaluate the init file.
1245 #
1246 # This isn't really safe, because there's a race
1247 # between checking and opening.  The solution is to
1248 # open and fstat the handle, but then you have to read and
1249 # eval the contents.  But then the silly thing gets
1250 # your lexical scope, which is unfortunate at best.
1251 sub safe_do {
1252     my $file = shift;
1253
1254     # Just exactly what part of the word "CORE::" don't you understand?
1255     local $SIG{__WARN__};
1256     local $SIG{__DIE__};
1257
1258     unless ( is_safe_file($file) ) {
1259         CORE::warn <<EO_GRIPE;
1260 perldb: Must not source insecure rcfile $file.
1261         You or the superuser must be the owner, and it must not
1262         be writable by anyone but its owner.
1263 EO_GRIPE
1264         return;
1265     } ## end unless (is_safe_file($file...
1266
1267     do $file;
1268     CORE::warn("perldb: couldn't parse $file: $@") if $@;
1269 } ## end sub safe_do
1270
1271 # This is the safety test itself.
1272 #
1273 # Verifies that owner is either real user or superuser and that no
1274 # one but owner may write to it.  This function is of limited use
1275 # when called on a path instead of upon a handle, because there are
1276 # no guarantees that filename (by dirent) whose file (by ino) is
1277 # eventually accessed is the same as the one tested.
1278 # Assumes that the file's existence is not in doubt.
1279 sub is_safe_file {
1280     my $path = shift;
1281     stat($path) || return;    # mysteriously vaporized
1282     my ( $dev, $ino, $mode, $nlink, $uid, $gid ) = stat(_);
1283
1284     return 0 if $uid != 0 && $uid != $<;
1285     return 0 if $mode & 022;
1286     return 1;
1287 } ## end sub is_safe_file
1288
1289 # If the rcfile (whichever one we decided was the right one to read)
1290 # exists, we safely do it.
1291 if ( -f $rcfile ) {
1292     safe_do("./$rcfile");
1293 }
1294
1295 # If there isn't one here, try the user's home directory.
1296 elsif ( defined $ENV{HOME} && -f "$ENV{HOME}/$rcfile" ) {
1297     safe_do("$ENV{HOME}/$rcfile");
1298 }
1299
1300 # Else try the login directory.
1301 elsif ( defined $ENV{LOGDIR} && -f "$ENV{LOGDIR}/$rcfile" ) {
1302     safe_do("$ENV{LOGDIR}/$rcfile");
1303 }
1304
1305 # If the PERLDB_OPTS variable has options in it, parse those out next.
1306 if ( defined $ENV{PERLDB_OPTS} ) {
1307     parse_options( $ENV{PERLDB_OPTS} );
1308 }
1309
1310 =pod
1311
1312 The last thing we do during initialization is determine which subroutine is
1313 to be used to obtain a new terminal when a new debugger is started. Right now,
1314 the debugger only handles TCP sockets, X11, OS/2, amd Mac OS X
1315 (darwin).
1316
1317 =cut
1318
1319 # Set up the get_fork_TTY subroutine to be aliased to the proper routine.
1320 # Works if you're running an xterm or xterm-like window, or you're on
1321 # OS/2, or on Mac OS X. This may need some expansion.
1322
1323 if (not defined &get_fork_TTY)       # only if no routine exists
1324 {
1325     if ( defined $remoteport ) {
1326                                                  # Expect an inetd-like server
1327         *get_fork_TTY = \&socket_get_fork_TTY;   # to listen to us
1328     }
1329     elsif (defined $ENV{TERM}                    # If we know what kind
1330                                                  # of terminal this is,
1331         and $ENV{TERM} eq 'xterm'                # and it's an xterm,
1332         and defined $ENV{DISPLAY}                # and what display it's on,
1333       )
1334     {
1335         *get_fork_TTY = \&xterm_get_fork_TTY;    # use the xterm version
1336     }
1337     elsif ( $^O eq 'os2' ) {                     # If this is OS/2,
1338         *get_fork_TTY = \&os2_get_fork_TTY;      # use the OS/2 version
1339     }
1340     elsif ( $^O eq 'darwin'                      # If this is Mac OS X
1341             and defined $ENV{TERM_PROGRAM}       # and we're running inside
1342             and $ENV{TERM_PROGRAM}
1343                 eq 'Apple_Terminal'              # Terminal.app
1344             )
1345     {
1346         *get_fork_TTY = \&macosx_get_fork_TTY;   # use the Mac OS X version
1347     }
1348 } ## end if (not defined &get_fork_TTY...
1349
1350 # untaint $^O, which may have been tainted by the last statement.
1351 # see bug [perl #24674]
1352 $^O =~ m/^(.*)\z/;
1353 $^O = $1;
1354
1355 # Here begin the unreadable code.  It needs fixing.
1356
1357 =head2 RESTART PROCESSING
1358
1359 This section handles the restart command. When the C<R> command is invoked, it
1360 tries to capture all of the state it can into environment variables, and
1361 then sets C<PERLDB_RESTART>. When we start executing again, we check to see
1362 if C<PERLDB_RESTART> is there; if so, we reload all the information that
1363 the R command stuffed into the environment variables.
1364
1365   PERLDB_RESTART   - flag only, contains no restart data itself.
1366   PERLDB_HIST      - command history, if it's available
1367   PERLDB_ON_LOAD   - breakpoints set by the rc file
1368   PERLDB_POSTPONE  - subs that have been loaded/not executed, and have actions
1369   PERLDB_VISITED   - files that had breakpoints
1370   PERLDB_FILE_...  - breakpoints for a file
1371   PERLDB_OPT       - active options
1372   PERLDB_INC       - the original @INC
1373   PERLDB_PRETYPE   - preprompt debugger actions
1374   PERLDB_PRE       - preprompt Perl code
1375   PERLDB_POST      - post-prompt Perl code
1376   PERLDB_TYPEAHEAD - typeahead captured by readline()
1377
1378 We chug through all these variables and plug the values saved in them
1379 back into the appropriate spots in the debugger.
1380
1381 =cut
1382
1383 use vars qw(@hist @truehist %postponed_file @typeahead);
1384
1385 if ( exists $ENV{PERLDB_RESTART} ) {
1386
1387     # We're restarting, so we don't need the flag that says to restart anymore.
1388     delete $ENV{PERLDB_RESTART};
1389
1390     # $restart = 1;
1391     @hist          = get_list('PERLDB_HIST');
1392     %break_on_load = get_list("PERLDB_ON_LOAD");
1393     %postponed     = get_list("PERLDB_POSTPONE");
1394
1395         share(@hist);
1396         share(@truehist);
1397         share(%break_on_load);
1398         share(%postponed);
1399
1400     # restore breakpoints/actions
1401     my @had_breakpoints = get_list("PERLDB_VISITED");
1402     for my $file_idx ( 0 .. $#had_breakpoints ) {
1403         my $filename = $had_breakpoints[$file_idx];
1404         my %pf = get_list("PERLDB_FILE_$file_idx");
1405         $postponed_file{ $filename } = \%pf if %pf;
1406         my @lines = sort {$a <=> $b} keys(%pf);
1407         my @enabled_statuses = get_list("PERLDB_FILE_ENABLED_$file_idx");
1408         for my $line_idx (0 .. $#lines) {
1409             _set_breakpoint_enabled_status(
1410                 $filename,
1411                 $lines[$line_idx],
1412                 ($enabled_statuses[$line_idx] ? 1 : ''),
1413             );
1414         }
1415     }
1416
1417     # restore options
1418     my %opt = get_list("PERLDB_OPT");
1419     my ( $opt, $val );
1420     while ( ( $opt, $val ) = each %opt ) {
1421         $val =~ s/[\\\']/\\$1/g;
1422         parse_options("$opt'$val'");
1423     }
1424
1425     # restore original @INC
1426     @INC     = get_list("PERLDB_INC");
1427     @ini_INC = @INC;
1428
1429     # return pre/postprompt actions and typeahead buffer
1430     $pretype   = [ get_list("PERLDB_PRETYPE") ];
1431     $pre       = [ get_list("PERLDB_PRE") ];
1432     $post      = [ get_list("PERLDB_POST") ];
1433     @typeahead = get_list( "PERLDB_TYPEAHEAD", @typeahead );
1434 } ## end if (exists $ENV{PERLDB_RESTART...
1435
1436 =head2 SETTING UP THE TERMINAL
1437
1438 Now, we'll decide how the debugger is going to interact with the user.
1439 If there's no TTY, we set the debugger to run non-stop; there's not going
1440 to be anyone there to enter commands.
1441
1442 =cut
1443
1444 use vars qw($notty $runnonstop $console $tty $LINEINFO);
1445 use vars qw($lineinfo $doccmd);
1446
1447 if ($notty) {
1448     $runnonstop = 1;
1449         share($runnonstop);
1450 }
1451
1452 =pod
1453
1454 If there is a TTY, we have to determine who it belongs to before we can
1455 proceed. If this is a slave editor or graphical debugger (denoted by
1456 the first command-line switch being '-emacs'), we shift this off and
1457 set C<$rl> to 0 (XXX ostensibly to do straight reads).
1458
1459 =cut
1460
1461 else {
1462
1463     # Is Perl being run from a slave editor or graphical debugger?
1464     # If so, don't use readline, and set $slave_editor = 1.
1465     $slave_editor =
1466       ( ( defined $main::ARGV[0] ) and ( $main::ARGV[0] eq '-emacs' ) );
1467     $rl = 0, shift(@main::ARGV) if $slave_editor;
1468
1469     #require Term::ReadLine;
1470
1471 =pod
1472
1473 We then determine what the console should be on various systems:
1474
1475 =over 4
1476
1477 =item * Cygwin - We use C<stdin> instead of a separate device.
1478
1479 =cut
1480
1481     if ( $^O eq 'cygwin' ) {
1482
1483         # /dev/tty is binary. use stdin for textmode
1484         undef $console;
1485     }
1486
1487 =item * Unix - use C</dev/tty>.
1488
1489 =cut
1490
1491     elsif ( -e "/dev/tty" ) {
1492         $console = "/dev/tty";
1493     }
1494
1495 =item * Windows or MSDOS - use C<con>.
1496
1497 =cut
1498
1499     elsif ( $^O eq 'dos' or -e "con" or $^O eq 'MSWin32' ) {
1500         $console = "con";
1501     }
1502
1503 =item * VMS - use C<sys$command>.
1504
1505 =cut
1506
1507     else {
1508
1509         # everything else is ...
1510         $console = "sys\$command";
1511     }
1512
1513 =pod
1514
1515 =back
1516
1517 Several other systems don't use a specific console. We C<undef $console>
1518 for those (Windows using a slave editor/graphical debugger, NetWare, OS/2
1519 with a slave editor, Epoc).
1520
1521 =cut
1522
1523     if ( ( $^O eq 'MSWin32' ) and ( $slave_editor or defined $ENV{EMACS} ) ) {
1524
1525         # /dev/tty is binary. use stdin for textmode
1526         $console = undef;
1527     }
1528
1529     if ( $^O eq 'NetWare' ) {
1530
1531         # /dev/tty is binary. use stdin for textmode
1532         $console = undef;
1533     }
1534
1535     # In OS/2, we need to use STDIN to get textmode too, even though
1536     # it pretty much looks like Unix otherwise.
1537     if ( defined $ENV{OS2_SHELL} and ( $slave_editor or $ENV{WINDOWID} ) )
1538     {    # In OS/2
1539         $console = undef;
1540     }
1541
1542     # EPOC also falls into the 'got to use STDIN' camp.
1543     if ( $^O eq 'epoc' ) {
1544         $console = undef;
1545     }
1546
1547 =pod
1548
1549 If there is a TTY hanging around from a parent, we use that as the console.
1550
1551 =cut
1552
1553     $console = $tty if defined $tty;
1554
1555 =head2 SOCKET HANDLING
1556
1557 The debugger is capable of opening a socket and carrying out a debugging
1558 session over the socket.
1559
1560 If C<RemotePort> was defined in the options, the debugger assumes that it
1561 should try to start a debugging session on that port. It builds the socket
1562 and then tries to connect the input and output filehandles to it.
1563
1564 =cut
1565
1566     # Handle socket stuff.
1567
1568     if ( defined $remoteport ) {
1569
1570         # If RemotePort was defined in the options, connect input and output
1571         # to the socket.
1572         $IN = $OUT = connect_remoteport();
1573     } ## end if (defined $remoteport)
1574
1575 =pod
1576
1577 If no C<RemotePort> was defined, and we want to create a TTY on startup,
1578 this is probably a situation where multiple debuggers are running (for example,
1579 a backticked command that starts up another debugger). We create a new IN and
1580 OUT filehandle, and do the necessary mojo to create a new TTY if we know how
1581 and if we can.
1582
1583 =cut
1584
1585     # Non-socket.
1586     else {
1587
1588         # Two debuggers running (probably a system or a backtick that invokes
1589         # the debugger itself under the running one). create a new IN and OUT
1590         # filehandle, and do the necessary mojo to create a new tty if we
1591         # know how, and we can.
1592         create_IN_OUT(4) if $CreateTTY & 4;
1593         if ($console) {
1594
1595             # If we have a console, check to see if there are separate ins and
1596             # outs to open. (They are assumed identical if not.)
1597
1598             my ( $i, $o ) = split /,/, $console;
1599             $o = $i unless defined $o;
1600
1601             # read/write on in, or just read, or read on STDIN.
1602             open( IN,      "+<$i" )
1603               || open( IN, "<$i" )
1604               || open( IN, "<&STDIN" );
1605
1606             # read/write/create/clobber out, or write/create/clobber out,
1607             # or merge with STDERR, or merge with STDOUT.
1608                  open( OUT, "+>$o" )
1609               || open( OUT, ">$o" )
1610               || open( OUT, ">&STDERR" )
1611               || open( OUT, ">&STDOUT" );    # so we don't dongle stdout
1612
1613         } ## end if ($console)
1614         elsif ( not defined $console ) {
1615
1616             # No console. Open STDIN.
1617             open( IN, "<&STDIN" );
1618
1619             # merge with STDERR, or with STDOUT.
1620             open( OUT,      ">&STDERR" )
1621               || open( OUT, ">&STDOUT" );    # so we don't dongle stdout
1622             $console = 'STDIN/OUT';
1623         } ## end elsif (not defined $console)
1624
1625         # Keep copies of the filehandles so that when the pager runs, it
1626         # can close standard input without clobbering ours.
1627         $IN = \*IN, $OUT = \*OUT if $console or not defined $console;
1628     } ## end elsif (from if(defined $remoteport))
1629
1630     # Unbuffer DB::OUT. We need to see responses right away.
1631     $OUT->autoflush(1);
1632
1633     # Line info goes to debugger output unless pointed elsewhere.
1634     # Pointing elsewhere makes it possible for slave editors to
1635     # keep track of file and position. We have both a filehandle
1636     # and a I/O description to keep track of.
1637     $LINEINFO = $OUT     unless defined $LINEINFO;
1638     $lineinfo = $console unless defined $lineinfo;
1639         # share($LINEINFO); # <- unable to share globs
1640         share($lineinfo);   #
1641
1642 =pod
1643
1644 To finish initialization, we show the debugger greeting,
1645 and then call the C<afterinit()> subroutine if there is one.
1646
1647 =cut
1648
1649     # Show the debugger greeting.
1650     $header =~ s/.Header: ([^,]+),v(\s+\S+\s+\S+).*$/$1$2/;
1651     unless ($runnonstop) {
1652         local $\ = '';
1653         local $, = '';
1654         if ( $term_pid eq '-1' ) {
1655             print $OUT "\nDaughter DB session started...\n";
1656         }
1657         else {
1658             print $OUT "\nLoading DB routines from $header\n";
1659             print $OUT (
1660                 "Editor support ",
1661                 $slave_editor ? "enabled" : "available", ".\n"
1662             );
1663             print $OUT
1664 "\nEnter h or 'h h' for help, or '$doccmd perldebug' for more help.\n\n";
1665         } ## end else [ if ($term_pid eq '-1')
1666     } ## end unless ($runnonstop)
1667 } ## end else [ if ($notty)
1668
1669 # XXX This looks like a bug to me.
1670 # Why copy to @ARGS and then futz with @args?
1671 @ARGS = @ARGV;
1672 # for (@args) {
1673     # Make sure backslashes before single quotes are stripped out, and
1674     # keep args unless they are numeric (XXX why?)
1675     # s/\'/\\\'/g;                      # removed while not justified understandably
1676     # s/(.*)/'$1'/ unless /^-?[\d.]+$/; # ditto
1677 # }
1678
1679 # If there was an afterinit() sub defined, call it. It will get
1680 # executed in our scope, so it can fiddle with debugger globals.
1681 if ( defined &afterinit ) {    # May be defined in $rcfile
1682     &afterinit();
1683 }
1684
1685 # Inform us about "Stack dump during die enabled ..." in dieLevel().
1686 use vars qw($I_m_init);
1687
1688 $I_m_init = 1;
1689
1690 ############################################################ Subroutines
1691
1692 =head1 SUBROUTINES
1693
1694 =head2 DB
1695
1696 This gigantic subroutine is the heart of the debugger. Called before every
1697 statement, its job is to determine if a breakpoint has been reached, and
1698 stop if so; read commands from the user, parse them, and execute
1699 them, and then send execution off to the next statement.
1700
1701 Note that the order in which the commands are processed is very important;
1702 some commands earlier in the loop will actually alter the C<$cmd> variable
1703 to create other commands to be executed later. This is all highly I<optimized>
1704 but can be confusing. Check the comments for each C<$cmd ... && do {}> to
1705 see what's happening in any given command.
1706
1707 =cut
1708
1709 use vars qw(
1710     $action
1711     %alias
1712     $cmd
1713     $doret
1714     $fall_off_end
1715     $file
1716     $filename_ini
1717     $finished
1718     %had_breakpoints
1719     $incr
1720     $laststep
1721     $level
1722     $max
1723     @old_watch
1724     $package
1725     $rc
1726     $sh
1727     @stack
1728     $stack_depth
1729     @to_watch
1730     $try
1731     $end
1732 );
1733
1734 sub DB {
1735
1736     # lock the debugger and get the thread id for the prompt
1737         lock($DBGR);
1738         my $tid;
1739         my $position;
1740         my ($prefix, $after, $infix);
1741         my $pat;
1742
1743         if ($ENV{PERL5DB_THREADED}) {
1744                 $tid = eval { "[".threads->tid."]" };
1745         }
1746
1747     # Check for whether we should be running continuously or not.
1748     # _After_ the perl program is compiled, $single is set to 1:
1749     if ( $single and not $second_time++ ) {
1750
1751         # Options say run non-stop. Run until we get an interrupt.
1752         if ($runnonstop) {    # Disable until signal
1753                 # If there's any call stack in place, turn off single
1754                 # stepping into subs throughout the stack.
1755             for my $i (0 .. $stack_depth) {
1756                 $stack[ $i ] &= ~1;
1757             }
1758
1759             # And we are now no longer in single-step mode.
1760             $single = 0;
1761
1762             # If we simply returned at this point, we wouldn't get
1763             # the trace info. Fall on through.
1764             # return;
1765         } ## end if ($runnonstop)
1766
1767         elsif ($ImmediateStop) {
1768
1769             # We are supposed to stop here; XXX probably a break.
1770             $ImmediateStop = 0;    # We've processed it; turn it off
1771             $signal        = 1;    # Simulate an interrupt to force
1772                                    # us into the command loop
1773         }
1774     } ## end if ($single and not $second_time...
1775
1776     # If we're in single-step mode, or an interrupt (real or fake)
1777     # has occurred, turn off non-stop mode.
1778     $runnonstop = 0 if $single or $signal;
1779
1780     # Preserve current values of $@, $!, $^E, $,, $/, $\, $^W.
1781     # The code being debugged may have altered them.
1782     &save;
1783
1784     # Since DB::DB gets called after every line, we can use caller() to
1785     # figure out where we last were executing. Sneaky, eh? This works because
1786     # caller is returning all the extra information when called from the
1787     # debugger.
1788     local ( $package, $filename, $line ) = caller;
1789     $filename_ini = $filename;
1790
1791     # set up the context for DB::eval, so it can properly execute
1792     # code on behalf of the user. We add the package in so that the
1793     # code is eval'ed in the proper package (not in the debugger!).
1794     local $usercontext = _calc_usercontext($package);
1795
1796     # Create an alias to the active file magical array to simplify
1797     # the code here.
1798     local (*dbline) = $main::{ '_<' . $filename };
1799
1800     # Last line in the program.
1801     $max = $#dbline;
1802
1803     # if we have something here, see if we should break.
1804     {
1805         # $stop is lexical and local to this block - $action on the other hand
1806         # is global.
1807         my $stop;
1808
1809         if ( $dbline{$line}
1810             && _is_breakpoint_enabled($filename, $line)
1811             && (( $stop, $action ) = split( /\0/, $dbline{$line} ) ) )
1812         {
1813
1814             # Stop if the stop criterion says to just stop.
1815             if ( $stop eq '1' ) {
1816                 $signal |= 1;
1817             }
1818
1819             # It's a conditional stop; eval it in the user's context and
1820             # see if we should stop. If so, remove the one-time sigil.
1821             elsif ($stop) {
1822                 $evalarg = "\$DB::signal |= 1 if do {$stop}";
1823                 &eval;
1824                 # If the breakpoint is temporary, then delete its enabled status.
1825                 if ($dbline{$line} =~ s/;9($|\0)/$1/) {
1826                     _cancel_breakpoint_temp_enabled_status($filename, $line);
1827                 }
1828             }
1829         } ## end if ($dbline{$line} && ...
1830     }
1831
1832     # Preserve the current stop-or-not, and see if any of the W
1833     # (watch expressions) has changed.
1834     my $was_signal = $signal;
1835
1836     # If we have any watch expressions ...
1837     if ( $trace & 2 ) {
1838         for my $n (0 .. $#to_watch) {
1839             $evalarg = $to_watch[$n];
1840             local $onetimeDump;    # Tell DB::eval() to not output results
1841
1842             # Fix context DB::eval() wants to return an array, but
1843             # we need a scalar here.
1844             my ($val) = join( "', '", &eval );
1845             $val = ( ( defined $val ) ? "'$val'" : 'undef' );
1846
1847             # Did it change?
1848             if ( $val ne $old_watch[$n] ) {
1849
1850                 # Yep! Show the difference, and fake an interrupt.
1851                 $signal = 1;
1852                 print $OUT <<EOP;
1853 Watchpoint $n:\t$to_watch[$n] changed:
1854     old value:\t$old_watch[$n]
1855     new value:\t$val
1856 EOP
1857                 $old_watch[$n] = $val;
1858             } ## end if ($val ne $old_watch...
1859         } ## end for my $n (0 ..
1860     } ## end if ($trace & 2)
1861
1862 =head2 C<watchfunction()>
1863
1864 C<watchfunction()> is a function that can be defined by the user; it is a
1865 function which will be run on each entry to C<DB::DB>; it gets the
1866 current package, filename, and line as its parameters.
1867
1868 The watchfunction can do anything it likes; it is executing in the
1869 debugger's context, so it has access to all of the debugger's internal
1870 data structures and functions.
1871
1872 C<watchfunction()> can control the debugger's actions. Any of the following
1873 will cause the debugger to return control to the user's program after
1874 C<watchfunction()> executes:
1875
1876 =over 4
1877
1878 =item *
1879
1880 Returning a false value from the C<watchfunction()> itself.
1881
1882 =item *
1883
1884 Altering C<$single> to a false value.
1885
1886 =item *
1887
1888 Altering C<$signal> to a false value.
1889
1890 =item *
1891
1892 Turning off the C<4> bit in C<$trace> (this also disables the
1893 check for C<watchfunction()>. This can be done with
1894
1895     $trace &= ~4;
1896
1897 =back
1898
1899 =cut
1900
1901     # If there's a user-defined DB::watchfunction, call it with the
1902     # current package, filename, and line. The function executes in
1903     # the DB:: package.
1904     if ( $trace & 4 ) {    # User-installed watch
1905         return
1906           if watchfunction( $package, $filename, $line )
1907           and not $single
1908           and not $was_signal
1909           and not( $trace & ~4 );
1910     } ## end if ($trace & 4)
1911
1912     # Pick up any alteration to $signal in the watchfunction, and
1913     # turn off the signal now.
1914     $was_signal = $signal;
1915     $signal     = 0;
1916
1917 =head2 GETTING READY TO EXECUTE COMMANDS
1918
1919 The debugger decides to take control if single-step mode is on, the
1920 C<t> command was entered, or the user generated a signal. If the program
1921 has fallen off the end, we set things up so that entering further commands
1922 won't cause trouble, and we say that the program is over.
1923
1924 =cut
1925
1926     # Make sure that we always print if asked for explicitly regardless
1927     # of $trace_to_depth .
1928     my $explicit_stop = ($single || $was_signal);
1929
1930     # Check to see if we should grab control ($single true,
1931     # trace set appropriately, or we got a signal).
1932     if ( $explicit_stop || ( $trace & 1 ) ) {
1933
1934         # Yes, grab control.
1935         if ($slave_editor) {
1936
1937             # Tell the editor to update its position.
1938             $position = "\032\032$filename:$line:0\n";
1939             print_lineinfo($position);
1940         }
1941
1942 =pod
1943
1944 Special check: if we're in package C<DB::fake>, we've gone through the
1945 C<END> block at least once. We set up everything so that we can continue
1946 to enter commands and have a valid context to be in.
1947
1948 =cut
1949
1950         elsif ( $package eq 'DB::fake' ) {
1951
1952             # Fallen off the end already.
1953             $term || &setterm;
1954             print_help(<<EOP);
1955 Debugged program terminated.  Use B<q> to quit or B<R> to restart,
1956   use B<o> I<inhibit_exit> to avoid stopping after program termination,
1957   B<h q>, B<h R> or B<h o> to get additional info.
1958 EOP
1959
1960             # Set the DB::eval context appropriately.
1961             $package     = 'main';
1962             $usercontext = _calc_usercontext($package);
1963         } ## end elsif ($package eq 'DB::fake')
1964
1965 =pod
1966
1967 If the program hasn't finished executing, we scan forward to the
1968 next executable line, print that out, build the prompt from the file and line
1969 number information, and print that.
1970
1971 =cut
1972
1973         else {
1974
1975
1976             # Still somewhere in the midst of execution. Set up the
1977             #  debugger prompt.
1978             $sub =~ s/\'/::/;    # Swap Perl 4 package separators (') to
1979                                  # Perl 5 ones (sorry, we don't print Klingon
1980                                  #module names)
1981
1982             $prefix = $sub =~ /::/ ? "" : ($package . '::');
1983             $prefix .= "$sub($filename:";
1984             $after = ( $dbline[$line] =~ /\n$/ ? '' : "\n" );
1985
1986             # Break up the prompt if it's really long.
1987             if ( length($prefix) > 30 ) {
1988                 $position = "$prefix$line):\n$line:\t$dbline[$line]$after";
1989                 $prefix   = "";
1990                 $infix    = ":\t";
1991             }
1992             else {
1993                 $infix    = "):\t";
1994                 $position = "$prefix$line$infix$dbline[$line]$after";
1995             }
1996
1997             # Print current line info, indenting if necessary.
1998             if ($frame) {
1999                 print_lineinfo( ' ' x $stack_depth,
2000                     "$line:\t$dbline[$line]$after" );
2001             }
2002             else {
2003                 depth_print_lineinfo($explicit_stop, $position);
2004             }
2005
2006             # Scan forward, stopping at either the end or the next
2007             # unbreakable line.
2008             for ( my $i = $line + 1 ; $i <= $max && $dbline[$i] == 0 ; ++$i )
2009             {    #{ vi
2010
2011                 # Drop out on null statements, block closers, and comments.
2012                 last if $dbline[$i] =~ /^\s*[\;\}\#\n]/;
2013
2014                 # Drop out if the user interrupted us.
2015                 last if $signal;
2016
2017                 # Append a newline if the line doesn't have one. Can happen
2018                 # in eval'ed text, for instance.
2019                 $after = ( $dbline[$i] =~ /\n$/ ? '' : "\n" );
2020
2021                 # Next executable line.
2022                 my $incr_pos = "$prefix$i$infix$dbline[$i]$after";
2023                 $position .= $incr_pos;
2024                 if ($frame) {
2025
2026                     # Print it indented if tracing is on.
2027                     print_lineinfo( ' ' x $stack_depth,
2028                         "$i:\t$dbline[$i]$after" );
2029                 }
2030                 else {
2031                     depth_print_lineinfo($explicit_stop, $incr_pos);
2032                 }
2033             } ## end for ($i = $line + 1 ; $i...
2034         } ## end else [ if ($slave_editor)
2035     } ## end if ($single || ($trace...
2036
2037 =pod
2038
2039 If there's an action to be executed for the line we stopped at, execute it.
2040 If there are any preprompt actions, execute those as well.
2041
2042 =cut
2043
2044     # If there's an action, do it now.
2045     $evalarg = $action, &eval if $action;
2046
2047     # Are we nested another level (e.g., did we evaluate a function
2048     # that had a breakpoint in it at the debugger prompt)?
2049     if ( $single || $was_signal ) {
2050
2051         # Yes, go down a level.
2052         local $level = $level + 1;
2053
2054         # Do any pre-prompt actions.
2055         foreach $evalarg (@$pre) {
2056             &eval;
2057         }
2058
2059         # Complain about too much recursion if we passed the limit.
2060         print $OUT $stack_depth . " levels deep in subroutine calls!\n"
2061           if $single & 4;
2062
2063         # The line we're currently on. Set $incr to -1 to stay here
2064         # until we get a command that tells us to advance.
2065         $start = $line;
2066         $incr  = -1;      # for backward motion.
2067
2068         # Tack preprompt debugger actions ahead of any actual input.
2069         @typeahead = ( @$pretype, @typeahead );
2070
2071 =head2 WHERE ARE WE?
2072
2073 XXX Relocate this section?
2074
2075 The debugger normally shows the line corresponding to the current line of
2076 execution. Sometimes, though, we want to see the next line, or to move elsewhere
2077 in the file. This is done via the C<$incr>, C<$start>, and C<$max> variables.
2078
2079 C<$incr> controls by how many lines the I<current> line should move forward
2080 after a command is executed. If set to -1, this indicates that the I<current>
2081 line shouldn't change.
2082
2083 C<$start> is the I<current> line. It is used for things like knowing where to
2084 move forwards or backwards from when doing an C<L> or C<-> command.
2085
2086 C<$max> tells the debugger where the last line of the current file is. It's
2087 used to terminate loops most often.
2088
2089 =head2 THE COMMAND LOOP
2090
2091 Most of C<DB::DB> is actually a command parsing and dispatch loop. It comes
2092 in two parts:
2093
2094 =over 4
2095
2096 =item *
2097
2098 The outer part of the loop, starting at the C<CMD> label. This loop
2099 reads a command and then executes it.
2100
2101 =item *
2102
2103 The inner part of the loop, starting at the C<PIPE> label. This part
2104 is wholly contained inside the C<CMD> block and only executes a command.
2105 Used to handle commands running inside a pager.
2106
2107 =back
2108
2109 So why have two labels to restart the loop? Because sometimes, it's easier to
2110 have a command I<generate> another command and then re-execute the loop to do
2111 the new command. This is faster, but perhaps a bit more convoluted.
2112
2113 =cut
2114
2115         # The big command dispatch loop. It keeps running until the
2116         # user yields up control again.
2117         #
2118         # If we have a terminal for input, and we get something back
2119         # from readline(), keep on processing.
2120         my $piped;
2121         my $selected;
2122
2123       CMD:
2124         while (
2125
2126             # We have a terminal, or can get one ...
2127             ( $term || &setterm ),
2128
2129             # ... and it belogs to this PID or we get one for this PID ...
2130             ( $term_pid == $$ or resetterm(1) ),
2131
2132             # ... and we got a line of command input ...
2133             defined(
2134                 $cmd = &readline(
2135                         "$pidprompt $tid DB"
2136                       . ( '<' x $level )
2137                       . ( $#hist + 1 )
2138                       . ( '>' x $level ) . " "
2139                 )
2140             )
2141           )
2142         {
2143
2144                         share($cmd);
2145             # ... try to execute the input as debugger commands.
2146
2147             # Don't stop running.
2148             $single = 0;
2149
2150             # No signal is active.
2151             $signal = 0;
2152
2153             # Handle continued commands (ending with \):
2154             if ($cmd =~ s/\\\z/\n/) {
2155                 $cmd .= &readline("  cont: ");
2156                 redo CMD;
2157             }
2158
2159 =head4 The null command
2160
2161 A newline entered by itself means I<re-execute the last command>. We grab the
2162 command out of C<$laststep> (where it was recorded previously), and copy it
2163 back into C<$cmd> to be executed below. If there wasn't any previous command,
2164 we'll do nothing below (no command will match). If there was, we also save it
2165 in the command history and fall through to allow the command parsing to pick
2166 it up.
2167
2168 =cut
2169
2170             # Empty input means repeat the last command.
2171             $cmd =~ /^$/ && ( $cmd = $laststep );
2172             chomp($cmd);    # get rid of the annoying extra newline
2173             push( @hist, $cmd ) if length($cmd) > 1;
2174             push( @truehist, $cmd );
2175                         share(@hist);
2176                         share(@truehist);
2177
2178             # This is a restart point for commands that didn't arrive
2179             # via direct user input. It allows us to 'redo PIPE' to
2180             # re-execute command processing without reading a new command.
2181           PIPE: {
2182                 $cmd =~ s/^\s+//s;    # trim annoying leading whitespace
2183                 $cmd =~ s/\s+$//s;    # trim annoying trailing whitespace
2184                 my ($i) = split( /\s+/, $cmd );
2185
2186 =head3 COMMAND ALIASES
2187
2188 The debugger can create aliases for commands (these are stored in the
2189 C<%alias> hash). Before a command is executed, the command loop looks it up
2190 in the alias hash and substitutes the contents of the alias for the command,
2191 completely replacing it.
2192
2193 =cut
2194
2195                 # See if there's an alias for the command, and set it up if so.
2196                 if ( $alias{$i} ) {
2197
2198                     # Squelch signal handling; we want to keep control here
2199                     # if something goes loco during the alias eval.
2200                     local $SIG{__DIE__};
2201                     local $SIG{__WARN__};
2202
2203                     # This is a command, so we eval it in the DEBUGGER's
2204                     # scope! Otherwise, we can't see the special debugger
2205                     # variables, or get to the debugger's subs. (Well, we
2206                     # _could_, but why make it even more complicated?)
2207                     eval "\$cmd =~ $alias{$i}";
2208                     if ($@) {
2209                         local $\ = '';
2210                         print $OUT "Couldn't evaluate '$i' alias: $@";
2211                         next CMD;
2212                     }
2213                 } ## end if ($alias{$i})
2214
2215 =head3 MAIN-LINE COMMANDS
2216
2217 All of these commands work up to and after the program being debugged has
2218 terminated.
2219
2220 =head4 C<q> - quit
2221
2222 Quit the debugger. This entails setting the C<$fall_off_end> flag, so we don't
2223 try to execute further, cleaning any restart-related stuff out of the
2224 environment, and executing with the last value of C<$?>.
2225
2226 =cut
2227
2228                 if ($cmd eq 'q') {
2229                     $fall_off_end = 1;
2230                     clean_ENV();
2231                     exit $?;
2232                 }
2233
2234 =head4 C<t> - trace [n]
2235
2236 Turn tracing on or off. Inverts the appropriate bit in C<$trace> (q.v.).
2237 If level is specified, set C<$trace_to_depth>.
2238
2239 =cut
2240
2241                 if (my ($levels) = $cmd =~ /\At(?:\s+(\d+))?\z/) {
2242                     $trace ^= 1;
2243                     local $\ = '';
2244                     $trace_to_depth = $levels ? $stack_depth + $levels : 1E9;
2245                     print $OUT "Trace = "
2246                       . ( ( $trace & 1 )
2247                       ? ( $levels ? "on (to level $trace_to_depth)" : "on" )
2248                       : "off" ) . "\n";
2249                     next CMD;
2250                 }
2251
2252 =head4 C<S> - list subroutines matching/not matching a pattern
2253
2254 Walks through C<%sub>, checking to see whether or not to print the name.
2255
2256 =cut
2257
2258                 if (my ($print_all_subs, $should_reverse, $Spatt)
2259                     = $cmd =~ /\AS(\s+(!)?(.+))?\z/) {
2260                     # $Spatt is the pattern (if any) to use.
2261                     # Reverse scan?
2262                     my $Srev     = defined $should_reverse;
2263                     # No args - print all subs.
2264                     my $Snocheck = !defined $print_all_subs;
2265
2266                     # Need to make these sane here.
2267                     local $\ = '';
2268                     local $, = '';
2269
2270                     # Search through the debugger's magical hash of subs.
2271                     # If $nocheck is true, just print the sub name.
2272                     # Otherwise, check it against the pattern. We then use
2273                     # the XOR trick to reverse the condition as required.
2274                     foreach $subname ( sort( keys %sub ) ) {
2275                         if ( $Snocheck or $Srev ^ ( $subname =~ /$Spatt/ ) ) {
2276                             print $OUT $subname, "\n";
2277                         }
2278                     }
2279                     next CMD;
2280                 }
2281
2282 =head4 C<X> - list variables in current package
2283
2284 Since the C<V> command actually processes this, just change this to the
2285 appropriate C<V> command and fall through.
2286
2287 =cut
2288
2289                 $cmd =~ s/^X\b/V $package/;
2290
2291 =head4 C<V> - list variables
2292
2293 Uses C<dumpvar.pl> to dump out the current values for selected variables.
2294
2295 =cut
2296
2297                 # Bare V commands get the currently-being-debugged package
2298                 # added.
2299                 if ($cmd eq "V") {
2300                     $cmd = "V $package";
2301                 }
2302
2303                 # V - show variables in package.
2304                 if (my ($new_packname, $new_vars_str) =
2305                     $cmd =~ /\AV\b\s*(\S+)\s*(.*)/) {
2306
2307                     # Save the currently selected filehandle and
2308                     # force output to debugger's filehandle (dumpvar
2309                     # just does "print" for output).
2310                     my $savout = select($OUT);
2311
2312                     # Grab package name and variables to dump.
2313                     $packname = $new_packname;
2314                     my @vars     = split( ' ', $new_vars_str );
2315
2316                     # If main::dumpvar isn't here, get it.
2317                     do 'dumpvar.pl' || die $@ unless defined &main::dumpvar;
2318                     if ( defined &main::dumpvar ) {
2319
2320                         # We got it. Turn off subroutine entry/exit messages
2321                         # for the moment, along with return values.
2322                         local $frame = 0;
2323                         local $doret = -2;
2324
2325                         # must detect sigpipe failures  - not catching
2326                         # then will cause the debugger to die.
2327                         eval {
2328                             &main::dumpvar(
2329                                 $packname,
2330                                 defined $option{dumpDepth}
2331                                 ? $option{dumpDepth}
2332                                 : -1,    # assume -1 unless specified
2333                                 @vars
2334                             );
2335                         };
2336
2337                         # The die doesn't need to include the $@, because
2338                         # it will automatically get propagated for us.
2339                         if ($@) {
2340                             die unless $@ =~ /dumpvar print failed/;
2341                         }
2342                     } ## end if (defined &main::dumpvar)
2343                     else {
2344
2345                         # Couldn't load dumpvar.
2346                         print $OUT "dumpvar.pl not available.\n";
2347                     }
2348
2349                     # Restore the output filehandle, and go round again.
2350                     select($savout);
2351                     next CMD;
2352                 }
2353
2354 =head4 C<x> - evaluate and print an expression
2355
2356 Hands the expression off to C<DB::eval>, setting it up to print the value
2357 via C<dumpvar.pl> instead of just printing it directly.
2358
2359 =cut
2360
2361                 if ($cmd =~ s#\Ax\b# #) {    # Remainder gets done by DB::eval()
2362                     $onetimeDump = 'dump';    # main::dumpvar shows the output
2363
2364                     # handle special  "x 3 blah" syntax XXX propagate
2365                     # doc back to special variables.
2366                     if ( $cmd =~ s#\A\s*(\d+)(?=\s)# #) {
2367                         $onetimedumpDepth = $1;
2368                     }
2369                 }
2370
2371 =head4 C<m> - print methods
2372
2373 Just uses C<DB::methods> to determine what methods are available.
2374
2375 =cut
2376
2377                 if ($cmd =~ s#\Am\s+([\w:]+)\s*\z# #) {
2378                     methods($1);
2379                     next CMD;
2380                 }
2381
2382                 # m expr - set up DB::eval to do the work
2383                 if ($cmd =~ s#\Am\b# #) {    # Rest gets done by DB::eval()
2384                     $onetimeDump = 'methods';   #  method output gets used there
2385                 }
2386
2387 =head4 C<f> - switch files
2388
2389 =cut
2390
2391                 if (($file) = $cmd =~ /\Af\b\s*(.*)/) {
2392                     $file =~ s/\s+$//;
2393
2394                     # help for no arguments (old-style was return from sub).
2395                     if ( !$file ) {
2396                         print $OUT
2397                           "The old f command is now the r command.\n";    # hint
2398                         print $OUT "The new f command switches filenames.\n";
2399                         next CMD;
2400                     } ## end if (!$file)
2401
2402                     # if not in magic file list, try a close match.
2403                     if ( !defined $main::{ '_<' . $file } ) {
2404                         if ( ($try) = grep( m#^_<.*$file#, keys %main:: ) ) {
2405                             {
2406                                 $try = substr( $try, 2 );
2407                                 print $OUT "Choosing $try matching '$file':\n";
2408                                 $file = $try;
2409                             }
2410                         } ## end if (($try) = grep(m#^_<.*$file#...
2411                     } ## end if (!defined $main::{ ...
2412
2413                     # If not successfully switched now, we failed.
2414                     if ( !defined $main::{ '_<' . $file } ) {
2415                         print $OUT "No file matching '$file' is loaded.\n";
2416                         next CMD;
2417                     }
2418
2419                     # We switched, so switch the debugger internals around.
2420                     elsif ( $file ne $filename ) {
2421                         *dbline   = $main::{ '_<' . $file };
2422                         $max      = $#dbline;
2423                         $filename = $file;
2424                         $start    = 1;
2425                         $cmd      = "l";
2426                     } ## end elsif ($file ne $filename)
2427
2428                     # We didn't switch; say we didn't.
2429                     else {
2430                         print $OUT "Already in $file.\n";
2431                         next CMD;
2432                     }
2433                 }
2434
2435 =head4 C<.> - return to last-executed line.
2436
2437 We set C<$incr> to -1 to indicate that the debugger shouldn't move ahead,
2438 and then we look up the line in the magical C<%dbline> hash.
2439
2440 =cut
2441
2442                 # . command.
2443                 if ($cmd eq '.') {
2444                     $incr = -1;    # stay at current line
2445
2446                     # Reset everything to the old location.
2447                     $start    = $line;
2448                     $filename = $filename_ini;
2449                     *dbline   = $main::{ '_<' . $filename };
2450                     $max      = $#dbline;
2451
2452                     # Now where are we?
2453                     print_lineinfo($position);
2454                     next CMD;
2455                 }
2456
2457 =head4 C<-> - back one window
2458
2459 We change C<$start> to be one window back; if we go back past the first line,
2460 we set it to be the first line. We ser C<$incr> to put us back at the
2461 currently-executing line, and then put a C<l $start +> (list one window from
2462 C<$start>) in C<$cmd> to be executed later.
2463
2464 =cut
2465
2466                 # - - back a window.
2467                 if ($cmd eq '-') {
2468
2469                     # back up by a window; go to 1 if back too far.
2470                     $start -= $incr + $window + 1;
2471                     $start = 1 if $start <= 0;
2472                     $incr  = $window - 1;
2473
2474                     # Generate and execute a "l +" command (handled below).
2475                     $cmd = 'l ' . ($start) . '+';
2476                 }
2477
2478 =head3 PRE-580 COMMANDS VS. NEW COMMANDS: C<a, A, b, B, h, l, L, M, o, O, P, v, w, W, E<lt>, E<lt>E<lt>, {, {{>
2479
2480 In Perl 5.8.0, a realignment of the commands was done to fix up a number of
2481 problems, most notably that the default case of several commands destroying
2482 the user's work in setting watchpoints, actions, etc. We wanted, however, to
2483 retain the old commands for those who were used to using them or who preferred
2484 them. At this point, we check for the new commands and call C<cmd_wrapper> to
2485 deal with them instead of processing them in-line.
2486
2487 =cut
2488
2489                 # All of these commands were remapped in perl 5.8.0;
2490                 # we send them off to the secondary dispatcher (see below).
2491                 if (my ($cmd_letter, $my_arg) = $cmd =~ /\A([aAbBeEhilLMoOPvwW]\b|[<>\{]{1,2})\s*(.*)/so) {
2492                     &cmd_wrapper( $cmd_letter, $my_arg, $line );
2493                     next CMD;
2494                 }
2495
2496 =head4 C<y> - List lexicals in higher scope
2497
2498 Uses C<PadWalker> to find the lexicals supplied as arguments in a scope
2499 above the current one and then displays then using C<dumpvar.pl>.
2500
2501 =cut
2502
2503                 if (my ($match_level, $match_vars)
2504                     = $cmd =~ /^y(?:\s+(\d*)\s*(.*))?$/) {
2505
2506                     # See if we've got the necessary support.
2507                     eval { require PadWalker; PadWalker->VERSION(0.08) }
2508                       or &warn(
2509                         $@ =~ /locate/
2510                         ? "PadWalker module not found - please install\n"
2511                         : $@
2512                       )
2513                       and next CMD;
2514
2515                     # Load up dumpvar if we don't have it. If we can, that is.
2516                     do 'dumpvar.pl' || die $@ unless defined &main::dumpvar;
2517                     defined &main::dumpvar
2518                       or print $OUT "dumpvar.pl not available.\n"
2519                       and next CMD;
2520
2521                     # Got all the modules we need. Find them and print them.
2522                     my @vars = split( ' ', $match_vars || '' );
2523
2524                     # Find the pad.
2525                     my $h = eval { PadWalker::peek_my( ( $match_level || 0 ) + 1 ) };
2526
2527                     # Oops. Can't find it.
2528                     $@ and $@ =~ s/ at .*//, &warn($@), next CMD;
2529
2530                     # Show the desired vars with dumplex().
2531                     my $savout = select($OUT);
2532
2533                     # Have dumplex dump the lexicals.
2534                     dumpvar::dumplex( $_, $h->{$_},
2535                         defined $option{dumpDepth} ? $option{dumpDepth} : -1,
2536                         @vars )
2537                       for sort keys %$h;
2538                     select($savout);
2539                     next CMD;
2540                 }
2541
2542 =head3 COMMANDS NOT WORKING AFTER PROGRAM ENDS
2543
2544 All of the commands below this point don't work after the program being
2545 debugged has ended. All of them check to see if the program has ended; this
2546 allows the commands to be relocated without worrying about a 'line of
2547 demarcation' above which commands can be entered anytime, and below which
2548 they can't.
2549
2550 =head4 C<n> - single step, but don't trace down into subs
2551
2552 Done by setting C<$single> to 2, which forces subs to execute straight through
2553 when entered (see C<DB::sub>). We also save the C<n> command in C<$laststep>,
2554 so a null command knows what to re-execute.
2555
2556 =cut
2557
2558                 # n - next
2559                 if ($cmd eq 'n') {
2560                     end_report(), next CMD if $finished and $level <= 1;
2561
2562                     # Single step, but don't enter subs.
2563                     $single = 2;
2564
2565                     # Save for empty command (repeat last).
2566                     $laststep = $cmd;
2567                     last CMD;
2568                 }
2569
2570 =head4 C<s> - single-step, entering subs
2571
2572 Sets C<$single> to 1, which causes C<DB::sub> to continue tracing inside
2573 subs. Also saves C<s> as C<$lastcmd>.
2574
2575 =cut
2576
2577                 # s - single step.
2578                 if ($cmd eq 's') {
2579
2580                     # Get out and restart the command loop if program
2581                     # has finished.
2582                     end_report(), next CMD if $finished and $level <= 1;
2583
2584                     # Single step should enter subs.
2585                     $single = 1;
2586
2587                     # Save for empty command (repeat last).
2588                     $laststep = $cmd;
2589                     last CMD;
2590                 }
2591
2592 =head4 C<c> - run continuously, setting an optional breakpoint
2593
2594 Most of the code for this command is taken up with locating the optional
2595 breakpoint, which is either a subroutine name or a line number. We set
2596 the appropriate one-time-break in C<@dbline> and then turn off single-stepping
2597 in this and all call levels above this one.
2598
2599 =cut
2600
2601                 # c - start continuous execution.
2602                 if (($i) = $cmd =~ m#\Ac\b\s*([\w:]*)\s*\z#) {
2603
2604                     # Hey, show's over. The debugged program finished
2605                     # executing already.
2606                     end_report(), next CMD if $finished and $level <= 1;
2607
2608                     # Capture the place to put a one-time break.
2609                     $subname = $i;
2610
2611                     #  Probably not needed, since we finish an interactive
2612                     #  sub-session anyway...
2613                     # local $filename = $filename;
2614                     # local *dbline = *dbline; # XXX Would this work?!
2615                     #
2616                     # The above question wonders if localizing the alias
2617                     # to the magic array works or not. Since it's commented
2618                     # out, we'll just leave that to speculation for now.
2619
2620                     # If the "subname" isn't all digits, we'll assume it
2621                     # is a subroutine name, and try to find it.
2622                     if ( $subname =~ /\D/ ) {    # subroutine name
2623                             # Qualify it to the current package unless it's
2624                             # already qualified.
2625                         $subname = $package . "::" . $subname
2626                           unless $subname =~ /::/;
2627
2628                         # find_sub will return "file:line_number" corresponding
2629                         # to where the subroutine is defined; we call find_sub,
2630                         # break up the return value, and assign it in one
2631                         # operation.
2632                         ( $file, $i ) = ( find_sub($subname) =~ /^(.*):(.*)$/ );
2633
2634                         # Force the line number to be numeric.
2635                         $i += 0;
2636
2637                         # If we got a line number, we found the sub.
2638                         if ($i) {
2639
2640                             # Switch all the debugger's internals around so
2641                             # we're actually working with that file.
2642                             $filename = $file;
2643                             *dbline   = $main::{ '_<' . $filename };
2644
2645                             # Mark that there's a breakpoint in this file.
2646                             $had_breakpoints{$filename} |= 1;
2647
2648                             # Scan forward to the first executable line
2649                             # after the 'sub whatever' line.
2650                             $max = $#dbline;
2651                             ++$i while $dbline[$i] == 0 && $i < $max;
2652                         } ## end if ($i)
2653
2654                         # We didn't find a sub by that name.
2655                         else {
2656                             print $OUT "Subroutine $subname not found.\n";
2657                             next CMD;
2658                         }
2659                     } ## end if ($subname =~ /\D/)
2660
2661                     # At this point, either the subname was all digits (an
2662                     # absolute line-break request) or we've scanned through
2663                     # the code following the definition of the sub, looking
2664                     # for an executable, which we may or may not have found.
2665                     #
2666                     # If $i (which we set $subname from) is non-zero, we
2667                     # got a request to break at some line somewhere. On
2668                     # one hand, if there wasn't any real subroutine name
2669                     # involved, this will be a request to break in the current
2670                     # file at the specified line, so we have to check to make
2671                     # sure that the line specified really is breakable.
2672                     #
2673                     # On the other hand, if there was a subname supplied, the
2674                     # preceding block has moved us to the proper file and
2675                     # location within that file, and then scanned forward
2676                     # looking for the next executable line. We have to make
2677                     # sure that one was found.
2678                     #
2679                     # On the gripping hand, we can't do anything unless the
2680                     # current value of $i points to a valid breakable line.
2681                     # Check that.
2682                     if ($i) {
2683
2684                         # Breakable?
2685                         if ( $dbline[$i] == 0 ) {
2686                             print $OUT "Line $i not breakable.\n";
2687                             next CMD;
2688                         }
2689
2690                         # Yes. Set up the one-time-break sigil.
2691                         $dbline{$i} =~ s/($|\0)/;9$1/;  # add one-time-only b.p.
2692                         _enable_breakpoint_temp_enabled_status($filename, $i);
2693                     } ## end if ($i)
2694
2695                     # Turn off stack tracing from here up.
2696                     for my $i (0 .. $stack_depth) {
2697                         $stack[ $i ] &= ~1;
2698                     }
2699                     last CMD;
2700                 }
2701
2702 =head4 C<r> - return from a subroutine
2703
2704 For C<r> to work properly, the debugger has to stop execution again
2705 immediately after the return is executed. This is done by forcing
2706 single-stepping to be on in the call level above the current one. If
2707 we are printing return values when a C<r> is executed, set C<$doret>
2708 appropriately, and force us out of the command loop.
2709
2710 =cut
2711
2712                 # r - return from the current subroutine.
2713                 if ($cmd eq 'r') {
2714
2715                     # Can't do anything if the program's over.
2716                     end_report(), next CMD if $finished and $level <= 1;
2717
2718                     # Turn on stack trace.
2719                     $stack[$stack_depth] |= 1;
2720
2721                     # Print return value unless the stack is empty.
2722                     $doret = $option{PrintRet} ? $stack_depth - 1 : -2;
2723                     last CMD;
2724                 }
2725
2726 =head4 C<T> - stack trace
2727
2728 Just calls C<DB::print_trace>.
2729
2730 =cut
2731
2732                 if ($cmd eq 'T') {
2733                     print_trace( $OUT, 1 );    # skip DB
2734                     next CMD;
2735                 }
2736
2737 =head4 C<w> - List window around current line.
2738
2739 Just calls C<DB::cmd_w>.
2740
2741 =cut
2742
2743                 if (my ($arg) = $cmd =~ /\Aw\b\s*(.*)/s) {
2744                     &cmd_w( 'w', $arg );
2745                     next CMD;
2746                 }
2747
2748 =head4 C<W> - watch-expression processing.
2749
2750 Just calls C<DB::cmd_W>.
2751
2752 =cut
2753
2754                 if (my ($arg) = $cmd =~ /\AW\b\s*(.*)/s) {
2755                     &cmd_W( 'W', $arg );
2756                     next CMD;
2757                 }
2758
2759 =head4 C</> - search forward for a string in the source
2760
2761 We take the argument and treat it as a pattern. If it turns out to be a
2762 bad one, we return the error we got from trying to C<eval> it and exit.
2763 If not, we create some code to do the search and C<eval> it so it can't
2764 mess us up.
2765
2766 =cut
2767
2768                 # The pattern as a string.
2769                 use vars qw($inpat);
2770
2771                 if (($inpat) = $cmd =~ m#\A/(.*)\z#) {
2772
2773                     # Remove the final slash.
2774                     $inpat =~ s:([^\\])/$:$1:;
2775
2776                     # If the pattern isn't null ...
2777                     if ( $inpat ne "" ) {
2778
2779                         # Turn of warn and die procesing for a bit.
2780                         local $SIG{__DIE__};
2781                         local $SIG{__WARN__};
2782
2783                         # Create the pattern.
2784                         eval '$inpat =~ m' . "\a$inpat\a";
2785                         if ( $@ ne "" ) {
2786
2787                             # Oops. Bad pattern. No biscuit.
2788                             # Print the eval error and go back for more
2789                             # commands.
2790                             print $OUT "$@";
2791                             next CMD;
2792                         }
2793                         $pat = $inpat;
2794                     } ## end if ($inpat ne "")
2795
2796                     # Set up to stop on wrap-around.
2797                     $end = $start;
2798
2799                     # Don't move off the current line.
2800                     $incr = -1;
2801
2802                     # Done in eval so nothing breaks if the pattern
2803                     # does something weird.
2804                     eval '
2805                         for (;;) {
2806                             # Move ahead one line.
2807                             ++$start;
2808
2809                             # Wrap if we pass the last line.
2810                             $start = 1 if ($start > $max);
2811
2812                             # Stop if we have gotten back to this line again,
2813                             last if ($start == $end);
2814
2815                             # A hit! (Note, though, that we are doing
2816                             # case-insensitive matching. Maybe a qr//
2817                             # expression would be better, so the user could
2818                             # do case-sensitive matching if desired.
2819                             if ($dbline[$start] =~ m' . "\a$pat\a" . 'i) {
2820                                 if ($slave_editor) {
2821                                     # Handle proper escaping in the slave.
2822                                     print $OUT "\032\032$filename:$start:0\n";
2823                                 }
2824                                 else {
2825                                     # Just print the line normally.
2826                                     print $OUT "$start:\t",$dbline[$start],"\n";
2827                                 }
2828                                 # And quit since we found something.
2829                                 last;
2830                             }
2831                          } ';
2832
2833                     # If we wrapped, there never was a match.
2834                     print $OUT "/$pat/: not found\n" if ( $start == $end );
2835                     next CMD;
2836                 }
2837
2838 =head4 C<?> - search backward for a string in the source
2839
2840 Same as for C</>, except the loop runs backwards.
2841
2842 =cut
2843
2844                 # ? - backward pattern search.
2845                 if (my ($inpat) = $cmd =~ m#\A\?(.*)\z#) {
2846
2847                     # Get the pattern, remove trailing question mark.
2848                     $inpat =~ s:([^\\])\?$:$1:;
2849
2850                     # If we've got one ...
2851                     if ( $inpat ne "" ) {
2852
2853                         # Turn off die & warn handlers.
2854                         local $SIG{__DIE__};
2855                         local $SIG{__WARN__};
2856                         eval '$inpat =~ m' . "\a$inpat\a";
2857
2858                         if ( $@ ne "" ) {
2859
2860                             # Ouch. Not good. Print the error.
2861                             print $OUT $@;
2862                             next CMD;
2863                         }
2864                         $pat = $inpat;
2865                     } ## end if ($inpat ne "")
2866
2867                     # Where we are now is where to stop after wraparound.
2868                     $end = $start;
2869
2870                     # Don't move away from this line.
2871                     $incr = -1;
2872
2873                     # Search inside the eval to prevent pattern badness
2874                     # from killing us.
2875                     eval '
2876                         for (;;) {
2877                             # Back up a line.
2878                             --$start;
2879
2880                             # Wrap if we pass the first line.
2881
2882                             $start = $max if ($start <= 0);
2883
2884                             # Quit if we get back where we started,
2885                             last if ($start == $end);
2886
2887                             # Match?
2888                             if ($dbline[$start] =~ m' . "\a$pat\a" . 'i) {
2889                                 if ($slave_editor) {
2890                                     # Yep, follow slave editor requirements.
2891                                     print $OUT "\032\032$filename:$start:0\n";
2892                                 }
2893                                 else {
2894                                     # Yep, just print normally.
2895                                     print $OUT "$start:\t",$dbline[$start],"\n";
2896                                 }
2897
2898                                 # Found, so done.
2899                                 last;
2900                             }
2901                         } ';
2902
2903                     # Say we failed if the loop never found anything,
2904                     print $OUT "?$pat?: not found\n" if ( $start == $end );
2905                     next CMD;
2906                 }
2907
2908 =head4 C<$rc> - Recall command
2909
2910 Manages the commands in C<@hist> (which is created if C<Term::ReadLine> reports
2911 that the terminal supports history). It find the the command required, puts it
2912 into C<$cmd>, and redoes the loop to execute it.
2913
2914 =cut
2915
2916                 # $rc - recall command.
2917                 if (my ($minus, $arg) = $cmd =~ m#\A$rc+\s*(-)?(\d+)?\z#) {
2918
2919                     # No arguments, take one thing off history.
2920                     pop(@hist) if length($cmd) > 1;
2921
2922                     # Relative (- found)?
2923                     #  Y - index back from most recent (by 1 if bare minus)
2924                     #  N - go to that particular command slot or the last
2925                     #      thing if nothing following.
2926                     $i = $minus ? ( $#hist - ( $arg || 1 ) ) : ( $arg || $#hist );
2927
2928                     # Pick out the command desired.
2929                     $cmd = $hist[$i];
2930
2931                     # Print the command to be executed and restart the loop
2932                     # with that command in the buffer.
2933                     print $OUT $cmd, "\n";
2934                     redo CMD;
2935                 }
2936
2937 =head4 C<$sh$sh> - C<system()> command
2938
2939 Calls the C<DB::system()> to handle the command. This keeps the C<STDIN> and
2940 C<STDOUT> from getting messed up.
2941
2942 =cut
2943
2944                 # $sh$sh - run a shell command (if it's all ASCII).
2945                 # Can't run shell commands with Unicode in the debugger, hmm.
2946                 if (my ($arg) = $cmd =~ m#\A$sh$sh\s*(.*)#ms) {
2947
2948                     # System it.
2949                     &system($arg);
2950                     next CMD;
2951                 }
2952
2953 =head4 C<$rc I<pattern> $rc> - Search command history
2954
2955 Another command to manipulate C<@hist>: this one searches it with a pattern.
2956 If a command is found, it is placed in C<$cmd> and executed via C<redo>.
2957
2958 =cut
2959
2960                 # $rc pattern $rc - find a command in the history.
2961                 if (my ($arg) = $cmd =~ /\A$rc([^$rc].*)\z/) {
2962
2963                     # Create the pattern to use.
2964                     $pat = "^$arg";
2965
2966                     # Toss off last entry if length is >1 (and it always is).
2967                     pop(@hist) if length($cmd) > 1;
2968
2969                     # Look backward through the history.
2970                     for ( $i = $#hist ; $i ; --$i ) {
2971                         # Stop if we find it.
2972                         last if $hist[$i] =~ /$pat/;
2973                     }
2974
2975                     if ( !$i ) {
2976
2977                         # Never found it.
2978                         print $OUT "No such command!\n\n";
2979                         next CMD;
2980                     }
2981
2982                     # Found it. Put it in the buffer, print it, and process it.
2983                     $cmd = $hist[$i];
2984                     print $OUT $cmd, "\n";
2985                     redo CMD;
2986                 }
2987
2988 =head4 C<$sh> - Invoke a shell
2989
2990 Uses C<DB::system> to invoke a shell.
2991
2992 =cut
2993
2994                 # $sh - start a shell.
2995                 if ($cmd =~ /\A$sh\z/) {
2996
2997                     # Run the user's shell. If none defined, run Bourne.
2998                     # We resume execution when the shell terminates.
2999                     &system( $ENV{SHELL} || "/bin/sh" );
3000                     next CMD;
3001                 }
3002
3003 =head4 C<$sh I<command>> - Force execution of a command in a shell
3004
3005 Like the above, but the command is passed to the shell. Again, we use
3006 C<DB::system> to avoid problems with C<STDIN> and C<STDOUT>.
3007
3008 =cut
3009
3010                 # $sh command - start a shell and run a command in it.
3011                 if (my ($arg) = $cmd =~ m#\A$sh\s*(.*)#ms) {
3012
3013                     # XXX: using csh or tcsh destroys sigint retvals!
3014                     #&system($1);  # use this instead
3015
3016                     # use the user's shell, or Bourne if none defined.
3017                     &system( $ENV{SHELL} || "/bin/sh", "-c", $arg );
3018                     next CMD;
3019                 }
3020
3021 =head4 C<H> - display commands in history
3022
3023 Prints the contents of C<@hist> (if any).
3024
3025 =cut
3026
3027                 if ($cmd =~ /\AH\b\s*\*/) {
3028                     @hist = @truehist = ();
3029                     print $OUT "History cleansed\n";
3030                     next CMD;
3031                 }
3032
3033                 if (my ($num)
3034                     = $cmd =~ /\AH\b\s*(?:-(\d+))?/) {
3035
3036                     # Anything other than negative numbers is ignored by
3037                     # the (incorrect) pattern, so this test does nothing.
3038                     $end = $num ? ( $#hist - $num ) : 0;
3039
3040                     # Set to the minimum if less than zero.
3041                     $hist = 0 if $hist < 0;
3042
3043                     # Start at the end of the array.
3044                     # Stay in while we're still above the ending value.
3045                     # Tick back by one each time around the loop.
3046                     for ( $i = $#hist ; $i > $end ; $i-- ) {
3047
3048                         # Print the command  unless it has no arguments.
3049                         print $OUT "$i: ", $hist[$i], "\n"
3050                           unless $hist[$i] =~ /^.?$/;
3051                     }
3052                     next CMD;
3053                 }
3054
3055 =head4 C<man, doc, perldoc> - look up documentation
3056
3057 Just calls C<runman()> to print the appropriate document.
3058
3059 =cut
3060
3061                 # man, perldoc, doc - show manual pages.
3062                 if (my ($man_page)
3063                     = $cmd =~ /\A(?:man|(?:perl)?doc)\b(?:\s+([^(]*))?\z/) {
3064                     runman($man_page);
3065                     next CMD;
3066                 }
3067
3068 =head4 C<p> - print
3069
3070 Builds a C<print EXPR> expression in the C<$cmd>; this will get executed at
3071 the bottom of the loop.
3072
3073 =cut
3074
3075                 my $print_cmd = 'print {$DB::OUT} ';
3076                 # p - print (no args): print $_.
3077                 if ($cmd eq 'p') {
3078                     $cmd = $print_cmd . '$_';
3079                 }
3080
3081                 # p - print the given expression.
3082                 $cmd =~ s/\Ap\b/$print_cmd /;
3083
3084 =head4 C<=> - define command alias
3085
3086 Manipulates C<%alias> to add or list command aliases.
3087
3088 =cut
3089
3090                 # = - set up a command alias.
3091                 if ($cmd =~ s/\A=\s*//) {
3092                     my @keys;
3093                     if ( length $cmd == 0 ) {
3094
3095                         # No args, get current aliases.
3096                         @keys = sort keys %alias;
3097                     }
3098                     elsif ( my ( $k, $v ) = ( $cmd =~ /^(\S+)\s+(\S.*)/ ) ) {
3099
3100                         # Creating a new alias. $k is alias name, $v is
3101                         # alias value.
3102
3103                         # can't use $_ or kill //g state
3104                         for my $x ( $k, $v ) {
3105
3106                             # Escape "alarm" characters.
3107                             $x =~ s/\a/\\a/g;
3108                         }
3109
3110                         # Substitute key for value, using alarm chars
3111                         # as separators (which is why we escaped them in
3112                         # the command).
3113                         $alias{$k} = "s\a$k\a$v\a";
3114
3115                         # Turn off standard warn and die behavior.
3116                         local $SIG{__DIE__};
3117                         local $SIG{__WARN__};
3118
3119                         # Is it valid Perl?
3120                         unless ( eval "sub { s\a$k\a$v\a }; 1" ) {
3121
3122                             # Nope. Bad alias. Say so and get out.
3123                             print $OUT "Can't alias $k to $v: $@\n";
3124                             delete $alias{$k};
3125                             next CMD;
3126                         }
3127
3128                         # We'll only list the new one.
3129                         @keys = ($k);
3130                     } ## end elsif (my ($k, $v) = ($cmd...
3131
3132                     # The argument is the alias to list.
3133                     else {
3134                         @keys = ($cmd);
3135                     }
3136
3137                     # List aliases.
3138                     for my $k (@keys) {
3139
3140                         # Messy metaquoting: Trim the substitution code off.
3141                         # We use control-G as the delimiter because it's not
3142                         # likely to appear in the alias.
3143                         if ( ( my $v = $alias{$k} ) =~ s\as\a$k\a(.*)\a$\a1\a ) {
3144
3145                             # Print the alias.
3146                             print $OUT "$k\t= $1\n";
3147                         }
3148                         elsif ( defined $alias{$k} ) {
3149
3150                             # Couldn't trim it off; just print the alias code.
3151                             print $OUT "$k\t$alias{$k}\n";
3152                         }
3153                         else {
3154
3155                             # No such, dude.
3156                             print "No alias for $k\n";
3157                         }
3158                     } ## end for my $k (@keys)
3159                     next CMD;
3160                 }
3161
3162 =head4 C<source> - read commands from a file.
3163
3164 Opens a lexical filehandle and stacks it on C<@cmdfhs>; C<DB::readline> will
3165 pick it up.
3166
3167 =cut
3168
3169                 # source - read commands from a file (or pipe!) and execute.
3170                 if (my ($sourced_fn) = $cmd =~ /\Asource\s+(.*\S)/) {
3171                     if ( open my $fh, $sourced_fn ) {
3172
3173                         # Opened OK; stick it in the list of file handles.
3174                         push @cmdfhs, $fh;
3175                     }
3176                     else {
3177
3178                         # Couldn't open it.
3179                         &warn("Can't execute '$sourced_fn': $!\n");
3180                     }
3181                     next CMD;
3182                 }
3183
3184                 if (my ($which_cmd, $position)
3185                     = $cmd =~ /^(enable|disable)\s+(\S+)\s*$/) {
3186
3187                     my ($fn, $line_num);
3188                     if ($position =~ m{\A\d+\z})
3189                     {
3190                         $fn = $filename;
3191                         $line_num = $position;
3192                     }
3193                     elsif (my ($new_fn, $new_line_num)
3194                         = $position =~ m{\A(.*):(\d+)\z}) {
3195                         ($fn, $line_num) = ($new_fn, $new_line_num);
3196                     }
3197                     else
3198                     {
3199                         &warn("Wrong spec for enable/disable argument.\n");
3200                     }
3201
3202                     if (defined($fn)) {
3203                         if (_has_breakpoint_data_ref($fn, $line_num)) {
3204                             _set_breakpoint_enabled_status($fn, $line_num,
3205                                 ($which_cmd eq 'enable' ? 1 : '')
3206                             );
3207                         }
3208                         else {
3209                             &warn("No breakpoint set at ${fn}:${line_num}\n");
3210                         }
3211                     }
3212
3213                     next CMD;
3214                 }
3215
3216 =head4 C<save> - send current history to a file
3217
3218 Takes the complete history, (not the shrunken version you see with C<H>),
3219 and saves it to the given filename, so it can be replayed using C<source>.
3220
3221 Note that all C<^(save|source)>'s are commented out with a view to minimise recursion.
3222
3223 =cut
3224
3225                 # save source - write commands to a file for later use
3226                 if (my ($new_fn) = $cmd =~ /\Asave\s*(.*)\z/) {
3227                     my $filename = $new_fn || '.perl5dbrc';    # default?
3228                     if ( open my $fh, '>', $filename ) {
3229
3230                        # chomp to remove extraneous newlines from source'd files
3231                         chomp( my @truelist =
3232                               map { m/^\s*(save|source)/ ? "#$_" : $_ }
3233                               @truehist );
3234                         print $fh join( "\n", @truelist );
3235                         print "commands saved in $file\n";
3236                     }
3237                     else {
3238                         &warn("Can't save debugger commands in '$new_fn': $!\n");
3239                     }
3240                     next CMD;
3241                 }
3242
3243 =head4 C<R> - restart
3244
3245 Restart the debugger session.
3246
3247 =head4 C<rerun> - rerun the current session
3248
3249 Return to any given position in the B<true>-history list
3250
3251 =cut
3252
3253                 # R - restart execution.
3254                 # rerun - controlled restart execution.
3255                 if (my ($cmd_cmd, $cmd_params) =
3256                     $cmd =~ /\A((?:R)|(?:rerun\s*(.*)))\z/) {
3257                     my @args = ($cmd_cmd eq 'R' ? restart() : rerun($cmd_params));
3258
3259                     # Close all non-system fds for a clean restart.  A more
3260                     # correct method would be to close all fds that were not
3261                     # open when the process started, but this seems to be
3262                     # hard.  See "debugger 'R'estart and open database
3263                     # connections" on p5p.
3264
3265                     my $max_fd = 1024; # default if POSIX can't be loaded
3266                     if (eval { require POSIX }) {
3267                         eval { $max_fd = POSIX::sysconf(POSIX::_SC_OPEN_MAX()) };
3268                     }
3269
3270                     if (defined $max_fd) {
3271                         foreach ($^F+1 .. $max_fd-1) {
3272                             next unless open FD_TO_CLOSE, "<&=$_";
3273                             close(FD_TO_CLOSE);
3274                         }
3275                     }
3276
3277                     # And run Perl again.  We use exec() to keep the
3278                     # PID stable (and that way $ini_pids is still valid).
3279                     exec(@args) || print $OUT "exec failed: $!\n";
3280
3281                     last CMD;
3282                 }
3283
3284 =head4 C<|, ||> - pipe output through the pager.
3285
3286 For C<|>, we save C<OUT> (the debugger's output filehandle) and C<STDOUT>
3287 (the program's standard output). For C<||>, we only save C<OUT>. We open a
3288 pipe to the pager (restoring the output filehandles if this fails). If this
3289 is the C<|> command, we also set up a C<SIGPIPE> handler which will simply
3290 set C<$signal>, sending us back into the debugger.
3291
3292 We then trim off the pipe symbols and C<redo> the command loop at the
3293 C<PIPE> label, causing us to evaluate the command in C<$cmd> without
3294 reading another.
3295
3296 =cut
3297
3298                 # || - run command in the pager, with output to DB::OUT.
3299                 if ($cmd =~ m#\A\|\|?\s*[^|]#) {
3300                     if ( $pager =~ /^\|/ ) {
3301
3302                         # Default pager is into a pipe. Redirect I/O.
3303                         open( SAVEOUT, ">&STDOUT" )
3304                           || &warn("Can't save STDOUT");
3305                         open( STDOUT, ">&OUT" )
3306                           || &warn("Can't redirect STDOUT");
3307                     } ## end if ($pager =~ /^\|/)
3308                     else {
3309
3310                         # Not into a pipe. STDOUT is safe.
3311                         open( SAVEOUT, ">&OUT" ) || &warn("Can't save DB::OUT");
3312                     }
3313
3314                     # Fix up environment to record we have less if so.
3315                     fix_less();
3316
3317                     unless ( $piped = open( OUT, $pager ) ) {
3318
3319                         # Couldn't open pipe to pager.
3320                         &warn("Can't pipe output to '$pager'");
3321                         if ( $pager =~ /^\|/ ) {
3322
3323                             # Redirect I/O back again.
3324                             open( OUT, ">&STDOUT" )    # XXX: lost message
3325                               || &warn("Can't restore DB::OUT");
3326                             open( STDOUT, ">&SAVEOUT" )
3327                               || &warn("Can't restore STDOUT");
3328                             close(SAVEOUT);
3329                         } ## end if ($pager =~ /^\|/)
3330                         else {
3331
3332                             # Redirect I/O. STDOUT already safe.
3333                             open( OUT, ">&STDOUT" )    # XXX: lost message
3334                               || &warn("Can't restore DB::OUT");
3335                         }
3336                         next CMD;
3337                     } ## end unless ($piped = open(OUT,...
3338
3339                     # Set up broken-pipe handler if necessary.
3340                     $SIG{PIPE} = \&DB::catch
3341                       if $pager =~ /^\|/
3342                       && ( "" eq $SIG{PIPE} || "DEFAULT" eq $SIG{PIPE} );
3343
3344                     OUT->autoflush(1);
3345                     # Save current filehandle, and put it back.
3346                     $selected = select(OUT);
3347                     # Don't put it back if pager was a pipe.
3348                     select($selected), $selected = "" unless $cmd =~ /^\|\|/;
3349
3350                     # Trim off the pipe symbols and run the command now.
3351                     $cmd =~ s#\A\|+\s*##;
3352                     redo PIPE;
3353                 }
3354
3355 =head3 END OF COMMAND PARSING
3356
3357 Anything left in C<$cmd> at this point is a Perl expression that we want to
3358 evaluate. We'll always evaluate in the user's context, and fully qualify
3359 any variables we might want to address in the C<DB> package.
3360
3361 =cut
3362
3363                 # t - turn trace on.
3364                 if ($cmd =~ s#\At\s+(\d+)?#\$DB::trace |= 1;\n#) {
3365                     my $trace_arg = $1;
3366                     $trace_to_depth = $trace_arg ? $stack_depth||0 + $1 : 1E9;
3367                 }
3368
3369                 # s - single-step. Remember the last command was 's'.
3370                 if ($cmd =~ s/\As\s/\$DB::single = 1;\n/) {
3371                     $laststep = 's';
3372                 }
3373
3374                 # n - single-step, but not into subs. Remember last command
3375                 # was 'n'.
3376                 if ($cmd =~ s#\An\s#\$DB::single = 2;\n#) {
3377                     $laststep = 'n';
3378                 }
3379
3380             }    # PIPE:
3381
3382             # Make sure the flag that says "the debugger's running" is
3383             # still on, to make sure we get control again.
3384             $evalarg = "\$^D = \$^D | \$DB::db_stop;\n$cmd";
3385
3386             # Run *our* eval that executes in the caller's context.
3387             &eval;
3388
3389             # Turn off the one-time-dump stuff now.
3390             if ($onetimeDump) {
3391                 $onetimeDump      = undef;
3392                 $onetimedumpDepth = undef;
3393             }
3394             elsif ( $term_pid == $$ ) {
3395                 eval {          # May run under miniperl, when not available...
3396                     STDOUT->flush();
3397                     STDERR->flush();
3398                 };
3399
3400                 # XXX If this is the master pid, print a newline.
3401                 print $OUT "\n";
3402             }
3403         } ## end while (($term || &setterm...
3404
3405 =head3 POST-COMMAND PROCESSING
3406
3407 After each command, we check to see if the command output was piped anywhere.
3408 If so, we go through the necessary code to unhook the pipe and go back to
3409 our standard filehandles for input and output.
3410
3411 =cut
3412
3413         continue {    # CMD:
3414
3415             # At the end of every command:
3416             if ($piped) {
3417
3418                 # Unhook the pipe mechanism now.
3419                 if ( $pager =~ /^\|/ ) {
3420
3421                     # No error from the child.
3422                     $? = 0;
3423
3424                     # we cannot warn here: the handle is missing --tchrist
3425                     close(OUT) || print SAVEOUT "\nCan't close DB::OUT\n";
3426
3427                     # most of the $? crud was coping with broken cshisms
3428                     # $? is explicitly set to 0, so this never runs.
3429                     if ($?) {
3430                         print SAVEOUT "Pager '$pager' failed: ";
3431                         if ( $? == -1 ) {
3432                             print SAVEOUT "shell returned -1\n";
3433                         }
3434                         elsif ( $? >> 8 ) {
3435                             print SAVEOUT ( $? & 127 )
3436                               ? " (SIG#" . ( $? & 127 ) . ")"
3437                               : "", ( $? & 128 ) ? " -- core dumped" : "", "\n";
3438                         }
3439                         else {
3440                             print SAVEOUT "status ", ( $? >> 8 ), "\n";
3441                         }
3442                     } ## end if ($?)
3443
3444                     # Reopen filehandle for our output (if we can) and
3445                     # restore STDOUT (if we can).
3446                     open( OUT, ">&STDOUT" ) || &warn("Can't restore DB::OUT");
3447                     open( STDOUT, ">&SAVEOUT" )
3448                       || &warn("Can't restore STDOUT");
3449
3450                     # Turn off pipe exception handler if necessary.
3451                     $SIG{PIPE} = "DEFAULT" if $SIG{PIPE} eq \&DB::catch;
3452
3453                     # Will stop ignoring SIGPIPE if done like nohup(1)
3454                     # does SIGINT but Perl doesn't give us a choice.
3455                 } ## end if ($pager =~ /^\|/)
3456                 else {
3457
3458                     # Non-piped "pager". Just restore STDOUT.
3459                     open( OUT, ">&SAVEOUT" ) || &warn("Can't restore DB::OUT");
3460                 }
3461
3462                 # Close filehandle pager was using, restore the normal one
3463                 # if necessary,
3464                 close(SAVEOUT);
3465                 select($selected), $selected = "" unless $selected eq "";
3466
3467                 # No pipes now.
3468                 $piped = "";
3469             } ## end if ($piped)
3470         }    # CMD:
3471
3472 =head3 COMMAND LOOP TERMINATION
3473
3474 When commands have finished executing, we come here. If the user closed the
3475 input filehandle, we turn on C<$fall_off_end> to emulate a C<q> command. We
3476 evaluate any post-prompt items. We restore C<$@>, C<$!>, C<$^E>, C<$,>, C<$/>,
3477 C<$\>, and C<$^W>, and return a null list as expected by the Perl interpreter.
3478 The interpreter will then execute the next line and then return control to us
3479 again.
3480
3481 =cut
3482
3483         # No more commands? Quit.
3484         $fall_off_end = 1 unless defined $cmd;    # Emulate 'q' on EOF
3485
3486         # Evaluate post-prompt commands.
3487         foreach $evalarg (@$post) {
3488             &eval;
3489         }
3490     }    # if ($single || $signal)
3491
3492     # Put the user's globals back where you found them.
3493     ( $@, $!, $^E, $,, $/, $\, $^W ) = @saved;
3494     ();
3495 } ## end sub DB
3496
3497 # The following code may be executed now:
3498 # BEGIN {warn 4}
3499
3500 =head2 sub
3501
3502 C<sub> is called whenever a subroutine call happens in the program being
3503 debugged. The variable C<$DB::sub> contains the name of the subroutine
3504 being called.
3505
3506 The core function of this subroutine is to actually call the sub in the proper
3507 context, capturing its output. This of course causes C<DB::DB> to get called
3508 again, repeating until the subroutine ends and returns control to C<DB::sub>
3509 again. Once control returns, C<DB::sub> figures out whether or not to dump the
3510 return value, and returns its captured copy of the return value as its own
3511 return value. The value then feeds back into the program being debugged as if
3512 C<DB::sub> hadn't been there at all.
3513
3514 C<sub> does all the work of printing the subroutine entry and exit messages
3515 enabled by setting C<$frame>. It notes what sub the autoloader got called for,
3516 and also prints the return value if needed (for the C<r> command and if
3517 the 16 bit is set in C<$frame>).
3518
3519 It also tracks the subroutine call depth by saving the current setting of
3520 C<$single> in the C<@stack> package global; if this exceeds the value in
3521 C<$deep>, C<sub> automatically turns on printing of the current depth by
3522 setting the C<4> bit in C<$single>. In any case, it keeps the current setting
3523 of stop/don't stop on entry to subs set as it currently is set.
3524
3525 =head3 C<caller()> support
3526
3527 If C<caller()> is called from the package C<DB>, it provides some
3528 additional data, in the following order:
3529
3530 =over 4
3531
3532 =item * C<$package>
3533
3534 The package name the sub was in
3535
3536 =item * C<$filename>
3537
3538 The filename it was defined in
3539
3540 =item * C<$line>
3541
3542 The line number it was defined on
3543
3544 =item * C<$subroutine>
3545
3546 The subroutine name; C<(eval)> if an C<eval>().
3547
3548 =item * C<$hasargs>
3549
3550 1 if it has arguments, 0 if not
3551
3552 =item * C<$wantarray>
3553
3554 1 if array context, 0 if scalar context
3555
3556 =item * C<$evaltext>
3557
3558 The C<eval>() text, if any (undefined for C<eval BLOCK>)
3559
3560 =item * C<$is_require>
3561
3562 frame was created by a C<use> or C<require> statement
3563
3564 =item * C<$hints>
3565
3566 pragma information; subject to change between versions
3567
3568 =item * C<$bitmask>
3569
3570 pragma information; subject to change between versions
3571
3572 =item * C<@DB::args>
3573
3574 arguments with which the subroutine was invoked
3575
3576 =back
3577
3578 =cut
3579
3580 use vars qw($deep);
3581
3582 # We need to fully qualify the name ("DB::sub") to make "use strict;"
3583 # happy. -- Shlomi Fish
3584 sub DB::sub {
3585         # Do not use a regex in this subroutine -> results in corrupted memory
3586         # See: [perl #66110]
3587
3588         # lock ourselves under threads
3589         lock($DBGR);
3590
3591     # Whether or not the autoloader was running, a scalar to put the
3592     # sub's return value in (if needed), and an array to put the sub's
3593     # return value in (if needed).
3594     my ( $al, $ret, @ret ) = "";
3595         if ($sub eq 'threads::new' && $ENV{PERL5DB_THREADED}) {
3596                 print "creating new thread\n";
3597         }
3598
3599     # If the last ten characters are '::AUTOLOAD', note we've traced
3600     # into AUTOLOAD for $sub.
3601     if ( length($sub) > 10 && substr( $sub, -10, 10 ) eq '::AUTOLOAD' ) {
3602         no strict 'refs';
3603         $al = " for $$sub" if defined $$sub;
3604     }
3605
3606     # We stack the stack pointer and then increment it to protect us
3607     # from a situation that might unwind a whole bunch of call frames
3608     # at once. Localizing the stack pointer means that it will automatically
3609     # unwind the same amount when multiple stack frames are unwound.
3610     local $stack_depth = $stack_depth + 1;    # Protect from non-local exits
3611
3612     # Expand @stack.
3613     $#stack = $stack_depth;
3614
3615     # Save current single-step setting.
3616     $stack[-1] = $single;
3617
3618     # Turn off all flags except single-stepping.
3619     $single &= 1;
3620
3621     # If we've gotten really deeply recursed, turn on the flag that will
3622     # make us stop with the 'deep recursion' message.
3623     $single |= 4 if $stack_depth == $deep;
3624
3625     # If frame messages are on ...
3626     (
3627         $frame & 4    # Extended frame entry message
3628         ? (
3629             print_lineinfo( ' ' x ( $stack_depth - 1 ), "in  " ),
3630
3631             # Why -1? But it works! :-(
3632             # Because print_trace will call add 1 to it and then call
3633             # dump_trace; this results in our skipping -1+1 = 0 stack frames
3634             # in dump_trace.
3635             print_trace( $LINEINFO, -1, 1, 1, "$sub$al" )
3636           )
3637         : print_lineinfo( ' ' x ( $stack_depth - 1 ), "entering $sub$al\n" )
3638
3639           # standard frame entry message
3640       )
3641       if $frame;
3642
3643     # Determine the sub's return type, and capture appropriately.
3644     if (wantarray) {
3645
3646         # Called in array context. call sub and capture output.
3647         # DB::DB will recursively get control again if appropriate; we'll come
3648         # back here when the sub is finished.
3649         {
3650             no strict 'refs';
3651             @ret = &$sub;
3652         }
3653
3654         # Pop the single-step value back off the stack.
3655         $single |= $stack[ $stack_depth-- ];
3656
3657         # Check for exit trace messages...
3658         (
3659             $frame & 4    # Extended exit message
3660             ? (
3661                 print_lineinfo( ' ' x $stack_depth, "out " ),
3662                 print_trace( $LINEINFO, -1, 1, 1, "$sub$al" )
3663               )
3664             : print_lineinfo( ' ' x $stack_depth, "exited $sub$al\n" )
3665
3666               # Standard exit message
3667           )
3668           if $frame & 2;
3669
3670         # Print the return info if we need to.
3671         if ( $doret eq $stack_depth or $frame & 16 ) {
3672
3673             # Turn off output record separator.
3674             local $\ = '';
3675             my $fh = ( $doret eq $stack_depth ? $OUT : $LINEINFO );
3676
3677             # Indent if we're printing because of $frame tracing.
3678             print $fh ' ' x $stack_depth if $frame & 16;
3679
3680             # Print the return value.
3681             print $fh "list context return from $sub:\n";
3682             dumpit( $fh, \@ret );
3683
3684             # And don't print it again.
3685             $doret = -2;
3686         } ## end if ($doret eq $stack_depth...
3687             # And we have to return the return value now.
3688         @ret;
3689     } ## end if (wantarray)
3690
3691     # Scalar context.
3692     else {
3693         if ( defined wantarray ) {
3694         no strict 'refs';
3695             # Save the value if it's wanted at all.
3696             $ret = &$sub;
3697         }
3698         else {
3699         no strict 'refs';
3700             # Void return, explicitly.
3701             &$sub;
3702             undef $ret;
3703         }
3704
3705         # Pop the single-step value off the stack.
3706         $single |= $stack[ $stack_depth-- ];
3707
3708         # If we're doing exit messages...
3709         (
3710             $frame & 4    # Extended messages
3711             ? (
3712                 print_lineinfo( ' ' x $stack_depth, "out " ),
3713                 print_trace( $LINEINFO, -1, 1, 1, "$sub$al" )
3714               )
3715             : print_lineinfo( ' ' x $stack_depth, "exited $sub$al\n" )
3716
3717               # Standard messages
3718           )
3719           if $frame & 2;
3720
3721         # If we are supposed to show the return value... same as before.
3722         if ( $doret eq $stack_depth or $frame & 16 and defined wantarray ) {
3723             local $\ = '';
3724             my $fh = ( $doret eq $stack_depth ? $OUT : $LINEINFO );
3725             print $fh ( ' ' x $stack_depth ) if $frame & 16;
3726             print $fh (
3727                 defined wantarray
3728                 ? "scalar context return from $sub: "
3729                 : "void context return from $sub\n"
3730             );
3731             dumpit( $fh, $ret ) if defined wantarray;
3732             $doret = -2;
3733         } ## end if ($doret eq $stack_depth...
3734
3735         # Return the appropriate scalar value.
3736         $ret;
3737     } ## end else [ if (wantarray)
3738 } ## end sub _sub
3739
3740 sub lsub : lvalue {
3741
3742     no strict 'refs';
3743
3744         # lock ourselves under threads
3745         lock($DBGR);
3746
3747     # Whether or not the autoloader was running, a scalar to put the
3748     # sub's return value in (if needed), and an array to put the sub's
3749     # return value in (if needed).
3750     my ( $al, $ret, @ret ) = "";
3751         if ($sub =~ /^threads::new$/ && $ENV{PERL5DB_THREADED}) {
3752                 print "creating new thread\n";
3753         }
3754
3755     # If the last ten characters are C'::AUTOLOAD', note we've traced
3756     # into AUTOLOAD for $sub.
3757     if ( length($sub) > 10 && substr( $sub, -10, 10 ) eq '::AUTOLOAD' ) {
3758         $al = " for $$sub";
3759     }
3760
3761     # We stack the stack pointer and then increment it to protect us
3762     # from a situation that might unwind a whole bunch of call frames
3763     # at once. Localizing the stack pointer means that it will automatically
3764     # unwind the same amount when multiple stack frames are unwound.
3765     local $stack_depth = $stack_depth + 1;    # Protect from non-local exits
3766
3767     # Expand @stack.
3768     $#stack = $stack_depth;
3769
3770     # Save current single-step setting.
3771     $stack[-1] = $single;
3772
3773     # Turn off all flags except single-stepping.
3774     $single &= 1;
3775
3776     # If we've gotten really deeply recursed, turn on the flag that will
3777     # make us stop with the 'deep recursion' message.
3778     $single |= 4 if $stack_depth == $deep;
3779
3780     # If frame messages are on ...
3781     (
3782         $frame & 4    # Extended frame entry message
3783         ? (
3784             print_lineinfo( ' ' x ( $stack_depth - 1 ), "in  " ),
3785
3786             # Why -1? But it works! :-(
3787             # Because print_trace will call add 1 to it and then call
3788             # dump_trace; this results in our skipping -1+1 = 0 stack frames
3789             # in dump_trace.
3790             print_trace( $LINEINFO, -1, 1, 1, "$sub$al" )
3791           )
3792         : print_lineinfo( ' ' x ( $stack_depth - 1 ), "entering $sub$al\n" )
3793
3794           # standard frame entry message
3795       )
3796       if $frame;
3797
3798     # Pop the single-step value back off the stack.
3799     $single |= $stack[ $stack_depth-- ];
3800
3801     # call the original lvalue sub.
3802     &$sub;
3803 }
3804
3805 # Abstracting common code from multiple places elsewhere:
3806 sub depth_print_lineinfo {
3807     my $always_print = shift;
3808
3809     print_lineinfo( @_ ) if ($always_print or $stack_depth < $trace_to_depth);
3810 }
3811
3812 =head1 EXTENDED COMMAND HANDLING AND THE COMMAND API
3813
3814 In Perl 5.8.0, there was a major realignment of the commands and what they did,
3815 Most of the changes were to systematize the command structure and to eliminate
3816 commands that threw away user input without checking.
3817
3818 The following sections describe the code added to make it easy to support
3819 multiple command sets with conflicting command names. This section is a start
3820 at unifying all command processing to make it simpler to develop commands.
3821
3822 Note that all the cmd_[a-zA-Z] subroutines require the command name, a line
3823 number, and C<$dbline> (the current line) as arguments.
3824
3825 Support functions in this section which have multiple modes of failure C<die>
3826 on error; the rest simply return a false value.
3827
3828 The user-interface functions (all of the C<cmd_*> functions) just output
3829 error messages.
3830
3831 =head2 C<%set>
3832
3833 The C<%set> hash defines the mapping from command letter to subroutine
3834 name suffix.
3835
3836 C<%set> is a two-level hash, indexed by set name and then by command name.
3837 Note that trying to set the CommandSet to C<foobar> simply results in the
3838 5.8.0 command set being used, since there's no top-level entry for C<foobar>.
3839
3840 =cut
3841
3842 ### The API section
3843
3844 my %set = (    #
3845     'pre580' => {
3846         'a' => 'pre580_a',
3847         'A' => 'pre580_null',
3848         'b' => 'pre580_b',
3849         'B' => 'pre580_null',
3850         'd' => 'pre580_null',
3851         'D' => 'pre580_D',
3852         'h' => 'pre580_h',
3853         'M' => 'pre580_null',
3854         'O' => 'o',
3855         'o' => 'pre580_null',
3856         'v' => 'M',
3857         'w' => 'v',
3858         'W' => 'pre580_W',
3859     },
3860     'pre590' => {
3861         '<'  => 'pre590_prepost',
3862         '<<' => 'pre590_prepost',
3863         '>'  => 'pre590_prepost',
3864         '>>' => 'pre590_prepost',
3865         '{'  => 'pre590_prepost',
3866         '{{' => 'pre590_prepost',
3867     },
3868 );
3869
3870 my %breakpoints_data;
3871
3872 sub _has_breakpoint_data_ref {
3873     my ($filename, $line) = @_;
3874
3875     return (
3876         exists( $breakpoints_data{$filename} )
3877             and
3878         exists( $breakpoints_data{$filename}{$line} )
3879     );
3880 }
3881
3882 sub _get_breakpoint_data_ref {
3883     my ($filename, $line) = @_;
3884
3885     return ($breakpoints_data{$filename}{$line} ||= +{});
3886 }
3887
3888 sub _delete_breakpoint_data_ref {
3889     my ($filename, $line) = @_;
3890
3891     delete($breakpoints_data{$filename}{$line});
3892     if (! scalar(keys( %{$breakpoints_data{$filename}} )) ) {
3893         delete($breakpoints_data{$filename});
3894     }
3895
3896     return;
3897 }
3898
3899 sub _set_breakpoint_enabled_status {
3900     my ($filename, $line, $status) = @_;
3901
3902     _get_breakpoint_data_ref($filename, $line)->{'enabled'} =
3903         ($status ? 1 : '')
3904         ;
3905
3906     return;
3907 }
3908
3909 sub _enable_breakpoint_temp_enabled_status {
3910     my ($filename, $line) = @_;
3911
3912     _get_breakpoint_data_ref($filename, $line)->{'temp_enabled'} = 1;
3913
3914     return;
3915 }
3916
3917 sub _cancel_breakpoint_temp_enabled_status {
3918     my ($filename, $line) = @_;
3919
3920     my $ref = _get_breakpoint_data_ref($filename, $line);
3921
3922     delete ($ref->{'temp_enabled'});
3923
3924     if (! %$ref) {
3925         _delete_breakpoint_data_ref($filename, $line);
3926     }
3927
3928     return;
3929 }
3930
3931 sub _is_breakpoint_enabled {
3932     my ($filename, $line) = @_;
3933
3934     my $data_ref = _get_breakpoint_data_ref($filename, $line);
3935     return ($data_ref->{'enabled'} || $data_ref->{'temp_enabled'});
3936 }
3937
3938 =head2 C<cmd_wrapper()> (API)
3939
3940 C<cmd_wrapper()> allows the debugger to switch command sets
3941 depending on the value of the C<CommandSet> option.
3942
3943 It tries to look up the command in the C<%set> package-level I<lexical>
3944 (which means external entities can't fiddle with it) and create the name of
3945 the sub to call based on the value found in the hash (if it's there). I<All>
3946 of the commands to be handled in a set have to be added to C<%set>; if they
3947 aren't found, the 5.8.0 equivalent is called (if there is one).
3948
3949 This code uses symbolic references.
3950
3951 =cut
3952
3953 sub cmd_wrapper {
3954     my $cmd      = shift;
3955     my $line     = shift;
3956     my $dblineno = shift;
3957
3958     # Assemble the command subroutine's name by looking up the
3959     # command set and command name in %set. If we can't find it,
3960     # default to the older version of the command.
3961     my $call = 'cmd_'
3962       . ( $set{$CommandSet}{$cmd}
3963           || ( $cmd =~ /^[<>{]+/o ? 'prepost' : $cmd ) );
3964
3965     # Call the command subroutine, call it by name.
3966     return __PACKAGE__->can($call)->( $cmd, $line, $dblineno );
3967 } ## end sub cmd_wrapper
3968
3969 =head3 C<cmd_a> (command)
3970
3971 The C<a> command handles pre-execution actions. These are associated with a
3972 particular line, so they're stored in C<%dbline>. We default to the current
3973 line if none is specified.
3974
3975 =cut
3976
3977 sub cmd_a {
3978     my $cmd    = shift;
3979     my $line   = shift || '';    # [.|line] expr
3980     my $dbline = shift;
3981
3982     # If it's dot (here), or not all digits,  use the current line.
3983     $line =~ s/^(\.|(?:[^\d]))/$dbline/;
3984
3985     # Should be a line number followed by an expression.
3986     if ( $line =~ /^\s*(\d*)\s*(\S.+)/ ) {
3987         my ( $lineno, $expr ) = ( $1, $2 );
3988
3989         # If we have an expression ...
3990         if ( length $expr ) {
3991
3992             # ... but the line isn't breakable, complain.
3993             if ( $dbline[$lineno] == 0 ) {
3994                 print $OUT
3995                   "Line $lineno($dbline[$lineno]) does not have an action?\n";
3996             }
3997             else {
3998
3999                 # It's executable. Record that the line has an action.
4000                 $had_breakpoints{$filename} |= 2;
4001
4002                 # Remove any action, temp breakpoint, etc.
4003                 $dbline{$lineno} =~ s/\0[^\0]*//;
4004
4005                 # Add the action to the line.
4006                 $dbline{$lineno} .= "\0" . action($expr);
4007
4008                 _set_breakpoint_enabled_status($filename, $lineno, 1);
4009             }
4010         } ## end if (length $expr)
4011     } ## end if ($line =~ /^\s*(\d*)\s*(\S.+)/)
4012     else {
4013
4014         # Syntax wrong.
4015         print $OUT
4016           "Adding an action requires an optional lineno and an expression\n"
4017           ;    # hint
4018     }
4019 } ## end sub cmd_a
4020
4021 =head3 C<cmd_A> (command)
4022
4023 Delete actions. Similar to above, except the delete code is in a separate
4024 subroutine, C<delete_action>.
4025
4026 =cut
4027
4028 sub cmd_A {
4029     my $cmd    = shift;
4030     my $line   = shift || '';
4031     my $dbline = shift;
4032
4033     # Dot is this line.
4034     $line =~ s/^\./$dbline/;
4035
4036     # Call delete_action with a null param to delete them all.
4037     # The '1' forces the eval to be true. It'll be false only
4038     # if delete_action blows up for some reason, in which case
4039     # we print $@ and get out.
4040     if ( $line eq '*' ) {
4041         eval { &delete_action(); 1 } or print $OUT $@ and return;
4042     }
4043
4044     # There's a real line  number. Pass it to delete_action.
4045     # Error trapping is as above.
4046     elsif ( $line =~ /^(\S.*)/ ) {
4047         eval { &delete_action($1); 1 } or print $OUT $@ and return;
4048     }
4049
4050     # Swing and a miss. Bad syntax.
4051     else {
4052         print $OUT
4053           "Deleting an action requires a line number, or '*' for all\n" ; # hint
4054     }
4055 } ## end sub cmd_A
4056
4057 =head3 C<delete_action> (API)
4058
4059 C<delete_action> accepts either a line number or C<undef>. If a line number
4060 is specified, we check for the line being executable (if it's not, it
4061 couldn't have had an  action). If it is, we just take the action off (this
4062 will get any kind of an action, including breakpoints).
4063
4064 =cut
4065
4066 sub delete_action {
4067     my $i = shift;
4068     if ( defined($i) ) {
4069
4070         # Can there be one?
4071         die "Line $i has no action .\n" if $dbline[$i] == 0;
4072
4073         # Nuke whatever's there.
4074         $dbline{$i} =~ s/\0[^\0]*//;    # \^a
4075         delete $dbline{$i} if $dbline{$i} eq '';
4076     }
4077     else {
4078         print $OUT "Deleting all actions...\n";
4079         for my $file ( keys %had_breakpoints ) {
4080             local *dbline = $main::{ '_<' . $file };
4081             $max = $#dbline;
4082             my $was;
4083             for $i (1 .. $max) {
4084                 if ( defined $dbline{$i} ) {
4085                     $dbline{$i} =~ s/\0[^\0]*//;
4086                     delete $dbline{$i} if $dbline{$i} eq '';
4087                 }
4088                 unless ( $had_breakpoints{$file} &= ~2 ) {
4089                     delete $had_breakpoints{$file};
4090                 }
4091             } ## end for ($i = 1 .. $max)
4092         } ## end for my $file (keys %had_breakpoints)
4093     } ## end else [ if (defined($i))
4094 } ## end sub delete_action
4095
4096 =head3 C<cmd_b> (command)
4097
4098 Set breakpoints. Since breakpoints can be set in so many places, in so many
4099 ways, conditionally or not, the breakpoint code is kind of complex. Mostly,
4100 we try to parse the command type, and then shuttle it off to an appropriate
4101 subroutine to actually do the work of setting the breakpoint in the right
4102 place.
4103
4104 =cut
4105
4106 sub cmd_b {
4107     my $cmd    = shift;
4108     my $line   = shift;    # [.|line] [cond]
4109     my $dbline = shift;
4110
4111     # Make . the current line number if it's there..
4112     $line =~ s/^\.(\s|\z)/$dbline$1/;
4113
4114     # No line number, no condition. Simple break on current line.
4115     if ( $line =~ /^\s*$/ ) {
4116         &cmd_b_line( $dbline, 1 );
4117     }
4118
4119     # Break on load for a file.
4120     elsif ( $line =~ /^load\b\s*(.*)/ ) {
4121         my $file = $1;
4122         $file =~ s/\s+$//;
4123         &cmd_b_load($file);
4124     }
4125
4126     # b compile|postpone <some sub> [<condition>]
4127     # The interpreter actually traps this one for us; we just put the
4128     # necessary condition in the %postponed hash.
4129     elsif ( $line =~ /^(postpone|compile)\b\s*([':A-Za-z_][':\w]*)\s*(.*)/ ) {
4130
4131         # Capture the condition if there is one. Make it true if none.
4132         my $cond = length $3 ? $3 : '1';
4133
4134         # Save the sub name and set $break to 1 if $1 was 'postpone', 0
4135         # if it was 'compile'.
4136         my ( $subname, $break ) = ( $2, $1 eq 'postpone' );
4137
4138         # De-Perl4-ify the name - ' separators to ::.
4139         $subname =~ s/\'/::/g;
4140
4141         # Qualify it into the current package unless it's already qualified.
4142         $subname = "${package}::" . $subname unless $subname =~ /::/;
4143
4144         # Add main if it starts with ::.
4145         $subname = "main" . $subname if substr( $subname, 0, 2 ) eq "::";
4146
4147         # Save the break type for this sub.
4148         $postponed{$subname} = $break ? "break +0 if $cond" : "compile";
4149     } ## end elsif ($line =~ ...
4150     # b <filename>:<line> [<condition>]
4151     elsif ($line =~ /\A(\S+[^:]):(\d+)\s*(.*)/ms) {
4152         my ($filename, $line_num, $cond) = ($1, $2, $3);
4153         cmd_b_filename_line(
4154             $filename,
4155             $line_num,
4156             (length($cond) ? $cond : '1'),
4157         );
4158     }
4159     # b <sub name> [<condition>]
4160     elsif ( $line =~ /^([':A-Za-z_][':\w]*(?:\[.*\])?)\s*(.*)/ ) {
4161
4162         #
4163         $subname = $1;
4164         my $cond = length $2 ? $2 : '1';
4165         &cmd_b_sub( $subname, $cond );
4166     }
4167
4168     # b <line> [<condition>].
4169     elsif ( $line =~ /^(\d*)\s*(.*)/ ) {
4170
4171         # Capture the line. If none, it's the current line.
4172         $line = $1 || $dbline;
4173
4174         # If there's no condition, make it '1'.
4175         my $cond = length $2 ? $2 : '1';
4176
4177         # Break on line.
4178         &cmd_b_line( $line, $cond );
4179     }
4180
4181     # Line didn't make sense.
4182     else {
4183         print "confused by line($line)?\n";
4184     }
4185 } ## end sub cmd_b
4186
4187 =head3 C<break_on_load> (API)
4188
4189 We want to break when this file is loaded. Mark this file in the
4190 C<%break_on_load> hash, and note that it has a breakpoint in
4191 C<%had_breakpoints>.
4192
4193 =cut
4194
4195 sub break_on_load {
4196     my $file = shift;
4197     $break_on_load{$file} = 1;
4198     $had_breakpoints{$file} |= 1;
4199 }
4200
4201 =head3 C<report_break_on_load> (API)
4202
4203 Gives us an array of filenames that are set to break on load. Note that
4204 only files with break-on-load are in here, so simply showing the keys
4205 suffices.
4206
4207 =cut
4208
4209 sub report_break_on_load {
4210     sort keys %break_on_load;
4211 }
4212
4213 =head3 C<cmd_b_load> (command)
4214
4215 We take the file passed in and try to find it in C<%INC> (which maps modules
4216 to files they came from). We mark those files for break-on-load via
4217 C<break_on_load> and then report that it was done.
4218
4219 =cut
4220
4221 sub cmd_b_load {
4222     my $file = shift;
4223     my @files;
4224
4225     # This is a block because that way we can use a redo inside it
4226     # even without there being any looping structure at all outside it.
4227     {
4228
4229         # Save short name and full path if found.
4230         push @files, $file;
4231         push @files, $::INC{$file} if $::INC{$file};
4232
4233         # Tack on .pm and do it again unless there was a '.' in the name
4234         # already.
4235         $file .= '.pm', redo unless $file =~ /\./;
4236     }
4237
4238     # Do the real work here.
4239     break_on_load($_) for @files;
4240
4241     # All the files that have break-on-load breakpoints.
4242     @files = report_break_on_load;
4243
4244     # Normalize for the purposes of our printing this.
4245     local $\ = '';
4246     local $" = ' ';
4247     print $OUT "Will stop on load of '@files'.\n";
4248 } ## end sub cmd_b_load
4249
4250 =head3 C<$filename_error> (API package global)
4251
4252 Several of the functions we need to implement in the API need to work both
4253 on the current file and on other files. We don't want to duplicate code, so
4254 C<$filename_error> is used to contain the name of the file that's being
4255 worked on (if it's not the current one).
4256
4257 We can now build functions in pairs: the basic function works on the current
4258 file, and uses C<$filename_error> as part of its error message. Since this is
4259 initialized to C<"">, no filename will appear when we are working on the
4260 current file.
4261
4262 The second function is a wrapper which does the following:
4263
4264 =over 4
4265
4266 =item *
4267
4268 Localizes C<$filename_error> and sets it to the name of the file to be processed.
4269
4270 =item *
4271
4272 Localizes the C<*dbline> glob and reassigns it to point to the file we want to process.
4273
4274 =item *
4275
4276 Calls the first function.
4277
4278 The first function works on the I<current> file (i.e., the one we changed to),
4279 and prints C<$filename_error> in the error message (the name of the other file)
4280 if it needs to. When the functions return, C<*dbline> is restored to point
4281 to the actual current file (the one we're executing in) and
4282 C<$filename_error> is restored to C<"">. This restores everything to
4283 the way it was before the second function was called at all.
4284
4285 See the comments in C<breakable_line> and C<breakable_line_in_file> for more
4286 details.
4287
4288 =back
4289
4290 =cut
4291
4292 use vars qw($filename_error);
4293 $filename_error = '';
4294
4295 =head3 breakable_line(from, to) (API)
4296
4297 The subroutine decides whether or not a line in the current file is breakable.
4298 It walks through C<@dbline> within the range of lines specified, looking for
4299 the first line that is breakable.
4300
4301 If C<$to> is greater than C<$from>, the search moves forwards, finding the
4302 first line I<after> C<$to> that's breakable, if there is one.
4303
4304 If C<$from> is greater than C<$to>, the search goes I<backwards>, finding the
4305 first line I<before> C<$to> that's breakable, if there is one.
4306
4307 =cut
4308
4309 sub breakable_line {
4310
4311     my ( $from, $to ) = @_;
4312
4313     # $i is the start point. (Where are the FORTRAN programs of yesteryear?)
4314     my $i = $from;
4315
4316     # If there are at least 2 arguments, we're trying to search a range.
4317     if ( @_ >= 2 ) {
4318
4319         # $delta is positive for a forward search, negative for a backward one.
4320         my $delta = $from < $to ? +1 : -1;
4321
4322         # Keep us from running off the ends of the file.
4323         my $limit = $delta > 0 ? $#dbline : 1;
4324
4325         # Clever test. If you're a mathematician, it's obvious why this
4326         # test works. If not:
4327         # If $delta is positive (going forward), $limit will be $#dbline.
4328         #    If $to is less than $limit, ($limit - $to) will be positive, times
4329         #    $delta of 1 (positive), so the result is > 0 and we should use $to
4330         #    as the stopping point.
4331         #
4332         #    If $to is greater than $limit, ($limit - $to) is negative,
4333         #    times $delta of 1 (positive), so the result is < 0 and we should
4334         #    use $limit ($#dbline) as the stopping point.
4335         #
4336         # If $delta is negative (going backward), $limit will be 1.
4337         #    If $to is zero, ($limit - $to) will be 1, times $delta of -1
4338         #    (negative) so the result is > 0, and we use $to as the stopping
4339         #    point.
4340         #
4341         #    If $to is less than zero, ($limit - $to) will be positive,
4342         #    times $delta of -1 (negative), so the result is not > 0, and
4343         #    we use $limit (1) as the stopping point.
4344         #
4345         #    If $to is 1, ($limit - $to) will zero, times $delta of -1
4346         #    (negative), still giving zero; the result is not > 0, and
4347         #    we use $limit (1) as the stopping point.
4348         #
4349         #    if $to is >1, ($limit - $to) will be negative, times $delta of -1
4350         #    (negative), giving a positive (>0) value, so we'll set $limit to
4351         #    $to.
4352
4353         $limit = $to if ( $limit - $to ) * $delta > 0;
4354
4355         # The real search loop.
4356         # $i starts at $from (the point we want to start searching from).
4357         # We move through @dbline in the appropriate direction (determined
4358         # by $delta: either -1 (back) or +1 (ahead).
4359         # We stay in as long as we haven't hit an executable line
4360         # ($dbline[$i] == 0 means not executable) and we haven't reached
4361         # the limit yet (test similar to the above).
4362         $i += $delta while $dbline[$i] == 0 and ( $limit - $i ) * $delta > 0;
4363
4364     } ## end if (@_ >= 2)
4365
4366     # If $i points to a line that is executable, return that.
4367     return $i unless $dbline[$i] == 0;
4368
4369     # Format the message and print it: no breakable lines in range.
4370     my ( $pl, $upto ) = ( '', '' );
4371     ( $pl, $upto ) = ( 's', "..$to" ) if @_ >= 2 and $from != $to;
4372
4373     # If there's a filename in filename_error, we'll see it.
4374     # If not, not.
4375     die "Line$pl $from$upto$filename_error not breakable\n";
4376 } ## end sub breakable_line
4377
4378 =head3 breakable_line_in_filename(file, from, to) (API)
4379
4380 Like C<breakable_line>, but look in another file.
4381
4382 =cut
4383
4384 sub breakable_line_in_filename {
4385
4386     # Capture the file name.
4387     my ($f) = shift;
4388
4389     # Swap the magic line array over there temporarily.
4390     local *dbline = $main::{ '_<' . $f };
4391
4392     # If there's an error, it's in this other file.
4393     local $filename_error = " of '$f'";
4394
4395     # Find the breakable line.
4396     breakable_line(@_);
4397
4398     # *dbline and $filename_error get restored when this block ends.
4399
4400 } ## end sub breakable_line_in_filename
4401
4402 =head3 break_on_line(lineno, [condition]) (API)
4403
4404 Adds a breakpoint with the specified condition (or 1 if no condition was
4405 specified) to the specified line. Dies if it can't.
4406
4407 =cut
4408
4409 sub break_on_line {
4410     my ( $i, $cond ) = @_;
4411
4412     # Always true if no condition supplied.
4413     $cond = 1 unless @_ >= 2;
4414
4415     my $inii  = $i;
4416     my $after = '';
4417     my $pl    = '';
4418
4419     # Woops, not a breakable line. $filename_error allows us to say
4420     # if it was in a different file.
4421     die "Line $i$filename_error not breakable.\n" if $dbline[$i] == 0;
4422
4423     # Mark this file as having breakpoints in it.
4424     $had_breakpoints{$filename} |= 1;
4425
4426     # If there is an action or condition here already ...
4427     if ( $dbline{$i} ) {
4428
4429         # ... swap this condition for the existing one.
4430         $dbline{$i} =~ s/^[^\0]*/$cond/;
4431     }
4432     else {
4433
4434         # Nothing here - just add the condition.
4435         $dbline{$i} = $cond;
4436
4437         _set_breakpoint_enabled_status($filename, $i, 1);
4438     }
4439 } ## end sub break_on_line
4440
4441 =head3 cmd_b_line(line, [condition]) (command)
4442
4443 Wrapper for C<break_on_line>. Prints the failure message if it
4444 doesn't work.
4445
4446 =cut
4447
4448 sub cmd_b_line {
4449     if (not eval { break_on_line(@_); 1 }) {
4450         local $\ = '';
4451         print $OUT $@ and return;
4452     }
4453
4454     return;
4455 } ## end sub cmd_b_line
4456
4457 =head3 cmd_b_filename_line(line, [condition]) (command)
4458
4459 Wrapper for C<break_on_filename_line>. Prints the failure message if it
4460 doesn't work.
4461
4462 =cut
4463
4464 sub cmd_b_filename_line {
4465     if (not eval { break_on_filename_line(@_); 1 }) {
4466         local $\ = '';
4467         print $OUT $@ and return;
4468     }
4469
4470     return;
4471 }
4472
4473 =head3 break_on_filename_line(file, line, [condition]) (API)
4474
4475 Switches to the file specified and then calls C<break_on_line> to set
4476 the breakpoint.
4477
4478 =cut
4479
4480 sub break_on_filename_line {
4481     my ( $f, $i, $cond ) = @_;
4482
4483     # Always true if condition left off.
4484     $cond = 1 unless @_ >= 3;
4485
4486     # Switch the magical hash temporarily.
4487     local *dbline = $main::{ '_<' . $f };
4488
4489     # Localize the variables that break_on_line uses to make its message.
4490     local $filename_error = " of '$f'";
4491     local $filename       = $f;
4492
4493     # Add the breakpoint.
4494     break_on_line( $i, $cond );
4495 } ## end sub break_on_filename_line
4496
4497 =head3 break_on_filename_line_range(file, from, to, [condition]) (API)
4498
4499 Switch to another file, search the range of lines specified for an
4500 executable one, and put a breakpoint on the first one you find.
4501
4502 =cut
4503
4504 sub break_on_filename_line_range {
4505     my ( $f, $from, $to, $cond ) = @_;
4506
4507     # Find a breakable line if there is one.
4508     my $i = breakable_line_in_filename( $f, $from, $to );
4509
4510     # Always true if missing.
4511     $cond = 1 unless @_ >= 3;
4512
4513     # Add the breakpoint.
4514     break_on_filename_line( $f, $i, $cond );
4515 } ## end sub break_on_filename_line_range
4516
4517 =head3 subroutine_filename_lines(subname, [condition]) (API)
4518