This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
8e1e16458907dc6326f7656123664a878700bcee
[perl5.git] / pod / perldiag.pod
1 =head1 NAME
2
3 perldiag - various Perl diagnostics
4
5 =head1 DESCRIPTION
6
7 These messages are classified as follows (listed in increasing order of
8 desperation):
9
10     (W) A warning (optional).
11     (D) A deprecation (enabled by default).
12     (S) A severe warning (enabled by default).
13     (F) A fatal error (trappable).
14     (P) An internal error you should never see (trappable).
15     (X) A very fatal error (nontrappable).
16     (A) An alien error message (not generated by Perl).
17
18 The majority of messages from the first three classifications above
19 (W, D & S) can be controlled using the C<warnings> pragma.
20
21 If a message can be controlled by the C<warnings> pragma, its warning
22 category is included with the classification letter in the description
23 below.
24
25 Optional warnings are enabled by using the C<warnings> pragma or the B<-w>
26 and B<-W> switches.  Warnings may be captured by setting C<$SIG{__WARN__}>
27 to a reference to a routine that will be called on each warning instead
28 of printing it.  See L<perlvar>.
29
30 Severe warnings are always enabled, unless they are explicitly disabled
31 with the C<warnings> pragma or the B<-X> switch.
32
33 Trappable errors may be trapped using the eval operator.  See
34 L<perlfunc/eval>.  In almost all cases, warnings may be selectively
35 disabled or promoted to fatal errors using the C<warnings> pragma.
36 See L<warnings>.
37
38 The messages are in alphabetical order, without regard to upper or
39 lower-case.  Some of these messages are generic.  Spots that vary are
40 denoted with a %s or other printf-style escape.  These escapes are
41 ignored by the alphabetical order, as are all characters other than
42 letters.  To look up your message, just ignore anything that is not a
43 letter.
44
45 =over 4
46
47 =item accept() on closed socket %s
48
49 (W closed) You tried to do an accept on a closed socket.  Did you forget
50 to check the return value of your socket() call?  See
51 L<perlfunc/accept>.
52
53 =item Allocation too large: %x
54
55 (X) You can't allocate more than 64K on an MS-DOS machine.
56
57 =item '%c' allowed only after types %s
58
59 (F) The modifiers '!', '<' and '>' are allowed in pack() or unpack() only
60 after certain types.  See L<perlfunc/pack>.
61
62 =item Ambiguous call resolved as CORE::%s(), qualify as such or use &
63
64 (W ambiguous) A subroutine you have declared has the same name as a Perl
65 keyword, and you have used the name without qualification for calling
66 one or the other.  Perl decided to call the builtin because the
67 subroutine is not imported.
68
69 To force interpretation as a subroutine call, either put an ampersand
70 before the subroutine name, or qualify the name with its package.
71 Alternatively, you can import the subroutine (or pretend that it's
72 imported with the C<use subs> pragma).
73
74 To silently interpret it as the Perl operator, use the C<CORE::> prefix
75 on the operator (e.g. C<CORE::log($x)>) or declare the subroutine
76 to be an object method (see L<perlsub/"Subroutine Attributes"> or
77 L<attributes>).
78
79 =item Ambiguous range in transliteration operator
80
81 (F) You wrote something like C<tr/a-z-0//> which doesn't mean anything at
82 all.  To include a C<-> character in a transliteration, put it either
83 first or last.  (In the past, C<tr/a-z-0//> was synonymous with
84 C<tr/a-y//>, which was probably not what you would have expected.)
85
86 =item Ambiguous use of %s resolved as %s
87
88 (S ambiguous) You said something that may not be interpreted the way
89 you thought.  Normally it's pretty easy to disambiguate it by supplying
90 a missing quote, operator, parenthesis pair or declaration.
91
92 =item Ambiguous use of %c resolved as operator %c
93
94 (S ambiguous) C<%>, C<&>, and C<*> are both infix operators (modulus,
95 bitwise and, and multiplication) I<and> initial special characters
96 (denoting hashes, subroutines and typeglobs), and you said something
97 like C<*foo * foo> that might be interpreted as either of them.  We
98 assumed you meant the infix operator, but please try to make it more
99 clear -- i