This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
unsubmitted _74 tweaks
[perl5.git] / pod / perldelta.pod
1 =head1 NAME
2
3 perldelta - what's new for perl5.005
4
5 =head1 DESCRIPTION
6
7 This document describes differences between the 5.004 release and this one.
8
9 [XXX this needs more verbose summaries of the sub topics, instead of just
10 the "See foo."  Scheduled for a second iteration. GSAR]
11
12 =head1 About the new versioning system
13
14 =head1 Incompatible Changes
15
16 =head2 WARNING:  This version is not binary compatible with Perl 5.004.
17
18 Starting with Perl 5.004_50 there were many deep and far-reaching changes
19 to the language internals.  If you have dynamically loaded extensions
20 that you built under perl 5.003 or 5.004, you can continue to use them
21 with 5.004, but you will need to rebuild and reinstall those extensions
22 to use them 5.005.  See L<INSTALL> for detailed instructions on how to
23 upgrade.
24
25 =head2 Default installation structure has changed
26
27 The new Configure defaults are designed to allow a smooth upgrade from
28 5.004 to 5.005, but you should read L<INSTALL> for a detailed
29 discussion of the changes in order to adapt them to your system.
30
31 =head2 Perl Source Compatibility
32
33 When none of the experimental features are enabled, there should be
34 no user-visible Perl source compatibility issue.
35
36 If threads are enabled, then some caveats apply. C<@_> and C<$_> become
37 lexical variables.  The effect of this should be largely transparent to
38 the user, but there are some boundary conditions under which user will
39 need to be aware of the issues. [XXX Add e.g. here.]
40
41 Some new keywords have been introduced.  These are generally expected to
42 have very little impact on compatibility.  See L</New C<INIT> keyword>,
43 L</New C<lock> keyword>, and L</New C<qr//> operator>.
44
45 Certain barewords are now reserved.  Use of these will provoke a warning
46 if you have asked for them with the C<-w> switch.
47 See L</C<our> is now a reserved word>.
48
49 =head2 C Source Compatibility
50
51 =item Core sources now require ANSI C compiler
52
53 =item Enabling threads has source compatibility issues
54
55 =head2 Binary Compatibility
56
57 This version is NOT binary compatible with older versions.  All extensions
58 will need to be recompiled.
59
60 =head2 Security fixes may affect compatibility
61
62 A few taint leaks and taint omissions have been corrected.  This may lead
63 to "failure" of scripts that used to work with older versions.  Compiling
64 with -DINCOMPLETE_TAINTS provides a perl with minimal amounts of changes
65 to the tainting behavior.  But note that the resulting perl will have
66 known insecurities.
67
68 Oneliners with the C<-e> switch do not create temporary files anymore.
69
70 =head2 Relaxed new mandatory warnings introduced in 5.004
71
72 Many new warnings that were introduced in 5.004 have been made
73 optional.  Some of these warnings are still present, but perl's new
74 features make them less often a problem.  See L<New Diagnostics>.
75
76 =head2 Licensing
77
78 Perl has a new Social Contract for contributors.  See F<Porting/Contract>.
79
80 The license included in much of the Perl documentation has changed.
81 [XXX See where?]
82
83 =head1 Core Changes
84
85
86 =head2 Threads
87
88 WARNING: Threading is considered an experimental feature.  Details of the
89 implementation may change without notice.  There are known limitations
90 and and some bugs.
91
92 See L<README.threads>.
93
94 =head2 Compiler
95
96 WARNING: The Compiler and related tools are considered experimental.
97 Features may change without notice, and there are known limitations
98 and bugs.
99
100 The Compiler produces three different types of transformations of a
101 perl program.  The C backend generates C code that captures perl's state
102 just before execution begins.  It eliminates the compile-time overheads
103 of the regular perl interpreter, but the run-time performance remains
104 comparatively the same.  The CC backend generates optimized C code
105 equivivalent to the code path at run-time.  The CC backend has greater
106 potential for big optimizations, but only a few optimizations are
107 implemented currently.  The Bytecode backend generates a platform
108 independent bytecode representation of the interpreter's state
109 just before execution.  Thus, the Bytecode back end also eliminates
110 much of the compilation overhead of the interpreter.
111
112 The compiler comes with several valuable utilities.
113
114 C<B::Lint> is an experimental module to detect and warn about suspicious
115 code, especially the cases that the C<-w> switch does not detect.
116
117 C<B::Deparse> can be used to demystify perl code, and understand
118 how perl optimizes certain constructs.
119
120 C<B::Xref> generates cross reference reports of all definition and use
121 of variables, subroutines and formats in a program.
122
123 C<B::Showlex> show the lexical variables used by a subroutine or file
124 at a glance.
125
126 C<perlcc> is a simple frontend for compiling perl.
127
128 See C<ext/B/README>.
129
130 =head2 Regular Expressions
131
132 See L<perlre> and L<perlop>.
133
134 =head2   Improved malloc()
135
136 See banner at the beginning of C<malloc.c> for details.
137
138 =head2 Quicksort is internally implemented
139
140 See C<perlfunc/sort>.
141
142 =head2 Reliable signals
143
144 Two kinds.
145
146 Via C<Thread::Signal>.
147
148 Via switched runtime op loop.  [XXX Not yet available.]
149
150 =head2 Reliable stack pointers
151
152 The internals now reallocate the perl stack only at predictable times.
153 In particular, magic calls never trigger reallocations of the stack,
154 because all reentrancy of the runtime is handled using a "stack of stacks".
155 This should improve reliability of cached stack pointers in the internals
156 and in XSUBs.
157
158 =head2 Behavior of local() on composites is now well-defined
159
160 See L<perlfunc/local>.
161
162 =head2 C<%!> is transparently tied to the L<Errno> module
163
164 See L<perlvar>, and L<Errno>.
165
166 =head2 Pseudo-hashes are supported
167
168 See L<perlref>.
169
170 =head2 C<EXPR foreach EXPR> is supported
171
172 See L<perlsyn>.
173
174 =head2 Slice notation on glob elements is supported
175
176 [XXX See what?]
177
178 =head2 Keywords can be globally overridden
179
180 See L<perlsub>.
181
182 =head2 C<$^E> is meaningful on Win32
183
184 See L<perlvar>.
185
186 =head2 C<foreach (1..1000000)> optimized
187
188 C<foreach (1..1000000)> is now optimized into a counting loop.  It does
189 not try to allocate a 1000000-size list anymore.
190
191 =head2 C<Foo::> can be used as implicitly quoted package name
192
193 [XXX See what?]
194
195 =head2 C<exists $Foo::{Bar::}> tests existence of a package
196
197 [XXX See what?]
198
199 =head2 Better locale support
200
201 See L<perllocale>.
202
203 =head2 Experimental support for 64-bit platforms
204
205 Perl5 has always had 64-bit support on systems with 64-bit longs.
206 Starting with 5.005, the beginnings of experimental support for systems
207 with 32-bit long and 64-bit 'long long' integers has been added.
208 If you add -DUSE_LONG_LONG to your ccflags in config.sh (or manually
209 define it in perl.h) then perl will be built with 'long long' support.
210 There will be many compiler warnings, and the resultant perl may not
211 work on all systems.  There are many other issues related to
212 third-party extensions and libraries.  This option exists to allow
213 people to work on those issues.
214
215 =head2 prototype() returns useful results on builtins
216
217 See L<perlfunc/prototype>.
218
219 =head2 Extended support for exception handling
220
221 C<die()> now accepts a reference value, and C<$@> gets set to that
222 value in exception traps.  This makes it possible to propagate
223 exception objects.  See L<perlfunc/eval>.  [XXX there's nothing
224 about this in perlfunc/eval yet.]
225
226 =head2 Re-blessing in DESTROY() supported for chaining DESTROY() methods
227
228 See L<perlobj/Destructors>.
229
230 =head2 All C<printf> format conversions are handled internally
231
232 See L<perlfunc/printf>.
233
234 =head2 New C<INIT> keyword
235
236 C<INIT> subs are like C<BEGIN> and C<END>, but they get run just before
237 the perl runtime begins execution.  e.g., the Perl Compiler makes use of
238 C<INIT> blocks to initialize and resolve pointers to XSUBs.
239
240 [XXX Needs to be documented in perlsub or perlmod.]
241
242 =head2 New C<lock> keyword
243
244 The C<lock> keyword is the fundamental synchronization primitive
245 in threaded perl.  When threads are not enabled, it is currently a noop.
246
247 To minimize impact on source compatibility this keyword is "weak", i.e., any
248 user-defined subroutine of the same name overrides it, unless a C<use Thread>
249 has been seen.
250
251 =head2 New C<qr//> operator
252
253 The C<qr//> operator, which is syntactically similar to the other quote-like
254 operators, is used to create compiled regular expressions.  This compiled
255 form can now be explicitly passed around in variables, and interpolated in
256 other regular expressions.  See L<perlop> and L<perlre>.
257
258 =head2 C<our> is now a reserved word
259
260 =head2 Tied arrays are now fully supported
261
262 See L<Tie::Array>.
263
264 =head2 Tied handles support is better
265
266 Several missing hooks have been added.  There is also a new base class for
267 TIEARRAY implementations.  See L<Tie::Array>.
268
269
270 =head1 Supported Platforms
271
272 Configure has many incremental improvements.  Site-wide policy for building
273 perl can now be made persistent, via Policy.sh.  Configure also records
274 the command-line arguments used in F<config.sh>.
275
276 =head2 New Platforms
277
278 BeOS is now supported.  See L<README.beos>.
279
280 DOS is now supported under the DJGPP tools.  See L<README.dos>.
281
282 MPE/iX is now supported.  See L<README.mpeix>.
283
284 =head2 Changes in existing support
285
286 Win32 support has been vastly enhanced.  Support for Perl Object, a C++
287 encapsulation of Perl.  GCC and EGCS are now supported on Win32.
288 [XXX Perl Object needs a big explanation elsewhere, and a pointer to
289 that location here.]
290
291 VMS configuration system has been rewritten.  See L<README.vms>.
292
293 OpenBSD better supported.  [XXX what others?]
294
295 =head1 Modules and Pragmata
296
297 =head2 New Modules
298
299 =over
300
301 =item B
302
303 Perl compiler and tools.  See [XXX what?].
304
305 =item Data::Dumper
306
307 A module to pretty print Perl data.  See L<Data::Dumper>.
308
309 =item Errno
310
311 A module to look up errors more conveniently.  See L<Errno>.
312
313 =item File::Spec
314
315 A portable API for file operations.
316
317 =item ExtUtils::Installed
318
319 Query and manage installed modules.
320
321 =item ExtUtils::Packlist
322
323 Manipulate .packlist files.
324
325 =item Fatal
326
327 Make functions/builtins succeed or die.
328
329 =item IPC::SysV
330
331 Constants and other support infrastructure for System V IPC operations
332 in perl.
333
334 =item Test
335
336 A framework for writing testsuites.
337
338 =item Tie::Array
339
340 Base class for tied arrays.
341
342 =item Tie::Handle
343
344 Base class for tied handles.
345
346 =item Thread
347
348 Perl thread creation, manipulation, and support.
349
350 =item attrs
351
352 Set subroutine attributes.
353
354 =item fields
355
356 Compile-time class fields.
357
358 =item re
359
360 Various pragmata to control behavior of regular expressions.
361
362 =back
363
364 =head2 Changes in existing modules
365
366 =over
367
368 =item CGI
369
370 CGI has been updated to version 2.42.
371
372 =item POSIX
373
374 POSIX now has its own platform-specific hints files.
375
376 =item DB_File
377
378 DB_File supports version 2.x of Berkeley DB.  See C<ext/DB_File/Changes>.
379
380 =item MakeMaker
381
382 MakeMaker now supports writing empty makefiles, provides a way to
383 specify that site umask() policy should be honored.  There is also
384 better support for manipulation of .packlist files, and getting
385 information about installed modules.
386
387 Extensions that have both architecture-dependent and
388 architecture-independent files are now always installed completely in
389 the architecture-dependent locations.  Previously, the shareable parts
390 were shared both across architectures and across perl versions and were
391 therefore liable to be overwritten with newer versions that might have
392 subtle incompatibilities.
393
394 =item CPAN
395
396 [XXX What?]
397
398 =item Cwd
399
400 Cwd::cwd is faster on most platforms.
401
402 =item Benchmark
403
404 Keeps better time.
405
406 =back
407
408 =head1 Utility Changes
409
410 h2ph and related utilities have been vastly overhauled.
411
412 perlcc, a new experimental front end for the compiler is available.
413
414 The crude GNU configure emulator is now called configure.gnu.
415
416 =head1 API Changes
417
418 =head2 Incompatible Changes
419
420 =head2 Deprecations, Extensions
421
422 =head2 C++ Support
423
424 =head1 Documentation Changes
425
426 Config.pm now has a glossary of variables.
427
428 Porting/patching.pod has detailed instructions on how to create and
429 submit patches for perl.
430
431 =head1 New Diagnostics
432
433 =over
434
435 =item Ambiguous call resolved as CORE::%s(), qualify as such or use &
436
437 (W) A subroutine you have declared has the same name as a Perl keyword,
438 and you have used the name without qualification for calling one or the
439 other.  Perl decided to call the builtin because the subroutine is
440 not imported.
441
442 To force interpretation as a subroutine call, either put an ampersand
443 before the subroutine name, or qualify the name with its package.
444 Alternatively, you can import the subroutine (or pretend that it's
445 imported with the C<use subs> pragma).
446
447 To silently interpret it as the Perl operator, use the C<CORE::> prefix
448 on the operator (e.g. C<CORE::log($x)>) or by declaring the subroutine
449 to be an object method (see L<attrs>).
450
451 =item Bad index while coercing array into hash
452
453 (F) The index looked up in the hash found as the 0'th element of a
454 pseudo-hash is not legal.  Index values must be at 1 or greater.
455 See L<perlref>.
456
457 =item Bareword "%s" refers to nonexistent package
458
459 (W) You used a qualified bareword of the form C<Foo::>, but
460 the compiler saw no other uses of that namespace before that point.
461 Perhaps you need to predeclare a package?
462
463 =item Can't call method "%s" on an undefined value
464
465 (F) You used the syntax of a method call, but the slot filled by the
466 object reference or package name contains an undefined value.
467 Something like this will reproduce the error:
468
469     $BADREF = 42;
470     process $BADREF 1,2,3;
471     $BADREF->process(1,2,3);
472
473 =item Can't coerce array into hash
474
475 (F) You used an array where a hash was expected, but the array has no
476 information on how to map from keys to array indices.  You can do that
477 only with arrays that have a hash reference at index 0.
478
479 =item Can't goto subroutine from an eval-string
480
481 (F) The "goto subroutine" call can't be used to jump out of an eval "string".
482 (You can use it to jump out of an eval {BLOCK}, but you probably don't want to.)
483
484 =item Can't use %%! because Errno.pm is not available
485
486 (F) The first time the %! hash is used, perl automatically loads the
487 Errno.pm module. The Errno module is expected to tie the %! hash to
488 provide symbolic names for C<$!> errno values.
489
490 =item Cannot find an opnumber for "%s"
491
492 (F) A string of a form C<CORE::word> was given to prototype(), but
493 there is no builtin with the name C<word>.
494
495 =item Character class syntax [. .] is reserved for future extensions
496
497 (W) Within regular expression character classes ([]) the syntax beginning
498 with "[." and ending with ".]" is reserved for future extensions.
499 If you need to represent those character sequences inside a regular
500 expression character class, just quote the square brackets with the
501 backslash: "\[." and ".\]".
502
503 =item Character class syntax [: :] is reserved for future extensions
504
505 (W) Within regular expression character classes ([]) the syntax beginning
506 with "[:" and ending with ":]" is reserved for future extensions.
507 If you need to represent those character sequences inside a regular
508 expression character class, just quote the square brackets with the
509 backslash: "\[:" and ":\]".
510
511 =item Character class syntax [= =] is reserved for future extensions
512
513 (W) Within regular expression character classes ([]) the syntax
514 beginning with "[=" and ending with "=]" is reserved for future extensions.
515 If you need to represent those character sequences inside a regular
516 expression character class, just quote the square brackets with the
517 backslash: "\[=" and "=\]".
518
519 =item %s: Eval-group in insecure regular expression
520
521 (F) Perl detected tainted data when trying to compile a regular expression
522 that contains the C<(?{ ... })> zero-width assertion, which is unsafe.
523 See L<perlre/(?{ code })>, and L<perlsec>.
524
525 =item %s: Eval-group not allowed, use re 'eval'
526
527 (F) A regular expression contained the C<(?{ ... })> zero-width assertion,
528 but that construct is only allowed when the C<use re 'eval'> pragma is
529 in effect.  See L<perlre/(?{ code })>.
530
531 =item %s: Eval-group not allowed at run time
532
533 (F) Perl tried to compile a regular expression containing the C<(?{ ... })>
534 zero-width assertion at run time, as it would when the pattern contains
535 interpolated values.  Since that is a security risk, it is not allowed.
536 If you insist, you may still do this by explicitly building the pattern
537 from an interpolated string at run time and using that in an eval().
538 See L<perlre/(?{ code })>.
539
540 =item Explicit blessing to '' (assuming package main)
541
542 (W) You are blessing a reference to a zero length string.  This has
543 the effect of blessing the reference into the package main.  This is
544 usually not what you want.  Consider providing a default target
545 package, e.g. bless($ref, $p or 'MyPackage');
546
547 =item Illegal hex digit ignored
548
549 (W) You may have tried to use a character other than 0 - 9 or A - F in a
550 hexadecimal number.  Interpretation of the hexadecimal number stopped
551 before the illegal character.
552
553 =item No such array field
554
555 (F) You tried to access an array as a hash, but the field name used is
556 not defined.  The hash at index 0 should map all valid field names to
557 array indices for that to work.
558
559 =item No such field "%s" in variable %s of type %s
560
561 (F) You tried to access a field of a typed variable where the type
562 does not know about the field name.  The field names are looked up in
563 the %FIELDS hash in the type package at compile time.  The %FIELDS hash
564 is usually set up with the 'fields' pragma.
565
566 =item Out of memory during ridiculously large request
567
568 (F) You can't allocate more than 2^31+"small amount" bytes.  This error
569 is most likely to be caused by a typo in the Perl program. e.g., C<$arr[time]>
570 instead of C<$arr[$time]>.
571
572 =item Range iterator outside integer range
573
574 (F) One (or both) of the numeric arguments to the range operator ".."
575 are outside the range which can be represented by integers internally.
576 One possible workaround is to force Perl to use magical string
577 increment by prepending "0" to your numbers.
578
579 =item Recursive inheritance detected while looking for method '%s' in package '%s'
580
581 (F) More than 100 levels of inheritance were encountered while invoking a
582 method.  Probably indicates an unintended loop in your inheritance hierarchy.
583
584 =item Reference found where even-sized list expected
585
586 (W) You gave a single reference where Perl was expecting a list with
587 an even number of elements (for assignment to a hash). This
588 usually means that you used the anon hash constructor when you meant 
589 to use parens. In any case, a hash requires key/value B<pairs>.
590
591     %hash = { one => 1, two => 2, };   # WRONG
592     %hash = [ qw/ an anon array / ];   # WRONG
593     %hash = ( one => 1, two => 2, );   # right
594     %hash = qw( one 1 two 2 );                 # also fine
595
596 =item Undefined value assigned to typeglob
597
598 (W) An undefined value was assigned to a typeglob, a la C<*foo = undef>.
599 This does nothing.  It's possible that you really mean C<undef *foo>.
600
601 =item Use of reserved word "%s" is deprecated
602
603 (D) The indicated bareword is a reserved word.  Future versions of perl
604 may use it as a keyword, so you're better off either explicitly quoting
605 the word in a manner appropriate for its context of use, or using a
606 different name altogether.  The warning can be suppressed for subroutine
607 names by either adding a C<&> prefix, or using a package qualifier,
608 e.g. C<&our()>, or C<Foo::our()>.
609
610 =item perl: warning: Setting locale failed.
611
612 (S) The whole warning message will look something like:
613
614        perl: warning: Setting locale failed.
615        perl: warning: Please check that your locale settings:
616                LC_ALL = "En_US",
617                LANG = (unset)
618            are supported and installed on your system.
619        perl: warning: Falling back to the standard locale ("C").
620
621 Exactly what were the failed locale settings varies.  In the above the
622 settings were that the LC_ALL was "En_US" and the LANG had no value.
623 This error means that Perl detected that you and/or your system
624 administrator have set up the so-called variable system but Perl could
625 not use those settings.  This was not dead serious, fortunately: there
626 is a "default locale" called "C" that Perl can and will use, the
627 script will be run.  Before you really fix the problem, however, you
628 will get the same error message each time you run Perl.  How to really
629 fix the problem can be found in L<perllocale> section B<LOCALE PROBLEMS>.
630
631 =back
632
633
634 =head1 Obsolete Diagnostics
635
636 =over
637
638 =item Can't mktemp()
639
640 (F) The mktemp() routine failed for some reason while trying to process
641 a B<-e> switch.  Maybe your /tmp partition is full, or clobbered.
642
643 =item Can't write to temp file for B<-e>: %s
644
645 (F) The write routine failed for some reason while trying to process
646 a B<-e> switch.  Maybe your /tmp partition is full, or clobbered.
647
648 =item Cannot open temporary file
649
650 (F) The create routine failed for some reason while trying to process
651 a B<-e> switch.  Maybe your /tmp partition is full, or clobbered.
652
653
654 =back
655
656 =head1 BUGS
657
658 If you find what you think is a bug, you might check the headers of
659 recently posted articles in the comp.lang.perl.misc newsgroup.
660 There may also be information at http://www.perl.com/perl/, the Perl
661 Home Page.
662
663 If you believe you have an unreported bug, please run the B<perlbug>
664 program included with your release.  Make sure you trim your bug down
665 to a tiny but sufficient test case.  Your bug report, along with the
666 output of C<perl -V>, will be sent off to <F<perlbug@perl.com>> to be
667 analysed by the Perl porting team.
668
669 =head1 SEE ALSO
670
671 The F<Changes> file for exhaustive details on what changed.
672
673 The F<INSTALL> file for how to build Perl.
674
675 The F<README> file for general stuff.
676
677 The F<Artistic> and F<Copying> files for copyright information.
678
679 =head1 HISTORY
680
681 =cut