This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
File::Basename::dirname bugs
[perl5.git] / lib / File / Basename.pm
1 package File::Basename;
2
3 =head1 NAME
4
5 fileparse - split a pathname into pieces
6
7 basename - extract just the filename from a path
8
9 dirname - extract just the directory from a path
10
11 =head1 SYNOPSIS
12
13     use File::Basename;
14
15     ($name,$path,$suffix) = fileparse($fullname,@suffixlist)
16     fileparse_set_fstype($os_string);
17     $basename = basename($fullname,@suffixlist);
18     $dirname = dirname($fullname);
19
20     ($name,$path,$suffix) = fileparse("lib/File/Basename.pm","\.pm");
21     fileparse_set_fstype("VMS");
22     $basename = basename("lib/File/Basename.pm",".pm");
23     $dirname = dirname("lib/File/Basename.pm");
24
25 =head1 DESCRIPTION
26
27 These routines allow you to parse file specifications into useful
28 pieces using the syntax of different operating systems.
29
30 =over 4
31
32 =item fileparse_set_fstype
33
34 You select the syntax via the routine fileparse_set_fstype().
35 If the argument passed to it contains one of the substrings
36 "VMS", "MSDOS", "MacOS" or "AmigaOS", the file specification 
37 syntax of that operating system is used in future calls to 
38 fileparse(), basename(), and dirname().  If it contains none of
39 these substrings, UNIX syntax is used.  This pattern matching is
40 case-insensitive.  If you've selected VMS syntax, and the file
41 specification you pass to one of these routines contains a "/",
42 they assume you are using UNIX emulation and apply the UNIX syntax
43 rules instead, for that function call only.
44
45 If you haven't called fileparse_set_fstype(), the syntax is chosen
46 by examining the builtin variable C<$^O> according to these rules.
47
48 =item fileparse
49
50 The fileparse() routine divides a file specification into three
51 parts: a leading B<path>, a file B<name>, and a B<suffix>.  The
52 B<path> contains everything up to and including the last directory
53 separator in the input file specification.  The remainder of the input
54 file specification is then divided into B<name> and B<suffix> based on
55 the optional patterns you specify in C<@suffixlist>.  Each element of
56 this list is interpreted as a regular expression, and is matched
57 against the end of B<name>.  If this succeeds, the matching portion of
58 B<name> is removed and prepended to B<suffix>.  By proper use of
59 C<@suffixlist>, you can remove file types or versions for examination.
60
61 You are guaranteed that if you concatenate B<path>, B<name>, and
62 B<suffix> together in that order, the result will denote the same
63 file as the input file specification.
64
65 =back
66
67 =head1 EXAMPLES
68
69 Using UNIX file syntax:
70
71     ($base,$path,$type) = fileparse('/virgil/aeneid/draft.book7',
72                                     '\.book\d+');
73
74 would yield
75
76     $base eq 'draft'
77     $path eq '/virgil/aeneid/',
78     $type eq '.book7'
79
80 Similarly, using VMS syntax:
81
82     ($name,$dir,$type) = fileparse('Doc_Root:[Help]Rhetoric.Rnh',
83                                    '\..*');
84
85 would yield
86
87     $name eq 'Rhetoric'
88     $dir  eq 'Doc_Root:[Help]'
89     $type eq '.Rnh'
90
91 =item C<basename>
92
93 The basename() routine returns the first element of the list produced
94 by calling fileparse() with the same arguments.  It is provided for
95 compatibility with the UNIX shell command basename(1).
96
97 =item C<dirname>
98
99 The dirname() routine returns the directory portion of the input file
100 specification.  When using VMS or MacOS syntax, this is identical to the
101 second element of the list produced by calling fileparse() with the same
102 input file specification.  (Under VMS, if there is no directory information
103 in the input file specification, then the current default device and
104 directory are returned.)  When using UNIX or MSDOS syntax, the return
105 value conforms to the behavior of the UNIX shell command dirname(1).  This
106 is usually the same as the behavior of fileparse(), but differs in some
107 cases.  For example, for the input file specification F<lib/>, fileparse()
108 considers the directory name to be F<lib/>, while dirname() considers the
109 directory name to be F<.>).
110
111 =cut
112
113 require 5.002;
114 require Exporter;
115 @ISA = qw(Exporter);
116 @EXPORT = qw(fileparse fileparse_set_fstype basename dirname);
117 #use strict;
118 #use vars qw($VERSION $Fileparse_fstype);
119 $VERSION = "2.4";
120
121
122 #   fileparse_set_fstype() - specify OS-based rules used in future
123 #                            calls to routines in this package
124 #
125 #   Currently recognized values: VMS, MSDOS, MacOS
126 #       Any other name uses Unix-style rules
127
128 sub fileparse_set_fstype {
129   my($old) = $Fileparse_fstype;
130   $Fileparse_fstype = $_[0] if $_[0];
131   $old;
132 }
133
134 #   fileparse() - parse file specification
135 #
136 #   Version 2.4  27-Sep-1996  Charles Bailey  bailey@genetics.upenn.edu
137
138
139 sub fileparse {
140   my($fullname,@suffices) = @_;
141   my($fstype) = $Fileparse_fstype;
142   my($dirpath,$tail,$suffix,$basename);
143
144   if ($fstype =~ /^VMS/i) {
145     if ($fullname =~ m#/#) { $fstype = '' }  # We're doing Unix emulation
146     else {
147       ($dirpath,$basename) = ($fullname =~ /^(.*[:>\]])?(.*)/);
148     }
149   }
150   if ($fstype =~ /^MSDOS/i) {
151     ($dirpath,$basename) = ($fullname =~ /^(.*[:\\\/])?(.*)/);
152     $dirpath .= '.\\' unless $dirpath =~ /[\\\/]$/;
153   }
154   elsif ($fstype =~ /^MacOS/i) {
155     ($dirpath,$basename) = ($fullname =~ /^(.*:)?(.*)/);
156   }
157   elsif ($fstype =~ /^AmigaOS/i) {
158     ($dirpath,$basename) = ($fullname =~ /(.*[:\/])?(.*)/);
159   }
160   elsif ($fstype !~ /^VMS/i) {  # default to Unix
161     ($dirpath,$basename) = ($fullname =~ m#^(.*/)?(.*)#);
162     $dirpath = './' unless $dirpath;
163   }
164
165   if (@suffices) {
166     $tail = '';
167     foreach $suffix (@suffices) {
168       if ($basename =~ /([\x00-\xff]*?)($suffix)$/) {
169         $tail = $2 . $tail;
170         $basename = $1;
171       }
172     }
173   }
174
175   wantarray ? ($basename,$dirpath,$tail) : $basename;
176
177 }
178
179
180 #   basename() - returns first element of list returned by fileparse()
181
182 sub basename {
183   my($name) = shift;
184   (fileparse($name, map("\Q$_\E",@_)))[0];
185 }
186
187
188 #    dirname() - returns device and directory portion of file specification
189 #        Behavior matches that of Unix dirname(1) exactly for Unix and MSDOS
190 #        filespecs except for names ending with a separator, e.g., "/xx/yy/".
191 #        This differs from the second element of the list returned
192 #        by fileparse() in that the trailing '/' (Unix) or '\' (MSDOS) (and
193 #        the last directory name if the filespec ends in a '/' or '\'), is lost.
194
195 sub dirname {
196     my($basename,$dirname) = fileparse($_[0]);
197     my($fstype) = $Fileparse_fstype;
198
199     if ($fstype =~ /VMS/i) { 
200         if ($_[0] =~ m#/#) { $fstype = '' }
201         else { return $dirname || $ENV{DEFAULT} }
202     }
203     if ($fstype =~ /MacOS/i) { return $dirname }
204     elsif ($fstype =~ /MSDOS/i) { 
205         $dirname =~ s/([^:])[\\\/]*$/$1/;
206         unless( length($basename) ) {
207             ($basename,$dirname) = fileparse $dirname;
208             $dirname =~ s/([^:])[\\\/]*$/$1/;
209         }
210     }
211     elsif ($fstype =~ /AmigaOS/i) {
212         if ( $dirname =~ /:$/) { return $dirname }
213         chop $dirname;
214         $dirname =~ s#[^:/]+$## unless length($basename);
215     }
216     else { 
217         $dirname =~ s:(.)/*$:$1:;
218         unless( length($basename) ) {
219             local($File::Basename::Fileparse_fstype) = $fstype;
220             ($basename,$dirname) = fileparse $dirname;
221             $dirname =~ s:(.)/*$:$1:;
222         }
223     }
224
225     $dirname;
226 }
227
228 $Fileparse_fstype = $^O;
229
230 1;