This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
update copyright years for Carp dual-life release
[perl5.git] / dist / Carp / lib / Carp.pm
1 package Carp;
2
3 { use 5.006; }
4 use strict;
5 use warnings;
6 BEGIN {
7     # Very old versions of warnings.pm load Carp.  This can go wrong due
8     # to the circular dependency.  If warnings is invoked before Carp,
9     # then warnings starts by loading Carp, then Carp (above) tries to
10     # invoke warnings, and gets nothing because warnings is in the process
11     # of loading and hasn't defined its import method yet.  If we were
12     # only turning on warnings ("use warnings" above) this wouldn't be too
13     # bad, because Carp would just gets the state of the -w switch and so
14     # might not get some warnings that it wanted.  The real problem is
15     # that we then want to turn off Unicode warnings, but "no warnings
16     # 'utf8'" won't be effective if we're in this circular-dependency
17     # situation.  So, if warnings.pm is an affected version, we turn
18     # off all warnings ourselves by directly setting ${^WARNING_BITS}.
19     # On unaffected versions, we turn off just Unicode warnings, via
20     # the proper API.
21     if(!defined($warnings::VERSION) || eval($warnings::VERSION) < 1.06) {
22         ${^WARNING_BITS} = "";
23     } else {
24         "warnings"->unimport("utf8");
25     }
26 }
27
28 sub _fetch_sub { # fetch sub without autovivifying
29     my($pack, $sub) = @_;
30     $pack .= '::';
31     # only works with top-level packages
32     return unless exists($::{$pack});
33     for ($::{$pack}) {
34         return unless ref \$_ eq 'GLOB' && *$_{HASH} && exists $$_{$sub};
35         for ($$_{$sub}) {
36             return ref \$_ eq 'GLOB' ? *$_{CODE} : undef
37         }
38     }
39 }
40
41 # UTF8_REGEXP_PROBLEM is a compile-time constant indicating whether Carp
42 # must avoid applying a regular expression to an upgraded (is_utf8)
43 # string.  There are multiple problems, on different Perl versions,
44 # that require this to be avoided.  All versions prior to 5.13.8 will
45 # load utf8_heavy.pl for the swash system, even if the regexp doesn't
46 # use character classes.  Perl 5.6 and Perls [5.11.2, 5.13.11) exhibit
47 # specific problems when Carp is being invoked in the aftermath of a
48 # syntax error.
49 BEGIN {
50     if("$]" < 5.013011) {
51         *UTF8_REGEXP_PROBLEM = sub () { 1 };
52     } else {
53         *UTF8_REGEXP_PROBLEM = sub () { 0 };
54     }
55 }
56
57 # is_utf8() is essentially the utf8::is_utf8() function, which indicates
58 # whether a string is represented in the upgraded form (using UTF-8
59 # internally).  As utf8::is_utf8() is only available from Perl 5.8
60 # onwards, extra effort is required here to make it work on Perl 5.6.
61 BEGIN {
62     if(defined(my $sub = _fetch_sub utf8 => 'is_utf8')) {
63         *is_utf8 = $sub;
64     } else {
65         # black magic for perl 5.6
66         *is_utf8 = sub { unpack("C", "\xaa".$_[0]) != 170 };
67     }
68 }
69
70 # The downgrade() function defined here is to be used for attempts to
71 # downgrade where it is acceptable to fail.  It must be called with a
72 # second argument that is a true value.
73 BEGIN {
74     if(defined(my $sub = _fetch_sub utf8 => 'downgrade')) {
75         *downgrade = \&{"utf8::downgrade"};
76     } else {
77         *downgrade = sub {
78             my $r = "";
79             my $l = length($_[0]);
80             for(my $i = 0; $i != $l; $i++) {
81                 my $o = ord(substr($_[0], $i, 1));
82                 return if $o > 255;
83                 $r .= chr($o);
84             }
85             $_[0] = $r;
86         };
87     }
88 }
89
90 our $VERSION = '1.32';
91
92 our $MaxEvalLen = 0;
93 our $Verbose    = 0;
94 our $CarpLevel  = 0;
95 our $MaxArgLen  = 64;    # How much of each argument to print. 0 = all.
96 our $MaxArgNums = 8;     # How many arguments to print. 0 = all.
97 our $RefArgFormatter = undef; # allow caller to format reference arguments
98
99 require Exporter;
100 our @ISA       = ('Exporter');
101 our @EXPORT    = qw(confess croak carp);
102 our @EXPORT_OK = qw(cluck verbose longmess shortmess);
103 our @EXPORT_FAIL = qw(verbose);    # hook to enable verbose mode
104
105 # The members of %Internal are packages that are internal to perl.
106 # Carp will not report errors from within these packages if it
107 # can.  The members of %CarpInternal are internal to Perl's warning
108 # system.  Carp will not report errors from within these packages
109 # either, and will not report calls *to* these packages for carp and
110 # croak.  They replace $CarpLevel, which is deprecated.    The
111 # $Max(EvalLen|(Arg(Len|Nums)) variables are used to specify how the eval
112 # text and function arguments should be formatted when printed.
113
114 our %CarpInternal;
115 our %Internal;
116
117 # disable these by default, so they can live w/o require Carp
118 $CarpInternal{Carp}++;
119 $CarpInternal{warnings}++;
120 $Internal{Exporter}++;
121 $Internal{'Exporter::Heavy'}++;
122
123 # if the caller specifies verbose usage ("perl -MCarp=verbose script.pl")
124 # then the following method will be called by the Exporter which knows
125 # to do this thanks to @EXPORT_FAIL, above.  $_[1] will contain the word
126 # 'verbose'.
127
128 sub export_fail { shift; $Verbose = shift if $_[0] eq 'verbose'; @_ }
129
130 sub _cgc {
131     no strict 'refs';
132     return \&{"CORE::GLOBAL::caller"} if defined &{"CORE::GLOBAL::caller"};
133     return;
134 }
135
136 sub longmess {
137     # Icky backwards compatibility wrapper. :-(
138     #
139     # The story is that the original implementation hard-coded the
140     # number of call levels to go back, so calls to longmess were off
141     # by one.  Other code began calling longmess and expecting this
142     # behaviour, so the replacement has to emulate that behaviour.
143     my $cgc = _cgc();
144     my $call_pack = $cgc ? $cgc->() : caller();
145     if ( $Internal{$call_pack} or $CarpInternal{$call_pack} ) {
146         return longmess_heavy(@_);
147     }
148     else {
149         local $CarpLevel = $CarpLevel + 1;
150         return longmess_heavy(@_);
151     }
152 }
153
154 our @CARP_NOT;
155
156 sub shortmess {
157     my $cgc = _cgc();
158
159     # Icky backwards compatibility wrapper. :-(
160     local @CARP_NOT = $cgc ? $cgc->() : caller();
161     shortmess_heavy(@_);
162 }
163
164 sub croak   { die shortmess @_ }
165 sub confess { die longmess @_ }
166 sub carp    { warn shortmess @_ }
167 sub cluck   { warn longmess @_ }
168
169 BEGIN {
170     if("$]" >= 5.015002 || ("$]" >= 5.014002 && "$]" < 5.015) ||
171             ("$]" >= 5.012005 && "$]" < 5.013)) {
172         *CALLER_OVERRIDE_CHECK_OK = sub () { 1 };
173     } else {
174         *CALLER_OVERRIDE_CHECK_OK = sub () { 0 };
175     }
176 }
177
178 sub caller_info {
179     my $i = shift(@_) + 1;
180     my %call_info;
181     my $cgc = _cgc();
182     {
183         # Some things override caller() but forget to implement the
184         # @DB::args part of it, which we need.  We check for this by
185         # pre-populating @DB::args with a sentinel which no-one else
186         # has the address of, so that we can detect whether @DB::args
187         # has been properly populated.  However, on earlier versions
188         # of perl this check tickles a bug in CORE::caller() which
189         # leaks memory.  So we only check on fixed perls.
190         @DB::args = \$i if CALLER_OVERRIDE_CHECK_OK;
191         package DB;
192         @call_info{
193             qw(pack file line sub has_args wantarray evaltext is_require) }
194             = $cgc ? $cgc->($i) : caller($i);
195     }
196
197     unless ( defined $call_info{file} ) {
198         return ();
199     }
200
201     my $sub_name = Carp::get_subname( \%call_info );
202     if ( $call_info{has_args} ) {
203         my @args;
204         if (CALLER_OVERRIDE_CHECK_OK && @DB::args == 1
205             && ref $DB::args[0] eq ref \$i
206             && $DB::args[0] == \$i ) {
207             @DB::args = ();    # Don't let anyone see the address of $i
208             local $@;
209             my $where = eval {
210                 my $func    = $cgc or return '';
211                 my $gv      =
212                     (_fetch_sub B => 'svref_2object' or return '')
213                         ->($func)->GV;
214                 my $package = $gv->STASH->NAME;
215                 my $subname = $gv->NAME;
216                 return unless defined $package && defined $subname;
217
218                 # returning CORE::GLOBAL::caller isn't useful for tracing the cause:
219                 return if $package eq 'CORE::GLOBAL' && $subname eq 'caller';
220                 " in &${package}::$subname";
221             } || '';
222             @args
223                 = "** Incomplete caller override detected$where; \@DB::args were not set **";
224         }
225         else {
226             @args = @DB::args;
227             my $overflow;
228             if ( $MaxArgNums and @args > $MaxArgNums )
229             {    # More than we want to show?
230                 $#args = $MaxArgNums;
231                 $overflow = 1;
232             }
233
234             @args = map { Carp::format_arg($_) } @args;
235
236             if ($overflow) {
237                 push @args, '...';
238             }
239         }
240
241         # Push the args onto the subroutine
242         $sub_name .= '(' . join( ', ', @args ) . ')';
243     }
244     $call_info{sub_name} = $sub_name;
245     return wantarray() ? %call_info : \%call_info;
246 }
247
248 # Transform an argument to a function into a string.
249 our $in_recurse;
250 sub format_arg {
251     my $arg = shift;
252
253     if ( ref($arg) ) {
254          # legitimate, let's not leak it.
255         if (!$in_recurse &&
256             do {
257                 local $@;
258                 local $in_recurse = 1;
259                 local $SIG{__DIE__} = sub{};
260                 eval {$arg->can('CARP_TRACE') }
261             })
262         {
263             return $arg->CARP_TRACE();
264         }
265         elsif (!$in_recurse &&
266                defined($RefArgFormatter) &&
267                do {
268                 local $@;
269                 local $in_recurse = 1;
270                 local $SIG{__DIE__} = sub{};
271                 eval {$arg = $RefArgFormatter->($arg); 1}
272                 })
273         {
274             return $arg;
275         }
276         else
277         {
278             my $sub = _fetch_sub(overload => 'StrVal');
279             return $sub ? &$sub($arg) : "$arg";
280         }
281     }
282     return "undef" if !defined($arg);
283     downgrade($arg, 1);
284     return $arg if !(UTF8_REGEXP_PROBLEM && is_utf8($arg)) &&
285             $arg =~ /\A-?[0-9]+(?:\.[0-9]*)?(?:[eE][-+]?[0-9]+)?\z/;
286     my $suffix = "";
287     if ( 2 < $MaxArgLen and $MaxArgLen < length($arg) ) {
288         substr ( $arg, $MaxArgLen - 3 ) = "";
289         $suffix = "...";
290     }
291     if(UTF8_REGEXP_PROBLEM && is_utf8($arg)) {
292         print "len = @{[length($arg)]}\n";
293         for(my $i = length($arg); $i--; ) {
294             my $c = substr($arg, $i, 1);
295             my $x = substr($arg, 0, 0);   # work around bug on Perl 5.8.{1,2}
296             if($c eq "\"" || $c eq "\\" || $c eq "\$" || $c eq "\@") {
297                 substr $arg, $i, 0, "\\";
298                 next;
299             }
300             my $o = ord($c);
301             print "i=$i o=$o\n";
302             print "arg=<$arg>\n";
303             substr $arg, $i, 1, sprintf("\\x{%x}", $o)
304                 if $o < 0x20 || $o > 0x7f;
305             print "arg=<$arg>\n";
306         }
307     } else {
308         $arg =~ s/([\"\\\$\@])/\\$1/g;
309         $arg =~ s/([^ -~])/sprintf("\\x{%x}",ord($1))/eg;
310     }
311     downgrade($arg, 1);
312     return "\"".$arg."\"".$suffix;
313 }
314
315 # Takes an inheritance cache and a package and returns
316 # an anon hash of known inheritances and anon array of
317 # inheritances which consequences have not been figured
318 # for.
319 sub get_status {
320     my $cache = shift;
321     my $pkg   = shift;
322     $cache->{$pkg} ||= [ { $pkg => $pkg }, [ trusts_directly($pkg) ] ];
323     return @{ $cache->{$pkg} };
324 }
325
326 # Takes the info from caller() and figures out the name of
327 # the sub/require/eval
328 sub get_subname {
329     my $info = shift;
330     if ( defined( $info->{evaltext} ) ) {
331         my $eval = $info->{evaltext};
332         if ( $info->{is_require} ) {
333             return "require $eval";
334         }
335         else {
336             $eval =~ s/([\\\'])/\\$1/g;
337             return "eval '" . str_len_trim( $eval, $MaxEvalLen ) . "'";
338         }
339     }
340
341     # this can happen on older perls when the sub (or the stash containing it)
342     # has been deleted
343     if ( !defined( $info->{sub} ) ) {
344         return '__ANON__::__ANON__';
345     }
346
347     return ( $info->{sub} eq '(eval)' ) ? 'eval {...}' : $info->{sub};
348 }
349
350 # Figures out what call (from the point of view of the caller)
351 # the long error backtrace should start at.
352 sub long_error_loc {
353     my $i;
354     my $lvl = $CarpLevel;
355     {
356         ++$i;
357         my $cgc = _cgc();
358         my @caller = $cgc ? $cgc->($i) : caller($i);
359         my $pkg = $caller[0];
360         unless ( defined($pkg) ) {
361
362             # This *shouldn't* happen.
363             if (%Internal) {
364                 local %Internal;
365                 $i = long_error_loc();
366                 last;
367             }
368             elsif (defined $caller[2]) {
369                 # this can happen when the stash has been deleted
370                 # in that case, just assume that it's a reasonable place to
371                 # stop (the file and line data will still be intact in any
372                 # case) - the only issue is that we can't detect if the
373                 # deleted package was internal (so don't do that then)
374                 # -doy
375                 redo unless 0 > --$lvl;
376                 last;
377             }
378             else {
379                 return 2;
380             }
381         }
382         redo if $CarpInternal{$pkg};
383         redo unless 0 > --$lvl;
384         redo if $Internal{$pkg};
385     }
386     return $i - 1;
387 }
388
389 sub longmess_heavy {
390     return @_ if ref( $_[0] );    # don't break references as exceptions
391     my $i = long_error_loc();
392     return ret_backtrace( $i, @_ );
393 }
394
395 # Returns a full stack backtrace starting from where it is
396 # told.
397 sub ret_backtrace {
398     my ( $i, @error ) = @_;
399     my $mess;
400     my $err = join '', @error;
401     $i++;
402
403     my $tid_msg = '';
404     if ( defined &threads::tid ) {
405         my $tid = threads->tid;
406         $tid_msg = " thread $tid" if $tid;
407     }
408
409     my %i = caller_info($i);
410     $mess = "$err at $i{file} line $i{line}$tid_msg";
411     if( defined $. ) {
412         local $@ = '';
413         local $SIG{__DIE__};
414         eval {
415             CORE::die;
416         };
417         if($@ =~ /^Died at .*(, <.*?> line \d+).$/ ) {
418             $mess .= $1;
419         }
420     }
421     $mess .= "\.\n";
422
423     while ( my %i = caller_info( ++$i ) ) {
424         $mess .= "\t$i{sub_name} called at $i{file} line $i{line}$tid_msg\n";
425     }
426
427     return $mess;
428 }
429
430 sub ret_summary {
431     my ( $i, @error ) = @_;
432     my $err = join '', @error;
433     $i++;
434
435     my $tid_msg = '';
436     if ( defined &threads::tid ) {
437         my $tid = threads->tid;
438         $tid_msg = " thread $tid" if $tid;
439     }
440
441     my %i = caller_info($i);
442     return "$err at $i{file} line $i{line}$tid_msg\.\n";
443 }
444
445 sub short_error_loc {
446     # You have to create your (hash)ref out here, rather than defaulting it
447     # inside trusts *on a lexical*, as you want it to persist across calls.
448     # (You can default it on $_[2], but that gets messy)
449     my $cache = {};
450     my $i     = 1;
451     my $lvl   = $CarpLevel;
452     {
453         my $cgc = _cgc();
454         my $called = $cgc ? $cgc->($i) : caller($i);
455         $i++;
456         my $caller = $cgc ? $cgc->($i) : caller($i);
457
458         if (!defined($caller)) {
459             my @caller = $cgc ? $cgc->($i) : caller($i);
460             if (@caller) {
461                 # if there's no package but there is other caller info, then
462                 # the package has been deleted - treat this as a valid package
463                 # in this case
464                 redo if defined($called) && $CarpInternal{$called};
465                 redo unless 0 > --$lvl;
466                 last;
467             }
468             else {
469                 return 0;
470             }
471         }
472         redo if $Internal{$caller};
473         redo if $CarpInternal{$caller};
474         redo if $CarpInternal{$called};
475         redo if trusts( $called, $caller, $cache );
476         redo if trusts( $caller, $called, $cache );
477         redo unless 0 > --$lvl;
478     }
479     return $i - 1;
480 }
481
482 sub shortmess_heavy {
483     return longmess_heavy(@_) if $Verbose;
484     return @_ if ref( $_[0] );    # don't break references as exceptions
485     my $i = short_error_loc();
486     if ($i) {
487         ret_summary( $i, @_ );
488     }
489     else {
490         longmess_heavy(@_);
491     }
492 }
493
494 # If a string is too long, trims it with ...
495 sub str_len_trim {
496     my $str = shift;
497     my $max = shift || 0;
498     if ( 2 < $max and $max < length($str) ) {
499         substr( $str, $max - 3 ) = '...';
500     }
501     return $str;
502 }
503
504 # Takes two packages and an optional cache.  Says whether the
505 # first inherits from the second.
506 #
507 # Recursive versions of this have to work to avoid certain
508 # possible endless loops, and when following long chains of
509 # inheritance are less efficient.
510 sub trusts {
511     my $child  = shift;
512     my $parent = shift;
513     my $cache  = shift;
514     my ( $known, $partial ) = get_status( $cache, $child );
515
516     # Figure out consequences until we have an answer
517     while ( @$partial and not exists $known->{$parent} ) {
518         my $anc = shift @$partial;
519         next if exists $known->{$anc};
520         $known->{$anc}++;
521         my ( $anc_knows, $anc_partial ) = get_status( $cache, $anc );
522         my @found = keys %$anc_knows;
523         @$known{@found} = ();
524         push @$partial, @$anc_partial;
525     }
526     return exists $known->{$parent};
527 }
528
529 # Takes a package and gives a list of those trusted directly
530 sub trusts_directly {
531     my $class = shift;
532     no strict 'refs';
533     my $stash = \%{"$class\::"};
534     for my $var (qw/ CARP_NOT ISA /) {
535         # Don't try using the variable until we know it exists,
536         # to avoid polluting the caller's namespace.
537         if ( $stash->{$var} && *{$stash->{$var}}{ARRAY} && @{$stash->{$var}} ) {
538            return @{$stash->{$var}}
539         }
540     }
541     return;
542 }
543
544 if(!defined($warnings::VERSION) ||
545         do { no warnings "numeric"; $warnings::VERSION < 1.03 }) {
546     # Very old versions of warnings.pm import from Carp.  This can go
547     # wrong due to the circular dependency.  If Carp is invoked before
548     # warnings, then Carp starts by loading warnings, then warnings
549     # tries to import from Carp, and gets nothing because Carp is in
550     # the process of loading and hasn't defined its import method yet.
551     # So we work around that by manually exporting to warnings here.
552     no strict "refs";
553     *{"warnings::$_"} = \&$_ foreach @EXPORT;
554 }
555
556 1;
557
558 __END__
559
560 =head1 NAME
561
562 Carp - alternative warn and die for modules
563
564 =head1 SYNOPSIS
565
566     use Carp;
567
568     # warn user (from perspective of caller)
569     carp "string trimmed to 80 chars";
570
571     # die of errors (from perspective of caller)
572     croak "We're outta here!";
573
574     # die of errors with stack backtrace
575     confess "not implemented";
576
577     # cluck, longmess and shortmess not exported by default
578     use Carp qw(cluck longmess shortmess);
579     cluck "This is how we got here!";
580     $long_message   = longmess( "message from cluck() or confess()" );
581     $short_message  = shortmess( "message from carp() or croak()" );
582
583 =head1 DESCRIPTION
584
585 The Carp routines are useful in your own modules because
586 they act like C<die()> or C<warn()>, but with a message which is more
587 likely to be useful to a user of your module.  In the case of
588 C<cluck()> and C<confess()>, that context is a summary of every
589 call in the call-stack; C<longmess()> returns the contents of the error
590 message.
591
592 For a shorter message you can use C<carp()> or C<croak()> which report the
593 error as being from where your module was called.  C<shortmess()> returns the
594 contents of this error message.  There is no guarantee that that is where the
595 error was, but it is a good educated guess.
596
597 You can also alter the way the output and logic of C<Carp> works, by
598 changing some global variables in the C<Carp> namespace. See the
599 section on C<GLOBAL VARIABLES> below.
600
601 Here is a more complete description of how C<carp> and C<croak> work.
602 What they do is search the call-stack for a function call stack where
603 they have not been told that there shouldn't be an error.  If every
604 call is marked safe, they give up and give a full stack backtrace
605 instead.  In other words they presume that the first likely looking
606 potential suspect is guilty.  Their rules for telling whether
607 a call shouldn't generate errors work as follows:
608
609 =over 4
610
611 =item 1.
612
613 Any call from a package to itself is safe.
614
615 =item 2.
616
617 Packages claim that there won't be errors on calls to or from
618 packages explicitly marked as safe by inclusion in C<@CARP_NOT>, or
619 (if that array is empty) C<@ISA>.  The ability to override what
620 @ISA says is new in 5.8.
621
622 =item 3.
623
624 The trust in item 2 is transitive.  If A trusts B, and B
625 trusts C, then A trusts C.  So if you do not override C<@ISA>
626 with C<@CARP_NOT>, then this trust relationship is identical to,
627 "inherits from".
628
629 =item 4.
630
631 Any call from an internal Perl module is safe.  (Nothing keeps
632 user modules from marking themselves as internal to Perl, but
633 this practice is discouraged.)
634
635 =item 5.
636
637 Any call to Perl's warning system (eg Carp itself) is safe.
638 (This rule is what keeps it from reporting the error at the
639 point where you call C<carp> or C<croak>.)
640
641 =item 6.
642
643 C<$Carp::CarpLevel> can be set to skip a fixed number of additional
644 call levels.  Using this is not recommended because it is very
645 difficult to get it to behave correctly.
646
647 =back
648
649 =head2 Forcing a Stack Trace
650
651 As a debugging aid, you can force Carp to treat a croak as a confess
652 and a carp as a cluck across I<all> modules. In other words, force a
653 detailed stack trace to be given.  This can be very helpful when trying
654 to understand why, or from where, a warning or error is being generated.
655
656 This feature is enabled by 'importing' the non-existent symbol
657 'verbose'. You would typically enable it by saying
658
659     perl -MCarp=verbose script.pl
660
661 or by including the string C<-MCarp=verbose> in the PERL5OPT
662 environment variable.
663
664 Alternately, you can set the global variable C<$Carp::Verbose> to true.
665 See the C<GLOBAL VARIABLES> section below.
666
667 =head2 Stack Trace formatting
668
669 At each stack level, the subroutine's name is displayed along with
670 its parameters.  For simple scalars, this is sufficient.  For complex
671 data types, such as objects and other references, this can simply
672 display C<'HASH(0x1ab36d8)'>.
673
674 Carp gives two ways to control this.
675
676 =over 4
677
678 =item 1.
679
680 For objects, a method, C<CARP_TRACE>, will be called, if it exists.  If
681 this method doesn't exist, or it recurses into C<Carp>, or it otherwise
682 throws an exception, this is skipped, and Carp moves on to the next option,
683 otherwise checking stops and the string returned is used.  It is recommended
684 that the object's type is part of the string to make debugging easier.
685
686 =item 2.
687
688 For any type of reference, C<$Carp::RefArgFormatter> is checked (see below).
689 This variable is expected to be a code reference, and the current parameter
690 is passed in.  If this function doesn't exist (the variable is undef), or
691 it recurses into C<Carp>, or it otherwise throws an exception, this is
692 skipped, and Carp moves on to the next option, otherwise checking stops
693 and the string returned is used.
694
695 =item 3.
696
697 Otherwise, if neither C<CARP_TRACE> nor C<$Carp::RefArgFormatter> is
698 available, stringify the value ignoring any overloading.
699
700 =back
701
702 =head1 GLOBAL VARIABLES
703
704 =head2 $Carp::MaxEvalLen
705
706 This variable determines how many characters of a string-eval are to
707 be shown in the output. Use a value of C<0> to show all text.
708
709 Defaults to C<0>.
710
711 =head2 $Carp::MaxArgLen
712
713 This variable determines how many characters of each argument to a
714 function to print. Use a value of C<0> to show the full length of the
715 argument.
716
717 Defaults to C<64>.
718
719 =head2 $Carp::MaxArgNums
720
721 This variable determines how many arguments to each function to show.
722 Use a value of C<0> to show all arguments to a function call.
723
724 Defaults to C<8>.
725
726 =head2 $Carp::Verbose
727
728 This variable makes C<carp()> and C<croak()> generate stack backtraces
729 just like C<cluck()> and C<confess()>.  This is how C<use Carp 'verbose'>
730 is implemented internally.
731
732 Defaults to C<0>.
733
734 =head2 $Carp::RefArgFormatter
735
736 This variable sets a general argument formatter to display references.
737 Plain scalars and objects that implement C<CARP_TRACE> will not go through
738 this formatter.  Calling C<Carp> from within this function is not supported.
739
740 local $Carp::RefArgFormatter = sub {
741     require Data::Dumper;
742     Data::Dumper::Dump($_[0]); # not necessarily safe
743 };
744
745 =head2 @CARP_NOT
746
747 This variable, I<in your package>, says which packages are I<not> to be
748 considered as the location of an error. The C<carp()> and C<cluck()>
749 functions will skip over callers when reporting where an error occurred.
750
751 NB: This variable must be in the package's symbol table, thus:
752
753     # These work
754     our @CARP_NOT; # file scope
755     use vars qw(@CARP_NOT); # package scope
756     @My::Package::CARP_NOT = ... ; # explicit package variable
757
758     # These don't work
759     sub xyz { ... @CARP_NOT = ... } # w/o declarations above
760     my @CARP_NOT; # even at top-level
761
762 Example of use:
763
764     package My::Carping::Package;
765     use Carp;
766     our @CARP_NOT;
767     sub bar     { .... or _error('Wrong input') }
768     sub _error  {
769         # temporary control of where'ness, __PACKAGE__ is implicit
770         local @CARP_NOT = qw(My::Friendly::Caller);
771         carp(@_)
772     }
773
774 This would make C<Carp> report the error as coming from a caller not
775 in C<My::Carping::Package>, nor from C<My::Friendly::Caller>.
776
777 Also read the L</DESCRIPTION> section above, about how C<Carp> decides
778 where the error is reported from.
779
780 Use C<@CARP_NOT>, instead of C<$Carp::CarpLevel>.
781
782 Overrides C<Carp>'s use of C<@ISA>.
783
784 =head2 %Carp::Internal
785
786 This says what packages are internal to Perl.  C<Carp> will never
787 report an error as being from a line in a package that is internal to
788 Perl.  For example:
789
790     $Carp::Internal{ (__PACKAGE__) }++;
791     # time passes...
792     sub foo { ... or confess("whatever") };
793
794 would give a full stack backtrace starting from the first caller
795 outside of __PACKAGE__.  (Unless that package was also internal to
796 Perl.)
797
798 =head2 %Carp::CarpInternal
799
800 This says which packages are internal to Perl's warning system.  For
801 generating a full stack backtrace this is the same as being internal
802 to Perl, the stack backtrace will not start inside packages that are
803 listed in C<%Carp::CarpInternal>.  But it is slightly different for
804 the summary message generated by C<carp> or C<croak>.  There errors
805 will not be reported on any lines that are calling packages in
806 C<%Carp::CarpInternal>.
807
808 For example C<Carp> itself is listed in C<%Carp::CarpInternal>.
809 Therefore the full stack backtrace from C<confess> will not start
810 inside of C<Carp>, and the short message from calling C<croak> is
811 not placed on the line where C<croak> was called.
812
813 =head2 $Carp::CarpLevel
814
815 This variable determines how many additional call frames are to be
816 skipped that would not otherwise be when reporting where an error
817 occurred on a call to one of C<Carp>'s functions.  It is fairly easy
818 to count these call frames on calls that generate a full stack
819 backtrace.  However it is much harder to do this accounting for calls
820 that generate a short message.  Usually people skip too many call
821 frames.  If they are lucky they skip enough that C<Carp> goes all of
822 the way through the call stack, realizes that something is wrong, and
823 then generates a full stack backtrace.  If they are unlucky then the
824 error is reported from somewhere misleading very high in the call
825 stack.
826
827 Therefore it is best to avoid C<$Carp::CarpLevel>.  Instead use
828 C<@CARP_NOT>, C<%Carp::Internal> and C<%Carp::CarpInternal>.
829
830 Defaults to C<0>.
831
832 =head1 BUGS
833
834 The Carp routines don't handle exception objects currently.
835 If called with a first argument that is a reference, they simply
836 call die() or warn(), as appropriate.
837
838 If a subroutine argument in a stack trace is a reference to a regexp
839 object, the manner in which it is shown in the stack trace depends on
840 whether the L<overload> module has been loaded.  This happens because
841 regexp objects effectively have overloaded stringification behaviour
842 without using the L<overload> module.  As a workaround, deliberately
843 loading the L<overload> module will mean that Carp consistently provides
844 the intended behaviour (of bypassing the overloading).
845
846 Some of the Carp code assumes that Perl's basic character encoding is
847 ASCII, and will go wrong on an EBCDIC platform.
848
849 =head1 SEE ALSO
850
851 L<Carp::Always>,
852 L<Carp::Clan>
853
854 =head1 AUTHOR
855
856 The Carp module first appeared in Larry Wall's perl 5.000 distribution.
857 Since then it has been modified by several of the perl 5 porters.
858 Andrew Main (Zefram) <zefram@fysh.org> divested Carp into an independent
859 distribution.
860
861 =head1 COPYRIGHT
862
863 Copyright (C) 1994-2013 Larry Wall
864
865 Copyright (C) 2011, 2012, 2013 Andrew Main (Zefram) <zefram@fysh.org>
866
867 =head1 LICENSE
868
869 This module is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it
870 under the same terms as Perl itself.