This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Consistent spaces after dots in perlmodstyle
[perl5.git] / pod / perlmodstyle.pod
1 =head1 NAME
2
3 perlmodstyle - Perl module style guide
4
5 =head1 INTRODUCTION
6
7 This document attempts to describe the Perl Community's "best practice"
8 for writing Perl modules.  It extends the recommendations found in 
9 L<perlstyle> , which should be considered required reading
10 before reading this document.
11
12 While this document is intended to be useful to all module authors, it is
13 particularly aimed at authors who wish to publish their modules on CPAN.
14
15 The focus is on elements of style which are visible to the users of a 
16 module, rather than those parts which are only seen by the module's 
17 developers.  However, many of the guidelines presented in this document
18 can be extrapolated and applied successfully to a module's internals.
19
20 This document differs from L<perlnewmod> in that it is a style guide
21 rather than a tutorial on creating CPAN modules.  It provides a
22 checklist against which modules can be compared to determine whether
23 they conform to best practice, without necessarily describing in detail
24 how to achieve this.  
25
26 All the advice contained in this document has been gleaned from
27 extensive conversations with experienced CPAN authors and users.  Every
28 piece of advice given here is the result of previous mistakes.  This
29 information is here to help you avoid the same mistakes and the extra
30 work that would inevitably be required to fix them.
31
32 The first section of this document provides an itemized checklist; 
33 subsequent sections provide a more detailed discussion of the items on 
34 the list.  The final section, "Common Pitfalls", describes some of the 
35 most popular mistakes made by CPAN authors.
36
37 =head1 QUICK CHECKLIST
38
39 For more detail on each item in this checklist, see below.
40
41 =head2 Before you start
42
43 =over 4
44
45 =item *
46
47 Don't re-invent the wheel
48
49 =item *
50
51 Patch, extend or subclass an existing module where possible
52
53 =item *
54
55 Do one thing and do it well
56
57 =item *
58
59 Choose an appropriate name
60
61 =back
62
63 =head2 The API
64
65 =over 4
66
67 =item *
68
69 API should be understandable by the average programmer
70
71 =item *
72
73 Simple methods for simple tasks
74
75 =item *
76
77 Separate functionality from output
78
79 =item *
80
81 Consistent naming of subroutines or methods
82
83 =item *
84
85 Use named parameters (a hash or hashref) when there are more than two
86 parameters
87
88 =back
89
90 =head2 Stability
91
92 =over 4
93
94 =item *
95
96 Ensure your module works under C<use strict> and C<-w>
97
98 =item *
99
100 Stable modules should maintain backwards compatibility
101
102 =back
103
104 =head2 Documentation
105
106 =over 4
107
108 =item *
109
110 Write documentation in POD
111
112 =item *
113
114 Document purpose, scope and target applications
115
116 =item *
117
118 Document each publically accessible method or subroutine, including params and return values
119
120 =item *
121
122 Give examples of use in your documentation
123
124 =item *
125
126 Provide a README file and perhaps also release notes, changelog, etc
127
128 =item *
129
130 Provide links to further information (URL, email)
131
132 =back
133
134 =head2 Release considerations
135
136 =over 4
137
138 =item *
139
140 Specify pre-requisites in Makefile.PL or Build.PL
141
142 =item *
143
144 Specify Perl version requirements with C<use>
145
146 =item *
147
148 Include tests with your module
149
150 =item *
151
152 Choose a sensible and consistent version numbering scheme (X.YY is the common Perl module numbering scheme)
153
154 =item *
155
156 Increment the version number for every change, no matter how small
157
158 =item *
159
160 Package the module using "make dist"
161
162 =item *
163
164 Choose an appropriate license (GPL/Artistic is a good default)
165
166 =back
167
168 =head1 BEFORE YOU START WRITING A MODULE
169
170 Try not to launch headlong into developing your module without spending
171 some time thinking first.  A little forethought may save you a vast
172 amount of effort later on.
173
174 =head2 Has it been done before?
175
176 You may not even need to write the module.  Check whether it's already 
177 been done in Perl, and avoid re-inventing the wheel unless you have a 
178 good reason.
179
180 Good places to look for pre-existing modules include
181 http://search.cpan.org/ and asking on modules@perl.org
182
183 If an existing module B<almost> does what you want, consider writing a
184 patch, writing a subclass, or otherwise extending the existing module
185 rather than rewriting it.
186
187 =head2 Do one thing and do it well
188
189 At the risk of stating the obvious, modules are intended to be modular.
190 A Perl developer should be able to use modules to put together the
191 building blocks of their application.  However, it's important that the
192 blocks are the right shape, and that the developer shouldn't have to use
193 a big block when all they need is a small one.
194
195 Your module should have a clearly defined scope which is no longer than
196 a single sentence.  Can your module be broken down into a family of
197 related modules?
198
199 Bad example:
200
201 "FooBar.pm provides an implementation of the FOO protocol and the
202 related BAR standard."
203
204 Good example:
205
206 "Foo.pm provides an implementation of the FOO protocol.  Bar.pm
207 implements the related BAR protocol."
208
209 This means that if a developer only needs a module for the BAR standard,
210 they should not be forced to install libraries for FOO as well.
211
212 =head2 What's in a name?
213
214 Make sure you choose an appropriate name for your module early on.  This
215 will help people find and remember your module, and make programming
216 with your module more intuitive.
217
218 When naming your module, consider the following:
219
220 =over 4
221
222 =item *
223
224 Be descriptive (i.e. accurately describes the purpose of the module).
225
226 =item * 
227
228 Be consistent with existing modules.
229
230 =item *
231
232 Reflect the functionality of the module, not the implementation.
233
234 =item *
235
236 Avoid starting a new top-level hierarchy, especially if a suitable
237 hierarchy already exists under which you could place your module.
238
239 =back
240
241 You should contact modules@perl.org to ask them about your module name
242 before publishing your module.  You should also try to ask people who 
243 are already familiar with the module's application domain and the CPAN
244 naming system.  Authors of similar modules, or modules with similar
245 names, may be a good place to start.
246
247 =head1 DESIGNING AND WRITING YOUR MODULE
248
249 Considerations for module design and coding:
250
251 =head2 To OO or not to OO?
252
253 Your module may be object oriented (OO) or not, or it may have both kinds 
254 of interfaces available.  There are pros and cons of each technique, which 
255 should be considered when you design your API.
256
257 In I<Perl Best Practices> (copyright 2004, Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.),
258 Damian Conway provides a list of criteria to use when deciding if OO is the
259 right fit for your problem:
260
261 =over 4
262
263 =item *
264
265 The system being designed is large, or is likely to become large.
266
267 =item *
268
269 The data can be aggregated into obvious structures, especially if
270 there's a large amount of data in each aggregate.
271
272 =item *
273
274 The various types of data aggregate form a natural hierarchy that
275 facilitates the use of inheritance and polymorphism.
276
277 =item *
278
279 You have a piece of data on which many different operations are
280 applied.
281
282 =item *
283
284 You need to perform the same general operations on related types of
285 data, but with slight variations depending on the specific type of data
286 the operations are applied to.
287
288 =item *
289
290 It's likely you'll have to add new data types later.
291
292 =item *
293
294 The typical interactions between pieces of data are best represented by
295 operators.
296
297 =item *
298
299 The implementation of individual components of the system is likely to
300 change over time.
301
302 =item *
303
304 The system design is already object-oriented.
305
306 =item *
307
308 Large numbers of other programmers will be using your code modules.
309
310 =back
311
312 Think carefully about whether OO is appropriate for your module.
313 Gratuitous object orientation results in complex APIs which are
314 difficult for the average module user to understand or use.
315
316 =head2 Designing your API
317
318 Your interfaces should be understandable by an average Perl programmer.  
319 The following guidelines may help you judge whether your API is
320 sufficiently straightforward:
321
322 =over 4
323
324 =item Write simple routines to do simple things.
325
326 It's better to have numerous simple routines than a few monolithic ones.
327 If your routine changes its behaviour significantly based on its
328 arguments, it's a sign that you should have two (or more) separate
329 routines.
330
331 =item Separate functionality from output.  
332
333 Return your results in the most generic form possible and allow the user 
334 to choose how to use them.  The most generic form possible is usually a
335 Perl data structure which can then be used to generate a text report,
336 HTML, XML, a database query, or whatever else your users require.
337
338 If your routine iterates through some kind of list (such as a list of
339 files, or records in a database) you may consider providing a callback
340 so that users can manipulate each element of the list in turn.
341 File::Find provides an example of this with its 
342 C<find(\&wanted, $dir)> syntax.
343
344 =item Provide sensible shortcuts and defaults.
345
346 Don't require every module user to jump through the same hoops to achieve a
347 simple result.  You can always include optional parameters or routines for 
348 more complex or non-standard behaviour.  If most of your users have to
349 type a few almost identical lines of code when they start using your
350 module, it's a sign that you should have made that behaviour a default.
351 Another good indicator that you should use defaults is if most of your 
352 users call your routines with the same arguments.
353
354 =item Naming conventions
355
356 Your naming should be consistent.  For instance, it's better to have:
357
358         display_day();
359         display_week();
360         display_year();
361
362 than
363
364         display_day();
365         week_display();
366         show_year();
367
368 This applies equally to method names, parameter names, and anything else
369 which is visible to the user (and most things that aren't!)
370
371 =item Parameter passing
372
373 Use named parameters.  It's easier to use a hash like this:
374
375     $obj->do_something(
376             name => "wibble",
377             type => "text",
378             size => 1024,
379     );
380
381 ... than to have a long list of unnamed parameters like this:
382
383     $obj->do_something("wibble", "text", 1024);
384
385 While the list of arguments might work fine for one, two or even three
386 arguments, any more arguments become hard for the module user to
387 remember, and hard for the module author to manage.  If you want to add
388 a new parameter you will have to add it to the end of the list for
389 backward compatibility, and this will probably make your list order
390 unintuitive.  Also, if many elements may be undefined you may see the
391 following unattractive method calls:
392
393     $obj->do_something(undef, undef, undef, undef, undef, 1024);
394
395 Provide sensible defaults for parameters which have them.  Don't make
396 your users specify parameters which will almost always be the same.
397
398 The issue of whether to pass the arguments in a hash or a hashref is
399 largely a matter of personal style. 
400
401 The use of hash keys starting with a hyphen (C<-name>) or entirely in 
402 upper case (C<NAME>) is a relic of older versions of Perl in which
403 ordinary lower case strings were not handled correctly by the C<=E<gt>>
404 operator.  While some modules retain uppercase or hyphenated argument
405 keys for historical reasons or as a matter of personal style, most new
406 modules should use simple lower case keys.  Whatever you choose, be
407 consistent!
408
409 =back
410
411 =head2 Strictness and warnings
412
413 Your module should run successfully under the strict pragma and should
414 run without generating any warnings.  Your module should also handle 
415 taint-checking where appropriate, though this can cause difficulties in
416 many cases.
417
418 =head2 Backwards compatibility
419
420 Modules which are "stable" should not break backwards compatibility
421 without at least a long transition phase and a major change in version
422 number.
423
424 =head2 Error handling and messages
425
426 When your module encounters an error it should do one or more of:
427
428 =over 4
429
430 =item *
431
432 Return an undefined value.
433
434 =item *
435
436 set C<$Module::errstr> or similar (C<errstr> is a common name used by
437 DBI and other popular modules; if you choose something else, be sure to
438 document it clearly).
439
440 =item *
441
442 C<warn()> or C<carp()> a message to STDERR.  
443
444 =item *
445
446 C<croak()> only when your module absolutely cannot figure out what to
447 do.  (C<croak()> is a better version of C<die()> for use within 
448 modules, which reports its errors from the perspective of the caller.  
449 See L<Carp> for details of C<croak()>, C<carp()> and other useful
450 routines.)
451
452 =item *
453
454 As an alternative to the above, you may prefer to throw exceptions using 
455 the Error module.
456
457 =back
458
459 Configurable error handling can be very useful to your users.  Consider
460 offering a choice of levels for warning and debug messages, an option to
461 send messages to a separate file, a way to specify an error-handling
462 routine, or other such features.  Be sure to default all these options
463 to the commonest use.
464
465 =head1 DOCUMENTING YOUR MODULE
466
467 =head2 POD
468
469 Your module should include documentation aimed at Perl developers.
470 You should use Perl's "plain old documentation" (POD) for your general 
471 technical documentation, though you may wish to write additional
472 documentation (white papers, tutorials, etc) in some other format.  
473 You need to cover the following subjects:
474
475 =over 4
476
477 =item *
478
479 A synopsis of the common uses of the module
480
481 =item *
482
483 The purpose, scope and target applications of your module
484
485 =item *
486
487 Use of each publically accessible method or subroutine, including
488 parameters and return values
489
490 =item *
491
492 Examples of use
493
494 =item *
495
496 Sources of further information
497
498 =item *
499
500 A contact email address for the author/maintainer
501
502 =back
503
504 The level of detail in Perl module documentation generally goes from
505 less detailed to more detailed.  Your SYNOPSIS section should contain a
506 minimal example of use (perhaps as little as one line of code; skip the
507 unusual use cases or anything not needed by most users); the
508 DESCRIPTION should describe your module in broad terms, generally in
509 just a few paragraphs; more detail of the module's routines or methods,
510 lengthy code examples, or other in-depth material should be given in 
511 subsequent sections.
512
513 Ideally, someone who's slightly familiar with your module should be able
514 to refresh their memory without hitting "page down".  As your reader
515 continues through the document, they should receive a progressively
516 greater amount of knowledge.
517
518 The recommended order of sections in Perl module documentation is:
519
520 =over 4
521
522 =item * 
523
524 NAME
525
526 =item *
527
528 SYNOPSIS
529
530 =item *
531
532 DESCRIPTION
533
534 =item *
535
536 One or more sections or subsections giving greater detail of available 
537 methods and routines and any other relevant information.
538
539 =item *
540
541 BUGS/CAVEATS/etc
542
543 =item *
544
545 AUTHOR
546
547 =item *
548
549 SEE ALSO
550
551 =item *
552
553 COPYRIGHT and LICENSE
554
555 =back
556
557 Keep your documentation near the code it documents ("inline"
558 documentation).  Include POD for a given method right above that 
559 method's subroutine.  This makes it easier to keep the documentation up
560 to date, and avoids having to document each piece of code twice (once in
561 POD and once in comments).
562
563 =head2 README, INSTALL, release notes, changelogs
564
565 Your module should also include a README file describing the module and
566 giving pointers to further information (website, author email).  
567
568 An INSTALL file should be included, and should contain simple installation 
569 instructions.  When using ExtUtils::MakeMaker this will usually be:
570
571 =over 4
572
573 =item perl Makefile.PL
574
575 =item make
576
577 =item make test
578
579 =item make install
580
581 =back
582
583 When using Module::Build, this will usually be:
584
585 =over 4
586
587 =item perl Build.PL
588
589 =item perl Build
590
591 =item perl Build test
592
593 =item perl Build install
594
595 =back
596
597 Release notes or changelogs should be produced for each release of your
598 software describing user-visible changes to your module, in terms
599 relevant to the user.
600
601 Unless you have good reasons for using some other format
602 (for example, a format used within your company),
603 the convention is to name your changelog file C<Changes>,
604 and to follow the simple format described in L<CPAN::Changes::Spec>.
605
606 =head1 RELEASE CONSIDERATIONS
607
608 =head2 Version numbering
609
610 Version numbers should indicate at least major and minor releases, and
611 possibly sub-minor releases.  A major release is one in which most of
612 the functionality has changed, or in which major new functionality is
613 added.  A minor release is one in which a small amount of functionality
614 has been added or changed.  Sub-minor version numbers are usually used
615 for changes which do not affect functionality, such as documentation
616 patches.
617
618 The most common CPAN version numbering scheme looks like this:
619
620     1.00, 1.10, 1.11, 1.20, 1.30, 1.31, 1.32
621
622 A correct CPAN version number is a floating point number with at least 
623 2 digits after the decimal.  You can test whether it conforms to CPAN by 
624 using
625
626     perl -MExtUtils::MakeMaker -le 'print MM->parse_version(shift)' 'Foo.pm'
627
628 If you want to release a 'beta' or 'alpha' version of a module but
629 don't want CPAN.pm to list it as most recent use an '_' after the
630 regular version number followed by at least 2 digits, eg. 1.20_01.  If
631 you do this, the following idiom is recommended:
632
633   our $VERSION = "1.12_01"; # so CPAN distribution will have
634                             # right filename
635   our $XS_VERSION = $VERSION; # only needed if you have XS code
636   $VERSION = eval $VERSION; # so "use Module 0.002" won't warn on
637                             # underscore
638
639 With that trick MakeMaker will only read the first line and thus read
640 the underscore, while the perl interpreter will evaluate the $VERSION
641 and convert the string into a number.  Later operations that treat
642 $VERSION as a number will then be able to do so without provoking a
643 warning about $VERSION not being a number.
644
645 Never release anything (even a one-word documentation patch) without
646 incrementing the number.  Even a one-word documentation patch should
647 result in a change in version at the sub-minor level.
648
649 Once picked, it is important to stick to your version scheme, without
650 reducing the number of digits.  This is because "downstream" packagers,
651 such as the FreeBSD ports system, interpret the version numbers in
652 various ways.  If you change the number of digits in your version scheme,
653 you can confuse these systems so they get the versions of your module
654 out of order, which is obviously bad.
655
656 =head2 Pre-requisites
657
658 Module authors should carefully consider whether to rely on other
659 modules, and which modules to rely on.
660
661 Most importantly, choose modules which are as stable as possible.  In
662 order of preference: 
663
664 =over 4
665
666 =item *
667
668 Core Perl modules
669
670 =item *
671
672 Stable CPAN modules
673
674 =item *
675
676 Unstable CPAN modules
677
678 =item *
679
680 Modules not available from CPAN
681
682 =back
683
684 Specify version requirements for other Perl modules in the
685 pre-requisites in your Makefile.PL or Build.PL.
686
687 Be sure to specify Perl version requirements both in Makefile.PL or
688 Build.PL and with C<require 5.6.1> or similar.  See the section on
689 C<use VERSION> of L<perlfunc/require> for details.
690
691 =head2 Testing
692
693 All modules should be tested before distribution (using "make disttest"),
694 and the tests should also be available to people installing the modules 
695 (using "make test").  
696 For Module::Build you would use the C<make test> equivalent C<perl Build test>.
697
698 The importance of these tests is proportional to the alleged stability of a 
699 module.  A module which purports to be
700 stable or which hopes to achieve wide 
701 use should adhere to as strict a testing regime as possible.
702
703 Useful modules to help you write tests (with minimum impact on your 
704 development process or your time) include Test::Simple, Carp::Assert 
705 and Test::Inline.
706 For more sophisticated test suites there are Test::More and Test::MockObject.
707
708 =head2 Packaging
709
710 Modules should be packaged using one of the standard packaging tools.
711 Currently you have the choice between ExtUtils::MakeMaker and the
712 more platform independent Module::Build, allowing modules to be installed in a
713 consistent manner.
714 When using ExtUtils::MakeMaker, you can use "make dist" to create your
715 package.  Tools exist to help you to build your module in a
716 MakeMaker-friendly style.  These include ExtUtils::ModuleMaker and h2xs.
717 See also L<perlnewmod>.
718
719 =head2 Licensing
720
721 Make sure that your module has a license, and that the full text of it
722 is included in the distribution (unless it's a common one and the terms
723 of the license don't require you to include it).
724
725 If you don't know what license to use, dual licensing under the GPL
726 and Artistic licenses (the same as Perl itself) is a good idea.
727 See L<perlgpl> and L<perlartistic>.
728
729 =head1 COMMON PITFALLS
730
731 =head2 Reinventing the wheel
732
733 There are certain application spaces which are already very, very well
734 served by CPAN.  One example is templating systems, another is date and
735 time modules, and there are many more.  While it is a rite of passage to
736 write your own version of these things, please consider carefully
737 whether the Perl world really needs you to publish it.
738
739 =head2 Trying to do too much
740
741 Your module will be part of a developer's toolkit.  It will not, in
742 itself, form the B<entire> toolkit.  It's tempting to add extra features
743 until your code is a monolithic system rather than a set of modular
744 building blocks.
745
746 =head2 Inappropriate documentation
747
748 Don't fall into the trap of writing for the wrong audience.  Your
749 primary audience is a reasonably experienced developer with at least 
750 a moderate understanding of your module's application domain, who's just 
751 downloaded your module and wants to start using it as quickly as possible.
752
753 Tutorials, end-user documentation, research papers, FAQs etc are not 
754 appropriate in a module's main documentation.  If you really want to 
755 write these, include them as sub-documents such as C<My::Module::Tutorial> or
756 C<My::Module::FAQ> and provide a link in the SEE ALSO section of the
757 main documentation.  
758
759 =head1 SEE ALSO
760
761 =over 4
762
763 =item L<perlstyle>
764
765 General Perl style guide
766
767 =item L<perlnewmod>
768
769 How to create a new module
770
771 =item L<perlpod>
772
773 POD documentation
774
775 =item L<podchecker>
776
777 Verifies your POD's correctness
778
779 =item Packaging Tools
780
781 L<ExtUtils::MakeMaker>, L<Module::Build>
782
783 =item Testing tools
784
785 L<Test::Simple>, L<Test::Inline>, L<Carp::Assert>, L<Test::More>, L<Test::MockObject>
786
787 =item http://pause.perl.org/
788
789 Perl Authors Upload Server.  Contains links to information for module
790 authors.
791
792 =item Any good book on software engineering
793
794 =back
795
796 =head1 AUTHOR
797
798 Kirrily "Skud" Robert <skud@cpan.org>
799