This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Magic numbers in B::Concise
[perl5.git] / ext / B / O.pm
1 package O;
2
3 our $VERSION = '1.00';
4
5 use B qw(minus_c save_BEGINs);
6 use Carp;
7
8 sub import {
9     my ($class, @options) = @_;
10     my ($quiet, $veryquiet) = (0, 0);
11     if ($options[0] eq '-q' || $options[0] eq '-qq') {
12         $quiet = 1;
13         open (SAVEOUT, ">&STDOUT");
14         close STDOUT;
15         open (STDOUT, ">", \$O::BEGIN_output);
16         if ($options[0] eq '-qq') {
17             $veryquiet = 1;
18         }
19         shift @options;
20     }
21     my $backend = shift (@options);
22     eval q[
23         BEGIN {
24             minus_c;
25             save_BEGINs;
26         }
27
28         CHECK {
29             if ($quiet) {
30                 close STDOUT;
31                 open (STDOUT, ">&SAVEOUT");
32                 close SAVEOUT;
33             }
34
35             # Note: if you change the code after this 'use', please
36             # change the fudge factors in B::Concise (grep for
37             # "fragile kludge") so that its output still looks
38             # nice. Thanks. --smcc
39             use B::].$backend.q[ ();
40             if ($@) {
41                 croak "use of backend $backend failed: $@";
42             }
43
44
45             my $compilesub = &{"B::${backend}::compile"}(@options);
46             if (ref($compilesub) ne "CODE") {
47                 die $compilesub;
48             }
49
50             local $savebackslash = $\;
51             local ($\,$",$,) = (undef,' ','');
52             &$compilesub();
53
54             close STDERR if $veryquiet;
55         }
56     ];
57     die $@ if $@;
58 }
59
60 1;
61
62 __END__
63
64 =head1 NAME
65
66 O - Generic interface to Perl Compiler backends
67
68 =head1 SYNOPSIS
69
70         perl -MO=[-q,]Backend[,OPTIONS] foo.pl
71
72 =head1 DESCRIPTION
73
74 This is the module that is used as a frontend to the Perl Compiler.
75
76 If you pass the C<-q> option to the module, then the STDOUT
77 filehandle will be redirected into the variable C<$O::BEGIN_output>
78 during compilation.  This has the effect that any output printed
79 to STDOUT by BEGIN blocks or use'd modules will be stored in this
80 variable rather than printed. It's useful with those backends which
81 produce output themselves (C<Deparse>, C<Concise> etc), so that
82 their output is not confused with that generated by the code
83 being compiled.
84
85 The C<-qq> option behaves like C<-q>, except that it also closes
86 STDERR after deparsing has finished. This suppresses the "Syntax OK"
87 message normally produced by perl.
88
89 =head1 CONVENTIONS
90
91 Most compiler backends use the following conventions: OPTIONS
92 consists of a comma-separated list of words (no white-space).
93 The C<-v> option usually puts the backend into verbose mode.
94 The C<-ofile> option generates output to B<file> instead of
95 stdout. The C<-D> option followed by various letters turns on
96 various internal debugging flags. See the documentation for the
97 desired backend (named C<B::Backend> for the example above) to
98 find out about that backend.
99
100 =head1 IMPLEMENTATION
101
102 This section is only necessary for those who want to write a
103 compiler backend module that can be used via this module.
104
105 The command-line mentioned in the SYNOPSIS section corresponds to
106 the Perl code
107
108     use O ("Backend", OPTIONS);
109
110 The C<import> function which that calls loads in the appropriate
111 C<B::Backend> module and calls the C<compile> function in that
112 package, passing it OPTIONS. That function is expected to return
113 a sub reference which we'll call CALLBACK. Next, the "compile-only"
114 flag is switched on (equivalent to the command-line option C<-c>)
115 and a CHECK block is registered which calls CALLBACK. Thus the main
116 Perl program mentioned on the command-line is read in, parsed and
117 compiled into internal syntax tree form. Since the C<-c> flag is
118 set, the program does not start running (excepting BEGIN blocks of
119 course) but the CALLBACK function registered by the compiler
120 backend is called.
121
122 In summary, a compiler backend module should be called "B::Foo"
123 for some foo and live in the appropriate directory for that name.
124 It should define a function called C<compile>. When the user types
125
126     perl -MO=Foo,OPTIONS foo.pl
127
128 that function is called and is passed those OPTIONS (split on
129 commas). It should return a sub ref to the main compilation function.
130 After the user's program is loaded and parsed, that returned sub ref
131 is invoked which can then go ahead and do the compilation, usually by
132 making use of the C<B> module's functionality.
133
134 =head1 AUTHOR
135
136 Malcolm Beattie, C<mbeattie@sable.ox.ac.uk>
137
138 =cut