This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Add socklen_t probe; Configure maintenance.
[perl5.git] / ext / Thread / Thread.pm
1 package Thread;
2 require Exporter;
3 use XSLoader ();
4 our($VERSION, @ISA, @EXPORT);
5
6 $VERSION = "1.0";
7
8 @ISA = qw(Exporter);
9 @EXPORT_OK = qw(yield cond_signal cond_broadcast cond_wait async);
10
11 =head1 NAME
12
13 Thread - manipulate threads in Perl (EXPERIMENTAL, subject to change)
14
15 =head1 SYNOPSIS
16
17     use Thread;
18
19     my $t = new Thread \&start_sub, @start_args;
20
21     $result = $t->join;
22     $result = $t->eval;
23     $t->detach;
24
25     if($t->equal($another_thread)) {
26         # ...
27     }
28
29     my $tid = Thread->self->tid; 
30     my $tlist = Thread->list;
31
32     lock($scalar);
33     yield();
34
35     use Thread 'async';
36
37 =head1 DESCRIPTION
38
39 The C<Thread> module provides multithreading support for perl.
40
41 WARNING: Threading is an experimental feature.  Both the interface
42 and implementation are subject to change drastically.
43
44 In fact, this documentation describes the flavor of threads that was in
45 version 5.005.  Perl v5.6 has the beginnings of support for interpreter
46 threads, which (when finished) is expected to be significantly different
47 from what is described here.  The information contained here may therefore
48 soon be obsolete.  Use at your own risk!
49
50 =head1 FUNCTIONS
51
52 =over 8
53
54 =item new \&start_sub
55
56 =item new \&start_sub, LIST
57
58 C<new> starts a new thread of execution in the referenced subroutine. The
59 optional list is passed as parameters to the subroutine. Execution
60 continues in both the subroutine and the code after the C<new> call.
61
62 C<new Thread> returns a thread object representing the newly created
63 thread.
64
65 =item lock VARIABLE
66
67 C<lock> places a lock on a variable until the lock goes out of scope.  If
68 the variable is locked by another thread, the C<lock> call will block until
69 it's available. C<lock> is recursive, so multiple calls to C<lock> are
70 safe--the variable will remain locked until the outermost lock on the
71 variable goes out of scope.
72
73 Locks on variables only affect C<lock> calls--they do I<not> affect normal
74 access to a variable. (Locks on subs are different, and covered in a bit)
75 If you really, I<really> want locks to block access, then go ahead and tie
76 them to something and manage this yourself. This is done on purpose. While
77 managing access to variables is a good thing, perl doesn't force you out of
78 its living room...
79
80 If a container object, such as a hash or array, is locked, all the elements
81 of that container are not locked. For example, if a thread does a C<lock
82 @a>, any other thread doing a C<lock($a[12])> won't block.
83
84 You may also C<lock> a sub, using C<lock &sub>. Any calls to that sub from
85 another thread will block until the lock is released. This behaviour is not
86 equivalent to declaring the sub with the C<locked> attribute.  The C<locked>
87 attribute serializes access to a subroutine, but allows different threads
88 non-simultaneous access. C<lock &sub>, on the other hand, will not allow
89 I<any> other thread access for the duration of the lock.
90
91 Finally, C<lock> will traverse up references exactly I<one> level.
92 C<lock(\$a)> is equivalent to C<lock($a)>, while C<lock(\\$a)> is not.
93
94 =item async BLOCK;
95
96 C<async> creates a thread to execute the block immediately following
97 it. This block is treated as an anonymous sub, and so must have a
98 semi-colon after the closing brace. Like C<new Thread>, C<async> returns a
99 thread object.
100
101 =item Thread->self
102
103 The C<Thread-E<gt>self> function returns a thread object that represents
104 the thread making the C<Thread-E<gt>self> call.
105
106 =item Thread->list
107
108 C<Thread-E<gt>list> returns a list of thread objects for all running and
109 finished but un-C<join>ed threads.
110
111 =item cond_wait VARIABLE
112
113 The C<cond_wait> function takes a B<locked> variable as a parameter,
114 unlocks the variable, and blocks until another thread does a C<cond_signal>
115 or C<cond_broadcast> for that same locked variable. The variable that
116 C<cond_wait> blocked on is relocked after the C<cond_wait> is satisfied.
117 If there are multiple threads C<cond_wait>ing on the same variable, all but
118 one will reblock waiting to reaquire the lock on the variable. (So if
119 you're only using C<cond_wait> for synchronization, give up the lock as
120 soon as possible)
121
122 =item cond_signal VARIABLE
123
124 The C<cond_signal> function takes a locked variable as a parameter and
125 unblocks one thread that's C<cond_wait>ing on that variable. If more than
126 one thread is blocked in a C<cond_wait> on that variable, only one (and
127 which one is indeterminate) will be unblocked.
128
129 If there are no threads blocked in a C<cond_wait> on the variable, the
130 signal is discarded.
131
132 =item cond_broadcast VARIABLE
133
134 The C<cond_broadcast> function works similarly to C<cond_wait>.
135 C<cond_broadcast>, though, will unblock B<all> the threads that are blocked
136 in a C<cond_wait> on the locked variable, rather than only one.
137
138 =item yield
139
140 The C<yield> function allows another thread to take control of the
141 CPU. The exact results are implementation-dependent.
142
143 =back
144
145 =head1 METHODS
146
147 =over 8
148
149 =item join
150
151 C<join> waits for a thread to end and returns any values the thread exited
152 with. C<join> will block until the thread has ended, though it won't block
153 if the thread has already terminated.
154
155 If the thread being C<join>ed C<die>d, the error it died with will be
156 returned at this time. If you don't want the thread performing the C<join>
157 to die as well, you should either wrap the C<join> in an C<eval> or use the
158 C<eval> thread method instead of C<join>.
159
160 =item eval
161
162 The C<eval> method wraps an C<eval> around a C<join>, and so waits for a
163 thread to exit, passing along any values the thread might have returned.
164 Errors, of course, get placed into C<$@>.
165
166 =item detach
167
168 C<detach> tells a thread that it is never going to be joined i.e.
169 that all traces of its existence can be removed once it stops running.
170 Errors in detached threads will not be visible anywhere - if you want
171 to catch them, you should use $SIG{__DIE__} or something like that.
172
173 =item equal 
174
175 C<equal> tests whether two thread objects represent the same thread and
176 returns true if they do.
177
178 =item tid
179
180 The C<tid> method returns the tid of a thread. The tid is a monotonically
181 increasing integer assigned when a thread is created. The main thread of a
182 program will have a tid of zero, while subsequent threads will have tids
183 assigned starting with one.
184
185 =back
186
187 =head1 LIMITATIONS
188
189 The sequence number used to assign tids is a simple integer, and no
190 checking is done to make sure the tid isn't currently in use. If a program
191 creates more than 2^32 - 1 threads in a single run, threads may be assigned
192 duplicate tids. This limitation may be lifted in a future version of Perl.
193
194 =head1 SEE ALSO
195
196 L<attributes>, L<Thread::Queue>, L<Thread::Semaphore>, L<Thread::Specific>.
197
198 =cut
199
200 #
201 # Methods
202 #
203
204 #
205 # Exported functions
206 #
207 sub async (&) {
208     return new Thread $_[0];
209 }
210
211 sub eval {
212     return eval { shift->join; };
213 }
214
215 XSLoader::load 'Thread';
216
217 1;