This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Teach bump-perl-version about additional perl511 references in makedef.pl.
[perl5.git] / lib / bytes.pm
1 package bytes;
2
3 our $VERSION = '1.04';
4
5 $bytes::hint_bits = 0x00000008;
6
7 sub import {
8     $^H |= $bytes::hint_bits;
9 }
10
11 sub unimport {
12     $^H &= ~$bytes::hint_bits;
13 }
14
15 sub AUTOLOAD {
16     require "bytes_heavy.pl";
17     goto &$AUTOLOAD if defined &$AUTOLOAD;
18     require Carp;
19     Carp::croak("Undefined subroutine $AUTOLOAD called");
20 }
21
22 sub length (_);
23 sub chr (_);
24 sub ord (_);
25 sub substr ($$;$$);
26 sub index ($$;$);
27 sub rindex ($$;$);
28
29 1;
30 __END__
31
32 =head1 NAME
33
34 bytes - Perl pragma to force byte semantics rather than character semantics
35
36 =head1 DEPRECATED
37
38 This pragma reflects early attempts to incorporate Unicode into perl and
39 has since been superceded. It breaks encapulation (i.e. it exposes the
40 innards of how perl happens to be currently storing a string), and use of
41 this module for anything other than debugging purposes is strongly
42 discouraged. If you feel that the functions here within might be useful
43 for your application, this possibly indicates a mismatch beteen your
44 mental model of Perl Unicode and the current reality. In that case, you
45 may wish to peruse some of the perl Unicode documentation: L<perluniintro>,
46 L<perlunitut>, L<perlunifaq> and L<perlunicode>.
47
48 =head1 SYNOPSIS
49
50     use bytes;
51     ... chr(...);       # or bytes::chr
52     ... index(...);     # or bytes::index
53     ... length(...);    # or bytes::length
54     ... ord(...);       # or bytes::ord
55     ... rindex(...);    # or bytes::rindex
56     ... substr(...);    # or bytes::substr
57     no bytes;
58
59
60 =head1 DESCRIPTION
61
62 The C<use bytes> pragma disables character semantics for the rest of the
63 lexical scope in which it appears.  C<no bytes> can be used to reverse
64 the effect of C<use bytes> within the current lexical scope.
65
66 Perl normally assumes character semantics in the presence of character
67 data (i.e. data that has come from a source that has been marked as
68 being of a particular character encoding). When C<use bytes> is in
69 effect, the encoding is temporarily ignored, and each string is treated
70 as a series of bytes. 
71
72 As an example, when Perl sees C<$x = chr(400)>, it encodes the character
73 in UTF-8 and stores it in $x. Then it is marked as character data, so,
74 for instance, C<length $x> returns C<1>. However, in the scope of the
75 C<bytes> pragma, $x is treated as a series of bytes - the bytes that make
76 up the UTF8 encoding - and C<length $x> returns C<2>:
77
78     $x = chr(400);
79     print "Length is ", length $x, "\n";     # "Length is 1"
80     printf "Contents are %vd\n", $x;         # "Contents are 400"
81     { 
82         use bytes; # or "require bytes; bytes::length()"
83         print "Length is ", length $x, "\n"; # "Length is 2"
84         printf "Contents are %vd\n", $x;     # "Contents are 198.144"
85     }
86
87 chr(), ord(), substr(), index() and rindex() behave similarly.
88
89 For more on the implications and differences between character
90 semantics and byte semantics, see L<perluniintro> and L<perlunicode>.
91
92 =head1 LIMITATIONS
93
94 bytes::substr() does not work as an lvalue().
95
96 =head1 SEE ALSO
97
98 L<perluniintro>, L<perlunicode>, L<utf8>
99
100 =cut