This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
0aa5f0f635c2c07b38e4aaca807af0e35cde0a2d
[perl5.git] / ext / Encode / encoding.pm
1 package encoding;
2 our $VERSION = do { my @r = (q$Revision: 1.35 $ =~ /\d+/g); sprintf "%d."."%02d" x $#r, @r };
3
4 use Encode;
5 use strict;
6
7 BEGIN {
8     if (ord("A") == 193) {
9         require Carp;
10         Carp::croak("encoding pragma does not support EBCDIC platforms");
11     }
12 }
13
14 our $HAS_PERLIO = 0;
15 eval { require PerlIO::encoding };
16 unless ($@){
17     $HAS_PERLIO = (PerlIO::encoding->VERSION >= 0.02);
18 }
19
20 sub import {
21     my $class = shift;
22     my $name  = shift;
23     my %arg = @_;
24     $name ||= $ENV{PERL_ENCODING};
25
26     my $enc = find_encoding($name);
27     unless (defined $enc) {
28         require Carp;
29         Carp::croak("Unknown encoding '$name'");
30     }
31     unless ($arg{Filter}){
32         ${^ENCODING} = $enc; # this is all you need, actually.
33         $HAS_PERLIO or return 1;
34         for my $h (qw(STDIN STDOUT)){
35             if ($arg{$h}){
36                 unless (defined find_encoding($arg{$h})) {
37                     require Carp;
38                     Carp::croak("Unknown encoding for $h, '$arg{$h}'");
39                 }
40                 eval { binmode($h, ":encoding($arg{$h})") };
41             }else{
42                 unless (exists $arg{$h}){
43                     eval { 
44                         no warnings 'uninitialized';
45                         binmode($h, ":encoding($name)");
46                     };
47                 }
48             }
49             if ($@){
50                 require Carp;
51                 Carp::croak($@);
52             }
53         }
54     }else{
55         defined(${^ENCODING}) and undef ${^ENCODING};
56         eval {
57             require Filter::Util::Call ;
58             Filter::Util::Call->import ;
59             binmode(STDIN);
60             binmode(STDOUT);
61             filter_add(sub{
62                            my $status;
63                            if (($status = filter_read()) > 0){
64                                $_ = $enc->decode($_, 1);
65                                # warn $_;
66                            }
67                            $status ;
68                        });
69         };
70         # warn "Filter installed";
71     }
72     return 1; # I doubt if we need it, though
73 }
74
75 sub unimport{
76     no warnings;
77     undef ${^ENCODING};
78     if ($HAS_PERLIO){
79         binmode(STDIN,  ":raw");
80         binmode(STDOUT, ":raw");
81     }else{
82     binmode(STDIN);
83     binmode(STDOUT);
84     }
85     if ($INC{"Filter/Util/Call.pm"}){
86         eval { filter_del() };
87     }
88 }
89
90 1;
91 __END__
92
93 =pod
94
95 =head1 NAME
96
97 encoding - allows you to write your script in non-ascii or non-utf8
98
99 =head1 SYNOPSIS
100
101   use encoding "greek";  # Perl like Greek to you?
102   use encoding "euc-jp"; # Jperl!
103
104   # or you can even do this if your shell supports your native encoding
105
106   perl -Mencoding=latin2 -e '...' # Feeling centrally European?
107   perl -Mencoding=euc-kr -e '...' # Or Korean?
108
109   # or from the shebang line
110
111   #!/your/path/to/perl -Mencoding="8859-6" # Arabian Nights
112   #!/your/path/to/perl -Mencoding=big5     # Taiwanese
113
114   # more control
115
116   # A simple euc-cn => utf-8 converter
117   use encoding "euc-cn", STDOUT => "utf8";  while(<>){print};
118
119   # "no encoding;" supported (but not scoped!)
120   no encoding;
121
122   # an alternate way, Filter
123   use encoding "euc-jp", Filter=>1;
124   use utf8;
125   # now you can use kanji identifiers -- in euc-jp!
126
127 =head1 ABSTRACT
128
129 Let's start with a bit of history: Perl 5.6.0 introduced Unicode
130 support.  You could apply C<substr()> and regexes even to complex CJK
131 characters -- so long as the script was written in UTF-8.  But back
132 then, text editors that supported UTF-8 were still rare and many users
133 instead chose to write scripts in legacy encodings, giving up a whole
134 new feature of Perl 5.6.
135
136 Rewind to the future: starting from perl 5.8.0 with the B<encoding>
137 pragma, you can write your script in any encoding you like (so long
138 as the C<Encode> module supports it) and still enjoy Unicode support.
139 You can write code in EUC-JP as follows:
140
141   my $Rakuda = "\xF1\xD1\xF1\xCC"; # Camel in Kanji
142                #<-char-><-char->   # 4 octets
143   s/\bCamel\b/$Rakuda/;
144
145 And with C<use encoding "euc-jp"> in effect, it is the same thing as
146 the code in UTF-8:
147
148   my $Rakuda = "\x{99F1}\x{99DD}"; # two Unicode Characters
149   s/\bCamel\b/$Rakuda/;
150
151 The B<encoding> pragma also modifies the filehandle disciplines of
152 STDIN, STDOUT, and STDERR to the specified encoding.  Therefore,
153
154   use encoding "euc-jp";
155   my $message = "Camel is the symbol of perl.\n";
156   my $Rakuda = "\xF1\xD1\xF1\xCC"; # Camel in Kanji
157   $message =~ s/\bCamel\b/$Rakuda/;
158   print $message;
159
160 Will print "\xF1\xD1\xF1\xCC is the symbol of perl.\n",
161 not "\x{99F1}\x{99DD} is the symbol of perl.\n".
162
163 You can override this by giving extra arguments; see below.
164
165 =head1 USAGE
166
167 =over 4
168
169 =item use encoding [I<ENCNAME>] ;
170
171 Sets the script encoding to I<ENCNAME>. Filehandle disciplines of
172 STDIN and STDOUT are set to ":encoding(I<ENCNAME>)".  Note that STDERR
173 will not be changed.
174
175 If no encoding is specified, the environment variable L<PERL_ENCODING>
176 is consulted.  If no encoding can be found, the error C<Unknown encoding
177 'I<ENCNAME>'> will be thrown.
178
179 Note that non-STD file handles remain unaffected.  Use C<use open> or
180 C<binmode> to change disciplines of those.
181
182 =item use encoding I<ENCNAME> [ STDIN =E<gt> I<ENCNAME_IN> ...] ;
183
184 You can also individually set encodings of STDIN and STDOUT via the
185 C<< STDIN => I<ENCNAME> >> form.  In this case, you cannot omit the
186 first I<ENCNAME>.  C<< STDIN => undef >> turns the IO transcoding
187 completely off.
188
189 =item no encoding;
190
191 Unsets the script encoding. The disciplines of STDIN, STDOUT are
192 reset to ":raw" (the default unprocessed raw stream of bytes).
193
194 =back
195
196 =head1 CAVEATS
197
198 =head2 NOT SCOPED
199
200 The pragma is a per script, not a per block lexical.  Only the last
201 C<use encoding> or C<no encoding> matters, and it affects 
202 B<the whole script>.  However, the <no encoding> pragma is supported and 
203 B<use encoding> can appear as many times as you want in a given script. 
204 The multiple use of this pragma is discouraged.
205
206 Because of this nature, the use of this pragma inside the module is
207 strongly discouraged (because the influence of this pragma lasts not
208 only for the module but the script that uses).  But if you have to,
209 make sure you say C<no encoding> at the end of the module so you
210 contain the influence of the pragma within the module.
211
212 =head2 DO NOT MIX MULTIPLE ENCODINGS
213
214 Notice that only literals (string or regular expression) having only
215 legacy code points are affected: if you mix data like this
216
217         \xDF\x{100}
218
219 the data is assumed to be in (Latin 1 and) Unicode, not in your native
220 encoding.  In other words, this will match in "greek":
221
222         "\xDF" =~ /\x{3af}/
223
224 but this will not
225
226         "\xDF\x{100}" =~ /\x{3af}\x{100}/
227
228 since the C<\xDF> (ISO 8859-7 GREEK SMALL LETTER IOTA WITH TONOS) on
229 the left will B<not> be upgraded to C<\x{3af}> (Unicode GREEK SMALL
230 LETTER IOTA WITH TONOS) because of the C<\x{100}> on the left.  You
231 should not be mixing your legacy data and Unicode in the same string.
232
233 This pragma also affects encoding of the 0x80..0xFF code point range:
234 normally characters in that range are left as eight-bit bytes (unless
235 they are combined with characters with code points 0x100 or larger,
236 in which case all characters need to become UTF-8 encoded), but if
237 the C<encoding> pragma is present, even the 0x80..0xFF range always
238 gets UTF-8 encoded.
239
240 After all, the best thing about this pragma is that you don't have to
241 resort to \x{....} just to spell your name in a native encoding.
242 So feel free to put your strings in your encoding in quotes and
243 regexes.
244
245 =head1 Non-ASCII Identifiers and Filter option
246
247 The magic of C<use encoding> is not applied to the names of
248 identifiers.  In order to make C<${"\x{4eba}"}++> ($human++, where human
249 is a single Han ideograph) work, you still need to write your script
250 in UTF-8 or use a source filter.
251
252 In other words, the same restriction as with Jperl applies.
253
254 If you dare to experiment, however, you can try the Filter option.
255
256 =over 4
257
258 =item use encoding I<ENCNAME> Filter=E<gt>1;
259
260 This turns the encoding pragma into a source filter.  While the default
261 approach just decodes interpolated literals (in qq() and qr()), this
262 will apply a source filter to the entire source code.  In this case,
263 STDIN and STDOUT remain untouched.
264
265 =back
266
267 What does this mean?  Your source code behaves as if it is written in
268 UTF-8.  So even if your editor only supports Shift_JIS, for example,
269 you can still try examples in Chapter 15 of C<Programming Perl, 3rd
270 Ed.>.  For instance, you can use UTF-8 identifiers.
271
272 This option is significantly slower and (as of this writing) non-ASCII
273 identifiers are not very stable WITHOUT this option and with the
274 source code written in UTF-8.
275
276 To make your script in legacy encoding work with minimum effort,
277 do not use Filter=E<gt>1.
278
279 =head1 EXAMPLE - Greekperl
280
281     use encoding "iso 8859-7";
282
283     # \xDF in ISO 8859-7 (Greek) is \x{3af} in Unicode.
284
285     $a = "\xDF";
286     $b = "\x{100}";
287
288     printf "%#x\n", ord($a); # will print 0x3af, not 0xdf
289
290     $c = $a . $b;
291
292     # $c will be "\x{3af}\x{100}", not "\x{df}\x{100}".
293
294     # chr() is affected, and ...
295
296     print "mega\n"  if ord(chr(0xdf)) == 0x3af;
297
298     # ... ord() is affected by the encoding pragma ...
299
300     print "tera\n" if ord(pack("C", 0xdf)) == 0x3af;
301
302     # ... as are eq and cmp ...
303
304     print "peta\n" if "\x{3af}" eq  pack("C", 0xdf);
305     print "exa\n"  if "\x{3af}" cmp pack("C", 0xdf) == 0;
306
307     # ... but pack/unpack C are not affected, in case you still
308     # want to go back to your native encoding
309
310     print "zetta\n" if unpack("C", (pack("C", 0xdf))) == 0xdf;
311
312 =head1 KNOWN PROBLEMS
313
314 For native multibyte encodings (either fixed or variable length),
315 the current implementation of the regular expressions may introduce
316 recoding errors for regular expression literals longer than 127 bytes.
317
318 The encoding pragma is not supported on EBCDIC platforms.
319 (Porters who are willing and able to remove this limitation are
320 welcome.)
321
322 =head1 SEE ALSO
323
324 L<perlunicode>, L<Encode>, L<open>, L<Filter::Util::Call>,
325
326 Ch. 15 of C<Programming Perl (3rd Edition)>
327 by Larry Wall, Tom Christiansen, Jon Orwant;
328 O'Reilly & Associates; ISBN 0-596-00027-8
329
330 =cut