This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
018ebb757a7384f41605ab3a5a15493d2b96f444
[perl5.git] / pod / perldiag.pod
1 =head1 NAME
2
3 perldiag - various Perl diagnostics
4
5 =head1 DESCRIPTION
6
7 These messages are classified as follows (listed in increasing order of
8 desperation):
9
10     (W) A warning (optional).
11     (D) A deprecation (optional).
12     (S) A severe warning (mandatory).
13     (F) A fatal error (trappable).
14     (P) An internal error you should never see (trappable).
15     (X) A very fatal error (non-trappable).
16     (A) An alien error message (not generated by Perl).
17
18 Optional warnings are enabled by using the B<-w> switch.  Warnings may
19 be captured by setting C<$SIG{__WARN__}> to a reference to a routine that will be
20 called on each warning instead of printing it.  See L<perlvar>.
21 Trappable errors may be trapped using the eval operator.  See
22 L<perlfunc/eval>.
23
24 Some of these messages are generic.  Spots that vary are denoted with a %s,
25 just as in a printf format.  Note that some messages start with a %s!
26 The symbols C<"%-?@> sort before the letters, while C<[> and C<\> sort after.
27
28 =over 4
29
30 =item "my" variable %s can't be in a package
31
32 (F) Lexically scoped variables aren't in a package, so it doesn't make sense
33 to try to declare one with a package qualifier on the front.  Use local()
34 if you want to localize a package variable.
35
36 =item "my" variable %s masks earlier declaration in same scope
37
38 (S) A lexical variable has been redeclared in the same scope, effectively
39 eliminating all access to the previous instance.  This is almost always
40 a typographical error.  Note that the earlier variable will still exist
41 until the end of the scope or until all closure referents to it are
42 destroyed.
43
44 =item "no" not allowed in expression
45
46 (F) The "no" keyword is recognized and executed at compile time, and returns
47 no useful value.  See L<perlmod>.
48
49 =item "use" not allowed in expression
50
51 (F) The "use" keyword is recognized and executed at compile time, and returns
52 no useful value.  See L<perlmod>.
53
54 =item % may only be used in unpack
55
56 (F) You can't pack a string by supplying a checksum, because the
57 checksumming process loses information, and you can't go the other
58 way.  See L<perlfunc/unpack>.
59
60 =item %s (...) interpreted as function
61
62 (W) You've run afoul of the rule that says that any list operator followed
63 by parentheses turns into a function, with all the list operators arguments
64 found inside the parentheses.  See L<perlop/Terms and List Operators (Leftward)>.
65
66 =item %s argument is not a HASH element
67
68 (F) The argument to exists() must be a hash element, such as
69
70     $foo{$bar}
71     $ref->[12]->{"susie"}
72
73 =item %s argument is not a HASH element or slice
74
75 (F) The argument to delete() must be either a hash element, such as
76
77     $foo{$bar}
78     $ref->[12]->{"susie"}
79
80 or a hash slice, such as
81
82     @foo{$bar, $baz, $xyzzy}
83     @{$ref->[12]}{"susie", "queue"}
84
85 =item %s did not return a true value
86
87 (F) A required (or used) file must return a true value to indicate that
88 it compiled correctly and ran its initialization code correctly.  It's
89 traditional to end such a file with a "1;", though any true value would
90 do.  See L<perlfunc/require>.
91
92 =item %s found where operator expected
93
94 (S) The Perl lexer knows whether to expect a term or an operator.  If it
95 sees what it knows to be a term when it was expecting to see an operator,
96 it gives you this warning.  Usually it indicates that an operator or
97 delimiter was omitted, such as a semicolon.
98
99 =item %s had compilation errors.
100
101 (F) The final summary message when a C<perl -c> fails.
102
103 =item %s has too many errors.
104
105 (F) The parser has given up trying to parse the program after 10 errors.
106 Further error messages would likely be uninformative.
107
108 =item %s matches null string many times
109
110 (W) The pattern you've specified would be an infinite loop if the
111 regular expression engine didn't specifically check for that.  See L<perlre>.
112
113 =item %s never introduced
114
115 (S) The symbol in question was declared but somehow went out of scope
116 before it could possibly have been used.
117
118 =item %s syntax OK
119
120 (F) The final summary message when a C<perl -c> succeeds.
121
122 =item %s: Command not found.
123
124 (A) You've accidentally run your script through B<csh> instead
125 of Perl.  Check the E<lt>#!E<gt> line, or manually feed your script
126 into Perl yourself.
127
128 =item %s: Expression syntax.
129
130 (A) You've accidentally run your script through B<csh> instead
131 of Perl.  Check the E<lt>#!E<gt> line, or manually feed your script
132 into Perl yourself.
133
134 =item %s: Undefined variable.
135
136 (A) You've accidentally run your script through B<csh> instead
137 of Perl.  Check the E<lt>#!E<gt> line, or manually feed your script
138 into Perl yourself.
139
140 =item %s: not found
141
142 (A) You've accidentally run your script through the Bourne shell
143 instead of Perl.  Check the E<lt>#!E<gt> line, or manually feed your script
144 into Perl yourself.
145
146 =item B<-P> not allowed for setuid/setgid script
147
148 (F) The script would have to be opened by the C preprocessor by name,
149 which provides a race condition that breaks security.
150
151 =item C<-T> and C<-B> not implemented on filehandles
152
153 (F) Perl can't peek at the stdio buffer of filehandles when it doesn't
154 know about your kind of stdio.  You'll have to use a filename instead.
155
156 =item 500 Server error
157
158 See Server error.
159
160 =item ?+* follows nothing in regexp
161
162 (F) You started a regular expression with a quantifier.  Backslash it
163 if you meant it literally.   See L<perlre>.
164
165 =item @ outside of string
166
167 (F) You had a pack template that specified an absolute position outside
168 the string being unpacked.  See L<perlfunc/pack>.
169
170 =item accept() on closed fd
171
172 (W) You tried to do an accept on a closed socket.  Did you forget to check
173 the return value of your socket() call?  See L<perlfunc/accept>.
174
175 =item Allocation too large: %lx
176
177 (X) You can't allocate more than 64K on an MSDOS machine.
178
179 =item Allocation too large
180
181 (F) You can't allocate more than 2^31+"small amount" bytes.
182
183 =item Arg too short for msgsnd
184
185 (F) msgsnd() requires a string at least as long as sizeof(long).
186
187 =item Ambiguous use of %s resolved as %s
188
189 (W)(S) You said something that may not be interpreted the way
190 you thought.  Normally it's pretty easy to disambiguate it by supplying
191 a missing quote, operator, parenthesis pair or declaration.
192
193 =item Args must match #! line
194
195 (F) The setuid emulator requires that the arguments Perl was invoked
196 with match the arguments specified on the #! line.
197
198 =item Argument "%s" isn't numeric
199
200 (W) The indicated string was fed as an argument to an operator that
201 expected a numeric value instead.  If you're fortunate the message
202 will identify which operator was so unfortunate.
203
204 =item Array @%s missing the @ in argument %d of %s()
205
206 (D) Really old Perl let you omit the @ on array names in some spots.  This
207 is now heavily deprecated.
208
209 =item assertion botched: %s
210
211 (P) The malloc package that comes with Perl had an internal failure.
212
213 =item Assertion failed: file "%s"
214
215 (P) A general assertion failed.  The file in question must be examined.
216
217 =item Assignment to both a list and a scalar
218
219 (F) If you assign to a conditional operator, the 2nd and 3rd arguments
220 must either both be scalars or both be lists.  Otherwise Perl won't
221 know which context to supply to the right side.
222
223 =item Attempt to free non-arena SV: 0x%lx
224
225 (P) All SV objects are supposed to be allocated from arenas that will
226 be garbage collected on exit.  An SV was discovered to be outside any
227 of those arenas.
228
229 =item Attempt to free non-existent shared string
230
231 (P) Perl maintains a reference counted internal table of strings to
232 optimize the storage and access of hash keys and other strings.  This
233 indicates someone tried to decrement the reference count of a string
234 that can no longer be found in the table.
235
236 =item Attempt to free temp prematurely
237
238 (W) Mortalized values are supposed to be freed by the free_tmps()
239 routine.  This indicates that something else is freeing the SV before
240 the free_tmps() routine gets a chance, which means that the free_tmps()
241 routine will be freeing an unreferenced scalar when it does try to free
242 it.
243
244 =item Attempt to free unreferenced glob pointers
245
246 (P) The reference counts got screwed up on symbol aliases.
247
248 =item Attempt to free unreferenced scalar
249
250 (W) Perl went to decrement the reference count of a scalar to see if it
251 would go to 0, and discovered that it had already gone to 0 earlier,
252 and should have been freed, and in fact, probably was freed.  This
253 could indicate that SvREFCNT_dec() was called too many times, or that
254 SvREFCNT_inc() was called too few times, or that the SV was mortalized
255 when it shouldn't have been, or that memory has been corrupted.
256
257 =item Attempt to use reference as lvalue in substr
258
259 (W) You supplied a reference as the first argument to substr() used
260 as an lvalue, which is pretty strange.  Perhaps you forgot to
261 dereference it first.  See L<perlfunc/substr>.
262
263 =item Bad arg length for %s, is %d, should be %d
264
265 (F) You passed a buffer of the wrong size to one of msgctl(), semctl() or
266 shmctl().  In C parlance, the correct sizes are, respectively,
267 S<sizeof(struct msqid_ds *)>, S<sizeof(struct semid_ds *)>, and
268 S<sizeof(struct shmid_ds *)>.
269
270 =item Bad associative array
271
272 (P) One of the internal hash routines was passed a null HV pointer.
273
274 =item Bad filehandle: %s
275
276 (F) A symbol was passed to something wanting a filehandle, but the symbol
277 has no filehandle associated with it.  Perhaps you didn't do an open(), or
278 did it in another package.
279
280 =item Bad free() ignored
281
282 (S) An internal routine called free() on something that had never been
283 malloc()ed in the first place. Mandatory, but can be disabled by
284 setting environment variable C<PERL_BADFREE> to 1.
285
286 This message can be quite often seen with DB_File on systems with
287 "hard" dynamic linking, like C<AIX> and C<OS/2>. It is a bug of
288 C<Berkeley DB> which is left unnoticed if C<DB> uses I<forgiving>
289 system malloc().
290
291 =item Bad name after %s::
292
293 (F) You started to name a symbol by using a package prefix, and then didn't
294 finish the symbol.  In particular, you can't interpolate outside of quotes,
295 so
296
297     $var = 'myvar';
298     $sym = mypack::$var;
299
300 is not the same as
301
302     $var = 'myvar';
303     $sym = "mypack::$var";
304
305 =item Bad symbol for array
306
307 (P) An internal request asked to add an array entry to something that
308 wasn't a symbol table entry.
309
310 =item Bad symbol for filehandle
311
312 (P) An internal request asked to add a filehandle entry to something that
313 wasn't a symbol table entry.
314
315 =item Bad symbol for hash
316
317 (P) An internal request asked to add a hash entry to something that
318 wasn't a symbol table entry.
319
320 =item Badly placed ()'s
321
322 (A) You've accidentally run your script through B<csh> instead
323 of Perl.  Check the E<lt>#!E<gt> line, or manually feed your script
324 into Perl yourself.
325
326 =item BEGIN failed--compilation aborted
327
328 (F) An untrapped exception was raised while executing a BEGIN subroutine.
329 Compilation stops immediately and the interpreter is exited.
330
331 =item bind() on closed fd
332
333 (W) You tried to do a bind on a closed socket.  Did you forget to check
334 the return value of your socket() call?  See L<perlfunc/bind>.
335
336 =item Bizarre copy of %s in %s
337
338 (P) Perl detected an attempt to copy an internal value that is not copiable.
339
340 =item Callback called exit
341
342 (F) A subroutine invoked from an external package via perl_call_sv()
343 exited by calling exit.
344
345 =item Can't "goto" outside a block
346
347 (F) A "goto" statement was executed to jump out of what might look
348 like a block, except that it isn't a proper block.  This usually
349 occurs if you tried to jump out of a sort() block or subroutine, which
350 is a no-no.  See L<perlfunc/goto>.
351
352 =item Can't "last" outside a block
353
354 (F) A "last" statement was executed to break out of the current block,
355 except that there's this itty bitty problem called there isn't a
356 current block.  Note that an "if" or "else" block doesn't count as a
357 "loopish" block, as doesn't a block given to sort().  You can usually double
358 the curlies to get the same effect though, because the inner curlies
359 will be considered a block that loops once.  See L<perlfunc/last>.
360
361 =item Can't "next" outside a block
362
363 (F) A "next" statement was executed to reiterate the current block, but
364 there isn't a current block.  Note that an "if" or "else" block doesn't
365 count as a "loopish" block, as doesn't a block given to sort().  You can
366 usually double the curlies to get the same effect though, because the inner
367 curlies will be considered a block that loops once.  See L<perlfunc/last>.
368
369 =item Can't "redo" outside a block
370
371 (F) A "redo" statement was executed to restart the current block, but
372 there isn't a current block.  Note that an "if" or "else" block doesn't
373 count as a "loopish" block, as doesn't a block given to sort().  You can
374 usually double the curlies to get the same effect though, because the inner
375 curlies will be considered a block that loops once.  See L<perlfunc/last>.
376
377 =item Can't bless non-reference value
378
379 (F) Only hard references may be blessed.  This is how Perl "enforces"
380 encapsulation of objects.  See L<perlobj>.
381
382 =item Can't break at that line
383
384 (S) A warning intended for while running within the debugger, indicating
385 the line number specified wasn't the location of a statement that could
386 be stopped at.
387
388 =item Can't call method "%s" in empty package "%s"
389
390 (F) You called a method correctly, and it correctly indicated a package
391 functioning as a class, but that package doesn't have ANYTHING defined
392 in it, let alone methods.  See L<perlobj>.
393
394 =item Can't call method "%s" on unblessed reference
395
396 (F) A method call must know what package it's supposed to run in.  It
397 ordinarily finds this out from the object reference you supply, but
398 you didn't supply an object reference in this case.  A reference isn't
399 an object reference until it has been blessed.  See L<perlobj>.
400
401 =item Can't call method "%s" without a package or object reference
402
403 (F) You used the syntax of a method call, but the slot filled by the
404 object reference or package name contains an expression that returns
405 neither an object reference nor a package name.  (Perhaps it's null?)
406 Something like this will reproduce the error:
407
408     $BADREF = undef;
409     process $BADREF 1,2,3;
410     $BADREF->process(1,2,3);
411
412 =item Can't chdir to %s
413
414 (F) You called C<perl -x/foo/bar>, but C</foo/bar> is not a directory
415 that you can chdir to, possibly because it doesn't exist.
416
417 =item Can't coerce %s to integer in %s
418
419 (F) Certain types of SVs, in particular real symbol table entries
420 (typeglobs), can't be forced to stop being what they are.  So you can't
421 say things like:
422
423     *foo += 1;
424
425 You CAN say
426
427     $foo = *foo;
428     $foo += 1;
429
430 but then $foo no longer contains a glob.
431
432 =item Can't coerce %s to number in %s
433
434 (F) Certain types of SVs, in particular real symbol table entries
435 (typeglobs), can't be forced to stop being what they are.
436
437 =item Can't coerce %s to string in %s
438
439 (F) Certain types of SVs, in particular real symbol table entries
440 (typeglobs), can't be forced to stop being what they are.
441
442 =item Can't create pipe mailbox
443
444 (P) An error peculiar to VMS.  The process is suffering from exhausted quotas
445 or other plumbing problems.
446
447 =item Can't declare %s in my
448
449 (F) Only scalar, array, and hash variables may be declared as lexical variables.
450 They must have ordinary identifiers as names.
451
452 =item Can't do inplace edit on %s: %s
453
454 (S) The creation of the new file failed for the indicated reason.
455
456 =item Can't do in-place edit without backup
457
458 (F) You're on a system such as MSDOS that gets confused if you try reading
459 from a deleted (but still opened) file.  You have to say B<-i>C<.bak>, or some
460 such.
461
462 =item Can't do inplace edit: %s E<gt> 14 characters
463
464 (S) There isn't enough room in the filename to make a backup name for the file.
465
466 =item Can't do inplace edit: %s is not a regular file
467
468 (S) You tried to use the B<-i> switch on a special file, such as a file in
469 /dev, or a FIFO.  The file was ignored.
470
471 =item Can't do setegid!
472
473 (P) The setegid() call failed for some reason in the setuid emulator
474 of suidperl.
475
476 =item Can't do seteuid!
477
478 (P) The setuid emulator of suidperl failed for some reason.
479
480 =item Can't do setuid
481
482 (F) This typically means that ordinary perl tried to exec suidperl to
483 do setuid emulation, but couldn't exec it.  It looks for a name of the
484 form sperl5.000 in the same directory that the perl executable resides
485 under the name perl5.000, typically /usr/local/bin on Unix machines.
486 If the file is there, check the execute permissions.  If it isn't, ask
487 your sysadmin why he and/or she removed it.
488
489 =item Can't do waitpid with flags
490
491 (F) This machine doesn't have either waitpid() or wait4(), so only waitpid()
492 without flags is emulated.
493
494 =item Can't do {n,m} with n E<gt> m
495
496 (F) Minima must be less than or equal to maxima.  If you really want
497 your regexp to match something 0 times, just put {0}.  See L<perlre>.
498
499 =item Can't emulate -%s on #! line
500
501 (F) The #! line specifies a switch that doesn't make sense at this point.
502 For example, it'd be kind of silly to put a B<-x> on the #! line.
503
504 =item Can't exec "%s": %s
505
506 (W) An system(), exec(), or piped open call could not execute the named
507 program for the indicated reason.  Typical reasons include: the permissions
508 were wrong on the file, the file wasn't found in C<$ENV{PATH}>, the
509 executable in question was compiled for another architecture, or the
510 #! line in a script points to an interpreter that can't be run for
511 similar reasons.  (Or maybe your system doesn't support #! at all.)
512
513 =item Can't exec %s
514
515 (F) Perl was trying to execute the indicated program for you because that's
516 what the #! line said.  If that's not what you wanted, you may need to
517 mention "perl" on the #! line somewhere.
518
519 =item Can't execute %s
520
521 (F) You used the B<-S> switch, but the script to execute could not be found
522 in the PATH, or at least not with the correct permissions.
523
524 =item Can't find label %s
525
526 (F) You said to goto a label that isn't mentioned anywhere that it's possible
527 for us to go to.  See L<perlfunc/goto>.
528
529 =item Can't find string terminator %s anywhere before EOF
530
531 (F) Perl strings can stretch over multiple lines.  This message means that
532 the closing delimiter was omitted.  Because bracketed quotes count nesting
533 levels, the following is missing its final parenthesis:
534
535     print q(The character '(' starts a side comment.)
536
537 =item Can't fork
538
539 (F) A fatal error occurred while trying to fork while opening a pipeline.
540
541 =item Unsupported function fork
542
543 (F) Your version of executable does not support forking.
544
545 Note that under some systems, like OS/2, there may be different flavors of
546 Perl executables, some of which may support fork, some not. Try changing
547 the name you call Perl by to C<perl_>, C<perl__>, and so on.
548
549 =item Can't get filespec - stale stat buffer?
550
551 (S) A warning peculiar to VMS.  This arises because of the difference between
552 access checks under VMS and under the Unix model Perl assumes.  Under VMS,
553 access checks are done by filename, rather than by bits in the stat buffer, so
554 that ACLs and other protections can be taken into account.  Unfortunately, Perl
555 assumes that the stat buffer contains all the necessary information, and passes
556 it, instead of the filespec, to the access checking routine.  It will try to
557 retrieve the filespec using the device name and FID present in the stat buffer,
558 but this works only if you haven't made a subsequent call to the CRTL stat()
559 routine, because the device name is overwritten with each call.  If this warning
560 appears, the name lookup failed, and the access checking routine gave up and
561 returned FALSE, just to be conservative.  (Note: The access checking routine
562 knows about the Perl C<stat> operator and file tests, so you shouldn't ever
563 see this warning in response to a Perl command; it arises only if some internal
564 code takes stat buffers lightly.)
565
566 =item Can't get pipe mailbox device name
567
568 (P) An error peculiar to VMS.  After creating a mailbox to act as a pipe, Perl
569 can't retrieve its name for later use.
570
571 =item Can't get SYSGEN parameter value for MAXBUF
572
573 (P) An error peculiar to VMS.  Perl asked $GETSYI how big you want your
574 mailbox buffers to be, and didn't get an answer.
575
576 =item Can't goto subroutine outside a subroutine
577
578 (F) The deeply magical "goto subroutine" call can only replace one subroutine
579 call for another.  It can't manufacture one out of whole cloth.  In general
580 you should be calling it out of only an AUTOLOAD routine anyway.  See
581 L<perlfunc/goto>.
582
583 =item Can't localize a reference
584
585 (F) You said something like C<local $$ref>, which is not allowed because
586 the compiler can't determine whether $ref will end up pointing to anything
587 with a symbol table entry, and a symbol table entry is necessary to
588 do a local.
589
590 =item Can't localize lexical variable %s
591
592 (F) You used local on a variable name that was previously declared as a
593 lexical variable using "my".  This is not allowed.  If you want to
594 localize a package variable of the same name, qualify it with the
595 package name.
596
597 =item Can't locate %s in @INC
598
599 (F) You said to do (or require, or use) a file that couldn't be found
600 in any of the libraries mentioned in @INC.  Perhaps you need to set
601 the PERL5LIB environment variable to say where the extra library is,
602 or maybe the script needs to add the library name to @INC.  Or maybe
603 you just misspelled the name of the file.  See L<perlfunc/require>.
604
605 =item Can't locate object method "%s" via package "%s"
606
607 (F) You called a method correctly, and it correctly indicated a package
608 functioning as a class, but that package doesn't define that particular
609 method, nor does any of its base classes.  See L<perlobj>.
610
611 =item Can't locate package %s for @%s::ISA
612
613 (W) The @ISA array contained the name of another package that doesn't seem
614 to exist.
615
616 =item Can't mktemp()
617
618 (F) The mktemp() routine failed for some reason while trying to process
619 a B<-e> switch.  Maybe your /tmp partition is full, or clobbered.
620
621 =item Can't modify %s in %s
622
623 (F) You aren't allowed to assign to the item indicated, or otherwise try to
624 change it, such as with an auto-increment.
625
626 =item Can't modify non-existent substring
627
628 (P) The internal routine that does assignment to a substr() was handed
629 a NULL.
630
631 =item Can't msgrcv to read-only var
632
633 (F) The target of a msgrcv must be modifiable to be used as a receive
634 buffer.
635
636 =item Can't open %s: %s
637
638 (S) An inplace edit couldn't open the original file for the indicated reason.
639 Usually this is because you don't have read permission for the file.
640
641 =item Can't open bidirectional pipe
642
643 (W) You tried to say C<open(CMD, "|cmd|")>, which is not supported.  You can
644 try any of several modules in the Perl library to do this, such as
645 IPC::Open2.  Alternately, direct the pipe's output to a file using "E<gt>",
646 and then read it in under a different file handle.
647
648 =item Can't open error file %s as stderr
649
650 (F) An error peculiar to VMS.  Perl does its own command line redirection, and
651 couldn't open the file specified after '2E<gt>' or '2E<gt>E<gt>' on the
652 command line for writing.
653
654 =item Can't open input file %s as stdin
655
656 (F) An error peculiar to VMS.  Perl does its own command line redirection, and
657 couldn't open the file specified after 'E<lt>' on the command line for reading.
658
659 =item Can't open output file %s as stdout
660
661 (F) An error peculiar to VMS.  Perl does its own command line redirection, and
662 couldn't open the file specified after 'E<gt>' or 'E<gt>E<gt>' on the command
663 line for writing.
664
665 =item Can't open output pipe (name: %s)
666
667 (P) An error peculiar to VMS.  Perl does its own command line redirection, and
668 couldn't open the pipe into which to send data destined for stdout.
669
670 =item Can't open perl script "%s": %s
671
672 (F) The script you specified can't be opened for the indicated reason.
673
674 =item Can't rename %s to %s: %s, skipping file
675
676 (S) The rename done by the B<-i> switch failed for some reason, probably because
677 you don't have write permission to the directory.
678
679 =item Can't reopen input pipe (name: %s) in binary mode
680
681 (P) An error peculiar to VMS.  Perl thought stdin was a pipe, and tried to
682 reopen it to accept binary data.  Alas, it failed.
683
684 =item Can't reswap uid and euid
685
686 (P) The setreuid() call failed for some reason in the setuid emulator
687 of suidperl.
688
689 =item Can't return outside a subroutine
690
691 (F) The return statement was executed in mainline code, that is, where
692 there was no subroutine call to return out of.  See L<perlsub>.
693
694 =item Can't stat script "%s"
695
696 (P) For some reason you can't fstat() the script even though you have
697 it open already.  Bizarre.
698
699 =item Can't swap uid and euid
700
701 (P) The setreuid() call failed for some reason in the setuid emulator
702 of suidperl.
703
704 =item Can't take log of %g
705
706 (F) Logarithms are defined on only positive real numbers.
707
708 =item Can't take sqrt of %g
709
710 (F) For ordinary real numbers, you can't take the square root of a
711 negative number.  There's a Complex package available for Perl, though,
712 if you really want to do that.
713
714 =item Can't undef active subroutine
715
716 (F) You can't undefine a routine that's currently running.  You can,
717 however, redefine it while it's running, and you can even undef the
718 redefined subroutine while the old routine is running.  Go figure.
719
720 =item Can't unshift
721
722 (F) You tried to unshift an "unreal" array that can't be unshifted, such
723 as the main Perl stack.
724
725 =item Can't upgrade that kind of scalar
726
727 (P) The internal sv_upgrade routine adds "members" to an SV, making
728 it into a more specialized kind of SV.  The top several SV types are
729 so specialized, however, that they cannot be interconverted.  This
730 message indicates that such a conversion was attempted.
731
732 =item Can't upgrade to undef
733
734 (P) The undefined SV is the bottom of the totem pole, in the scheme
735 of upgradability.  Upgrading to undef indicates an error in the
736 code calling sv_upgrade.
737
738 =item Can't use "my %s" in sort comparison
739
740 (F) The global variables $a and $b are reserved for sort comparisons.
741 You mentioned $a or $b in the same line as the E<lt>=E<gt> or cmp operator,
742 and the variable had earlier been declared as a lexical variable.
743 Either qualify the sort variable with the package name, or rename the
744 lexical variable.
745
746 =item Can't use %s for loop variable
747
748 (F) Only a simple scalar variable may be used as a loop variable on a foreach.
749
750 =item Can't use %s ref as %s ref
751
752 (F) You've mixed up your reference types.  You have to dereference a
753 reference of the type needed.  You can use the ref() function to
754 test the type of the reference, if need be.
755
756 =item Can't use \1 to mean $1 in expression
757
758 (W) In an ordinary expression, backslash is a unary operator that creates
759 a reference to its argument.  The use of backslash to indicate a backreference
760 to a matched substring is valid only as part of a regular expression pattern.
761 Trying to do this in ordinary Perl code produces a value that prints
762 out looking like SCALAR(0xdecaf).  Use the $1 form instead.
763
764 =item Can't use bareword ("%s") as %s ref while \"strict refs\" in use
765
766 (F) Only hard references are allowed by "strict refs".  Symbolic references
767 are disallowed.  See L<perlref>.
768
769 =item Can't use string ("%s") as %s ref while "strict refs" in use
770
771 (F) Only hard references are allowed by "strict refs".  Symbolic references
772 are disallowed.  See L<perlref>.
773
774 =item Can't use an undefined value as %s reference
775
776 (F) A value used as either a hard reference or a symbolic reference must
777 be a defined value.  This helps to de-lurk some insidious errors.
778
779 =item Can't use global %s in "my"
780
781 (F) You tried to declare a magical variable as a lexical variable.  This is
782 not allowed, because the magic can be tied to only one location (namely
783 the global variable) and it would be incredibly confusing to have
784 variables in your program that looked like magical variables but
785 weren't.
786
787 =item Can't use subscript on %s
788
789 (F) The compiler tried to interpret a bracketed expression as a
790 subscript.  But to the left of the brackets was an expression that
791 didn't look like an array reference, or anything else subscriptable.
792
793 =item Can't write to temp file for B<-e>: %s
794
795 (F) The write routine failed for some reason while trying to process
796 a B<-e> switch.  Maybe your /tmp partition is full, or clobbered.
797
798 =item Can't x= to read-only value
799
800 (F) You tried to repeat a constant value (often the undefined value) with
801 an assignment operator, which implies modifying the value itself.
802 Perhaps you need to copy the value to a temporary, and repeat that.
803
804 =item Cannot open temporary file
805
806 (F) The create routine failed for some reason while trying to process
807 a B<-e> switch.  Maybe your /tmp partition is full, or clobbered.
808
809 =item Cannot resolve method `%s' overloading `%s' in package `%s'
810
811 (F|P) Error resolving overloading specified by a method name (as
812 opposed to a subroutine reference): no such method callable via the
813 package. If method name is C<???>, this is an internal error.
814
815 =item chmod: mode argument is missing initial 0
816
817 (W) A novice will sometimes say
818
819     chmod 777, $filename
820
821 not realizing that 777 will be interpreted as a decimal number, equivalent
822 to 01411.  Octal constants are introduced with a leading 0 in Perl, as in C.
823
824 =item Close on unopened file E<lt>%sE<gt>
825
826 (W) You tried to close a filehandle that was never opened.
827
828 =item connect() on closed fd
829
830 (W) You tried to do a connect on a closed socket.  Did you forget to check
831 the return value of your socket() call?  See L<perlfunc/connect>.
832
833 =item Constant subroutine %s redefined
834
835 (S) You redefined a subroutine which had previously been eligible for
836 inlining.  See L<perlsub/"Constant Functions"> for commentary and
837 workarounds.
838
839 =item Copy method did not return a reference
840
841 (F) The method which overloads "=" is buggy. See L<overload/Copy Constructor>.
842
843 =item Corrupt malloc ptr 0x%lx at 0x%lx
844
845 (P) The malloc package that comes with Perl had an internal failure.
846
847 =item corrupted regexp pointers
848
849 (P) The regular expression engine got confused by what the regular
850 expression compiler gave it.
851
852 =item corrupted regexp program
853
854 (P) The regular expression engine got passed a regexp program without
855 a valid magic number.
856
857 =item Deep recursion on subroutine "%s"
858
859 (W) This subroutine has called itself (directly or indirectly) 100
860 times than it has returned.  This probably indicates an infinite
861 recursion, unless you're writing strange benchmark programs, in which
862 case it indicates something else.
863
864 =item Did you mean &%s instead?
865
866 (W) You probably referred to an imported subroutine &FOO as $FOO or some such.
867
868 =item Did you mean $ or @ instead of %?
869
870 (W) You probably said %hash{$key} when you meant $hash{$key} or @hash{@keys}.
871 On the other hand, maybe you just meant %hash and got carried away.
872
873 =item Died
874
875 (F) You passed die() an empty string (the equivalent of C<die "">) or
876 you called it with no args and both C<$@> and C<$_> were empty.
877
878 =item Do you need to pre-declare %s?
879
880 (S) This is an educated guess made in conjunction with the message "%s
881 found where operator expected".  It often means a subroutine or module
882 name is being referenced that hasn't been declared yet.  This may be
883 because of ordering problems in your file, or because of a missing
884 "sub", "package", "require", or "use" statement.  If you're
885 referencing something that isn't defined yet, you don't actually have
886 to define the subroutine or package before the current location.  You
887 can use an empty "sub foo;" or "package FOO;" to enter a "forward"
888 declaration.
889
890 =item Don't know how to handle magic of type '%s'
891
892 (P) The internal handling of magical variables has been cursed.
893
894 =item do_study: out of memory
895
896 (P) This should have been caught by safemalloc() instead.
897
898 =item Duplicate free() ignored
899
900 (S) An internal routine called free() on something that had already
901 been freed.
902
903 =item elseif should be elsif
904
905 (S) There is no keyword "elseif" in Perl because Larry thinks it's
906 ugly.  Your code will be interpreted as an attempt to call a method
907 named "elseif" for the class returned by the following block.  This is
908 unlikely to be what you want.
909
910 =item END failed--cleanup aborted
911
912 (F) An untrapped exception was raised while executing an END subroutine.
913 The interpreter is immediately exited.
914
915 =item Error converting file specification %s
916
917 (F) An error peculiar to VMS.  Because Perl may have to deal with file
918 specifications in either VMS or Unix syntax, it converts them to a
919 single form when it must operate on them directly.  Either you've
920 passed an invalid file specification to Perl, or you've found a
921 case the conversion routines don't handle.  Drat.
922
923 =item Execution of %s aborted due to compilation errors.
924
925 (F) The final summary message when a Perl compilation fails.
926
927 =item Exiting eval via %s
928
929 (W) You are exiting an eval by unconventional means, such as
930 a goto, or a loop control statement.
931
932 =item Exiting pseudo-block via %s
933
934 (W) You are exiting a rather special block construct (like a sort block or
935 subroutine) by unconventional means, such as a goto, or a loop control
936 statement.  See L<perlfunc/sort>.
937
938 =item Exiting subroutine via %s
939
940 (W) You are exiting a subroutine by unconventional means, such as
941 a goto, or a loop control statement.
942
943 =item Exiting substitution via %s
944
945 (W) You are exiting a substitution by unconventional means, such as
946 a return, a goto, or a loop control statement.
947
948 =item Fatal VMS error at %s, line %d
949
950 (P) An error peculiar to VMS.  Something untoward happened in a VMS system
951 service or RTL routine; Perl's exit status should provide more details.  The
952 filename in "at %s" and the line number in "line %d" tell you which section of
953 the Perl source code is distressed.
954
955 =item fcntl is not implemented
956
957 (F) Your machine apparently doesn't implement fcntl().  What is this, a
958 PDP-11 or something?
959
960 =item Filehandle %s never opened
961
962 (W) An I/O operation was attempted on a filehandle that was never initialized.
963 You need to do an open() or a socket() call, or call a constructor from
964 the FileHandle package.
965
966 =item Filehandle %s opened for only input
967
968 (W) You tried to write on a read-only filehandle.  If you
969 intended it to be a read-write filehandle, you needed to open it with
970 "+E<lt>" or "+E<gt>" or "+E<gt>E<gt>" instead of with "E<lt>" or nothing.  If
971 you intended only to write the file, use "E<gt>" or "E<gt>E<gt>".  See
972 L<perlfunc/open>.
973
974 =item Filehandle opened for only input
975
976 (W) You tried to write on a read-only filehandle.  If you
977 intended it to be a read-write filehandle, you needed to open it with
978 "+E<lt>" or "+E<gt>" or "+E<gt>E<gt>" instead of with "E<lt>" or nothing.  If
979 you intended only to write the file, use "E<gt>" or "E<gt>E<gt>".  See
980 L<perlfunc/open>.
981
982 =item Final $ should be \$ or $name
983
984 (F) You must now decide whether the final $ in a string was meant to be
985 a literal dollar sign, or was meant to introduce a variable name
986 that happens to be missing.  So you have to put either the backslash or
987 the name.
988
989 =item Final @ should be \@ or @name
990
991 (F) You must now decide whether the final @ in a string was meant to be
992 a literal "at" sign, or was meant to introduce a variable name
993 that happens to be missing.  So you have to put either the backslash or
994 the name.
995
996 =item Format %s redefined
997
998 (W) You redefined a format.  To suppress this warning, say
999
1000     {
1001         local $^W = 0;
1002         eval "format NAME =...";
1003     }
1004
1005 =item Format not terminated
1006
1007 (F) A format must be terminated by a line with a solitary dot.  Perl got
1008 to the end of your file without finding such a line.
1009
1010 =item Found = in conditional, should be ==
1011
1012 (W) You said
1013
1014     if ($foo = 123)
1015
1016 when you meant
1017
1018     if ($foo == 123)
1019
1020 (or something like that).
1021
1022 =item gdbm store returned %d, errno %d, key "%s"
1023
1024 (S) A warning from the GDBM_File extension that a store failed.
1025
1026 =item gethostent not implemented
1027
1028 (F) Your C library apparently doesn't implement gethostent(), probably
1029 because if it did, it'd feel morally obligated to return every hostname
1030 on the Internet.
1031
1032 =item get{sock,peer}name() on closed fd
1033
1034 (W) You tried to get a socket or peer socket name on a closed socket.
1035 Did you forget to check the return value of your socket() call?
1036
1037 =item getpwnam returned invalid UIC %#o for user "%s"
1038
1039 (S) A warning peculiar to VMS.  The call to C<sys$getuai> underlying the
1040 C<getpwnam> operator returned an invalid UIC.
1041
1042
1043 =item Glob not terminated
1044
1045 (F) The lexer saw a left angle bracket in a place where it was expecting
1046 a term, so it's looking for the corresponding right angle bracket, and not
1047 finding it.  Chances are you left some needed parentheses out earlier in
1048 the line, and you really meant a "less than".
1049
1050 =item Global symbol "%s" requires explicit package name
1051
1052 (F) You've said "use strict vars", which indicates that all variables must
1053 either be lexically scoped (using "my"), or explicitly qualified to
1054 say which package the global variable is in (using "::").
1055
1056 =item goto must have label
1057
1058 (F) Unlike with "next" or "last", you're not allowed to goto an
1059 unspecified destination.  See L<perlfunc/goto>.
1060
1061 =item Had to create %s unexpectedly
1062
1063 (S) A routine asked for a symbol from a symbol table that ought to have
1064 existed already, but for some reason it didn't, and had to be created on
1065 an emergency basis to prevent a core dump.
1066
1067 =item Hash %%s missing the % in argument %d of %s()
1068
1069 (D) Really old Perl let you omit the % on hash names in some spots.  This
1070 is now heavily deprecated.
1071
1072 =item Ill-formed logical name |%s| in prime_env_iter
1073
1074 (W) A warning peculiar to VMS.  A logical name was encountered when preparing
1075 to iterate over %ENV which violates the syntactic rules governing logical
1076 names.  Because it cannot be translated normally, it is skipped, and will not
1077 appear in %ENV.  This may be a benign occurrence, as some software packages
1078 might directly modify logical name tables and introduce non-standard names,
1079 or it may indicate that a logical name table has been corrupted.
1080
1081 =item Illegal division by zero
1082
1083 (F) You tried to divide a number by 0.  Either something was wrong in your
1084 logic, or you need to put a conditional in to guard against meaningless input.
1085
1086 =item Illegal modulus zero
1087
1088 (F) You tried to divide a number by 0 to get the remainder.  Most numbers
1089 don't take to this kindly.
1090
1091 =item Illegal octal digit
1092
1093 (F) You used an 8 or 9 in a octal number.
1094
1095 =item Illegal octal digit ignored
1096
1097 (W) You may have tried to use an 8 or 9 in a octal number.  Interpretation
1098 of the octal number stopped before the 8 or 9.
1099
1100 =item Insecure dependency in %s
1101
1102 (F) You tried to do something that the tainting mechanism didn't like.
1103 The tainting mechanism is turned on when you're running setuid or setgid,
1104 or when you specify B<-T> to turn it on explicitly.  The tainting mechanism
1105 labels all data that's derived directly or indirectly from the user,
1106 who is considered to be unworthy of your trust.  If any such data is
1107 used in a "dangerous" operation, you get this error.  See L<perlsec>
1108 for more information.
1109
1110 =item Insecure directory in %s
1111
1112 (F) You can't use system(), exec(), or a piped open in a setuid or setgid
1113 script if C<$ENV{PATH}> contains a directory that is writable by the world.
1114 See L<perlsec>.
1115
1116 =item Insecure PATH
1117
1118 (F) You can't use system(), exec(), or a piped open in a setuid or
1119 setgid script if C<$ENV{PATH}> is derived from data supplied (or
1120 potentially supplied) by the user.  The script must set the path to a
1121 known value, using trustworthy data.  See L<perlsec>.
1122
1123 =item Integer overflow in hex number
1124
1125 (S) The literal hex number you have specified is too big for your
1126 architecture. On a 32-bit architecture the largest hex literal is
1127 0xFFFFFFFF.
1128
1129 =item Integer overflow in octal number
1130
1131 (S) The literal octal number you have specified is too big for your
1132 architecture. On a 32-bit architecture the largest octal literal is
1133 037777777777.
1134
1135 =item Internal inconsistency in tracking vforks
1136
1137 (S) A warning peculiar to VMS.  Perl keeps track of the number
1138 of times you've called C<fork> and C<exec>, to determine
1139 whether the current call to C<exec> should affect the current
1140 script or a subprocess (see L<perlvms/exec>).  Somehow, this count
1141 has become scrambled, so Perl is making a guess and treating
1142 this C<exec> as a request to terminate the Perl script
1143 and execute the specified command.
1144
1145 =item internal disaster in regexp
1146
1147 (P) Something went badly wrong in the regular expression parser.
1148
1149 =item internal urp in regexp at /%s/
1150
1151 (P) Something went badly awry in the regular expression parser.
1152
1153 =item invalid [] range in regexp
1154
1155 (F) The range specified in a character class had a minimum character
1156 greater than the maximum character.  See L<perlre>.
1157
1158 =item ioctl is not implemented
1159
1160 (F) Your machine apparently doesn't implement ioctl(), which is pretty
1161 strange for a machine that supports C.
1162
1163 =item junk on end of regexp
1164
1165 (P) The regular expression parser is confused.
1166
1167 =item Label not found for "last %s"
1168
1169 (F) You named a loop to break out of, but you're not currently in a
1170 loop of that name, not even if you count where you were called from.
1171 See L<perlfunc/last>.
1172
1173 =item Label not found for "next %s"
1174
1175 (F) You named a loop to continue, but you're not currently in a loop of
1176 that name, not even if you count where you were called from.  See
1177 L<perlfunc/last>.
1178
1179 =item Label not found for "redo %s"
1180
1181 (F) You named a loop to restart, but you're not currently in a loop of
1182 that name, not even if you count where you were called from.  See
1183 L<perlfunc/last>.
1184
1185 =item listen() on closed fd
1186
1187 (W) You tried to do a listen on a closed socket.  Did you forget to check
1188 the return value of your socket() call?  See L<perlfunc/listen>.
1189
1190 =item Literal @%s now requires backslash
1191
1192 (F) It used to be that Perl would try to guess whether you wanted an
1193 array interpolated or a literal @.  It did this when the string was
1194 first used at runtime.  Now strings are parsed at compile time, and
1195 ambiguous instances of @ must be disambiguated, either by putting a
1196 backslash to indicate a literal, or by declaring (or using) the array
1197 within the program before the string (lexically).  (Someday it will simply
1198 assume that an unbackslashed @ interpolates an array.)
1199
1200 =item Method for operation %s not found in package %s during blessing
1201
1202 (F) An attempt was made to specify an entry in an overloading table that
1203 doesn't resolve to a valid subroutine.  See L<overload>.
1204
1205 =item Might be a runaway multi-line %s string starting on line %d
1206
1207 (S) An advisory indicating that the previous error may have been caused
1208 by a missing delimiter on a string or pattern, because it eventually
1209 ended earlier on the current line.
1210
1211 =item Misplaced _ in number
1212
1213 (W) An underline in a decimal constant wasn't on a 3-digit boundary.
1214
1215 =item Missing $ on loop variable
1216
1217 (F) Apparently you've been programming in B<csh> too much.  Variables are always
1218 mentioned with the $ in Perl, unlike in the shells, where it can vary from
1219 one line to the next.
1220
1221 =item Missing comma after first argument to %s function
1222
1223 (F) While certain functions allow you to specify a filehandle or an
1224 "indirect object" before the argument list, this ain't one of them.
1225
1226 =item Missing operator before %s?
1227
1228 (S) This is an educated guess made in conjunction with the message "%s
1229 found where operator expected".  Often the missing operator is a comma.
1230
1231 =item Missing right bracket
1232
1233 (F) The lexer counted more opening curly brackets (braces) than closing ones.
1234 As a general rule, you'll find it's missing near the place you were last
1235 editing.
1236
1237 =item Missing semicolon on previous line?
1238
1239 (S) This is an educated guess made in conjunction with the message "%s
1240 found where operator expected".  Don't automatically put a semicolon on
1241 the previous line just because you saw this message.
1242
1243 =item Modification of a read-only value attempted
1244
1245 (F) You tried, directly or indirectly, to change the value of a
1246 constant.  You didn't, of course, try "2 = 1", because the compiler
1247 catches that.  But an easy way to do the same thing is:
1248
1249     sub mod { $_[0] = 1 }
1250     mod(2);
1251
1252 Another way is to assign to a substr() that's off the end of the string.
1253
1254 =item Modification of non-creatable array value attempted, subscript %d
1255
1256 (F) You tried to make an array value spring into existence, and the
1257 subscript was probably negative, even counting from end of the array
1258 backwards.
1259
1260 =item Modification of non-creatable hash value attempted, subscript "%s"
1261
1262 (F) You tried to make a hash value spring into existence, and it couldn't
1263 be created for some peculiar reason.
1264
1265 =item Module name must be constant
1266
1267 (F) Only a bare module name is allowed as the first argument to a "use".
1268
1269 =item msg%s not implemented
1270
1271 (F) You don't have System V message IPC on your system.
1272
1273 =item Multidimensional syntax %s not supported
1274
1275 (W) Multidimensional arrays aren't written like C<$foo[1,2,3]>.  They're written
1276 like C<$foo[1][2][3]>, as in C.
1277
1278 =item Name "%s::%s" used only once: possible typo
1279
1280 (W) Typographical errors often show up as unique variable names.  If you
1281 had a good reason for having a unique name, then just mention it
1282 again somehow to suppress the message (the C<use vars> pragma is
1283 provided for just this purpose).
1284
1285 =item Negative length
1286
1287 (F) You tried to do a read/write/send/recv operation with a buffer length
1288 that is less than 0.  This is difficult to imagine.
1289
1290 =item nested *?+ in regexp
1291
1292 (F) You can't quantify a quantifier without intervening parentheses.  So
1293 things like ** or +* or ?* are illegal.
1294
1295 Note, however, that the minimal matching quantifiers, C<*?>, C<+?>, and C<??> appear
1296 to be nested quantifiers, but aren't.  See L<perlre>.
1297
1298 =item No #! line
1299
1300 (F) The setuid emulator requires that scripts have a well-formed #! line
1301 even on machines that don't support the #! construct.
1302
1303 =item No %s allowed while running setuid
1304
1305 (F) Certain operations are deemed to be too insecure for a setuid or setgid
1306 script to even be allowed to attempt.  Generally speaking there will be
1307 another way to do what you want that is, if not secure, at least securable.
1308 See L<perlsec>.
1309
1310 =item No B<-e> allowed in setuid scripts
1311
1312 (F) A setuid script can't be specified by the user.
1313
1314 =item No comma allowed after %s
1315
1316 (F) A list operator that has a filehandle or "indirect object" is not
1317 allowed to have a comma between that and the following arguments.
1318 Otherwise it'd be just another one of the arguments.
1319
1320 One possible cause for this is that you expected to have imported a
1321 constant to your name space with B<use> or B<import> while no such
1322 importing took place, it may for example be that your operating system
1323 does not support that particular constant. Hopefully you did use an
1324 explicit import list for the constants you expect to see, please see
1325 L<perlfunc/use> and L<perlfunc/import>. While an explicit import list
1326 would probably have caught this error earlier it naturally does not
1327 remedy the fact that your operating system still does not support that
1328 constant. Maybe you have a typo in the constants of the symbol import
1329 list of B<use> or B<import> or in the constant name at the line where
1330 this error was triggered?
1331
1332 =item No command into which to pipe on command line
1333
1334 (F) An error peculiar to VMS.  Perl handles its own command line redirection,
1335 and found a '|' at the end of the command line, so it doesn't know whither you
1336 want to pipe the output from this command.
1337
1338 =item No DB::DB routine defined
1339
1340 (F) The currently executing code was compiled with the B<-d> switch,
1341 but for some reason the perl5db.pl file (or some facsimile thereof)
1342 didn't define a routine to be called at the beginning of each
1343 statement.  Which is odd, because the file should have been required
1344 automatically, and should have blown up the require if it didn't parse
1345 right.
1346
1347 =item No dbm on this machine
1348
1349 (P) This is counted as an internal error, because every machine should
1350 supply dbm nowadays, because Perl comes with SDBM.  See L<SDBM_File>.
1351
1352 =item No DBsub routine
1353
1354 (F) The currently executing code was compiled with the B<-d> switch,
1355 but for some reason the perl5db.pl file (or some facsimile thereof)
1356 didn't define a DB::sub routine to be called at the beginning of each
1357 ordinary subroutine call.
1358
1359 =item No error file after 2E<gt> or 2E<gt>E<gt> on command line
1360
1361 (F) An error peculiar to VMS.  Perl handles its own command line redirection,
1362 and found a '2E<gt>' or a '2E<gt>E<gt>' on the command line, but can't find
1363 the name of the file to which to write data destined for stderr.
1364
1365 =item No input file after E<lt> on command line
1366
1367 (F) An error peculiar to VMS.  Perl handles its own command line redirection,
1368 and found a 'E<lt>' on the command line, but can't find the name of the file
1369 from which to read data for stdin.
1370
1371 =item No output file after E<gt> on command line
1372
1373 (F) An error peculiar to VMS.  Perl handles its own command line redirection,
1374 and found a lone 'E<gt>' at the end of the command line, so it doesn't know
1375 whither you wanted to redirect stdout.
1376
1377 =item No output file after E<gt> or E<gt>E<gt> on command line
1378
1379 (F) An error peculiar to VMS.  Perl handles its own command line redirection,
1380 and found a 'E<gt>' or a 'E<gt>E<gt>' on the command line, but can't find the
1381 name of the file to which to write data destined for stdout.
1382
1383 =item No Perl script found in input
1384
1385 (F) You called C<perl -x>, but no line was found in the file beginning
1386 with #! and containing the word "perl".
1387
1388 =item No setregid available
1389
1390 (F) Configure didn't find anything resembling the setregid() call for
1391 your system.
1392
1393 =item No setreuid available
1394
1395 (F) Configure didn't find anything resembling the setreuid() call for
1396 your system.
1397
1398 =item No space allowed after B<-I>
1399
1400 (F) The argument to B<-I> must follow the B<-I> immediately with no
1401 intervening space.
1402
1403 =item No such pipe open
1404
1405 (P) An error peculiar to VMS.  The internal routine my_pclose() tried to
1406 close a pipe which hadn't been opened.  This should have been caught earlier as
1407 an attempt to close an unopened filehandle.
1408
1409 =item No such signal: SIG%s
1410
1411 (W) You specified a signal name as a subscript to %SIG that was not recognized.
1412 Say C<kill -l> in your shell to see the valid signal names on your system.
1413
1414 =item Not a CODE reference
1415
1416 (F) Perl was trying to evaluate a reference to a code value (that is, a
1417 subroutine), but found a reference to something else instead.  You can
1418 use the ref() function to find out what kind of ref it really was.
1419 See also L<perlref>.
1420
1421 =item Not a format reference
1422
1423 (F) I'm not sure how you managed to generate a reference to an anonymous
1424 format, but this indicates you did, and that it didn't exist.
1425
1426 =item Not a GLOB reference
1427
1428 (F) Perl was trying to evaluate a reference to a "typeglob" (that is,
1429 a symbol table entry that looks like C<*foo>), but found a reference to
1430 something else instead.  You can use the ref() function to find out
1431 what kind of ref it really was.  See L<perlref>.
1432
1433 =item Not a HASH reference
1434
1435 (F) Perl was trying to evaluate a reference to a hash value, but
1436 found a reference to something else instead.  You can use the ref()
1437 function to find out what kind of ref it really was.  See L<perlref>.
1438
1439 =item Not a perl script
1440
1441 (F) The setuid emulator requires that scripts have a well-formed #! line
1442 even on machines that don't support the #! construct.  The line must
1443 mention perl.
1444
1445 =item Not a SCALAR reference
1446
1447 (F) Perl was trying to evaluate a reference to a scalar value, but
1448 found a reference to something else instead.  You can use the ref()
1449 function to find out what kind of ref it really was.  See L<perlref>.
1450
1451 =item Not a subroutine reference
1452
1453 (F) Perl was trying to evaluate a reference to a code value (that is, a
1454 subroutine), but found a reference to something else instead.  You can
1455 use the ref() function to find out what kind of ref it really was.
1456 See also L<perlref>.
1457
1458 =item Not a subroutine reference in overload table
1459
1460 (F) An attempt was made to specify an entry in an overloading table that
1461 doesn't somehow point to a valid subroutine.  See L<overload>.
1462
1463 =item Not an ARRAY reference
1464
1465 (F) Perl was trying to evaluate a reference to an array value, but
1466 found a reference to something else instead.  You can use the ref()
1467 function to find out what kind of ref it really was.  See L<perlref>.
1468
1469 =item Not enough arguments for %s
1470
1471 (F) The function requires more arguments than you specified.
1472
1473 =item Not enough format arguments
1474
1475 (W) A format specified more picture fields than the next line supplied.
1476 See L<perlform>.
1477
1478 =item Null filename used
1479
1480 (F) You can't require the null filename, especially because on many machines
1481 that means the current directory!  See L<perlfunc/require>.
1482
1483 =item Null picture in formline
1484
1485 (F) The first argument to formline must be a valid format picture
1486 specification.  It was found to be empty, which probably means you
1487 supplied it an uninitialized value.  See L<perlform>.
1488
1489 =item NULL OP IN RUN
1490
1491 (P) Some internal routine called run() with a null opcode pointer.
1492
1493 =item Null realloc
1494
1495 (P) An attempt was made to realloc NULL.
1496
1497 =item NULL regexp argument
1498
1499 (P) The internal pattern matching routines blew it big time.
1500
1501 =item NULL regexp parameter
1502
1503 (P) The internal pattern matching routines are out of their gourd.
1504
1505 =item Odd number of elements in hash list
1506
1507 (S) You specified an odd number of elements to a hash list, which is odd,
1508 because hash lists come in key/value pairs.
1509
1510 =item Offset outside string
1511
1512 (F) You tried to do a read/write/send/recv operation with an offset
1513 pointing outside the buffer.  This is difficult to imagine.
1514 The sole exception to this is that C<sysread()>ing past the buffer
1515 will extend the buffer and zero pad the new area.
1516
1517 =item oops: oopsAV
1518
1519 (S) An internal warning that the grammar is screwed up.
1520
1521 =item oops: oopsHV
1522
1523 (S) An internal warning that the grammar is screwed up.
1524
1525 =item Operation `%s': no method found,%s
1526
1527 (F) An attempt was made to perform an overloaded operation for which
1528 no handler was defined.  While some handlers can be autogenerated in
1529 terms of other handlers, there is no default handler for any
1530 operation, unless C<fallback> overloading key is specified to be
1531 true.  See L<overload>.
1532
1533 =item Operator or semicolon missing before %s
1534
1535 (S) You used a variable or subroutine call where the parser was
1536 expecting an operator.  The parser has assumed you really meant
1537 to use an operator, but this is highly likely to be incorrect.
1538 For example, if you say "*foo *foo" it will be interpreted as
1539 if you said "*foo * 'foo'".
1540
1541 =item Out of memory for yacc stack
1542
1543 (F) The yacc parser wanted to grow its stack so it could continue parsing,
1544 but realloc() wouldn't give it more memory, virtual or otherwise.
1545
1546 =item Out of memory!
1547
1548 (X|F) The malloc() function returned 0, indicating there was insufficient
1549 remaining memory (or virtual memory) to satisfy the request. 
1550
1551 The request was judged to be small, so the possibility to trap it
1552 depends on the way perl was compiled.  By default it is not trappable.
1553 However, if compiled for this, Perl may use the contents of C<$^M> as
1554 an emergency pool after die()ing with this message.  In this case the
1555 error is trappable I<once>.
1556
1557 =item Out of memory during request for %s
1558
1559 (F) The malloc() function returned 0, indicating there was insufficient
1560 remaining memory (or virtual memory) to satisfy the request. However,
1561 the request was judged large enough (compile-time default is 64K), so
1562 a possibility to shut down by trapping this error is granted.
1563
1564 =item page overflow
1565
1566 (W) A single call to write() produced more lines than can fit on a page.
1567 See L<perlform>.
1568
1569 =item panic: ck_grep
1570
1571 (P) Failed an internal consistency check trying to compile a grep.
1572
1573 =item panic: ck_split
1574
1575 (P) Failed an internal consistency check trying to compile a split.
1576
1577 =item panic: corrupt saved stack index
1578
1579 (P) The savestack was requested to restore more localized values than there
1580 are in the savestack.
1581
1582 =item panic: die %s
1583
1584 (P) We popped the context stack to an eval context, and then discovered
1585 it wasn't an eval context.
1586
1587 =item panic: do_match
1588
1589 (P) The internal pp_match() routine was called with invalid operational data.
1590
1591 =item panic: do_split
1592
1593 (P) Something terrible went wrong in setting up for the split.
1594
1595 =item panic: do_subst
1596
1597 (P) The internal pp_subst() routine was called with invalid operational data.
1598
1599 =item panic: do_trans
1600
1601 (P) The internal do_trans() routine was called with invalid operational data.
1602
1603 =item panic: goto
1604
1605 (P) We popped the context stack to a context with the specified label,
1606 and then discovered it wasn't a context we know how to do a goto in.
1607
1608 =item panic: INTERPCASEMOD
1609
1610 (P) The lexer got into a bad state at a case modifier.
1611
1612 =item panic: INTERPCONCAT
1613
1614 (P) The lexer got into a bad state parsing a string with brackets.
1615
1616 =item panic: last
1617
1618 (P) We popped the context stack to a block context, and then discovered
1619 it wasn't a block context.
1620
1621 =item panic: leave_scope clearsv
1622
1623 (P) A writable lexical variable became read-only somehow within the scope.
1624
1625 =item panic: leave_scope inconsistency
1626
1627 (P) The savestack probably got out of sync.  At least, there was an
1628 invalid enum on the top of it.
1629
1630 =item panic: malloc
1631
1632 (P) Something requested a negative number of bytes of malloc.
1633
1634 =item panic: mapstart
1635
1636 (P) The compiler is screwed up with respect to the map() function.
1637
1638 =item panic: null array
1639
1640 (P) One of the internal array routines was passed a null AV pointer.
1641
1642 =item panic: pad_alloc
1643
1644 (P) The compiler got confused about which scratch pad it was allocating
1645 and freeing temporaries and lexicals from.
1646
1647 =item panic: pad_free curpad
1648
1649 (P) The compiler got confused about which scratch pad it was allocating
1650 and freeing temporaries and lexicals from.
1651
1652 =item panic: pad_free po
1653
1654 (P) An invalid scratch pad offset was detected internally.
1655
1656 =item panic: pad_reset curpad
1657
1658 (P) The compiler got confused about which scratch pad it was allocating
1659 and freeing temporaries and lexicals from.
1660
1661 =item panic: pad_sv po
1662
1663 (P) An invalid scratch pad offset was detected internally.
1664
1665 =item panic: pad_swipe curpad
1666
1667 (P) The compiler got confused about which scratch pad it was allocating
1668 and freeing temporaries and lexicals from.
1669
1670 =item panic: pad_swipe po
1671
1672 (P) An invalid scratch pad offset was detected internally.
1673
1674 =item panic: pp_iter
1675
1676 (P) The foreach iterator got called in a non-loop context frame.
1677
1678 =item panic: realloc
1679
1680 (P) Something requested a negative number of bytes of realloc.
1681
1682 =item panic: restartop
1683
1684 (P) Some internal routine requested a goto (or something like it), and
1685 didn't supply the destination.
1686
1687 =item panic: return
1688
1689 (P) We popped the context stack to a subroutine or eval context, and
1690 then discovered it wasn't a subroutine or eval context.
1691
1692 =item panic: scan_num
1693
1694 (P) scan_num() got called on something that wasn't a number.
1695
1696 =item panic: sv_insert
1697
1698 (P) The sv_insert() routine was told to remove more string than there
1699 was string.
1700
1701 =item panic: top_env
1702
1703 (P) The compiler attempted to do a goto, or something weird like that.
1704
1705 =item panic: yylex
1706
1707 (P) The lexer got into a bad state while processing a case modifier.
1708
1709 =item Pareneses missing around "%s" list
1710
1711 (W) You said something like
1712
1713     my $foo, $bar = @_;
1714
1715 when you meant
1716
1717     my ($foo, $bar) = @_;
1718
1719 Remember that "my" and "local" bind closer than comma.
1720
1721 =item Perl %3.3f required--this is only version %s, stopped
1722
1723 (F) The module in question uses features of a version of Perl more recent
1724 than the currently running version.  How long has it been since you upgraded,
1725 anyway?  See L<perlfunc/require>.
1726
1727 =item Permission denied
1728
1729 (F) The setuid emulator in suidperl decided you were up to no good.
1730
1731 =item pid %d not a child
1732
1733 (W) A warning peculiar to VMS.  Waitpid() was asked to wait for a process which
1734 isn't a subprocess of the current process.  While this is fine from VMS'
1735 perspective, it's probably not what you intended.
1736
1737 =item POSIX getpgrp can't take an argument
1738
1739 (F) Your C compiler uses POSIX getpgrp(), which takes no argument, unlike
1740 the BSD version, which takes a pid.
1741
1742 =item Possible attempt to put comments in qw() list
1743
1744 (W) qw() lists contain items separated by whitespace; as with literal
1745 strings, comment characters are not ignored, but are instead treated
1746 as literal data.  (You may have used different delimiters than the
1747 exclamation marks parentheses shown here; braces are also frequently
1748 used.)
1749
1750 You probably wrote something like this:
1751
1752     @list = qw( 
1753         a # a comment
1754         b # another comment
1755     );
1756
1757 when you should have written this:
1758
1759     @list = qw(
1760         a 
1761         b 
1762     );
1763
1764 If you really want comments, build your list the
1765 old-fashioned way, with quotes and commas:
1766
1767     @list = (
1768         'a',    # a comment
1769         'b',    # another comment
1770     );
1771
1772 =item Possible attempt to separate words with commas
1773
1774 (W) qw() lists contain items separated by whitespace; therefore commas
1775 aren't needed to separate the items. (You may have used different
1776 delimiters than the parentheses shown here; braces are also frequently
1777 used.)
1778
1779 You probably wrote something like this: 
1780
1781     qw! a, b, c !;
1782
1783 which puts literal commas into some of the list items.  Write it without
1784 commas if you don't want them to appear in your data:
1785
1786     qw! a b c !;
1787
1788 =item Possible memory corruption: %s overflowed 3rd argument
1789
1790 (F) An ioctl() or fcntl() returned more than Perl was bargaining for.
1791 Perl guesses a reasonable buffer size, but puts a sentinel byte at the
1792 end of the buffer just in case.  This sentinel byte got clobbered, and
1793 Perl assumes that memory is now corrupted.  See L<perlfunc/ioctl>.
1794
1795 =item Precedence problem: open %s should be open(%s)
1796
1797 (S) The old irregular construct
1798
1799     open FOO || die;
1800
1801 is now misinterpreted as
1802
1803     open(FOO || die);
1804
1805 because of the strict regularization of Perl 5's grammar into unary and
1806 list operators.  (The old open was a little of both.) You must put
1807 parentheses around the filehandle, or use the new "or" operator instead of "||".
1808
1809 =item print on closed filehandle %s
1810
1811 (W) The filehandle you're printing on got itself closed sometime before now.
1812 Check your logic flow.
1813
1814 =item printf on closed filehandle %s
1815
1816 (W) The filehandle you're writing to got itself closed sometime before now.
1817 Check your logic flow.
1818
1819 =item Probable precedence problem on %s
1820
1821 (W) The compiler found a bare word where it expected a conditional,
1822 which often indicates that an || or && was parsed as part of the
1823 last argument of the previous construct, for example:
1824
1825     open FOO || die;
1826
1827 =item Prototype mismatch: (%s) vs (%s)
1828
1829 (S) The subroutine being defined had a pre-declared (forward) declaration
1830 with a different function prototype.
1831
1832 =item Read on closed filehandle E<lt>%sE<gt>
1833
1834 (W) The filehandle you're reading from got itself closed sometime before now.
1835 Check your logic flow.
1836
1837 =item Reallocation too large: %lx
1838
1839 (F) You can't allocate more than 64K on an MSDOS machine.
1840
1841 =item Recompile perl with B<-D>DEBUGGING to use B<-D> switch
1842
1843 (F) You can't use the B<-D> option unless the code to produce the
1844 desired output is compiled into Perl, which entails some overhead,
1845 which is why it's currently left out of your copy.
1846
1847 =item Recursive inheritance detected
1848
1849 (F) More than 100 levels of inheritance were used.  Probably indicates
1850 an unintended loop in your inheritance hierarchy.
1851
1852 =item Reference miscount in sv_replace()
1853
1854 (W) The internal sv_replace() function was handed a new SV with a
1855 reference count of other than 1.
1856
1857 =item regexp memory corruption
1858
1859 (P) The regular expression engine got confused by what the regular
1860 expression compiler gave it.
1861
1862 =item regexp out of space
1863
1864 (P) A "can't happen" error, because safemalloc() should have caught it earlier.
1865
1866 =item regexp too big
1867
1868 (F) The current implementation of regular expressions uses shorts as
1869 address offsets within a string.  Unfortunately this means that if
1870 the regular expression compiles to longer than 32767, it'll blow up.
1871 Usually when you want a regular expression this big, there is a better
1872 way to do it with multiple statements.  See L<perlre>.
1873
1874 =item Reversed %s= operator
1875
1876 (W) You wrote your assignment operator backwards.  The = must always
1877 comes last, to avoid ambiguity with subsequent unary operators.
1878
1879 =item Runaway format
1880
1881 (F) Your format contained the ~~ repeat-until-blank sequence, but it
1882 produced 200 lines at once, and the 200th line looked exactly like the
1883 199th line.  Apparently you didn't arrange for the arguments to exhaust
1884 themselves, either by using ^ instead of @ (for scalar variables), or by
1885 shifting or popping (for array variables).  See L<perlform>.
1886
1887 =item Scalar value @%s[%s] better written as $%s[%s]
1888
1889 (W) You've used an array slice (indicated by @) to select a single element of
1890 an array.  Generally it's better to ask for a scalar value (indicated by $).
1891 The difference is that C<$foo[&bar]> always behaves like a scalar, both when
1892 assigning to it and when evaluating its argument, while C<@foo[&bar]> behaves
1893 like a list when you assign to it, and provides a list context to its
1894 subscript, which can do weird things if you're expecting only one subscript.
1895
1896 On the other hand, if you were actually hoping to treat the array
1897 element as a list, you need to look into how references work, because
1898 Perl will not magically convert between scalars and lists for you.  See
1899 L<perlref>.
1900
1901 =item Scalar value @%s{%s} better written as $%s{%s}
1902
1903 (W) You've used a hash slice (indicated by @) to select a single element of
1904 a hash.  Generally it's better to ask for a scalar value (indicated by $).
1905 The difference is that C<$foo{&bar}> always behaves like a scalar, both when
1906 assigning to it and when evaluating its argument, while C<@foo{&bar}> behaves
1907 like a list when you assign to it, and provides a list context to its
1908 subscript, which can do weird things if you're expecting only one subscript.
1909
1910 On the other hand, if you were actually hoping to treat the hash
1911 element as a list, you need to look into how references work, because
1912 Perl will not magically convert between scalars and lists for you.  See
1913 L<perlref>.
1914
1915 =item Script is not setuid/setgid in suidperl
1916
1917 (F) Oddly, the suidperl program was invoked on a script with its setuid
1918 or setgid bit not set.  This doesn't make much sense.
1919
1920 =item Search pattern not terminated
1921
1922 (F) The lexer couldn't find the final delimiter of a // or m{}
1923 construct.  Remember that bracketing delimiters count nesting level.
1924
1925 =item seek() on unopened file
1926
1927 (W) You tried to use the seek() function on a filehandle that was either
1928 never opened or has been closed since.
1929
1930 =item select not implemented
1931
1932 (F) This machine doesn't implement the select() system call.
1933
1934 =item sem%s not implemented
1935
1936 (F) You don't have System V semaphore IPC on your system.
1937
1938 =item semi-panic: attempt to dup freed string
1939
1940 (S) The internal newSVsv() routine was called to duplicate a scalar
1941 that had previously been marked as free.
1942
1943 =item Semicolon seems to be missing
1944
1945 (W) A nearby syntax error was probably caused by a missing semicolon,
1946 or possibly some other missing operator, such as a comma.
1947
1948 =item Send on closed socket
1949
1950 (W) The filehandle you're sending to got itself closed sometime before now.
1951 Check your logic flow.
1952
1953 =item Sequence (?#... not terminated
1954
1955 (F) A regular expression comment must be terminated by a closing
1956 parenthesis.  Embedded parentheses aren't allowed.  See L<perlre>.
1957
1958 =item Sequence (?%s...) not implemented
1959
1960 (F) A proposed regular expression extension has the character reserved
1961 but has not yet been written.  See L<perlre>.
1962
1963 =item Sequence (?%s...) not recognized
1964
1965 (F) You used a regular expression extension that doesn't make sense.
1966 See L<perlre>.
1967
1968 =item Server error
1969
1970 Also known as "500 Server error".  This is a CGI error, not a Perl
1971 error.  You need to make sure your script is executable, is accessible
1972 by the user CGI is running the script under (which is probably not
1973 the user account you tested it under), does not rely on any environment
1974 variables (like PATH) from the user it isn't running under, and isn't
1975 in a location where the CGI server can't find it, basically, more or less.
1976
1977 =item setegid() not implemented
1978
1979 (F) You tried to assign to C<$)>, and your operating system doesn't support
1980 the setegid() system call (or equivalent), or at least Configure didn't
1981 think so.
1982
1983 =item seteuid() not implemented
1984
1985 (F) You tried to assign to C<$E<gt>>, and your operating system doesn't support
1986 the seteuid() system call (or equivalent), or at least Configure didn't
1987 think so.
1988
1989 =item setrgid() not implemented
1990
1991 (F) You tried to assign to C<$(>, and your operating system doesn't support
1992 the setrgid() system call (or equivalent), or at least Configure didn't
1993 think so.
1994
1995 =item setruid() not implemented
1996
1997 (F) You tried to assign to C<$<lt>>, and your operating system doesn't support
1998 the setruid() system call (or equivalent), or at least Configure didn't
1999 think so.
2000
2001 =item Setuid/gid script is writable by world
2002
2003 (F) The setuid emulator won't run a script that is writable by the world,
2004 because the world might have written on it already.
2005
2006 =item shm%s not implemented
2007
2008 (F) You don't have System V shared memory IPC on your system.
2009
2010 =item shutdown() on closed fd
2011
2012 (W) You tried to do a shutdown on a closed socket.  Seems a bit superfluous.
2013
2014 =item SIG%s handler "%s" not defined.
2015
2016 (W) The signal handler named in %SIG doesn't, in fact, exist.  Perhaps you
2017 put it into the wrong package?
2018
2019 =item sort is now a reserved word
2020
2021 (F) An ancient error message that almost nobody ever runs into anymore.
2022 But before sort was a keyword, people sometimes used it as a filehandle.
2023
2024 =item Sort subroutine didn't return a numeric value
2025
2026 (F) A sort comparison routine must return a number.  You probably blew
2027 it by not using C<E<lt>=E<gt>> or C<cmp>, or by not using them correctly.
2028 See L<perlfunc/sort>.
2029
2030 =item Sort subroutine didn't return single value
2031
2032 (F) A sort comparison subroutine may not return a list value with more
2033 or less than one element.  See L<perlfunc/sort>.
2034
2035 =item Split loop
2036
2037 (P) The split was looping infinitely.  (Obviously, a split shouldn't iterate
2038 more times than there are characters of input, which is what happened.)
2039 See L<perlfunc/split>.
2040
2041 =item Stat on unopened file E<lt>%sE<gt>
2042
2043 (W) You tried to use the stat() function (or an equivalent file test)
2044 on a filehandle that was either never opened or has been closed since.
2045
2046 =item Statement unlikely to be reached
2047
2048 (W) You did an exec() with some statement after it other than a die().
2049 This is almost always an error, because exec() never returns unless
2050 there was a failure.  You probably wanted to use system() instead,
2051 which does return.  To suppress this warning, put the exec() in a block
2052 by itself.
2053
2054 =item Stub found while resolving method `%s' overloading `%s' in package `%s'
2055
2056 (P) Overloading resolution over @ISA tree may be broken by importation stubs.
2057 Stubs should never be implicitely created, but explicit calls to C<can>
2058 may break this.
2059
2060 =item Subroutine %s redefined
2061
2062 (W) You redefined a subroutine.  To suppress this warning, say
2063
2064     {
2065         local $^W = 0;
2066         eval "sub name { ... }";
2067     }
2068
2069 =item Substitution loop
2070
2071 (P) The substitution was looping infinitely.  (Obviously, a
2072 substitution shouldn't iterate more times than there are characters of
2073 input, which is what happened.) See the discussion of substitution in
2074 L<perlop/"Quote and Quote-like Operators">.
2075
2076 =item Substitution pattern not terminated
2077
2078 (F) The lexer couldn't find the interior delimiter of a s/// or s{}{}
2079 construct.  Remember that bracketing delimiters count nesting level.
2080
2081 =item Substitution replacement not terminated
2082
2083 (F) The lexer couldn't find the final delimiter of a s/// or s{}{}
2084 construct.  Remember that bracketing delimiters count nesting level.
2085
2086 =item substr outside of string
2087
2088 (W) You tried to reference a substr() that pointed outside of a string.
2089 That is, the absolute value of the offset was larger than the length of
2090 the string.  See L<perlfunc/substr>.
2091
2092 =item suidperl is no longer needed since...
2093
2094 (F) Your Perl was compiled with B<-D>SETUID_SCRIPTS_ARE_SECURE_NOW, but a
2095 version of the setuid emulator somehow got run anyway.
2096
2097 =item syntax error
2098
2099 (F) Probably means you had a syntax error.  Common reasons include:
2100
2101     A keyword is misspelled.
2102     A semicolon is missing.
2103     A comma is missing.
2104     An opening or closing parenthesis is missing.
2105     An opening or closing brace is missing.
2106     A closing quote is missing.
2107
2108 Often there will be another error message associated with the syntax
2109 error giving more information.  (Sometimes it helps to turn on B<-w>.)
2110 The error message itself often tells you where it was in the line when
2111 it decided to give up.  Sometimes the actual error is several tokens
2112 before this, because Perl is good at understanding random input.
2113 Occasionally the line number may be misleading, and once in a blue moon
2114 the only way to figure out what's triggering the error is to call
2115 C<perl -c> repeatedly, chopping away half the program each time to see
2116 if the error went away.  Sort of the cybernetic version of S<20 questions>.
2117
2118 =item syntax error at line %d: `%s' unexpected
2119
2120 (A) You've accidentally run your script through the Bourne shell
2121 instead of Perl.  Check the E<lt>#!E<gt> line, or manually feed your script
2122 into Perl yourself.
2123
2124 =item System V IPC is not implemented on this machine
2125
2126 (F) You tried to do something with a function beginning with "sem", "shm",
2127 or "msg".  See L<perlfunc/semctl>, for example.
2128
2129 =item Syswrite on closed filehandle
2130
2131 (W) The filehandle you're writing to got itself closed sometime before now.
2132 Check your logic flow.
2133
2134 =item tell() on unopened file
2135
2136 (W) You tried to use the tell() function on a filehandle that was either
2137 never opened or has been closed since.
2138
2139 =item Test on unopened file E<lt>%sE<gt>
2140
2141 (W) You tried to invoke a file test operator on a filehandle that isn't
2142 open.  Check your logic.  See also L<perlfunc/-X>.
2143
2144 =item That use of $[ is unsupported
2145
2146 (F) Assignment to C<$[> is now strictly circumscribed, and interpreted as
2147 a compiler directive.  You may say only one of
2148
2149     $[ = 0;
2150     $[ = 1;
2151     ...
2152     local $[ = 0;
2153     local $[ = 1;
2154     ...
2155
2156 This is to prevent the problem of one module changing the array base
2157 out from under another module inadvertently.  See L<perlvar/$[>.
2158
2159 =item The %s function is unimplemented
2160
2161 The function indicated isn't implemented on this architecture, according
2162 to the probings of Configure.
2163
2164 =item The crypt() function is unimplemented due to excessive paranoia.
2165
2166 (F) Configure couldn't find the crypt() function on your machine,
2167 probably because your vendor didn't supply it, probably because they
2168 think the U.S. Government thinks it's a secret, or at least that they
2169 will continue to pretend that it is.  And if you quote me on that, I
2170 will deny it.
2171
2172 =item The stat preceding C<-l _> wasn't an lstat
2173
2174 (F) It makes no sense to test the current stat buffer for symbolic linkhood
2175 if the last stat that wrote to the stat buffer already went past
2176 the symlink to get to the real file.  Use an actual filename instead.
2177
2178 =item times not implemented
2179
2180 (F) Your version of the C library apparently doesn't do times().  I suspect
2181 you're not running on Unix.
2182
2183 =item Too few args to syscall
2184
2185 (F) There has to be at least one argument to syscall() to specify the
2186 system call to call, silly dilly.
2187
2188 =item Too many ('s
2189
2190 =item Too many )'s
2191
2192 (A) You've accidentally run your script through B<csh> instead
2193 of Perl.  Check the E<lt>#!E<gt> line, or manually feed your script
2194 into Perl yourself.
2195
2196 =item Too many args to syscall
2197
2198 (F) Perl supports a maximum of only 14 args to syscall().
2199
2200 =item Too many arguments for %s
2201
2202 (F) The function requires fewer arguments than you specified.
2203
2204 =item trailing \ in regexp
2205
2206 (F) The regular expression ends with an unbackslashed backslash.  Backslash
2207 it.   See L<perlre>.
2208
2209 =item Translation pattern not terminated
2210
2211 (F) The lexer couldn't find the interior delimiter of a tr/// or tr[][]
2212 construct.
2213
2214 =item Translation replacement not terminated
2215
2216 (F) The lexer couldn't find the final delimiter of a tr/// or tr[][]
2217 construct.
2218
2219 =item truncate not implemented
2220
2221 (F) Your machine doesn't implement a file truncation mechanism that
2222 Configure knows about.
2223
2224 =item Type of arg %d to %s must be %s (not %s)
2225
2226 (F) This function requires the argument in that position to be of a
2227 certain type.  Arrays must be @NAME or C<@{EXPR}>.  Hashes must be
2228 %NAME or C<%{EXPR}>.  No implicit dereferencing is allowed--use the
2229 {EXPR} forms as an explicit dereference.  See L<perlref>.
2230
2231 =item umask: argument is missing initial 0
2232
2233 (W) A umask of 222 is incorrect.  It should be 0222, because octal literals
2234 always start with 0 in Perl, as in C.
2235
2236 =item Unable to create sub named "%s"
2237
2238 (F) You attempted to create or access a subroutine with an illegal name.
2239
2240 =item Unbalanced context: %d more PUSHes than POPs
2241
2242 (W) The exit code detected an internal inconsistency in how many execution
2243 contexts were entered and left.
2244
2245 =item Unbalanced saves: %d more saves than restores
2246
2247 (W) The exit code detected an internal inconsistency in how many
2248 values were temporarily localized.
2249
2250 =item Unbalanced scopes: %d more ENTERs than LEAVEs
2251
2252 (W) The exit code detected an internal inconsistency in how many blocks
2253 were entered and left.
2254
2255 =item Unbalanced tmps: %d more allocs than frees
2256
2257 (W) The exit code detected an internal inconsistency in how many mortal
2258 scalars were allocated and freed.
2259
2260 =item Undefined format "%s" called
2261
2262 (F) The format indicated doesn't seem to exist.  Perhaps it's really in
2263 another package?  See L<perlform>.
2264
2265 =item Undefined sort subroutine "%s" called
2266
2267 (F) The sort comparison routine specified doesn't seem to exist.  Perhaps
2268 it's in a different package?  See L<perlfunc/sort>.
2269
2270 =item Undefined subroutine &%s called
2271
2272 (F) The subroutine indicated hasn't been defined, or if it was, it
2273 has since been undefined.
2274
2275 =item Undefined subroutine called
2276
2277 (F) The anonymous subroutine you're trying to call hasn't been defined,
2278 or if it was, it has since been undefined.
2279
2280 =item Undefined subroutine in sort
2281
2282 (F) The sort comparison routine specified is declared but doesn't seem to
2283 have been defined yet.  See L<perlfunc/sort>.
2284
2285 =item Undefined top format "%s" called
2286
2287 (F) The format indicated doesn't seem to exist.  Perhaps it's really in
2288 another package?  See L<perlform>.
2289
2290 =item unexec of %s into %s failed!
2291
2292 (F) The unexec() routine failed for some reason.  See your local FSF
2293 representative, who probably put it there in the first place.
2294
2295 =item Unknown BYTEORDER
2296
2297 (F) There are no byte-swapping functions for a machine with this byte order.
2298
2299 =item unmatched () in regexp
2300
2301 (F) Unbackslashed parentheses must always be balanced in regular
2302 expressions.  If you're a vi user, the % key is valuable for finding
2303 the matching parenthesis.  See L<perlre>.
2304
2305 =item Unmatched right bracket
2306
2307 (F) The lexer counted more closing curly brackets (braces) than opening
2308 ones, so you're probably missing an opening bracket.  As a general
2309 rule, you'll find the missing one (so to speak) near the place you were
2310 last editing.
2311
2312 =item unmatched [] in regexp
2313
2314 (F) The brackets around a character class must match.  If you wish to
2315 include a closing bracket in a character class, backslash it or put it first.
2316 See L<perlre>.
2317
2318 =item Unquoted string "%s" may clash with future reserved word
2319
2320 (W) You used a bare word that might someday be claimed as a reserved word.
2321 It's best to put such a word in quotes, or capitalize it somehow, or insert
2322 an underbar into it.  You might also declare it as a subroutine.
2323
2324 =item Unrecognized character \%03o ignored
2325
2326 (S) A garbage character was found in the input, and ignored, in case it's
2327 a weird control character on an EBCDIC machine, or some such.
2328
2329 =item Unrecognized signal name "%s"
2330
2331 (F) You specified a signal name to the kill() function that was not recognized.
2332 Say C<kill -l> in your shell to see the valid signal names on your system.
2333
2334 =item Unrecognized switch: -%s
2335
2336 (F) You specified an illegal option to Perl.  Don't do that.
2337 (If you think you didn't do that, check the #! line to see if it's
2338 supplying the bad switch on your behalf.)
2339
2340 =item Unsuccessful %s on filename containing newline
2341
2342 (W) A file operation was attempted on a filename, and that operation
2343 failed, PROBABLY because the filename contained a newline, PROBABLY
2344 because you forgot to chop() or chomp() it off.  See L<perlfunc/chop>.
2345
2346 =item Unsupported directory function "%s" called
2347
2348 (F) Your machine doesn't support opendir() and readdir().
2349
2350 =item Unsupported function %s
2351
2352 (F) This machines doesn't implement the indicated function, apparently.
2353 At least, Configure doesn't think so.
2354
2355 =item Unsupported socket function "%s" called
2356
2357 (F) Your machine doesn't support the Berkeley socket mechanism, or at
2358 least that's what Configure thought.
2359
2360 =item Unterminated E<lt>E<gt> operator
2361
2362 (F) The lexer saw a left angle bracket in a place where it was expecting
2363 a term, so it's looking for the corresponding right angle bracket, and not
2364 finding it.  Chances are you left some needed parentheses out earlier in
2365 the line, and you really meant a "less than".
2366
2367 =item Use of $# is deprecated
2368
2369 (D) This was an ill-advised attempt to emulate a poorly defined B<awk> feature.
2370 Use an explicit printf() or sprintf() instead.
2371
2372 =item Use of $* is deprecated
2373
2374 (D) This variable magically turned on multi-line pattern matching, both for
2375 you and for any luckless subroutine that you happen to call.  You should
2376 use the new C<//m> and C<//s> modifiers now to do that without the dangerous
2377 action-at-a-distance effects of C<$*>.
2378
2379 =item Use of %s in printf format not supported
2380
2381 (F) You attempted to use a feature of printf that is accessible from
2382 only C.  This usually means there's a better way to do it in Perl.
2383
2384 =item Use of %s is deprecated
2385
2386 (D) The construct indicated is no longer recommended for use, generally
2387 because there's a better way to do it, and also because the old way has
2388 bad side effects.
2389
2390 =item Use of bare E<lt>E<lt> to mean E<lt>E<lt>"" is deprecated
2391
2392 (D) You are now encouraged to use the explicitly quoted form if you
2393 wish to use a blank line as the terminator of the here-document.
2394
2395 =item Use of implicit split to @_ is deprecated
2396
2397 (D) It makes a lot of work for the compiler when you clobber a
2398 subroutine's argument list, so it's better if you assign the results of
2399 a split() explicitly to an array (or list).
2400
2401 =item Use of uninitialized value
2402
2403 (W) An undefined value was used as if it were already defined.  It was
2404 interpreted as a "" or a 0, but maybe it was a mistake.  To suppress this
2405 warning assign an initial value to your variables.
2406
2407 =item Useless use of %s in void context
2408
2409 (W) You did something without a side effect in a context that does nothing
2410 with the return value, such as a statement that doesn't return a value
2411 from a block, or the left side of a scalar comma operator.  Very often
2412 this points not to stupidity on your part, but a failure of Perl to parse
2413 your program the way you thought it would.  For example, you'd get this
2414 if you mixed up your C precedence with Python precedence and said
2415
2416     $one, $two = 1, 2;
2417
2418 when you meant to say
2419
2420     ($one, $two) = (1, 2);
2421
2422 Another common error is to use ordinary parentheses to construct a list
2423 reference when you should be using square or curly brackets, for
2424 example, if you say
2425
2426     $array = (1,2);
2427
2428 when you should have said
2429
2430     $array = [1,2];
2431
2432 The square brackets explicitly turn a list value into a scalar value,
2433 while parentheses do not.  So when a parenthesized list is evaluated in
2434 a scalar context, the comma is treated like C's comma operator, which
2435 throws away the left argument, which is not what you want.  See
2436 L<perlref> for more on this.
2437
2438 =item untie attempted while %d inner references still exist
2439
2440 (W) A copy of the object returned from C<tie> (or C<tied>) was still
2441 valid when C<untie> was called.
2442
2443 =item Value of %s construct can be "0"; test with defined()
2444
2445 (W) In a conditional expression, you used <HANDLE>, <*> (glob), or
2446 C<readdir> as a boolean value.  Each of these constructs can return a
2447 value of "0"; that would make the conditional expression false, which
2448 is probably not what you intended.  When using these constructs in
2449 conditional expressions, test their values with the C<defined> operator.
2450
2451 =item Variable "%s" is not exported
2452
2453 (F) While "use strict" in effect, you referred to a global variable
2454 that you apparently thought was imported from another module, because
2455 something else of the same name (usually a subroutine) is exported
2456 by that module.  It usually means you put the wrong funny character
2457 on the front of your variable.
2458
2459 =item Variable "%s" may be unavailable
2460
2461 (W) An inner (nested) I<anonymous> subroutine is inside a I<named>
2462 subroutine, and outside that is another subroutine; and the anonymous
2463 (innermost) subroutine is referencing a lexical variable defined in
2464 the outermost subroutine.  For example:
2465
2466    sub outermost { my $a; sub middle { sub { $a } } }
2467
2468 If the anonymous subroutine is called or referenced (directly or
2469 indirectly) from the outermost subroutine, it will share the variable
2470 as you would expect.  But if the anonymous subroutine is called or
2471 referenced when the outermost subroutine is not active, it will see
2472 the value of the shared variable as it was before and during the
2473 *first* call to the outermost subroutine, which is probably not what
2474 you want.
2475
2476 In these circumstances, it is usually best to make the middle
2477 subroutine anonymous, using the C<sub {}> syntax.  Perl has specific
2478 support for shared variables in nested anonymous subroutines; a named
2479 subroutine in between interferes with this feature.
2480
2481 =item Variable "%s" will not stay shared
2482
2483 (W) An inner (nested) I<named> subroutine is referencing a lexical
2484 variable defined in an outer subroutine.
2485
2486 When the inner subroutine is called, it will probably see the value of
2487 the outer subroutine's variable as it was before and during the
2488 *first* call to the outer subroutine; in this case, after the first
2489 call to the outer subroutine is complete, the inner and outer
2490 subroutines will no longer share a common value for the variable.  In
2491 other words, the variable will no longer be shared.
2492
2493 Furthermore, if the outer subroutine is anonymous and references a
2494 lexical variable outside itself, then the outer and inner subroutines
2495 will I<never> share the given variable.
2496
2497 This problem can usually be solved by making the inner subroutine
2498 anonymous, using the C<sub {}> syntax.  When inner anonymous subs that
2499 reference variables in outer subroutines are called or referenced,
2500 they are automatically re-bound to the current values of such
2501 variables.
2502
2503 =item Variable syntax.
2504
2505 (A) You've accidentally run your script through B<csh> instead
2506 of Perl.  Check the E<lt>#!E<gt> line, or manually feed your script
2507 into Perl yourself.
2508
2509 =item Warning: something's wrong
2510
2511 (W) You passed warn() an empty string (the equivalent of C<warn "">) or
2512 you called it with no args and C<$_> was empty.
2513
2514 =item Warning: unable to close filehandle %s properly.
2515
2516 (S) The implicit close() done by an open() got an error indication on the
2517 close().  This usually indicates your file system ran out of disk space.
2518
2519 =item Warning: Use of "%s" without parentheses is ambiguous
2520
2521 (S) You wrote a unary operator followed by something that looks like a
2522 binary operator that could also have been interpreted as a term or
2523 unary operator.  For instance, if you know that the rand function
2524 has a default argument of 1.0, and you write
2525
2526     rand + 5;
2527
2528 you may THINK you wrote the same thing as
2529
2530     rand() + 5;
2531
2532 but in actual fact, you got
2533
2534     rand(+5);
2535
2536 So put in parentheses to say what you really mean.
2537
2538 =item Write on closed filehandle
2539
2540 (W) The filehandle you're writing to got itself closed sometime before now.
2541 Check your logic flow.
2542
2543 =item X outside of string
2544
2545 (F) You had a pack template that specified a relative position before
2546 the beginning of the string being unpacked.  See L<perlfunc/pack>.
2547
2548 =item x outside of string
2549
2550 (F) You had a pack template that specified a relative position after
2551 the end of the string being unpacked.  See L<perlfunc/pack>.
2552
2553 =item Xsub "%s" called in sort
2554
2555 (F) The use of an external subroutine as a sort comparison is not yet supported.
2556
2557 =item Xsub called in sort
2558
2559 (F) The use of an external subroutine as a sort comparison is not yet supported.
2560
2561 =item You can't use C<-l> on a filehandle
2562
2563 (F) A filehandle represents an opened file, and when you opened the file it
2564 already went past any symlink you are presumably trying to look for.
2565 Use a filename instead.
2566
2567 =item YOU HAVEN'T DISABLED SET-ID SCRIPTS IN THE KERNEL YET!
2568
2569 (F) And you probably never will, because you probably don't have the
2570 sources to your kernel, and your vendor probably doesn't give a rip
2571 about what you want.  Your best bet is to use the wrapsuid script in
2572 the eg directory to put a setuid C wrapper around your script.
2573
2574 =item You need to quote "%s"
2575
2576 (W) You assigned a bareword as a signal handler name.  Unfortunately, you
2577 already have a subroutine of that name declared, which means that Perl 5
2578 will try to call the subroutine when the assignment is executed, which is
2579 probably not what you want.  (If it IS what you want, put an & in front.)
2580
2581 =item [gs]etsockopt() on closed fd
2582
2583 (W) You tried to get or set a socket option on a closed socket.
2584 Did you forget to check the return value of your socket() call?
2585 See L<perlfunc/getsockopt>.
2586
2587 =item \1 better written as $1
2588
2589 (W) Outside of patterns, backreferences live on as variables.  The use
2590 of backslashes is grandfathered on the right-hand side of a
2591 substitution, but stylistically it's better to use the variable form
2592 because other Perl programmers will expect it, and it works better
2593 if there are more than 9 backreferences.
2594
2595 =item '|' and 'E<lt>' may not both be specified on command line
2596
2597 (F) An error peculiar to VMS.  Perl does its own command line redirection, and
2598 found that STDIN was a pipe, and that you also tried to redirect STDIN using
2599 'E<lt>'.  Only one STDIN stream to a customer, please.
2600
2601 =item '|' and 'E<gt>' may not both be specified on command line
2602
2603 (F) An error peculiar to VMS.  Perl does its own command line redirection, and
2604 thinks you tried to redirect stdout both to a file and into a pipe to another
2605 command.  You need to choose one or the other, though nothing's stopping you
2606 from piping into a program or Perl script which 'splits' output into two
2607 streams, such as
2608
2609     open(OUT,">$ARGV[0]") or die "Can't write to $ARGV[0]: $!";
2610     while (<STDIN>) {
2611         print;
2612         print OUT;
2613     }
2614     close OUT;
2615
2616 =item Got an error from DosAllocMem
2617
2618 (P) An error peculiar to OS/2.  Most probably you're using an obsolete
2619 version of Perl, and this should not happen anyway.
2620
2621 =item Malformed PERLLIB_PREFIX
2622
2623 (F) An error peculiar to OS/2. PERLLIB_PREFIX should be of the form
2624
2625     prefix1;prefix2
2626
2627 or
2628
2629     prefix1 prefix2
2630
2631 with non-empty prefix1 and prefix2. If C<prefix1> is indeed a prefix of 
2632 a builtin library search path, prefix2 is substituted. The error may appear
2633 if components are not found, or are too long. See L<perlos2/"PERLLIB_PREFIX">.
2634
2635 =item PERL_SH_DIR too long
2636
2637 (F) An error peculiar to OS/2. PERL_SH_DIR is the directory to find the 
2638 C<sh>-shell in. See L<perlos2/"PERL_SH_DIR">.
2639
2640 =item Process terminated by SIG%s
2641
2642 (W) This is a standard message issued by OS/2 applications, while *nix
2643 applications die in silence. It is considered a feature of the OS/2
2644 port. One can easily disable this by appropriate sighandlers, see
2645 L<perlipc/"Signals">.  See L<perlos2/"Process terminated by SIGTERM/SIGINT">.
2646
2647 =back
2648