[perl #32419] Spelling fixes for perl@23492
authorRichard Soderberg <p5-authors@crystalflame.net>
Fri, 12 Nov 2004 16:14:49 +0000 (16:14 +0000)
committerH.Merijn Brand <h.m.brand@xs4all.nl>
Fri, 12 Nov 2004 20:47:19 +0000 (20:47 +0000)
From: Richard Soderberg (via RT) <perlbug-followup@perl.org>
Message-ID: <rt-3.0.11-32419-100173.13.0717895191322@perl.org>

p4raw-id: //depot/perl@23496

18 files changed:
pod/perl573delta.pod
pod/perl58delta.pod
pod/perl590delta.pod
pod/perl591delta.pod
pod/perl592delta.pod
pod/perlapi.pod
pod/perlapio.pod
pod/perldata.pod
pod/perldebtut.pod
pod/perlipc.pod
pod/perlport.pod
pod/perlre.pod
pod/perlretut.pod
pod/perlrun.pod
pod/perlsub.pod
pod/perlthrtut.pod
pod/perltodo.pod
pod/perltooc.pod

index 1121eb5..ea49678 100644 (file)
@@ -103,7 +103,7 @@ document that use utf8 is not the right way most of the time
 
 =item 11656
 
-allow builing perl with -DUSE_UTF8_SCRIPTS which makes UTF-8
+allow building perl with -DUSE_UTF8_SCRIPTS which makes UTF-8
 the default script encoding (not the default since that would
 break all scripts having legacy eight-bit data in them)
 
index 9d955ef..295724f 100644 (file)
@@ -2992,7 +2992,7 @@ Using splice() past the end of an array now causes a warning.
 =item *
 
 Malformed Unicode encodings (UTF-8 and UTF-16) cause a lot of warnings,
-ad doestrying to use UTF-16 surrogates (which are unimplemented).
+as does trying to use UTF-16 surrogates (which are unimplemented).
 
 =item *
 
index b71457e..389105e 100644 (file)
@@ -121,7 +121,7 @@ modifiers, has been removed.
 
 =head2 Assertions
 
-Perl 5.9.0 has experimental support for assertions.  Note that hhe user
+Perl 5.9.0 has experimental support for assertions.  Note that the user
 interface is not fully stabilized yet, and it may change until the 5.10.0
 release.  A new command-line switch, B<-A>, is used to activate
 assertions, which are declared with the C<assertions> pragma.  See
index 83252e6..400f90f 100644 (file)
@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@ perldelta - what is new for perl v5.9.1
 =head1 DESCRIPTION
 
 This document describes differences between the 5.9.0 and the 5.9.1
-developement releases. See L<perl590delta> for the differences between
+development releases. See L<perl590delta> for the differences between
 5.8.0 and 5.9.0.
 
 =head1 Incompatible Changes
@@ -15,7 +15,7 @@ developement releases. See L<perl590delta> for the differences between
 The lvalues returned by the three argument form of substr() used to be a
 "fixed length window" on the original string. In some cases this could
 cause surprising action at distance or other undefined behaviour. Now the
-length of the window adjusts iself to the length of the string assigned to
+length of the window adjusts itself to the length of the string assigned to
 it.
 
 =head2 The C<:unique> attribute is only meaningful for globals
index 9041b06..2002132 100644 (file)
@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@ perldelta - what is new for perl v5.9.2
 =head1 DESCRIPTION
 
 This document describes differences between the 5.9.1 and the 5.9.2
-developement releases. See L<perl590delta> and L<perl591delta> for the
+development releases. See L<perl590delta> and L<perl591delta> for the
 differences between 5.8.0 and 5.9.1.
 
 =head1 Incompatible Changes
index 896dcc4..9f43de0 100644 (file)
@@ -1096,7 +1096,7 @@ Clears any placeholders from a hash.  If a restricted hash has any of its keys
 marked as readonly and the key is subsequently deleted, the key is not actually
 deleted but is marked by assigning it a value of &PL_sv_placeholder.  This tags
 it so it will be ignored by future operations such as iterating over the hash,
-but will still allow the hash to have a value reaasigned to the key at some
+but will still allow the hash to have a value reassigned to the key at some
 future point.  This function clears any such placeholder keys from the hash.
 See Hash::Util::lock_keys() for an example of its use.
 
@@ -5130,7 +5130,7 @@ If the pe1 and pe2 are non-NULL, the scanning pointers will be copied
 in there (they will point at the beginning of the I<next> character).
 If the pointers behind pe1 or pe2 are non-NULL, they are the end
 pointers beyond which scanning will not continue under any
-circustances.  If the byte lengths l1 and l2 are non-zero, s1+l1 and
+circumstances.  If the byte lengths l1 and l2 are non-zero, s1+l1 and
 s2+l2 will be used as goal end pointers that will also stop the scan,
 and which qualify towards defining a successful match: all the scans
 that define an explicit length must reach their goal pointers for
index 10b8dc5..1dc3d53 100644 (file)
@@ -225,7 +225,7 @@ This corresponds to clearerr(), i.e., clears 'error' and (usually)
 
 This corresponds to fflush().  Sends any buffered write data to the
 underlying file.  If called with C<NULL> this may flush all open
-streams (or core dump with some USE_STDIO implementattions).  Calling
+streams (or core dump with some USE_STDIO implementations).  Calling
 on a handle open for read only, or on which last operation was a read
 of some kind may lead to undefined behaviour on some USE_STDIO
 implementations.  The USE_PERLIO (layers) implementation tries to
index 5ff97d4..254304c 100644 (file)
@@ -634,7 +634,7 @@ of how to arrange for an output ordering.
 
 =head2 Subscripts
 
-An array is subscripted by specifying a dollary sign (C<$>), then the
+An array is subscripted by specifying a dollar sign (C<$>), then the
 name of the array (without the leading C<@>), then the subscript inside
 square brackets.  For example:
 
index 2ead854..a38349b 100644 (file)
@@ -332,7 +332,7 @@ and will merrily dump out nested references, complete objects, partial objects
 - just about whatever you throw at it:
 
 Let's make a quick object and x-plode it, first we'll start the debugger:
-it wants some form of input from STDIN, so we give it something non-commital,
+it wants some form of input from STDIN, so we give it something non-committal,
 a zero:
 
        > perl -de 0
index 5d916e8..f94cc5b 100644 (file)
@@ -388,7 +388,7 @@ will generate the signal again. The result of this is a rather odd
 "loop". In future Perl's signal mechanism may be changed to avoid this
 - perhaps by simply disallowing %SIG handlers on signals of that
 type. Until then the work-round is not to set a %SIG handler on those
-signals. (Which signals they are is operating system dependant.)
+signals. (Which signals they are is operating system dependent.)
 
 =item Signals triggered by operating system state
 
index e7fcde7..ffd7c86 100644 (file)
@@ -1106,7 +1106,7 @@ native formats.
 
 What C<\n> represents depends on the type of file opened.  It usually
 represents C<\012> but it could also be C<\015>, C<\012>, C<\015\012>, 
-C<\000>, C<\040>, or nothing depending on the file organiztion and 
+C<\000>, C<\040>, or nothing depending on the file organization and 
 record format.  The VMS::Stdio module provides access to the 
 special fopen() requirements of files with unusual attributes on VMS.
 
index ea88fc0..625988f 100644 (file)
@@ -195,7 +195,7 @@ as endpoints of a range, that's not a range, the "-" is understood
 literally.  If Unicode is in effect, C<\s> matches also "\x{85}",
 "\x{2028}, and "\x{2029}", see L<perlunicode> for more details about
 C<\pP>, C<\PP>, and C<\X>, and L<perluniintro> about Unicode in general.
-You can define your own C<\p> and C<\P> propreties, see L<perlunicode>.
+You can define your own C<\p> and C<\P> properties, see L<perlunicode>.
 
 The POSIX character class syntax
 
@@ -576,7 +576,7 @@ track of the number of nested parentheses. For example:
 
 Inside the C<(?{...})> block, C<$_> refers to the string the regular
 expression is matching against. You can also use C<pos()> to know what is
-the current position of matching withing this string.
+the current position of matching within this string.
 
 The C<code> is properly scoped in the following sense: If the assertion
 is backtracked (compare L<"Backtracking">), all changes introduced after
index b738c3b..c0a78a4 100644 (file)
@@ -1754,7 +1754,7 @@ letter, the braces can be dropped.  For instance, C<\pM> is the
 character class of Unicode 'marks', for example accent marks.
 For the full list see L<perlunicode>.
 
-The Unicode has also been separated into various sets of charaters
+The Unicode has also been separated into various sets of characters
 which you can test with C<\p{In...}> (in) and C<\P{In...}> (not in),
 for example C<\p{Latin}>, C<\p{Greek}>, or C<\P{Katakana}>.
 For the full list see L<perlunicode>.
@@ -2271,7 +2271,7 @@ may surprise you:
     $pat = qr/(?{ $foo = 1 })/;  # precompile code regexp
     /foo${pat}bar/;      # compiles ok
 
-If a regexp has (1) code expressions and interpolating variables,or
+If a regexp has (1) code expressions and interpolating variables, or
 (2) a variable that interpolates a code expression, perl treats the
 regexp as an error. If the code expression is precompiled into a
 variable, however, interpolating is ok. The question is, why is this
index 1d0d55b..029b09b 100644 (file)
@@ -616,7 +616,7 @@ Note that the lines are not printed by default.  See B<-p> to have
 lines printed.  If a file named by an argument cannot be opened for
 some reason, Perl warns you about it and moves on to the next file.
 
-Here is an efficient way to delete all files that haven't been modifed for
+Here is an efficient way to delete all files that haven't been modified for
 at least a week:
 
     find . -mtime +7 -print | perl -nle unlink
index bfb2909..0839f1b 100644 (file)
@@ -212,7 +212,7 @@ C<DESTROY> plus all functions mentioned in L<perltie> and L<PerlIO::via>.
 
 The C<BEGIN>, C<CHECK>, C<INIT> and C<END> subroutines are not so much
 subroutines as named special code blocks, of which you can have more
-than one in a package, and which you can B<not> call explicitely.  See
+than one in a package, and which you can B<not> call explicitly.  See
 L<perlmod/"BEGIN, CHECK, INIT and END">
 
 =head2 Private Variables via my()
index 517fdd1..8e4e4f6 100644 (file)
@@ -602,7 +602,7 @@ communications between threads.
 =head2 Semaphores: Synchronizing Data Access
 
 Semaphores are a kind of generic locking mechanism. In their most basic
-form, they behave very much like lockable scalars, except that thay
+form, they behave very much like lockable scalars, except that they
 can't hold data, and that they must be explicitly unlocked. In their
 advanced form, they act like a kind of counter, and can allow multiple
 threads to have the 'lock' at any one time.
index 23fd3f5..219e92b 100644 (file)
@@ -225,7 +225,7 @@ Currently perl from p4/rsync ships with a patchlevel.h file that usually
 defines one local patch, of the form "MAINT12345" or "RC1". The output of
 perl -v doesn't report that a perl isn't an official release, and this
 information can get lost in bugs reports. Because of this, the minor version
-isn't bumped up util RC time, to minimise the possibility of versions of perl
+isn't bumped up until RC time, to minimise the possibility of versions of perl
 escaping that believe themselves to be newer than they actually are.
 
 It would be useful to find an elegant way to have the "this is an interim
index 78b6135..6737105 100644 (file)
@@ -922,7 +922,7 @@ all privacy in Perl, and it is a powerful form of privacy indeed.
 
 It is widely perceived, and indeed has often been written, that Perl
 provides no data hiding, that it affords the class designer no privacy
-nor isolation, merely a rag-tag assortment of weak and unenforcible
+nor isolation, merely a rag-tag assortment of weak and unenforceable
 social conventions instead.  This perception is demonstrably false and
 easily disproven.  In the next section, we show how to implement forms
 of privacy that are far stronger than those provided in nearly any
@@ -1106,7 +1106,7 @@ itself access its own class attributes without the mediating intervention of
 properly designed accessor methods is probably not a good idea after all.
 
 Restricting access to class attributes from the class itself is usually
-not enforcible even in strongly object-oriented languages.  But in Perl,
+not enforceable even in strongly object-oriented languages.  But in Perl,
 you can.
 
 Here's one way:
@@ -1298,7 +1298,7 @@ You can't use file-scoped lexicals in conjunction with the SelfLoader
 or the AutoLoader, because they alter the lexical scope in which the
 module's methods wind up getting compiled.
 
-The usual mealy-mouthed package-mungeing doubtless applies to setting
+The usual mealy-mouthed package-munging doubtless applies to setting
 up names of object attributes.  For example, C<< $self->{ObData1} >>
 should probably be C<< $self->{ __PACKAGE__ . "_ObData1" } >>, but that
 would just confuse the examples.