This is my patch patch.1g for perl5.001.
authorAndy Dougherty <doughera@lafcol.lafayette.edu>
Tue, 30 May 1995 01:56:48 +0000 (01:56 +0000)
committerAndy Dougherty <doughera@lafcol.lafayette.edu>
Tue, 30 May 1995 01:56:48 +0000 (01:56 +0000)
This patch only includes updates to the lib/ directory and
the removal of the pod/modpods.  The main things are the following:

The modpods are now embedded in their corresponding .pm files.

The Grand AutoLoader patch.

Updates to lib/ExtUtils/xsubpp by Paul Marquess
<pmarquess@bfsec.bt.co.uk>.

Minor changes to a very few modules and pods.

To apply, change to your perl directory, run the commands above, then
apply with
    patch -p1 -N  < thispatch.

After you apply this patch, you should go on to apply patch.1h and
patch.1i before reConfiguring and building.

Patch and enjoy,

Andy Dougherty doughera@lafcol.lafayette.edu
Dept. of Physics
Lafayette College, Easton PA

Here's the file-by-file description:

lib/AnyDBM_File.pm
    Embedded pod.

lib/AutoLoader.pm
    Grand AutoLoader patch.

    Embedded pod.

lib/AutoSplit.pm
    Grand AutoLoader patch.

    Embedded pod.

    Skip pod sections when splitting .pm files.

lib/Benchmark.pm
lib/Carp.pm
lib/Cwd.pm
lib/English.pm
    Grand AutoLoader patch.

    Embedded pod.

lib/Exporter.pm
    Grand AutoLoader patch.

    Embedded pod.

    Update comments to match behavior.

lib/ExtUtils/MakeMaker.pm
    Include installation of .pod and .pm files.

    Space out documentation for better printing with pod2man.

lib/ExtUtils/xsubpp
    Patches from Paul Marquess <pmarquess@bfsec.bt.co.uk>, 22 May 1995.
    Now at version 1.4.

lib/File/Basename.pm
    Embedded pod.

lib/File/CheckTree.pm
    Embedded pod.

lib/File/Find.pm
    Embedded pod.

    Included finddepth pod too.

lib/FileHandle.pm
    Embedded pod.

lib/Getopt/Long.pm
    Embedded pod.

    Fixed PERMUTE order bug.

lib/Getopt/Std.pm
    Embedded pod.

    Caught accessing undefined element off end of @arg array.

lib/I18N/Collate.pm
lib/IPC/Open2.pm
lib/IPC/Open3.pm
lib/Net/Ping.pm
    Embedded pod.

lib/Term/Complete.pm
    Embedded pod.

    Changed name from complete to Complete to match documentation and
    exported name.

lib/Text/Abbrev.pm
    Embedded pod.

lib/Text/Tabs.pm
    Updated.

lib/integer.pm
lib/less.pm
lib/sigtrap.pm
lib/strict.pm
lib/subs.pm
    Embedded pod.

61 files changed:
lib/AnyDBM_File.pm
lib/AutoLoader.pm
lib/AutoSplit.pm
lib/Benchmark.pm
lib/Carp.pm
lib/Cwd.pm
lib/English.pm
lib/Exporter.pm
lib/ExtUtils/MakeMaker.pm
lib/ExtUtils/xsubpp
lib/File/Basename.pm
lib/File/CheckTree.pm
lib/File/Find.pm
lib/FileHandle.pm
lib/Getopt/Long.pm
lib/Getopt/Std.pm
lib/I18N/Collate.pm
lib/IPC/Open2.pm
lib/IPC/Open3.pm
lib/Net/Ping.pm
lib/Term/Complete.pm
lib/Text/Abbrev.pm
lib/Text/Tabs.pm
lib/integer.pm
lib/less.pm
lib/sigtrap.pm
lib/strict.pm
lib/subs.pm
pod/modpods/Abbrev.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/AnyDBMFile.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/AutoLoader.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/AutoSplit.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/Basename.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/Benchmark.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/Carp.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/CheckTree.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/Collate.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/Config.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/Cwd.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/DB_File.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/Dynaloader.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/English.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/Env.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/Exporter.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/Fcntl.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/FileHandle.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/Find.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/Finddepth.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/GetOptions.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/Getopt.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/MakeMaker.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/Open2.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/Open3.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/POSIX.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/Ping.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/Socket.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/integer.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/less.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/sigtrap.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/strict.pod [deleted file]
pod/modpods/subs.pod [deleted file]

index ff90786..50acce4 100644 (file)
@@ -7,3 +7,86 @@ eval { require DB_File } ||
 eval { require GDBM_File } ||
 eval { require SDBM_File } ||
 eval { require ODBM_File };
+
+=head1 NAME
+
+AnyDBM_File - provide framework for multiple DBMs
+
+NDBM_File, ODBM_File, SDBM_File, GDBM_File - various DBM implementations
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+    use AnyDBM_File;
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+This module is a "pure virtual base class"--it has nothing of its own.
+It's just there to inherit from one of the various DBM packages.  It
+prefers ndbm for compatibility reasons with Perl 4, then Berkeley DB (See
+L<DB_File>), GDBM, SDBM (which is always there--it comes with Perl), and
+finally ODBM.   This way old programs that used to use NDBM via dbmopen()
+can still do so, but new ones can reorder @ISA:
+
+    @AnyDBM_File::ISA = qw(DB_File GDBM_File NDBM_File);
+
+Note, however, that an explicit use overrides the specified order:
+
+    use GDBM_File;
+    @AnyDBM_File::ISA = qw(DB_File GDBM_File NDBM_File);
+
+will only find GDBM_File.
+
+Having multiple DBM implementations makes it trivial to copy database formats:
+
+    use POSIX; use NDBM_File; use DB_File;
+    tie %newhash,  DB_File, $new_filename, O_CREAT|O_RDWR;
+    tie %oldhash,  NDBM_File, $old_filename, 1, 0;
+    %newhash = %oldhash;
+
+=head2 DBM Comparisons
+
+Here's a partial table of features the different packages offer:
+
+                         odbm    ndbm    sdbm    gdbm    bsd-db
+                        ----    ----    ----    ----    ------
+ Linkage comes w/ perl   yes     yes     yes     yes     yes
+ Src comes w/ perl       no      no      yes     no      no
+ Comes w/ many unix os   yes     yes[0]  no      no      no
+ Builds ok on !unix      ?       ?       yes     yes     ?
+ Code Size               ?       ?       small   big     big
+ Database Size           ?       ?       small   big?    ok[1]
+ Speed                   ?       ?       slow    ok      fast
+ FTPable                 no      no      yes     yes     yes
+ Easy to build          N/A     N/A      yes     yes     ok[2]
+ Size limits             1k      4k      1k[3]   none    none
+ Byte-order independent  no      no      no      no      yes
+ Licensing restrictions  ?       ?       no      yes     no
+
+
+=over 4
+
+=item [0] 
+
+on mixed universe machines, may be in the bsd compat library,
+which is often shunned.
+
+=item [1] 
+
+Can be trimmed if you compile for one access method.
+
+=item [2] 
+
+See L<DB_File>. 
+Requires symbolic links.  
+
+=item [3] 
+
+By default, but can be redefined.
+
+=back
+
+=head1 SEE ALSO
+
+dbm(3), ndbm(3), DB_File(3)
+
+=cut
index 92109a3..449498c 100644 (file)
@@ -1,6 +1,24 @@
 package AutoLoader;
 use Carp;
 
+=head1 NAME
+
+AutoLoader - load functions only on demand
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+    package FOOBAR;
+    use Exporter;
+    use AutoLoader;
+    @ISA = (Exporter, AutoLoader);
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+This module tells its users that functions in the FOOBAR package are to be
+autoloaded from F<auto/$AUTOLOAD.al>.  See L<perlsub/"Autoloading">.
+
+=cut
+
 AUTOLOAD {
     my $name = "auto/$AUTOLOAD.al";
     $name =~ s#::#/#g;
@@ -24,5 +42,23 @@ AUTOLOAD {
     }
     goto &$AUTOLOAD;
 }
+                            
+sub import
+{
+ my ($callclass, $callfile, $callline,$path,$callpack) = caller(0);
+ ($callpack = $callclass) =~ s#::#/#;
+ if (defined($path = $INC{$callpack . '.pm'}))
+  {
+   if ($path =~ s#^(.*)$callpack\.pm$#$1auto/$callpack/autosplit.ix# && -e $path) 
+    {
+     eval {require $path}; 
+     carp $@ if ($@);  
+    } 
+   else 
+    {
+     croak "Have not loaded $callpack.pm";
+    }
+  }
+}
 
 1;
index a642261..72f897d 100644 (file)
@@ -10,6 +10,19 @@ use Carp;
 @EXPORT = qw(&autosplit &autosplit_lib_modules);
 @EXPORT_OK = qw($Verbose $Keep $Maxlen $CheckForAutoloader $CheckModTime);
 
+=head1 NAME
+
+AutoSplit - split a package for autoloading
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+This function will split up your program into files that the AutoLoader
+module can handle.  Normally only used to build autoloading Perl library
+modules, especially extensions (like POSIX).  You should look at how
+they're built out for details.
+
+=cut
+
 # for portability warn about names longer than $maxlen
 $Maxlen  = 8;  # 8 for dos, 11 (14-".al") for SYSVR3
 $Verbose = 1;  # 0=none, 1=minimal, 2=list .al files
@@ -83,7 +96,13 @@ sub autosplit_file{
     open(IN, "<$filename") || die "AutoSplit: Can't open $filename: $!\n";
     my($pm_mod_time) = (stat($filename))[9];
     my($autoloader_seen) = 0;
+    my($in_pod) = 0;
     while (<IN>) {
+       # Skip pod text.
+       $in_pod = 1 if /^=/;
+       $in_pod = 0 if /^=cut/;
+       next if ($in_pod || /^=cut/);
+
        # record last package name seen
        $package = $1 if (m/^\s*package\s+([\w:]+)\s*;/);
        ++$autoloader_seen if m/^\s*(use|require)\s+AutoLoader\b/;
@@ -199,7 +218,9 @@ sub autosplit_file{
            next if $names{substr($subname,0,$maxflen-3)};
            my($file) = "$autodir/$modpname/$_";
            print "  deleting $file\n" if ($Verbose>=2);
-           unlink $file or carp "Unable to delete $file: $!";
+           my($deleted,$thistime);  # catch all versions on VMS
+           do { $deleted += ($thistime = unlink $file) } while ($thistime);
+           carp "Unable to delete $file: $!" unless $deleted;
        }
        closedir(OUTDIR);
     }
@@ -207,7 +228,9 @@ sub autosplit_file{
     open(TS,">$al_idx_file") or
        carp "AutoSplit: unable to create timestamp file ($al_idx_file): $!";
     print TS "# Index created by AutoSplit for $filename (file acts as timestamp)\n";
+    print TS "package $package;\n";
     print TS map("sub $_ ;\n", @subnames);
+    print TS "1;\n";
     close(TS);
 
     check_unique($package, $Maxlen, 1, @names);
index a19caff..40481f9 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,166 @@
 package Benchmark;
 
+=head1 NAME
+
+Benchmark - benchmark running times of code
+
+timethis - run a chunk of code several times
+
+timethese - run several chunks of code several times
+
+timeit - run a chunk of code and see how long it goes
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+    timethis ($count, "code");
+
+    timethese($count, {
+       'Name1' => '...code1...',
+       'Name2' => '...code2...',
+    });
+
+    $t = timeit($count, '...other code...')
+    print "$count loops of other code took:",timestr($t),"\n";
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+The Benchmark module encapsulates a number of routines to help you
+figure out how long it takes to execute some code.
+
+=head2 Methods
+
+=over 10
+
+=item new
+
+Returns the current time.   Example:
+
+    use Benchmark;
+    $t0 = new Benchmark;
+    # ... your code here ...
+    $t1 = new Benchmark;
+    $td = timediff($t1, $t0);
+    print "the code took:",timestr($dt),"\n";
+
+=item debug
+
+Enables or disable debugging by setting the C<$Benchmark::Debug> flag:
+
+    debug Benchmark 1; 
+    $t = timeit(10, ' 5 ** $Global ');
+    debug Benchmark 0; 
+
+=back
+
+=head2 Standard Exports
+
+The following routines will be exported into your namespace 
+if you use the Benchmark module:
+
+=over 10
+
+=item timeit(COUNT, CODE)
+
+Arguments: COUNT is the number of time to run the loop, and 
+the second is the code to run.  CODE may be a string containing the code,
+a reference to the function to run, or a reference to a hash containing 
+keys which are names and values which are more CODE specs.
+
+Side-effects: prints out noise to standard out.
+
+Returns: a Benchmark object.  
+
+=item timethis
+
+=item timethese
+
+=item timediff
+
+=item timestr
+
+=back
+
+=head2 Optional Exports
+
+The following routines will be exported into your namespace
+if you specifically ask that they be imported:
+
+=over 10
+
+clearcache
+
+clearallcache
+
+disablecache
+
+enablecache
+
+=back
+
+=head1 NOTES
+
+The data is stored as a list of values from the time and times
+functions: 
+
+      ($real, $user, $system, $children_user, $children_system)
+
+in seconds for the whole loop (not divided by the number of rounds).
+
+The timing is done using time(3) and times(3).
+
+Code is executed in the caller's package.
+
+Enable debugging by:  
+
+    $Benchmark::debug = 1;
+
+The time of the null loop (a loop with the same
+number of rounds but empty loop body) is subtracted
+from the time of the real loop.
+
+The null loop times are cached, the key being the
+number of rounds. The caching can be controlled using
+calls like these:
+
+    clearcache($key); 
+    clearallcache();
+
+    disablecache(); 
+    enablecache();
+
+=head1 INHERITANCE
+
+Benchmark inherits from no other class, except of course
+for Exporter.
+
+=head1 CAVEATS
+
+The real time timing is done using time(2) and
+the granularity is therefore only one second.
+
+Short tests may produce negative figures because perl
+can appear to take longer to execute the empty loop 
+than a short test; try: 
+
+    timethis(100,'1');
+
+The system time of the null loop might be slightly
+more than the system time of the loop with the actual
+code and therefore the difference might end up being < 0.
+
+More documentation is needed :-( especially for styles and formats.
+
+=head1 AUTHORS
+
+Jarkko Hietaniemi <Jarkko.Hietaniemi@hut.fi>,
+Tim Bunce <Tim.Bunce@ig.co.uk>
+
+=head1 MODIFICATION HISTORY
+
+September 8th, 1994; by Tim Bunce.
+
+=cut
+
 # Purpose: benchmark running times of code.
 #
 #
index c847b77..ba21d9c 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,29 @@
 package Carp;
 
+=head1 NAME
+
+carp - warn of errors (from perspective of caller)
+
+croak - die of errors (from perspective of caller)
+
+confess - die of errors with stack backtrace
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+    use Carp;
+    croak "We're outta here!";
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+The Carp routines are useful in your own modules because
+they act like die() or warn(), but report where the error
+was in the code they were called from.  Thus if you have a 
+routine Foo() that has a carp() in it, then the carp() 
+will report the error as occurring where Foo() was called, 
+not where carp() was called.
+
+=cut
+
 # This package implements handy routines for modules that wish to throw
 # exceptions outside of the current package.
 
index 20b175c..af1167d 100644 (file)
@@ -3,6 +3,35 @@ require 5.000;
 require Exporter;
 use Config;
 
+=head1 NAME
+
+getcwd - get pathname of current working directory
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+    require Cwd;
+    $dir = Cwd::getcwd();
+
+    use Cwd;
+    $dir = getcwd();
+
+    use Cwd 'chdir';
+    chdir "/tmp";
+    print $ENV{'PWD'};
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+The getcwd() function re-implements the getcwd(3) (or getwd(3)) functions
+in Perl.  If you ask to override your chdir() built-in function, then your
+PWD environment variable will be kept up to date.  (See
+L<perlsub/Overriding builtin functions>.)
+
+The fastgetcwd() function looks the same as getcwd(), but runs faster.
+It's also more dangerous because you might conceivably chdir() out of a
+directory that you can't chdir() back into.
+
+=cut
+
 @ISA = qw(Exporter);
 @EXPORT = qw(getcwd fastcwd);
 @EXPORT_OK = qw(chdir);
index d40d28a..d82ba2c 100644 (file)
@@ -3,6 +3,32 @@ package English;
 require Exporter;
 @ISA = (Exporter);
 
+=head1 NAME
+
+English - use nice English (or awk) names for ugly punctuation variables
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+    use English;
+    ...
+    if ($ERRNO =~ /denied/) { ... }
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+This module provides aliases for the built-in variables whose
+names no one seems to like to read.  Variables with side-effects
+which get triggered just by accessing them (like $0) will still 
+be affected.
+
+For those variables that have an B<awk> version, both long
+and short English alternatives are provided.  For example, 
+the C<$/> variable can be referred to either $RS or 
+$INPUT_RECORD_SEPARATOR if you are using the English module.
+
+See L<perlvar> for a complete list of these.
+
+=cut
+
 local $^W = 0;
 
 # Grandfather $NAME import
index add5657..ca1ff35 100644 (file)
@@ -2,31 +2,40 @@ package Exporter;
 
 =head1 Comments
 
-If the first entry in an import list begins with /, ! or : then
-treat the list as a series of specifications which either add to
-or delete from the list of names to import. They are processed
-left to right. Specifications are in the form:
+If the first entry in an import list begins with !, : or / then the
+list is treated as a series of specifications which either add to or
+delete from the list of names to import. They are processed left to
+right. Specifications are in the form:
 
-    [!]/pattern/    All names in @EXPORT and @EXPORT_OK which match
     [!]name         This name only
-    [!]:tag         All names in $EXPORT_TAGS{":tag"}
     [!]:DEFAULT     All names in @EXPORT
+    [!]:tag         All names in $EXPORT_TAGS{tag} anonymous list
+    [!]/pattern/    All names in @EXPORT and @EXPORT_OK which match
 
-e.g., Foo.pm defines:
+A leading ! indicates that matching names should be deleted from the
+list of names to import.  If the first specification is a deletion it
+is treated as though preceded by :DEFAULT. If you just want to import
+extra names in addition to the default set you will still need to
+include :DEFAULT explicitly.
+
+e.g., Module.pm defines:
 
     @EXPORT      = qw(A1 A2 A3 A4 A5);
     @EXPORT_OK   = qw(B1 B2 B3 B4 B5);
-    %EXPORT_TAGS = (':T1' => [qw(A1 A2 B1 B2)], ':T2' => [qw(A1 A2 B3 B4)]);
+    %EXPORT_TAGS = (T1 => [qw(A1 A2 B1 B2)], T2 => [qw(A1 A2 B3 B4)]);
 
     Note that you cannot use tags in @EXPORT or @EXPORT_OK.
     Names in EXPORT_TAGS must also appear in @EXPORT or @EXPORT_OK.
 
 Application says:
 
-    use Module qw(:T2 !B3 A3);
+    use Module qw(:DEFAULT :T2 !B3 A3);
     use Socket qw(!/^[AP]F_/ !SOMAXCONN !SOL_SOCKET);
     use POSIX  qw(/^S_/ acos asin atan /^E/ !/^EXIT/);
 
+You can set C<$Exporter::Verbose=1;> to see how the specifications are
+being processed and what is actually being imported into modules.
+
 =cut
 
 require 5.001;
@@ -110,7 +119,7 @@ sub export {
                }
            }
        }
-       die "Can't continue with import errors.\n" if $oops;
+       Carp::croak("Can't continue with import errors.\n") if $oops;
     }
     else {
        @imports = @exports;
index fb2dc14..0e3d049 100644 (file)
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
 package ExtUtils::MakeMaker;
 
-$Version = 4.094; # Last edited 17 Apr 1995 by Andy Dougherty
+$Version = 4.095; # Last edited 17 Apr 1995 by Andy Dougherty
 
 use Config;
 use Carp;
@@ -835,7 +835,7 @@ EOM
 }
 
 
-sub init_dirscan {     # --- File and Directory Lists (.xs .pm etc)
+sub init_dirscan {     # --- File and Directory Lists (.xs .pm .pod etc)
 
     my($name, %dir, %xs, %c, %h, %ignore, %pl_files);
     local(%pm); #the sub in find() has to see this hash
@@ -853,7 +853,7 @@ sub init_dirscan {  # --- File and Directory Lists (.xs .pm etc)
            $c{$name} = 1;
        } elsif ($name =~ /\.h$/){
            $h{$name} = 1;
-       } elsif ($name =~ /\.p[ml]$/){
+       } elsif ($name =~ /\.(p[ml]|pod)$/){
            $pm{$name} = "\$(INST_LIBDIR)/$name";
        } elsif ($name =~ /\.PL$/ && $name ne "Makefile.PL") {
            ($pl_files{$name} = $name) =~ s/\.PL$// ;
@@ -2336,27 +2336,49 @@ F<E<lt>bailey@HMIVAX.HUMGEN.UPENN.EDUE<gt>>.
 =head1 MODIFICATION HISTORY
 
 v1, August 1994; by Andreas Koenig. Based on Andy Dougherty's Makefile.SH.
+
 v2, September 1994 by Tim Bunce.
+
 v3.0 October  1994 by Tim Bunce.
+
 v3.1 November 11th 1994 by Tim Bunce.
+
 v3.2 November 18th 1994 by Tim Bunce.
+
 v3.3 November 27th 1994 by Andreas Koenig.
+
 v3.4 December  7th 1994 by Andreas Koenig and Tim Bunce.
+
 v3.5 December 15th 1994 by Tim Bunce.
+
 v3.6 December 15th 1994 by Tim Bunce.
+
 v3.7 December 30th 1994 By Tim Bunce
+
 v3.8 January  17th 1995 By Andreas Koenig and Tim Bunce
+
 v3.9 January 19th 1995 By Tim Bunce
+
 v3.10 January 23rd 1995 By Tim Bunce
+
 v3.11 January 24th 1995 By Andreas Koenig
+
 v4.00 January 24th 1995 By Tim Bunce
+
 v4.01 January 25th 1995 By Tim Bunce
+
 v4.02 January 29th 1995 By Andreas Koenig
+
 v4.03 January 30th 1995 By Andreas Koenig
+
 v4.04 Februeary 5th 1995 By Andreas Koenig
+
 v4.05 February 8th 1995 By Andreas Koenig
+
 v4.06 February 10th 1995 By Andreas Koenig
+
 v4.061 February 12th 1995 By Andreas Koenig
+
 v4.08 - 4.085  February 14th-21st 1995 by Andreas Koenig
 
 Introduces EXE_FILES and INST_EXE for installing executable scripts 
@@ -2384,7 +2406,7 @@ Variable LIBPERL_A enables indirect setting of the switches -DEMBED,
 old_extliblist() code deleted, new_extliblist() renamed to extliblist().
 
 Improved algorithm in extliblist, that returns ('','','') if no
-library has been found, even if a -L directory has been found.
+library has been found, even if a C<-L> directory has been found.
 
 Fixed a bug that didn't allow lib/ directory work as documented.
 
@@ -2436,7 +2458,7 @@ v4.091 April 3 1995 by Andy Dougherty
 
 Another attempt to fix writedoc() from Dean Roehrich.
 
-v4.092 April 11 1994 by Andreas Koenig
+v4.092 April 11 1995 by Andreas Koenig
 
 Fixed a docu bug in hint file description. Added printing of a warning
 from eval in the hintfile section if the eval has errors.  Moved
@@ -2456,7 +2478,7 @@ line for the linking of a new static perl.
 
 Minor cosmetics.
 
-v4.093 April 12 1994 by Andy Dougherty
+v4.093 April 12 1995 by Andy Dougherty
 
 Rename distclean target to plain dist.  Insert a dummy distclean
 target that's the same as realclean.  This is more consistent with the
@@ -2468,10 +2490,16 @@ are handled.
 Include Tim's suggestions about $verbose and more careful substitution
 of $(CC) for $Config{'cc'}.
 
-v4.094 April 12 1994 by Andy Dougherty
+v4.094 April 12 1995 by Andy Dougherty
 
 Include Andreas' improvement of $(CC) detection.
 
+v4.095 May 30 1995 by Andy Dougherty
+
+Include installation of .pod and .pm files.
+
+Space out documentation for better printing with pod2man.
+
 =head1 NOTES
 
 MakeMaker development work still to be done:
index 21bbc4e..3be47e0 100755 (executable)
@@ -50,12 +50,97 @@ No environment variables are used.
 
 Larry Wall
 
+=head1 MODIFICATION HISTORY
+
+=head2 1.0
+
+I<xsubpp> as released with Perl 5.000
+
+=head2 1.1
+
+I<xsubpp> as released with Perl 5.001
+
+=head2 1.2 
+
+Changes by Paul Marquess <pmarquess@bfsec.bt.co.uk>, 22 May 1995.
+
+=over 5
+
+=item 1.
+
+Added I<xsubpp> version number for the first time. As previous releases
+of I<xsubpp> did not have a formal version number, a numbering scheme
+has been applied retrospectively.
+
+=item 2.
+
+If OUTPUT: is being used to specify output parameters and RETVAL is
+also to be returned, it is now no longer necessary for the user to
+ensure that RETVAL is specified last.
+
+=item 3.
+
+The I<xsubpp> version number, the .xs filename and a time stamp are
+written to the generated .c file as a comment.
+
+=item 4.
+
+When I<xsubpp> is parsing the definition of both the input parameters
+and the OUTPUT parameters, any duplicate definitions will be noted and
+ignored.
+
+=item 5.
+
+I<xsubpp> is slightly more forgiving with extra whitespace.
+
+=back
+
+=head2 1.3 
+
+Changes by Paul Marquess <pmarquess@bfsec.bt.co.uk>, 23 May 1995.
+
+=over 5
+
+=item 1.
+
+More whitespace restrictions have been relaxed. In particular some
+cases where a tab character was used to delimit fields has been
+removed. In these cases any whitespace will now suffice.
+
+The specific places where changes have been made are in the TYPEMAP
+section of a typemap file and the input and OUTPUT: parameter
+declarations sections in a .xs file.
+
+=item 2.
+
+More error checking added.
+
+Before processing each typemap file I<xsubpp> now checks that it is a
+text file. If not an warning will be displayed. In addition, a warning
+will be displayed if it is not possible to open the typemap file.
+
+In the TYPEMAP section of a typemap file, an error will be raised if
+the line does not have 2 columns.
+
+When parsing input parameter declarations check that there is at least
+a type and name pair.
+
+=back
+
+=head2 1.4 
+
+When parsing the OUTPUT arguments check that they are all present in
+the corresponding input argument definitions.
+
 =head1 SEE ALSO
 
 perl(1)
 
 =cut
 
+# Global Constants
+$XSUBPP_version = "1.4" ;
+
 $usage = "Usage: xsubpp [-C++] [-except] [-typemap typemap] file.xs\n";
 
 SWITCH: while ($ARGV[0] =~ s/^-//) {
@@ -75,6 +160,27 @@ if ($pwd =~ /unrecognized command verb/) { $Is_VMS = 1; $pwd = $ENV{DEFAULT} }
        or ($dir, $filename) = ('.', $ARGV[0]);
 chdir($dir);
 
+sub TrimWhitespace
+{
+    $_[0] =~ s/^\s+|\s+$//go ;
+}
+
+sub TidyType
+{
+    local ($_) = @_ ;
+
+    # rationalise any '*' by joining them into bunches and removing whitespace
+    s#\s*(\*+)\s*#$1#g;
+
+    # change multiple whitespace into a single space
+    s/\s+/ /g ;
+    
+    # trim leading & trailing whitespace
+    TrimWhitespace($_) ;
+
+    $_ ;
+}
+
 $typemap = shift @ARGV;
 foreach $typemap (@tm) {
     die "Can't find $typemap in $pwd\n" unless -r $typemap;
@@ -83,7 +189,12 @@ unshift @tm, qw(../../../../lib/ExtUtils/typemap ../../../lib/ExtUtils/typemap
                 ../../lib/ExtUtils/typemap ../../../typemap ../../typemap
                 ../typemap typemap);
 foreach $typemap (@tm) {
-    open(TYPEMAP, $typemap) || next;
+    next unless -e $typemap ;
+    # skip directories, binary files etc.
+    warn("Warning: ignoring non-text typemap file '$typemap'\n"), next 
+       unless -T $typemap ;
+    open(TYPEMAP, $typemap) 
+       or warn ("Warning: could not open typemap file '$typemap': $!\n"), next;
     $mode = Typemap;
     $current = \$junk;
     while (<TYPEMAP>) {
@@ -93,8 +204,16 @@ foreach $typemap (@tm) {
        if (/^TYPEMAP\s*$/) { $mode = Typemap, next }
        if ($mode eq Typemap) {
            chop;
-           ($typename, $kind) = split(/\t+/, $_, 2);
-           $type_kind{$typename} = $kind if $kind ne '';
+           my $line = $_ ;
+            TrimWhitespace($_) ;
+           # skip blank lines and comment lines
+           next if /^$/ or /^#/ ;
+           my @words = split (' ') ;
+           blurt("Error: File '$typemap' Line $. '$line' TYPEMAP entry needs 2 columns\n"), next 
+               unless @words >= 2 ;
+           my $kind = pop @words ;
+            TrimWhitespace($kind) ;
+           $type_kind{TidyType("@words")} = $kind ;
        }
        elsif ($mode eq Input) {
            if (/^\s/) {
@@ -132,7 +251,19 @@ sub Q {
     $text;
 }
 
-open(F, $filename) || die "cannot open $filename\n";
+# Identify the version of xsubpp used
+$TimeStamp = localtime ;
+print <<EOM ;
+/* 
+ * This file was generated automatically by xsubpp version $XSUBPP_version
+ * from $filename on $TimeStamp
+ *
+ */
+EOM
+
+open(F, $filename) or die "cannot open $filename: $!\n";
 
 while (<F>) {
     last if ($Module, $foo, $Package, $foo1, $Prefix) =
@@ -196,9 +327,11 @@ while (&fetch_para) {
     undef($class);
     undef($static);
     undef($elipsis);
+    undef($wantRETVAL) ;
+    undef(%arg_list) ;
 
     # extract return type, function name and arguments
-    $ret_type = shift(@line);
+    $ret_type = TidyType(shift(@line));
     if ($ret_type =~ /^BOOT:/) {
         push (@BootCode, @line, "", "") ;
         next ;
@@ -325,11 +458,20 @@ EOF
                $_ = shift(@line);
                last if /^\s*NOT_IMPLEMENTED_YET/;
                last if /^\s*(PPCODE|CODE|OUTPUT|CLEANUP|CASE)\s*:/;
-               ($var_type, $var_name, $var_init) =
-                   /\s*([^\t]+)\s*([^\s=]+)\s*(=.*)?/;
-               # Catch common errors. More error checking required here.
-               blurt("Error: no tab in $pname argument declaration '$_'\n")
-                       unless (m/\S+\s*\t\s*\S+/);
+
+                TrimWhitespace($_) ;
+                # skip blank lines 
+                next if /^$/ ;
+               my $line = $_ ;
+               # check for optional initialisation code
+               my $var_init = $1 if s/\s*(=.*)$// ;
+
+                my @words = split (' ') ;
+                blurt("Error: invalid argument declaration '$line'"), next
+                    unless @words >= 2 ;
+                my $var_name = pop @words ;
+               my $var_type = "@words" ;
+
                # catch C style argument declaration (this could be made alowable syntax)
                warn("Warning: ignored semicolon in $pname argument declaration '$_'\n")
                        if ($var_name =~ s/;//g); # eg SV *<tab>name;
@@ -340,6 +482,11 @@ EOF
                        $var_name =~ s/^&//;
                        $var_addr{$var_name} = 1;
                }
+
+               # Check for duplicate definitions
+               blurt ("Error: duplicate definition of argument '$var_name' ignored"), next
+                   if $arg_list{$var_name} ++  ;
+
                $thisdone |= $var_name eq "THIS";
                $retvaldone |= $var_name eq "RETVAL";
                $var_types{$var_name} = $var_type;
@@ -425,29 +572,48 @@ EOF
                                $func_name = $2;
                        }
                        print "$func_name($func_args);\n";
-                       &generate_output($ret_type, 0, "RETVAL")
-                           unless $ret_type eq "void";
+                       $wantRETVAL = 1 
+                           unless $ret_type eq "void";
                }
        }
 
        # do output variables
        if (/^\s*OUTPUT\s*:/) {
+               my $gotRETVAL ;
+               my %outargs ;
                while (@line) {
                        $_ = shift(@line);
                        last if /^\s*CLEANUP\s*:/;
-                       s/^\s+//;
-                       ($outarg, $outcode) = split(/\t+/);
+                       TrimWhitespace($_) ;
+                       next if /^$/ ;
+                       my ($outarg, $outcode) = /^(\S+)\s*(.*)/ ;
+                       if (!$gotRETVAL and $outarg eq 'RETVAL') {
+                           # deal with RETVAL last
+                           push(@line, $_) ;
+                           $gotRETVAL = 1 ;
+                           undef ($wantRETVAL) ;
+                           next ;
+                       }
+                       blurt ("Error: duplicate OUTPUT argument '$outarg' ignored"), next
+                           if $outargs{$outarg} ++ ;
+                       blurt ("Error: OUTPUT $outarg not an argument"), next
+                           unless defined($args_match{$outarg});
+                       blurt("Error: No input definition for OUTPUT argument '$outarg' - ignored"), next
+                           unless defined $var_types{$outarg} ;
                        if ($outcode) {
                            print "\t$outcode\n";
                        } else {
-                               die "$outarg not an argument"
-                                   unless defined($args_match{$outarg});
                                $var_num = $args_match{$outarg};
                                &generate_output($var_types{$outarg}, $var_num,
                                    $outarg); 
                        }
                }
        }
+
+       # all OUTPUT done, so now push the return value on the stack
+       &generate_output($ret_type, 0, "RETVAL")
+            if $wantRETVAL ;
+
        # do cleanup
        if (/^\s*CLEANUP\s*:/) {
            while (@line) {
@@ -533,7 +699,8 @@ sub generate_init {
     local($ntype);
     local($tk);
 
-    blurt("'$type' not in typemap"), return unless defined($type_kind{$type});
+    $type = TidyType($type) ;
+    blurt("Error: '$type' not in typemap"), return unless defined($type_kind{$type});
     ($ntype = $type) =~ s/\s*\*/Ptr/g;
     $subtype = $ntype;
     $subtype =~ s/Ptr$//;
@@ -570,10 +737,11 @@ sub generate_output {
     local($argoff) = $num - 1;
     local($ntype);
 
+    $type = TidyType($type) ;
     if ($type =~ /^array\(([^,]*),(.*)\)/) {
            print "\tsv_setpvn($arg, (char *)$var, $2 * sizeof($1)), XFree((char *)$var);\n";
     } else {
-           blurt("'$type' not in typemap"), return
+           blurt("Error: '$type' not in typemap"), return
                unless defined($type_kind{$type});
            ($ntype = $type) =~ s/\s*\*/Ptr/g;
            $ntype =~ s/\(\)//g;
index 5e09ae4..596bff4 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,116 @@
 package File::Basename;
 
+=head1 NAME
+
+Basename - parse file specifications
+
+fileparse - split a pathname into pieces
+
+basename - extract just the filename from a path
+
+dirname - extract just the directory from a path
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+    use File::Basename;
+
+    ($name,$path,$suffix) = fileparse($fullname,@suffixlist)
+    fileparse_set_fstype($os_string);
+    $basename = basename($fullname,@suffixlist);
+    $dirname = dirname($fullname);
+
+    ($name,$path,$suffix) = fileparse("lib/File/Basename.pm","\.pm");
+    fileparse_set_fstype("VMS");
+    $basename = basename("lib/File/Basename.pm",".pm");
+    $dirname = dirname("lib/File/Basename.pm");
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+These routines allow you to parse file specifications into useful
+pieces using the syntax of different operating systems.
+
+=over 4
+
+=item fileparse_set_fstype
+
+You select the syntax via the routine fileparse_set_fstype().
+If the argument passed to it contains one of the substrings
+"VMS", "MSDOS", or "MacOS", the file specification syntax of that
+operating system is used in future calls to fileparse(),
+basename(), and dirname().  If it contains none of these
+substrings, UNIX syntax is used.  This pattern matching is
+case-insensitive.  If you've selected VMS syntax, and the file
+specification you pass to one of these routines contains a "/",
+they assume you are using UNIX emulation and apply the UNIX syntax
+rules instead, for that function call only.
+
+If you haven't called fileparse_set_fstype(), the syntax is chosen
+by examining the "osname" entry from the C<Config> package
+according to these rules.
+
+=item fileparse
+
+The fileparse() routine divides a file specification into three
+parts: a leading B<path>, a file B<name>, and a B<suffix>.  The
+B<path> contains everything up to and including the last directory
+separator in the input file specification.  The remainder of the input
+file specification is then divided into B<name> and B<suffix> based on
+the optional patterns you specify in C<@suffixlist>.  Each element of
+this list is interpreted as a regular expression, and is matched
+against the end of B<name>.  If this succeeds, the matching portion of
+B<name> is removed and prepended to B<suffix>.  By proper use of
+C<@suffixlist>, you can remove file types or versions for examination.
+
+You are guaranteed that if you concatenate B<path>, B<name>, and
+B<suffix> together in that order, the result will be identical to the
+input file specification.
+
+=back
+
+=head1 EXAMPLES
+
+Using UNIX file syntax:
+
+    ($base,$path,$type) = fileparse('/virgil/aeneid/draft.book7', 
+                                   '\.book\d+');
+
+would yield
+
+    $base eq 'draft'
+    $path eq '/virgil/aeneid',
+    $tail eq '.book7'
+
+Similarly, using VMS syntax:
+
+    ($name,$dir,$type) = fileparse('Doc_Root:[Help]Rhetoric.Rnh',
+                                  '\..*');
+
+would yield
+
+    $name eq 'Rhetoric'
+    $dir  eq 'Doc_Root:[Help]'
+    $type eq '.Rnh'
+
+=item C<basename>
+
+The basename() routine returns the first element of the list produced
+by calling fileparse() with the same arguments.  It is provided for
+compatibility with the UNIX shell command basename(1).
+
+=item C<dirname>
+
+The dirname() routine returns the directory portion of the input file
+specification.  When using VMS or MacOS syntax, this is identical to the
+second element of the list produced by calling fileparse() with the same
+input file specification.  When using UNIX or MSDOS syntax, the return
+value conforms to the behavior of the UNIX shell command dirname(1).  This
+is usually the same as the behavior of fileparse(), but differs in some
+cases.  For example, for the input file specification F<lib/>, fileparse()
+considers the directory name to be F<lib/>, while dirname() considers the
+directory name to be F<.>).
+
+=cut
+
 require 5.000;
 use Config;
 require Exporter;
@@ -62,7 +173,7 @@ sub fileparse_set_fstype {
 sub fileparse {
   my($fullname,@suffices) = @_;
   my($fstype) = $Fileparse_fstype;
-  my($dirpath,$tail,$suffix,$idx);
+  my($dirpath,$tail,$suffix);
 
   if ($fstype =~ /^VMS/i) {
     if ($fullname =~ m#/#) { $fstype = '' }  # We're doing Unix emulation
@@ -84,6 +195,7 @@ sub fileparse {
   }
 
   if (@suffices) {
+    $tail = '';
     foreach $suffix (@suffices) {
       if ($basename =~ /($suffix)$/) {
         $tail = $1 . $tail;
index a440bda..a39308b 100644 (file)
@@ -2,6 +2,45 @@ package File::CheckTree;
 require 5.000;
 require Exporter;
 
+=head1 NAME
+
+validate - run many filetest checks on a tree
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+    use File::CheckTree;
+
+    $warnings += validate( q{
+       /vmunix                 -e || die
+       /boot                   -e || die
+       /bin                    cd
+           csh                 -ex
+           csh                 !-ug
+           sh                  -ex
+           sh                  !-ug
+       /usr                    -d || warn "What happened to $file?\n"
+    });
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+The validate() routine takes a single multiline string consisting of
+lines containing a filename plus a file test to try on it.  (The
+file test may also be a "cd", causing subsequent relative filenames
+to be interpreted relative to that directory.)  After the file test
+you may put C<|| die> to make it a fatal error if the file test fails.
+The default is C<|| warn>.  The file test may optionally have a "!' prepended
+to test for the opposite condition.  If you do a cd and then list some
+relative filenames, you may want to indent them slightly for readability.
+If you supply your own die() or warn() message, you can use $file to
+interpolate the filename.
+
+Filetests may be bunched:  "-rwx" tests for all of C<-r>, C<-w>, and C<-x>.
+Only the first failed test of the bunch will produce a warning.
+
+The routine returns the number of warnings issued.
+
+=cut
+
 @ISA = qw(Exporter);
 @EXPORT = qw(validate);
 
index c7b0051..ba495a1 100644 (file)
@@ -5,6 +5,61 @@ use Config;
 use Cwd;
 use File::Basename;
 
+=head1 NAME
+
+find - traverse a file tree
+
+finddepth - traverse a directory structure depth-first
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+    use File::Find;
+    find(\&wanted, '/foo','/bar');
+    sub wanted { ... }
+    
+    use File::Find;
+    finddepth(\&wanted, '/foo','/bar');
+    sub wanted { ... }
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+The wanted() function does whatever verifications you want.  $dir contains
+the current directory name, and $_ the current filename within that
+directory.  $name contains C<"$dir/$_">.  You are chdir()'d to $dir when
+the function is called.  The function may set $prune to prune the tree.
+
+This library is primarily for the C<find2perl> tool, which when fed, 
+
+    find2perl / -name .nfs\* -mtime +7 \
+       -exec rm -f {} \; -o -fstype nfs -prune
+
+produces something like:
+
+    sub wanted {
+        /^\.nfs.*$/ &&
+        (($dev,$ino,$mode,$nlink,$uid,$gid) = lstat($_)) &&
+        int(-M _) > 7 &&
+        unlink($_)
+        ||
+        ($nlink || (($dev,$ino,$mode,$nlink,$uid,$gid) = lstat($_))) &&
+        $dev < 0 &&
+        ($prune = 1);
+    }
+
+Set the variable $dont_use_nlink if you're using AFS, since AFS cheats.
+
+C<finddepth> is just like C<find>, except that it does a depth-first
+search.
+
+Here's another interesting wanted function.  It will find all symlinks
+that don't resolve:
+
+    sub wanted {
+       -l && !-e && print "bogus link: $name\n";
+    } 
+
+=cut
+
 @ISA = qw(Exporter);
 @EXPORT = qw(find finddepth $name $dir);
 
index c45f446..9408717 100644 (file)
@@ -2,6 +2,55 @@ package FileHandle;
 
 # Note that some additional FileHandle methods are defined in POSIX.pm.
 
+=head1 NAME 
+
+FileHandle - supply object methods for filehandles
+
+cacheout - keep more files open than the system permits
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+    use FileHandle;
+    autoflush STDOUT 1;
+
+    cacheout($path);
+    print $path @data;
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+See L<perlvar> for complete descriptions of each of the following supported C<FileHandle> 
+methods:
+
+    print
+    autoflush
+    output_field_separator
+    output_record_separator
+    input_record_separator
+    input_line_number
+    format_page_number
+    format_lines_per_page
+    format_lines_left
+    format_name
+    format_top_name
+    format_line_break_characters
+    format_formfeed
+
+The cacheout() function will make sure that there's a filehandle
+open for writing available as the pathname you give it.  It automatically
+closes and re-opens files if you exceed your system file descriptor maximum.
+
+=head1 BUGS
+
+F<sys/param.h> lies with its C<NOFILE> define on some systems,
+so you may have to set $cacheout::maxopen yourself.
+
+Due to backwards compatibility, all filehandles resemble objects
+of class C<FileHandle>, or actually classes derived from that class.
+They actually aren't.  Which means you can't derive your own 
+class from C<FileHandle> and inherit those methods.
+
+=cut
+
 require 5.000;
 use English;
 use Exporter;
index 48cda7e..43e1e58 100644 (file)
@@ -5,6 +5,144 @@ require Exporter;
 @ISA = qw(Exporter);
 @EXPORT = qw(GetOptions);
 
+=head1 NAME
+
+GetOptions - extended getopt processing
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+    use Getopt::Long;
+    $result = GetOptions (...option-descriptions...);
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+The Getopt::Long module implements an extended getopt function called
+GetOptions(). This function adheres to the new syntax (long option names,
+no bundling).  It tries to implement the better functionality of
+traditional, GNU and POSIX getopt() functions.
+
+Each description should designate a valid Perl identifier, optionally
+followed by an argument specifier.
+
+Values for argument specifiers are:
+
+  <none>   option does not take an argument
+  !        option does not take an argument and may be negated
+  =s :s    option takes a mandatory (=) or optional (:) string argument
+  =i :i    option takes a mandatory (=) or optional (:) integer argument
+  =f :f    option takes a mandatory (=) or optional (:) real number argument
+
+If option "name" is set, it will cause the Perl variable $opt_name to
+be set to the specified value. The calling program can use this
+variable to detect whether the option has been set. Options that do
+not take an argument will be set to 1 (one).
+
+Options that take an optional argument will be defined, but set to ''
+if no actual argument has been supplied.
+
+If an "@" sign is appended to the argument specifier, the option is
+treated as an array.  Value(s) are not set, but pushed into array
+@opt_name.
+
+Options that do not take a value may have an "!" argument specifier to
+indicate that they may be negated. E.g. "foo!" will allow B<-foo> (which
+sets $opt_foo to 1) and B<-nofoo> (which will set $opt_foo to 0).
+
+The option name may actually be a list of option names, separated by
+'|'s, e.g. B<"foo|bar|blech=s". In this example, options 'bar' and
+'blech' will set $opt_foo instead.
+
+Option names may be abbreviated to uniqueness, depending on
+configuration variable $autoabbrev.
+
+Dashes in option names are allowed (e.g. pcc-struct-return) and will
+be translated to underscores in the corresponding Perl variable (e.g.
+$opt_pcc_struct_return).  Note that a lone dash "-" is considered an
+option, corresponding Perl identifier is $opt_ .
+
+A double dash "--" signals end of the options list.
+
+If the first option of the list consists of non-alphanumeric
+characters only, it is interpreted as a generic option starter.
+Everything starting with one of the characters from the starter will
+be considered an option.
+
+The default values for the option starters are "-" (traditional), "--"
+(POSIX) and "+" (GNU, being phased out).
+
+Options that start with "--" may have an argument appended, separated
+with an "=", e.g. "--foo=bar".
+
+If configuration variable $getopt_compat is set to a non-zero value,
+options that start with "+" may also include their arguments,
+e.g. "+foo=bar".
+
+A return status of 0 (false) indicates that the function detected
+one or more errors.
+
+=head1 EXAMPLES
+
+If option "one:i" (i.e. takes an optional integer argument), then
+the following situations are handled:
+
+   -one -two           -> $opt_one = '', -two is next option
+   -one -2             -> $opt_one = -2
+
+Also, assume "foo=s" and "bar:s" :
+
+   -bar -xxx           -> $opt_bar = '', '-xxx' is next option
+   -foo -bar           -> $opt_foo = '-bar'
+   -foo --             -> $opt_foo = '--'
+
+In GNU or POSIX format, option names and values can be combined:
+
+   +foo=blech          -> $opt_foo = 'blech'
+   --bar=              -> $opt_bar = ''
+   --bar=--            -> $opt_bar = '--'
+
+=over 12
+
+=item $autoabbrev      
+
+Allow option names to be abbreviated to uniqueness.
+Default is 1 unless environment variable
+POSIXLY_CORRECT has been set.
+
+=item $getopt_compat   
+
+Allow '+' to start options.
+Default is 1 unless environment variable
+POSIXLY_CORRECT has been set.
+
+=item $option_start    
+
+Regexp with option starters.
+Default is (--|-) if environment variable
+POSIXLY_CORRECT has been set, (--|-|\+) otherwise.
+
+=item $order           
+
+Whether non-options are allowed to be mixed with
+options.
+Default is $REQUIRE_ORDER if environment variable
+POSIXLY_CORRECT has been set, $PERMUTE otherwise.
+
+=item $ignorecase      
+
+Ignore case when matching options. Default is 1.
+
+=item $debug           
+
+Enable debugging output. Default is 0.
+
+=back
+
+=head1 NOTE
+
+Does not yet use the Exporter--or even packages!!
+Thus, it's not a real module.
+
+=cut
 
 # newgetopt.pl -- new options parsing
 
@@ -316,7 +454,7 @@ sub GetOptions {
 
        # Double dash is option list terminator.
        if ( $opt eq $argend ) {
-           unshift (@ret, @ARGV) if $order == $PERMUTE;
+           unshift (@ARGV, @ret) if $order == $PERMUTE;
            return ($error == 0);
        }
        elsif ( $opt =~ /^$genprefix/ ) {
index e1de3b5..4117ca7 100644 (file)
@@ -2,6 +2,30 @@ package Getopt::Std;
 require 5.000;
 require Exporter;
 
+=head1 NAME
+
+getopt - Process single-character switches with switch clustering
+
+getopts - Process single-character switches with switch clustering
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+    use Getopt::Std;
+    getopt('oDI');  # -o, -D & -I take arg.  Sets opt_* as a side effect.
+    getopts('oif:');  # -o & -i are boolean flags, -f takes an argument
+                     # Sets opt_* as a side effect.
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+The getopt() functions processes single-character switches with switch
+clustering.  Pass one argument which is a string containing all switches
+that take an argument.  For each switch found, sets $opt_x (where x is the
+switch name) to the value of the argument, or 1 if no argument.  Switches
+which take an argument don't care whether there is a space between the
+switch and the argument.
+
+=cut
+
 @ISA = qw(Exporter);
 @EXPORT = qw(getopt getopts);
 
@@ -64,7 +88,7 @@ sub getopts {
        ($first,$rest) = ($1,$2);
        $pos = index($argumentative,$first);
        if($pos >= 0) {
-           if($args[$pos+1] eq ':') {
+           if(defined($args[$pos+1]) and ($args[$pos+1] eq ':')) {
                shift(@ARGV);
                if($rest eq '') {
                    ++$errs unless @ARGV;
index 52c78ab..35c8025 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,39 @@
 package I18N::Collate;
 
+=head1 NAME
+
+Collate - compare 8-bit scalar data according to the current locale
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+    use Collate;
+    setlocale(LC_COLLATE, 'locale-of-your-choice'); 
+    $s1 = new Collate "scalar_data_1";
+    $s2 = new Collate "scalar_data_2";
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+This module provides you with objects that will collate 
+according to your national character set, providing the 
+POSIX setlocale() function should be supported on your system.
+
+You can compare $s1 and $s2 above with
+
+    $s1 le $s2
+
+to extract the data itself, you'll need a dereference: $$s1
+
+This uses POSIX::setlocale The basic collation conversion is done by
+strxfrm() which terminates at NUL characters being a decent C routine.
+collate_xfrm() handles embedded NUL characters gracefully.  Due to C<cmp>
+and overload magic, C<lt>, C<le>, C<eq>, C<ge>, and C<gt> work also.  The
+available locales depend on your operating system; try whether C<locale
+-a> shows them or the more direct approach C<ls /usr/lib/nls/loc> or C<ls
+/usr/lib/nls>.  The locale names are probably something like
+"xx_XX.(ISO)?8859-N".
+
+=cut
+
 # Collate.pm
 #
 # Author:      Jarkko Hietaniemi <Jarkko.Hietaniemi@hut.fi>
index c59c7d6..71f89f3 100644 (file)
@@ -3,6 +3,51 @@ require 5.000;
 require Exporter;
 use Carp;
 
+=head1 NAME
+
+IPC::Open2, open2 - open a process for both reading and writing
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+    use IPC::Open2;
+    $pid = open2('rdr', 'wtr', 'some cmd and args');
+      # or
+    $pid = open2('rdr', 'wtr', 'some', 'cmd', 'and', 'args');
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+The open2() function spawns the given $cmd and connects $rdr for
+reading and $wtr for writing.  It's what you think should work 
+when you try
+
+    open(HANDLE, "|cmd args");
+
+open2() returns the process ID of the child process.  It doesn't return on
+failure: it just raises an exception matching C</^open2:/>.
+
+=head1 WARNING 
+
+It will not create these file handles for you.  You have to do this yourself.
+So don't pass it empty variables expecting them to get filled in for you.
+
+Additionally, this is very dangerous as you may block forever.
+It assumes it's going to talk to something like B<bc>, both writing to
+it and reading from it.  This is presumably safe because you "know"
+that commands like B<bc> will read a line at a time and output a line at
+a time.  Programs like B<sort> that read their entire input stream first,
+however, are quite apt to cause deadlock.  
+
+The big problem with this approach is that if you don't have control 
+over source code being run in the the child process, you can't control what it does 
+with pipe buffering.  Thus you can't just open a pipe to "cat -v" and continually
+read and write a line from it.
+
+=head1 SEE ALSO
+
+See L<open3> for an alternative that handles STDERR as well.
+
+=cut
+
 @ISA = qw(Exporter);
 @EXPORT = qw(open2);
 
index 3426f19..8d324cc 100644 (file)
@@ -3,6 +3,31 @@ require 5.000;
 require Exporter;
 use Carp;
 
+=head1 NAME
+
+IPC::Open3, open3 - open a process for reading, writing, and error handling
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+    $pid = open3('WTRFH', 'RDRFH', 'ERRFH' 
+                   'some cmd and args', 'optarg', ...);
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+Extremely similar to open2(), open3() spawns the given $cmd and
+connects RDRFH for reading, WTRFH for writing, and ERRFH for errors.  If
+ERRFH is '', or the same as RDRFH, then STDOUT and STDERR of the child are
+on the same file handle.
+
+If WTRFH begins with ">&", then WTRFH will be closed in the parent, and
+the child will read from it directly.  if RDRFH or ERRFH begins with
+">&", then the child will send output directly to that file handle.  In both
+cases, there will be a dup(2) instead of a pipe(2) made.
+
+All caveats from open2() continue to apply.  See L<open2> for details.
+
+=cut
+
 @ISA = qw(Exporter);
 @EXPORT = qw(open3);
 
index 2528f55..cfc8f9f 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,44 @@
 package Net::Ping;
 
+=head1 NAME
+
+Net::Ping, pingecho - check a host for upness
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+    use Net::Ping;
+    print "'jimmy' is alive and kicking\n" if pingecho('jimmy', 10) ;
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+This module contains routines to test for the reachability of remote hosts.
+Currently the only routine implemented is pingecho(). 
+
+pingecho() uses a TCP echo (I<not> an ICMP one) to determine if the
+remote host is reachable. This is usually adequate to tell that a remote
+host is available to rsh(1), ftp(1), or telnet(1) onto.
+
+=head2 Parameters
+
+=over 5
+
+=item hostname
+
+The remote host to check, specified either as a hostname or as an IP address.
+
+=item timeout
+
+The timeout in seconds. If not specified it will default to 5 seconds.
+
+=back
+
+=head1 WARNING
+
+pingecho() uses alarm to implement the timeout, so don't set another alarm
+while you are using it.
+
+=cut
+
 # Authors: karrer@bernina.ethz.ch (Andreas Karrer)
 #          pmarquess@bfsec.bt.co.uk (Paul Marquess)
 
index 10b12a2..97c71fe 100644 (file)
@@ -37,7 +37,7 @@ CONFIG: {
     $erase2 =   "\010";
 }
 
-sub complete {
+sub Complete {
     $prompt = shift;
     if (ref $_[0] || $_[0] =~ /^\*/) {
        @cmp_lst = sort @{$_[0]};
index 77370d3..d12dfb3 100644 (file)
@@ -2,6 +2,28 @@ package Text::Abbrev;
 require 5.000;
 require Exporter;
 
+=head1 NAME
+
+abbrev - create an abbreviation table from a list
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+    use Abbrev;
+    abbrev *HASH, LIST
+
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+Stores all unambiguous truncations of each element of LIST
+as keys key in the associative array indicated by C<*hash>.
+The values are the original list elements.
+
+=head1 EXAMPLE
+
+    abbrev(*hash,qw("list edit send abort gripe"));
+
+=cut
+
 @ISA = qw(Exporter);
 @EXPORT = qw(abbrev);
 
index c90d1aa..fa86698 100644 (file)
@@ -2,10 +2,10 @@
 # expand and unexpand tabs as per the unix expand and 
 # unexpand programs.
 #
-# expand and unexpand operate on arrays of lines.  Do not
-# feed strings that contain newlines to them.
+# expand and unexpand operate on arrays of lines.  
 #
 # David Muir Sharnoff <muir@idiom.com>
+# Version: 4/19/95
 # 
 
 package Text::Tabs;
@@ -19,29 +19,45 @@ $tabstop = 8;
 
 sub expand
 {
-       my @l = @_;
-       for $_ (@l) {
-               1 while s/^([^\t]*)(\t+)/
-                       $1 . (" " x 
-                               ($tabstop * length($2)
-                               - (length($1) % $tabstop)))
-                       /e;
+       my (@l) = @_;
+       my $l, @k;
+       my $nl;
+       for $l (@l) {
+               $nl = $/ if chomp($l);
+               @k = split($/,$l);
+               for $_ (@k) {
+                       1 while s/^([^\t]*)(\t+)/
+                               $1 . (" " x 
+                                       ($tabstop * length($2)
+                                       - (length($1) % $tabstop)))
+                               /e;
+               }
+               $l = join("\n",@k).$nl;
        }
-       return @l;
+       return @l if $#l > 0;
+       return $l[0];
 }
 
 sub unexpand
 {
-       my @l = &expand(@_);
+       my (@l) = &expand(@_);
        my @e;
-       for $x (@l) {
-               @e = split(/(.{$tabstop})/,$x);
-               for $_ (@e) {
-                       s/  +$/\t/;
+       my $k, @k;
+       my $nl;
+       for $k (@l) {
+               $nl = $/ if chomp($k);
+               @k = split($/,$k);
+               for $x (@k) {
+                       @e = split(/(.{$tabstop})/,$x);
+                       for $_ (@e) {
+                               s/  +$/\t/;
+                       }
+                       $x = join('',@e);
                }
-               $x = join('',@e);
+               $k = join("\n",@k).$nl;
        }
-       return @l;
+       return @l if $#l > 0;
+       return $l[0];
 }
 
 1;
index 74039bb..a88ce6a 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,26 @@
 package integer;
 
+=head1 NAME
+
+integer - Perl pragma to compute arithmetic in integer instead of double
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+    use integer;
+    $x = 10/3;
+    # $x is now 3, not 3.33333333333333333
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+This tells the compiler that it's okay to use integer operations
+from here to the end of the enclosing BLOCK.  On many machines, 
+this doesn't matter a great deal for most computations, but on those 
+without floating point hardware, it can make a big difference.
+
+See L<perlmod/Pragmatic Modules>.
+
+=cut
+
 sub import {
     $^H |= 1;
 }
index a95484f..5e055f3 100644 (file)
@@ -1,2 +1,19 @@
 package less;
+
+=head1 NAME
+
+less - Perl pragma to request less of something from the compiler
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+Currently unimplemented, this may someday be a compiler directive
+to make certain trade-offs, such as perhaps
+
+    use less 'memory';
+    use less 'CPU';
+    use less 'fat';
+
+
+=cut
+
 1;
index 72b9cb6..dd4df90 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,27 @@
 package sigtrap;
 
+=head1 NAME
+
+sigtrap - Perl pragma to enable stack backtrace on unexpected signals
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+    use sigtrap;
+    use sigtrap qw(BUS SEGV PIPE SYS ABRT TRAP);
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+The C<sigtrap> pragma initializes some default signal handlers that print
+a stack dump of your Perl program, then sends itself a SIGABRT.  This
+provides a nice starting point if something horrible goes wrong.
+
+By default, handlers are installed for the ABRT, BUS, EMT, FPE, ILL, PIPE,
+QUIT, SEGV, SYS, TERM, and TRAP signals.
+
+See L<perlmod/Pragmatic Modules>.
+
+=cut
+
 require Carp;
 
 sub import {
index adaf47c..d35c6c1 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,73 @@
 package strict;
 
+=head1 NAME
+
+strict - Perl pragma to restrict unsafe constructs
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+    use strict;
+
+    use strict "vars";
+    use strict "refs";
+    use strict "subs";
+
+    use strict;
+    no strict "vars";
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+If no import list is supplied, all possible restrictions are assumed.
+(This is the safest mode to operate in, but is sometimes too strict for
+casual programming.)  Currently, there are three possible things to be
+strict about:  "subs", "vars", and "refs".
+
+=over 6
+
+=item C<strict refs>
+
+This generates a runtime error if you 
+use symbolic references (see L<perlref>).
+
+    use strict 'refs';
+    $ref = \$foo;
+    print $$ref;       # ok
+    $ref = "foo";
+    print $$ref;       # runtime error; normally ok
+
+=item C<strict vars>
+
+This generates a compile-time error if you access a variable that wasn't
+localized via C<my()> or wasn't fully qualified.  Because this is to avoid
+variable suicide problems and subtle dynamic scoping issues, a merely
+local() variable isn't good enough.  See L<perlfunc/my> and
+L<perlfunc/local>.
+
+    use strict 'vars';
+    $X::foo = 1;        # ok, fully qualified
+    my $foo = 10;       # ok, my() var
+    local $foo = 9;     # blows up
+
+The local() generated a compile-time error because you just touched a global
+name without fully qualifying it.
+
+=item C<strict subs>
+
+This disables the poetry optimization,
+generating a compile-time error if you 
+try to use a bareword identifier that's not a subroutine.
+
+    use strict 'subs';
+    $SIG{PIPE} = Plumber;      # blows up
+    $SIG{"PIPE"} = "Plumber";  # just fine
+
+=back
+
+See L<perlmod/Pragmatic Modules>.
+
+
+=cut
+
 sub bits {
     my $bits = 0;
     foreach $sememe (@_) {
index 8b58357..0dbbadd 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,23 @@
 package subs;
 
+=head1 NAME
+
+subs - Perl pragma to predeclare sub names
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+    use subs qw(frob);
+    frob 3..10;
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+This will predeclare all the subroutine whose names are 
+in the list, allowing you to use them without parentheses
+even before they're declared.
+
+See L<perlmod/Pragmatic Modules> and L<strict/subs>.
+
+=cut
 require 5.000;
 
 $ExportLevel = 0;
diff --git a/pod/modpods/Abbrev.pod b/pod/modpods/Abbrev.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 85ec88e..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,19 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-abbrev - create an abbreviation table from a list
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use Abbrev;
-    abbrev *HASH, LIST
-
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-Stores all unambiguous truncations of each element of LIST
-as keys key in the associative array indicated by C<*hash>.
-The values are the original list elements.
-
-=head1 EXAMPLE
-
-    abbrev(*hash,qw("list edit send abort gripe"));
diff --git a/pod/modpods/AnyDBMFile.pod b/pod/modpods/AnyDBMFile.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 5692144..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,80 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-AnyDBM_File - provide framework for multiple DBMs
-
-NDBM_File, ODBM_File, SDBM_File, GDBM_File - various DBM implementations
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use AnyDBM_File;
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-This module is a "pure virtual base class"--it has nothing of its own.
-It's just there to inherit from one of the various DBM packages.  It
-prefers ndbm for compatibility reasons with Perl 4, then Berkeley DB (See
-L<DB_File>), GDBM, SDBM (which is always there--it comes with Perl), and
-finally ODBM.   This way old programs that used to use NDBM via dbmopen()
-can still do so, but new ones can reorder @ISA:
-
-    @AnyDBM_File::ISA = qw(DB_File GDBM_File NDBM_File);
-
-Note, however, that an explicit use overrides the specified order:
-
-    use GDBM_File;
-    @AnyDBM_File::ISA = qw(DB_File GDBM_File NDBM_File);
-
-will only find GDBM_File.
-
-Having multiple DBM implementations makes it trivial to copy database formats:
-
-    use POSIX; use NDBM_File; use DB_File;
-    tie %newhash,  DB_File, $new_filename, O_CREAT|O_RDWR;
-    tie %oldhash,  NDBM_File, $old_filename, 1, 0;
-    %newhash = %oldhash;
-
-=head2 DBM Comparisons
-
-Here's a partial table of features the different packages offer:
-
-                         odbm    ndbm    sdbm    gdbm    bsd-db
-                        ----    ----    ----    ----    ------
- Linkage comes w/ perl   yes     yes     yes     yes     yes
- Src comes w/ perl       no      no      yes     no      no
- Comes w/ many unix os   yes     yes[0]  no      no      no
- Builds ok on !unix      ?       ?       yes     yes     ?
- Code Size               ?       ?       small   big     big
- Database Size           ?       ?       small   big?    ok[1]
- Speed                   ?       ?       slow    ok      fast
- FTPable                 no      no      yes     yes     yes
- Easy to build          N/A     N/A      yes     yes     ok[2]
- Size limits             1k      4k      1k[3]   none    none
- Byte-order independent  no      no      no      no      yes
- Licensing restrictions  ?       ?       no      yes     no
-
-
-=over 4
-
-=item [0] 
-
-on mixed universe machines, may be in the bsd compat library,
-which is often shunned.
-
-=item [1] 
-
-Can be trimmed if you compile for one access method.
-
-=item [2] 
-
-See L<DB_File>. 
-Requires symbolic links.  
-
-=item [3] 
-
-By default, but can be redefined.
-
-=back
-
-=head1 SEE ALSO
-
-dbm(3), ndbm(3), DB_File(3)
diff --git a/pod/modpods/AutoLoader.pod b/pod/modpods/AutoLoader.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 203f951..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,16 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-AutoLoader - load functions only on demand
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    package FOOBAR;
-    use Exporter;
-    use AutoLoader;
-    @ISA = (Exporter, AutoLoader);
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-This module tells its users that functions in the FOOBAR package are to be
-autoloaded from F<auto/$AUTOLOAD.al>.  See L<perlsub/"Autoloading">.
-
diff --git a/pod/modpods/AutoSplit.pod b/pod/modpods/AutoSplit.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 86df8c0..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,11 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-AutoSplit - split a package for autoloading
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-This function will split up your program into files that the AutoLoader
-module can handle.  Normally only used to build autoloading Perl library
-modules, especially extensions (like POSIX).  You should look at how
-they're built out for details.
-
diff --git a/pod/modpods/Basename.pod b/pod/modpods/Basename.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index b0f8229..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,108 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-Basename - parse file specifications
-
-fileparse - split a pathname into pieces
-
-basename - extract just the filename from a path
-
-dirname - extract just the directory from a path
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use File::Basename;
-
-    ($name,$path,$suffix) = fileparse($fullname,@suffixlist)
-    fileparse_set_fstype($os_string);
-    $basename = basename($fullname,@suffixlist);
-    $dirname = dirname($fullname);
-
-    ($name,$path,$suffix) = fileparse("lib/File/Basename.pm",".pm");
-    fileparse_set_fstype("VMS");
-    $basename = basename("lib/File/Basename.pm",".pm");
-    $dirname = dirname("lib/File/Basename.pm");
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-These routines allow you to parse file specifications into useful
-pieces using the syntax of different operating systems.
-
-=over 4
-
-=item fileparse_set_fstype
-
-You select the syntax via the routine fileparse_set_fstype().
-If the argument passed to it contains one of the substrings
-"VMS", "MSDOS", or "MacOS", the file specification syntax of that
-operating system is used in future calls to fileparse(),
-basename(), and dirname().  If it contains none of these
-substrings, UNIX syntax is used.  This pattern matching is
-case-insensitive.  If you've selected VMS syntax, and the file
-specification you pass to one of these routines contains a "/",
-they assume you are using UNIX emulation and apply the UNIX syntax
-rules instead, for that function call only.
-
-If you haven't called fileparse_set_fstype(), the syntax is chosen
-by examining the "osname" entry from the C<Config> package
-according to these rules.
-
-=item fileparse
-
-The fileparse() routine divides a file specification into three
-parts: a leading B<path>, a file B<name>, and a B<suffix>.  The
-B<path> contains everything up to and including the last directory
-separator in the input file specification.  The remainder of the input
-file specification is then divided into B<name> and B<suffix> based on
-the optional patterns you specify in C<@suffixlist>.  Each element of
-this list is interpreted as a regular expression, and is matched
-against the end of B<name>.  If this succeeds, the matching portion of
-B<name> is removed and prepended to B<suffix>.  By proper use of
-C<@suffixlist>, you can remove file types or versions for examination.
-
-You are guaranteed that if you concatenate B<path>, B<name>, and
-B<suffix> together in that order, the result will be identical to the
-input file specification.
-
-=back
-
-=head1 EXAMPLES
-
-Using UNIX file syntax:
-
-    ($base,$path,$type) = fileparse('/virgil/aeneid/draft.book7', 
-                                   '\.book\d+');
-
-would yield
-
-    $base eq 'draft'
-    $path eq '/virgil/aeneid',
-    $tail eq '.book7'
-
-Similarly, using VMS syntax:
-
-    ($name,$dir,$type) = fileparse('Doc_Root:[Help]Rhetoric.Rnh',
-                                  '\..*');
-
-would yield
-
-    $name eq 'Rhetoric'
-    $dir  eq 'Doc_Root:[Help]'
-    $type eq '.Rnh'
-
-=item C<basename>
-
-The basename() routine returns the first element of the list produced
-by calling fileparse() with the same arguments.  It is provided for
-compatibility with the UNIX shell command basename(1).
-
-=item C<dirname>
-
-The dirname() routine returns the directory portion of the input file
-specification.  When using VMS or MacOS syntax, this is identical to the
-second element of the list produced by calling fileparse() with the same
-input file specification.  When using UNIX or MSDOS syntax, the return
-value conforms to the behavior of the UNIX shell command dirname(1).  This
-is usually the same as the behavior of fileparse(), but differs in some
-cases.  For example, for the input file specification F<lib/>, fileparse()
-considers the directory name to be F<lib/>, while dirname() considers the
-directory name to be F<.>).
diff --git a/pod/modpods/Benchmark.pod b/pod/modpods/Benchmark.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 6b7d949..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,159 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-Benchmark - benchmark running times of code
-
-timethis - run a chunk of code several times
-
-timethese - run several chunks of code several times
-
-timeit - run a chunk of code and see how long it goes
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    timethis ($count, "code");
-
-    timethese($count, {
-       'Name1' => '...code1...',
-       'Name2' => '...code2...',
-    });
-
-    $t = timeit($count, '...other code...')
-    print "$count loops of other code took:",timestr($t),"\n";
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-The Benchmark module encapsulates a number of routines to help you
-figure out how long it takes to execute some code.
-
-=head2 Methods
-
-=over 10
-
-=item new
-
-Returns the current time.   Example:
-
-    use Benchmark;
-    $t0 = new Benchmark;
-    # ... your code here ...
-    $t1 = new Benchmark;
-    $td = timediff($t1, $t0);
-    print "the code took:",timestr($dt),"\n";
-
-=item debug
-
-Enables or disable debugging by setting the C<$Benchmark::Debug> flag:
-
-    debug Benchmark 1; 
-    $t = timeit(10, ' 5 ** $Global ');
-    debug Benchmark 0; 
-
-=back
-
-=head2 Standard Exports
-
-The following routines will be exported into your namespace 
-if you use the Benchmark module:
-
-=over 10
-
-=item timeit(COUNT, CODE)
-
-Arguments: COUNT is the number of time to run the loop, and 
-the second is the code to run.  CODE may be a string containing the code,
-a reference to the function to run, or a reference to a hash containing 
-keys which are names and values which are more CODE specs.
-
-Side-effects: prints out noise to standard out.
-
-Returns: a Benchmark object.  
-
-=item timethis
-
-=item timethese
-
-=item timediff
-
-=item timestr
-
-=back
-
-=head2 Optional Exports
-
-The following routines will be exported into your namespace
-if you specifically ask that they be imported:
-
-=over 10
-
-clearcache
-
-clearallcache
-
-disablecache
-
-enablecache
-
-=back
-
-=head1 NOTES
-
-The data is stored as a list of values from the time and times
-functions: 
-
-      ($real, $user, $system, $children_user, $children_system)
-
-in seconds for the whole loop (not divided by the number of rounds).
-
-The timing is done using time(3) and times(3).
-
-Code is executed in the caller's package.
-
-Enable debugging by:  
-
-    $Benchmark::debug = 1;
-
-The time of the null loop (a loop with the same
-number of rounds but empty loop body) is subtracted
-from the time of the real loop.
-
-The null loop times are cached, the key being the
-number of rounds. The caching can be controlled using
-calls like these:
-
-    clearcache($key); 
-    clearallcache();
-
-    disablecache(); 
-    enablecache();
-
-=head1 INHERITANCE
-
-Benchmark inherits from no other class, except of course
-for Exporter.
-
-=head1 CAVEATS
-
-The real time timing is done using time(2) and
-the granularity is therefore only one second.
-
-Short tests may produce negative figures because perl
-can appear to take longer to execute the empty loop 
-than a short test; try: 
-
-    timethis(100,'1');
-
-The system time of the null loop might be slightly
-more than the system time of the loop with the actual
-code and therefore the difference might end up being < 0.
-
-More documentation is needed :-( especially for styles and formats.
-
-=head1 AUTHORS
-
-Jarkko Hietaniemi <Jarkko.Hietaniemi@hut.fi>,
-Tim Bunce <Tim.Bunce@ig.co.uk>
-
-=head1 MODIFICATION HISTORY
-
-September 8th, 1994; by Tim Bunce.
-
diff --git a/pod/modpods/Carp.pod b/pod/modpods/Carp.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index b543977..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,22 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-carp - warn of errors (from perspective of caller)
-
-croak - die of errors (from perspective of caller)
-
-confess - die of errors with stack backtrace
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use Carp;
-    croak "We're outta here!";
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-The Carp routines are useful in your own modules because
-they act like die() or warn(), but report where the error
-was in the code they were called from.  Thus if you have a 
-routine Foo() that has a carp() in it, then the carp() 
-will report the error as occurring where Foo() was called, 
-not where carp() was called.
-
diff --git a/pod/modpods/CheckTree.pod b/pod/modpods/CheckTree.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index cc06eee..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,37 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-validate - run many filetest checks on a tree
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use File::CheckTree;
-
-    $warnings += validate( q{
-       /vmunix                 -e || die
-       /boot                   -e || die
-       /bin                    cd
-           csh                 -ex
-           csh                 !-ug
-           sh                  -ex
-           sh                  !-ug
-       /usr                    -d || warn "What happened to $file?\n"
-    });
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-The validate() routine takes a single multiline string consisting of
-lines containing a filename plus a file test to try on it.  (The
-file test may also be a "cd", causing subsequent relative filenames
-to be interpreted relative to that directory.)  After the file test
-you may put C<|| die> to make it a fatal error if the file test fails.
-The default is C<|| warn>.  The file test may optionally have a "!' prepended
-to test for the opposite condition.  If you do a cd and then list some
-relative filenames, you may want to indent them slightly for readability.
-If you supply your own die() or warn() message, you can use $file to
-interpolate the filename.
-
-Filetests may be bunched:  "-rwx" tests for all of C<-r>, C<-w>, and C<-x>.
-Only the first failed test of the bunch will produce a warning.
-
-The routine returns the number of warnings issued.
-
diff --git a/pod/modpods/Collate.pod b/pod/modpods/Collate.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 852fd1f..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,31 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-Collate - compare 8-bit scalar data according to the current locale
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use Collate;
-    setlocale(LC_COLLATE, 'locale-of-your-choice'); 
-    $s1 = new Collate "scalar_data_1";
-    $s2 = new Collate "scalar_data_2";
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-This module provides you with objects that will collate 
-according to your national character set, providing the 
-POSIX setlocale() function should be supported on your system.
-
-You can compare $s1 and $s2 above with
-
-    $s1 le $s2
-
-to extract the data itself, you'll need a dereference: $$s1
-
-This uses POSIX::setlocale The basic collation conversion is done by
-strxfrm() which terminates at NUL characters being a decent C routine.
-collate_xfrm() handles embedded NUL characters gracefully.  Due to C<cmp>
-and overload magic, C<lt>, C<le>, C<eq>, C<ge>, and C<gt> work also.  The
-available locales depend on your operating system; try whether C<locale
--a> shows them or the more direct approach C<ls /usr/lib/nls/loc> or C<ls
-/usr/lib/nls>.  The locale names are probably something like
-"xx_XX.(ISO)?8859-N".
diff --git a/pod/modpods/Config.pod b/pod/modpods/Config.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 141fb67..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,40 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-Config - access Perl configuration option
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use Config;
-    if ($Config{'cc'} =~ /gcc/) {
-       print "built by gcc\n";
-    } 
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-The Config module contains everything that was available to the
-C<Configure> program at Perl build time.  Shell variables from
-F<config.sh> are stored in the readonly-variable C<%Config>, indexed by
-their names.
-
-=head1 EXAMPLE
-
-Here's a more sophisticated example of using %Config:
-
-    use Config;
-
-    defined $Config{sig_name} || die "No sigs?";
-    foreach $name (split(' ', $Config{sig_name})) {
-       $signo{$name} = $i;
-       $signame[$i] = $name;
-       $i++;
-    }   
-
-    print "signal #17 = $signame[17]\n";
-    if ($signo{ALRM}) { 
-       print "SIGALRM is $signo{ALRM}\n";
-    }   
-
-=head1 NOTE
-
-This module contains a good example of how to make a variable
-readonly to those outside of it.  
diff --git a/pod/modpods/Cwd.pod b/pod/modpods/Cwd.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 042db81..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,26 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-getcwd - get pathname of current working directory
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    require Cwd;
-    $dir = Cwd::getcwd();
-
-    use Cwd;
-    $dir = getcwd();
-
-    use Cwd 'chdir';
-    chdir "/tmp";
-    print $ENV{'PWD'};
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-The getcwd() function re-implements the getcwd(3) (or getwd(3)) functions
-in Perl.  If you ask to override your chdir() built-in function, then your
-PWD environment variable will be kept up to date.  (See
-L<perlsub/Overriding builtin functions>.)
-
-The fastgetcwd() function looks the same as getcwd(), but runs faster.
-It's also more dangerous because you might conceivably chdir() out of a
-directory that you can't chdir() back into.
diff --git a/pod/modpods/DB_File.pod b/pod/modpods/DB_File.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 919743b..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,319 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-DB_File - Perl5 access to Berkeley DB
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
- use DB_File ;
-  
- [$X =] tie %hash,  DB_File, $filename [, $flags, $mode, $DB_HASH] ;
- [$X =] tie %hash,  DB_File, $filename, $flags, $mode, $DB_BTREE ;
- [$X =] tie @array, DB_File, $filename, $flags, $mode, $DB_RECNO ;
-   
- $status = $X->del($key [, $flags]) ;
- $status = $X->put($key, $value [, $flags]) ;
- $status = $X->get($key, $value [, $flags]) ;
- $status = $X->seq($key, $value [, $flags]) ;
- $status = $X->sync([$flags]) ;
- $status = $X->fd ;
-    
- untie %hash ;
- untie @array ;
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-B<DB_File> is a module which allows Perl programs to make use of 
-the facilities provided by Berkeley DB.  If you intend to use this
-module you should really have a copy of the Berkeley DB manual
-page at hand. The interface defined here
-mirrors the Berkeley DB interface closely.
-
-Berkeley DB is a C library which provides a consistent interface to a number of 
-database formats. 
-B<DB_File> provides an interface to all three of the database types currently
-supported by Berkeley DB.
-
-The file types are:
-
-=over 5
-
-=item DB_HASH
-
-This database type allows arbitrary key/data pairs to be stored in data files.
-This is equivalent to the functionality provided by 
-other hashing packages like DBM, NDBM, ODBM, GDBM, and SDBM.
-Remember though, the files created using DB_HASH are 
-not compatible with any of the other packages mentioned.
-
-A default hashing algorithm, which will be adequate for most applications, 
-is built into Berkeley DB.  
-If you do need to use your own hashing algorithm it is possible to write your
-own in Perl and have B<DB_File> use it instead.
-
-=item DB_BTREE
-
-The btree format allows arbitrary key/data pairs to be stored in a sorted, 
-balanced binary tree.
-
-As with the DB_HASH format, it is possible to provide a user defined Perl routine
-to perform the comparison of keys. By default, though, the keys are stored 
-in lexical order.
-
-=item DB_RECNO
-
-DB_RECNO allows both fixed-length and variable-length flat text files to be 
-manipulated using 
-the same key/value pair interface as in DB_HASH and DB_BTREE. 
-In this case the key will consist of a record (line) number. 
-
-=back
-
-=head2 How does DB_File interface to Berkeley DB?
-
-B<DB_File> allows access to Berkeley DB files using the tie() mechanism
-in Perl 5 (for full details, see L<perlfunc/tie()>).
-This facility allows B<DB_File> to access Berkeley DB files using
-either an associative array (for DB_HASH & DB_BTREE file types) or an
-ordinary array (for the DB_RECNO file type).
-
-In addition to the tie() interface, it is also possible to use most of the
-functions provided in the Berkeley DB API.
-
-=head2 Differences with Berkeley DB
-
-Berkeley DB uses the function dbopen() to open or create a 
-database. Below is the C prototype for dbopen().
-
-      DB*
-      dbopen (const char * file, int flags, int mode, 
-              DBTYPE type, const void * openinfo)
-
-The parameter C<type> is an enumeration which specifies which of the 3
-interface methods (DB_HASH, DB_BTREE or DB_RECNO) is to be used.
-Depending on which of these is actually chosen, the final parameter,
-I<openinfo> points to a data structure which allows tailoring of the
-specific interface method.
-
-This interface is handled 
-slightly differently in B<DB_File>. Here is an equivalent call using
-B<DB_File>.
-
-        tie %array, DB_File, $filename, $flags, $mode, $DB_HASH ;
-
-The C<filename>, C<flags> and C<mode> parameters are the direct equivalent 
-of their dbopen() counterparts. The final parameter $DB_HASH
-performs the function of both the C<type> and C<openinfo>
-parameters in dbopen().
-
-In the example above $DB_HASH is actually a reference to a hash object.
-B<DB_File> has three of these pre-defined references.
-Apart from $DB_HASH, there is also $DB_BTREE and $DB_RECNO.
-
-The keys allowed in each of these pre-defined references is limited to the names
-used in the equivalent C structure.
-So, for example, the $DB_HASH reference will only allow keys called C<bsize>,
-C<cachesize>, C<ffactor>, C<hash>, C<lorder> and C<nelem>. 
-
-To change one of these elements, just assign to it like this
-
-       $DB_HASH{cachesize} = 10000 ;
-
-
-=head2 RECNO
-
-
-In order to make RECNO more compatible with Perl the array offset for all
-RECNO arrays begins at 0 rather than 1 as in Berkeley DB.
-
-
-=head2 In Memory Databases
-
-Berkeley DB allows the creation of in-memory databases by using NULL (that is, a 
-C<(char *)0 in C) in 
-place of the filename. 
-B<DB_File> uses C<undef> instead of NULL to provide this functionality.
-
-
-=head2 Using the Berkeley DB Interface Directly
-
-As well as accessing Berkeley DB using a tied hash or array, it is also
-possible to make direct use of most of the functions defined in the Berkeley DB
-documentation.
-
-
-To do this you need to remember the return value from the tie.
-
-       $db = tie %hash, DB_File, "filename"
-
-Once you have done that, you can access the Berkeley DB API functions directly.
-
-       $db->put($key, $value, R_NOOVERWRITE) ;
-
-All the functions defined in L<dbx(3X)> are available except
-for close() and dbopen() itself.  
-The B<DB_File> interface to these functions have been implemented to mirror
-the the way Berkeley DB works. In particular note that all the functions return
-only a status value. Whenever a Berkeley DB function returns data via one of
-its parameters, the B<DB_File> equivalent does exactly the same.
-
-All the constants defined in L<dbopen> are also available.
-
-Below is a list of the functions available.
-
-=over 5
-
-=item get
-
-Same as in C<recno> except that the flags parameter is optional. 
-Remember the value
-associated with the key you request is returned in the $value parameter.
-
-=item put
-
-As usual the flags parameter is optional. 
-
-If you use either the R_IAFTER or
-R_IBEFORE flags, the key parameter will have the record number of the inserted
-key/value pair set.
-
-=item del
-
-The flags parameter is optional.
-
-=item fd
-
-As in I<recno>.
-
-=item seq
-
-The flags parameter is optional.
-
-Both the key and value parameters will be set.
-
-=item sync
-
-The flags parameter is optional.
-
-=back
-
-=head1 EXAMPLES
-
-It is always a lot easier to understand something when you see a real example.
-So here are a few.
-
-=head2 Using HASH
-
-       use DB_File ;
-       use Fcntl ;
-       
-       tie %h,  DB_File, "hashed", O_RDWR|O_CREAT, 0640, $DB_HASH ;
-       
-       # Add a key/value pair to the file
-       $h{"apple"} = "orange" ;
-       
-       # Check for existence of a key
-       print "Exists\n" if $h{"banana"} ;
-       
-       # Delete 
-       delete $h{"apple"} ;
-       
-       untie %h ;
-
-=head2 Using BTREE
-
-Here is sample of code which used BTREE. Just to make life more interesting
-the default comparision function will not be used. Instead a Perl sub, C<Compare()>,
-will be used to do a case insensitive comparison.
-
-        use DB_File ;
-        use Fcntl ;
-        
-       sub Compare
-        {
-           my ($key1, $key2) = @_ ;
-       
-           "\L$key1" cmp "\L$key2" ;
-       }
-       
-        $DB_BTREE->{compare} = 'Compare' ;
-        
-        tie %h,  DB_File, "tree", O_RDWR|O_CREAT, 0640, $DB_BTREE ;
-        
-        # Add a key/value pair to the file
-        $h{'Wall'} = 'Larry' ;
-        $h{'Smith'} = 'John' ;
-       $h{'mouse'} = 'mickey' ;
-       $h{'duck'}   = 'donald' ;
-        
-        # Delete
-        delete $h{"duck"} ;
-        
-       # Cycle through the keys printing them in order.
-       # Note it is not necessary to sort the keys as
-       # the btree will have kept them in order automatically.
-       foreach (keys %h)
-         { print "$_\n" }
-       
-        untie %h ;
-
-Here is the output from the code above.
-
-       mouse
-       Smith
-       Wall
-
-
-=head2 Using RECNO
-
-       use DB_File ;
-       use Fcntl ;
-       
-       $DB_RECNO->{psize} = 3000 ;
-       
-       tie @h,  DB_File, "text", O_RDWR|O_CREAT, 0640, $DB_RECNO ;
-       
-       # Add a key/value pair to the file
-       $h[0] = "orange" ;
-       
-       # Check for existence of a key
-       print "Exists\n" if $h[1] ;
-       
-       untie @h ;
-
-
-
-=head1 WARNINGS
-
-If you happen find any other functions defined in the source for this module 
-that have not been mentioned in this document -- beware. 
-I may drop them at a moments notice.
-
-If you cannot find any, then either you didn't look very hard or the moment has
-passed and I have dropped them.
-
-=head1 BUGS
-
-Some older versions of Berkeley DB had problems with fixed length records
-using the RECNO file format. The newest version at the time of writing 
-was 1.85 - this seems to have fixed the problems with RECNO.
-
-I am sure there are bugs in the code. If you do find any, or can suggest any
-enhancements, I would welcome your comments.
-
-=head1 AVAILABILITY
-
-Berkeley DB is available via the hold C<ftp.cs.berkeley.edu> in the
-directory C</ucb/4bsd/db.tar.gz>.  It is I<not> under the GPL.
-
-=head1 SEE ALSO
-
-L<perl(1)>, L<dbopen(3)>, L<hash(3)>, L<recno(3)>, L<btree(3)> 
-
-Berkeley DB is available from F<ftp.cs.berkeley.edu> in the directory F</ucb/4bsd>.
-
-=head1 AUTHOR
-
-The DB_File interface was written by 
-Paul Marquess <pmarquess@bfsec.bt.co.uk>.
-Questions about the DB system itself may be addressed to
-Keith Bostic  <bostic@cs.berkeley.edu>.
diff --git a/pod/modpods/Dynaloader.pod b/pod/modpods/Dynaloader.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 344fb69..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,316 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-DynaLoader - Dynamically load C libraries into Perl code
-
-dl_error(), dl_findfile(), dl_expandspec(), dl_load_file(), dl_find_symbol(), dl_undef_symbols(), dl_install_xsub(), boostrap() - routines used by DynaLoader modules
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    require DynaLoader;
-    push (@ISA, 'DynaLoader');
-
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-This specification defines a standard generic interface to the dynamic
-linking mechanisms available on many platforms.  Its primary purpose is
-to implement automatic dynamic loading of Perl modules.
-
-The DynaLoader is designed to be a very simple high-level
-interface that is sufficiently general to cover the requirements
-of SunOS, HP-UX, NeXT, Linux, VMS and other platforms.
-
-It is also hoped that the interface will cover the needs of OS/2,
-NT etc and allow pseudo-dynamic linking (using C<ld -A> at runtime).
-
-This document serves as both a specification for anyone wishing to
-implement the DynaLoader for a new platform and as a guide for
-anyone wishing to use the DynaLoader directly in an application.
-
-It must be stressed that the DynaLoader, by itself, is practically
-useless for accessing non-Perl libraries because it provides almost no
-Perl-to-C 'glue'.  There is, for example, no mechanism for calling a C
-library function or supplying arguments.  It is anticipated that any
-glue that may be developed in the future will be implemented in a
-separate dynamically loaded module.
-
-DynaLoader Interface Summary
-
-  @dl_library_path
-  @dl_resolve_using
-  @dl_require_symbols
-  $dl_debug
-                                                  Implemented in:
-  bootstrap($modulename)                               Perl
-  @filepaths = dl_findfile(@names)                     Perl
-
-  $libref  = dl_load_file($filename)                   C
-  $symref  = dl_find_symbol($libref, $symbol)          C
-  @symbols = dl_undef_symbols()                        C
-  dl_install_xsub($name, $symref [, $filename])        C
-  $message = dl_error                                  C
-
-=over 4
-
-=item @dl_library_path
-
-The standard/default list of directories in which dl_findfile() will
-search for libraries etc.  Directories are searched in order:
-$dl_library_path[0], [1], ... etc
-
-@dl_library_path is initialised to hold the list of 'normal' directories
-(F</usr/lib>, etc) determined by B<Configure> (C<$Config{'libpth'}>).  This should
-ensure portability across a wide range of platforms.
-
-@dl_library_path should also be initialised with any other directories
-that can be determined from the environment at runtime (such as
-LD_LIBRARY_PATH for SunOS).
-
-After initialisation @dl_library_path can be manipulated by an
-application using push and unshift before calling dl_findfile().
-Unshift can be used to add directories to the front of the search order
-either to save search time or to override libraries with the same name
-in the 'normal' directories.
-
-The load function that dl_load_file() calls may require an absolute
-pathname.  The dl_findfile() function and @dl_library_path can be
-used to search for and return the absolute pathname for the
-library/object that you wish to load.
-
-=item @dl_resolve_using
-
-A list of additional libraries or other shared objects which can be
-used to resolve any undefined symbols that might be generated by a
-later call to load_file().
-
-This is only required on some platforms which do not handle dependent
-libraries automatically.  For example the Socket Perl extension library
-(F<auto/Socket/Socket.so>) contains references to many socket functions
-which need to be resolved when it's loaded.  Most platforms will
-automatically know where to find the 'dependent' library (e.g.,
-F</usr/lib/libsocket.so>).  A few platforms need to to be told the location
-of the dependent library explicitly.  Use @dl_resolve_using for this.
-
-Example usage:
-
-    @dl_resolve_using = dl_findfile('-lsocket');
-
-=item @dl_require_symbols
-
-A list of one or more symbol names that are in the library/object file
-to be dynamically loaded.  This is only required on some platforms.
-
-=item dl_error()
-
-Syntax:
-
-    $message = dl_error();
-
-Error message text from the last failed DynaLoader function.  Note
-that, similar to errno in unix, a successful function call does not
-reset this message.
-
-Implementations should detect the error as soon as it occurs in any of
-the other functions and save the corresponding message for later
-retrieval.  This will avoid problems on some platforms (such as SunOS)
-where the error message is very temporary (e.g., dlerror()).
-
-=item $dl_debug
-
-Internal debugging messages are enabled when $dl_debug is set true.
-Currently setting $dl_debug only affects the Perl side of the
-DynaLoader.  These messages should help an application developer to
-resolve any DynaLoader usage problems.
-
-$dl_debug is set to C<$ENV{'PERL_DL_DEBUG'}> if defined.
-
-For the DynaLoader developer/porter there is a similar debugging
-variable added to the C code (see dlutils.c) and enabled if Perl was
-built with the B<-DDEBUGGING> flag.  This can also be set via the
-PERL_DL_DEBUG environment variable.  Set to 1 for minimal information or
-higher for more.
-
-=item dl_findfile()
-
-Syntax:
-
-    @filepaths = dl_findfile(@names)
-
-Determine the full paths (including file suffix) of one or more
-loadable files given their generic names and optionally one or more
-directories.  Searches directories in @dl_library_path by default and
-returns an empty list if no files were found.
-
-Names can be specified in a variety of platform independent forms.  Any
-names in the form B<-lname> are converted into F<libname.*>, where F<.*> is
-an appropriate suffix for the platform.
-
-If a name does not already have a suitable prefix and/or suffix then
-the corresponding file will be searched for by trying combinations of
-prefix and suffix appropriate to the platform: "$name.o", "lib$name.*"
-and "$name".
-
-If any directories are included in @names they are searched before
-@dl_library_path.  Directories may be specified as B<-Ldir>.  Any other names
-are treated as filenames to be searched for.
-
-Using arguments of the form C<-Ldir> and C<-lname> is recommended.
-
-Example: 
-
-    @dl_resolve_using = dl_findfile(qw(-L/usr/5lib -lposix));
-
-
-=item dl_expandspec()
-
-Syntax:
-
-    $filepath = dl_expandspec($spec)
-
-Some unusual systems, such as VMS, require special filename handling in
-order to deal with symbolic names for files (i.e., VMS's Logical Names).
-
-To support these systems a dl_expandspec() function can be implemented
-either in the F<dl_*.xs> file or code can be added to the autoloadable
-dl_expandspec(0 function in F<DynaLoader.pm>).  See F<DynaLoader.pm> for more
-information.
-
-=item dl_load_file()
-
-Syntax:
-
-    $libref = dl_load_file($filename)
-
-Dynamically load $filename, which must be the path to a shared object
-or library.  An opaque 'library reference' is returned as a handle for
-the loaded object.  Returns undef on error.
-
-(On systems that provide a handle for the loaded object such as SunOS
-and HPUX, $libref will be that handle.  On other systems $libref will
-typically be $filename or a pointer to a buffer containing $filename.
-The application should not examine or alter $libref in any way.)
-
-This is function that does the real work.  It should use the current
-values of @dl_require_symbols and @dl_resolve_using if required.
-
-    SunOS: dlopen($filename)
-    HP-UX: shl_load($filename)
-    Linux: dld_create_reference(@dl_require_symbols); dld_link($filename)
-    NeXT:  rld_load($filename, @dl_resolve_using)
-    VMS:   lib$find_image_symbol($filename,$dl_require_symbols[0])
-
-
-=item dl_find_symbol()
-
-Syntax:
-
-    $symref = dl_find_symbol($libref, $symbol)
-
-Return the address of the symbol $symbol or C<undef> if not found.  If the
-target system has separate functions to search for symbols of different
-types then dl_find_symbol() should search for function symbols first and
-then other types.
-
-The exact manner in which the address is returned in $symref is not
-currently defined.  The only initial requirement is that $symref can
-be passed to, and understood by, dl_install_xsub().
-
-    SunOS: dlsym($libref, $symbol)
-    HP-UX: shl_findsym($libref, $symbol)
-    Linux: dld_get_func($symbol) and/or dld_get_symbol($symbol)
-    NeXT:  rld_lookup("_$symbol")
-    VMS:   lib$find_image_symbol($libref,$symbol)
-
-
-=item dl_undef_symbols()
-
-Example
-
-    @symbols = dl_undef_symbols()
-
-Return a list of symbol names which remain undefined after load_file().
-Returns C<()> if not known.  Don't worry if your platform does not provide
-a mechanism for this.  Most do not need it and hence do not provide it.
-
-
-=item dl_install_xsub()
-
-Syntax:
-
-    dl_install_xsub($perl_name, $symref [, $filename])
-
-Create a new Perl external subroutine named $perl_name using $symref as
-a pointer to the function which implements the routine.  This is simply
-a direct call to newXSUB().  Returns a reference to the installed
-function.
-
-The $filename parameter is used by Perl to identify the source file for
-the function if required by die(), caller() or the debugger.  If
-$filename is not defined then "DynaLoader" will be used.
-
-
-=item boostrap()
-
-Syntax:
-
-bootstrap($module)
-
-This is the normal entry point for automatic dynamic loading in Perl.
-
-It performs the following actions:
-
-=over 8
-
-=item *
-
-locates an auto/$module directory by searching @INC
-
-=item *
-
-uses dl_findfile() to determine the filename to load
-
-=item *
-
-sets @dl_require_symbols to C<("boot_$module")>
-
-=item *
-
-executes an F<auto/$module/$module.bs> file if it exists
-(typically used to add to @dl_resolve_using any files which
-are required to load the module on the current platform)
-
-=item *
-
-calls dl_load_file() to load the file
-
-=item *
-
-calls dl_undef_symbols() and warns if any symbols are undefined
-
-=item *
-
-calls dl_find_symbol() for "boot_$module"
-
-=item *
-
-calls dl_install_xsub() to install it as "${module}::bootstrap"
-
-=item *
-
-calls &{"${module}::bootstrap"} to bootstrap the module
-
-=back
-
-=back
-
-
-=head1 AUTHOR
-
-This interface is based on the work and comments of (in no particular
-order): Larry Wall, Robert Sanders, Dean Roehrich, Jeff Okamoto, Anno
-Siegel, Thomas Neumann, Paul Marquess, Charles Bailey, and others.
-
-Larry Wall designed the elegant inherited bootstrap mechanism and
-implemented the first Perl 5 dynamic loader using it.
-
-Tim Bunce, 11 August 1994.
diff --git a/pod/modpods/English.pod b/pod/modpods/English.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index d6b26be..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,24 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-English - use nice English (or awk) names for ugly punctuation variables
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use English;
-    ...
-    if ($ERRNO =~ /denied/) { ... }
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-This module provides aliases for the built-in variables whose
-names no one seems to like to read.  Variables with side-effects
-which get triggered just by accessing them (like $0) will still 
-be affected.
-
-For those variables that have an B<awk> version, both long
-and short English alternatives are provided.  For example, 
-the C<$/> variable can be referred to either $RS or 
-$INPUT_RECORD_SEPARATOR if you are using the English module.
-
-See L<perlvar> for a complete list of these.
-
diff --git a/pod/modpods/Env.pod b/pod/modpods/Env.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 4434499..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,31 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-Env - Perl module that imports environment variables
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-Perl maintains environment variables in a pseudo-associative-array
-named %ENV.  For when this access method is inconvenient, the Perl
-module C<Env> allows environment variables to be treated as simple
-variables.
-
-The Env::import() function ties environment variables with suitable
-names to global Perl variables with the same names.  By default it
-does so with all existing environment variables (C<keys %ENV>).  If
-the import function receives arguments, it takes them to be a list of
-environment variables to tie; it's okay if they don't yet exist.
-
-After an environment variable is tied, merely use it like a normal variable.
-You may access its value 
-
-    @path = split(/:/, $PATH);
-
-or modify it
-
-    $PATH .= ":.";
-
-however you'd like.
-To remove a tied environment variable from
-the environment, assign it the undefined value
-
-    undef $PATH;
diff --git a/pod/modpods/Exporter.pod b/pod/modpods/Exporter.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 050fafa..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,60 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-Exporter - module to control namespace manipulations
-
-import - import functions into callers namespace
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    package WhatEver;
-    require Exporter;
-    @ISA = (Exporter);
-    @EXPORT    = qw(func1, $foo, %tabs);
-    @EXPORT_OK = qw(sin cos);
-    ...
-    use WhatEver;
-    use WhatEver 'sin';
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-The Exporter module is used by well-behaved Perl modules to 
-control what they will export into their user's namespace.
-The WhatEver module above has placed in its export list
-the function C<func1()>, the scalar C<$foo>, and the
-hash C<%tabs>.  When someone decides to 
-C<use WhatEver>, they get those identifiers grafted
-onto their own namespace.  That means the user of 
-package whatever can use the function func1() instead
-of fully qualifying it as WhatEver::func1().  
-
-You should be careful of such namespace pollution.
-Of course, the user of the WhatEver module is free to 
-use a C<require> instead of a C<use>, which will 
-preserve the sanctity of their namespace.
-
-In particular, you almost certainly shouldn't
-automatically export functions whose names are 
-already used in the language.  For this reason,
-the @EXPORT_OK list contains those function which 
-may be selectively imported, as the sin() function 
-was above.
-See L<perlsub/Overriding builtin functions>.
-
-You can't import names that aren't in either the @EXPORT
-or the @EXPORT_OK list.
-
-Remember that these two constructs are identical:
-
-    use WhatEver;
-
-    BEGIN {
-       require WhatEver;
-       import Module;
-    } 
-
-The import() function above is not predefined in the
-language.  Rather, it's a method in the Exporter module.
-A sneaky library writer could conceivably have an import()
-method that behaved differently from the standard one, but
-that's not very friendly.
-
diff --git a/pod/modpods/Fcntl.pod b/pod/modpods/Fcntl.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 165153e..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,20 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-Fcntl - load the C Fcntl.h defines
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use Fcntl;
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-This module is just a translation of the C F<fnctl.h> file.
-Unlike the old mechanism of requiring a translated F<fnctl.ph>
-file, this uses the B<h2xs> program (see the Perl source distribution)
-and your native C compiler.  This means that it has a 
-far more likely chance of getting the numbers right.
-
-=head1 NOTE
-
-Only C<#define> symbols get translated; you must still correctly
-pack up your own arguments to pass as args for locking functions, etc.
diff --git a/pod/modpods/FileHandle.pod b/pod/modpods/FileHandle.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index d595617..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,46 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME 
-
-FileHandle - supply object methods for filehandles
-
-cacheout - keep more files open than the system permits
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use FileHandle;
-    autoflush STDOUT 1;
-
-    cacheout($path);
-    print $path @data;
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-See L<perlvar> for complete descriptions of each of the following supported C<FileHandle> 
-methods:
-
-    print
-    autoflush
-    output_field_separator
-    output_record_separator
-    input_record_separator
-    input_line_number
-    format_page_number
-    format_lines_per_page
-    format_lines_left
-    format_name
-    format_top_name
-    format_line_break_characters
-    format_formfeed
-
-The cacheout() function will make sure that there's a filehandle
-open for writing available as the pathname you give it.  It automatically
-closes and re-opens files if you exceed your system file descriptor maximum.
-
-=head1 BUGS
-
-F<sys/param.h> lies with its C<NOFILE> define on some systems,
-so you may have to set $cacheout::maxopen yourself.
-
-Due to backwards compatibility, all filehandles resemble objects
-of class C<FileHandle>, or actually classes derived from that class.
-They actually aren't.  Which means you can't derive your own 
-class from C<FileHandle> and inherit those methods.
diff --git a/pod/modpods/Find.pod b/pod/modpods/Find.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 40a2aed..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,44 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-find - traverse a file tree
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use File::Find;
-    find(\&wanted, '/foo','/bar');
-    sub wanted { ... }
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-The wanted() function does whatever verifications you want.  $dir contains
-the current directory name, and $_ the current filename within that
-directory.  $name contains C<"$dir/$_">.  You are chdir()'d to $dir when
-the function is called.  The function may set $prune to prune the tree.
-
-This library is primarily for the C<find2perl> tool, which when fed, 
-
-    find2perl / -name .nfs\* -mtime +7 \
-       -exec rm -f {} \; -o -fstype nfs -prune
-
-produces something like:
-
-    sub wanted {
-        /^\.nfs.*$/ &&
-        (($dev,$ino,$mode,$nlink,$uid,$gid) = lstat($_)) &&
-        int(-M _) > 7 &&
-        unlink($_)
-        ||
-        ($nlink || (($dev,$ino,$mode,$nlink,$uid,$gid) = lstat($_))) &&
-        $dev < 0 &&
-        ($prune = 1);
-    }
-
-Set the variable $dont_use_nlink if you're using AFS, since AFS cheats.
-
-Here's another interesting wanted function.  It will find all symlinks
-that don't resolve:
-
-    sub wanted {
-       -l && !-e && print "bogus link: $name\n";
-    } 
-
diff --git a/pod/modpods/Finddepth.pod b/pod/modpods/Finddepth.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index c651265..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,14 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-finddepth - traverse a directory structure depth-first
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use File::Finddepth;
-    finddepth(\&wanted, '/foo','/bar');
-    sub wanted { ... }
-
-=head2 DESCRIPTION
-
-This is just like C<File::Find>, except that it does a depth-first
-search and uses finddepth() rather than find().
diff --git a/pod/modpods/GetOptions.pod b/pod/modpods/GetOptions.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index ca64639..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,137 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-Getopt::Long, GetOptions - extended getopt processing
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use Getopt::Long;
-    $result = GetOptions (...option-descriptions...);
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-This package implements an extended getopt function. This function adheres
-to the new syntax (long option names, no bundling).
-It tries to implement the better functionality of traditional, GNU and
-POSIX getopt() functions.
-
-Each description should designate a valid Perl identifier, optionally
-followed by an argument specifier.
-
-Values for argument specifiers are:
-
-  <none>   option does not take an argument
-  !        option does not take an argument and may be negated
-  =s :s    option takes a mandatory (=) or optional (:) string argument
-  =i :i    option takes a mandatory (=) or optional (:) integer argument
-  =f :f    option takes a mandatory (=) or optional (:) real number argument
-
-If option "name" is set, it will cause the Perl variable $opt_name to
-be set to the specified value. The calling program can use this
-variable to detect whether the option has been set. Options that do
-not take an argument will be set to 1 (one).
-
-Options that take an optional argument will be defined, but set to ''
-if no actual argument has been supplied.
-
-If an "@" sign is appended to the argument specifier, the option is
-treated as an array.  Value(s) are not set, but pushed into array
-@opt_name.
-
-Options that do not take a value may have an "!" argument spacifier to
-indicate that they may be negated. E.g. "foo!" will allow B<-foo> (which
-sets $opt_foo to 1) and B<-nofoo> (which will set $opt_foo to 0).
-
-The option name may actually be a list of option names, separated by
-'|'s, e.g. B<"foo|bar|blech=s". In this example, options 'bar' and
-'blech' will set $opt_foo instead.
-
-Option names may be abbreviated to uniqueness, depending on
-configuration variable $autoabbrev.
-
-Dashes in option names are allowed (e.g. pcc-struct-return) and will
-be translated to underscores in the corresponding Perl variable (e.g.
-$opt_pcc_struct_return).  Note that a lone dash "-" is considered an
-option, corresponding Perl identifier is $opt_ .
-
-A double dash "--" signals end of the options list.
-
-If the first option of the list consists of non-alphanumeric
-characters only, it is interpreted as a generic option starter.
-Everything starting with one of the characters from the starter will
-be considered an option.
-
-The default values for the option starters are "-" (traditional), "--"
-(POSIX) and "+" (GNU, being phased out).
-
-Options that start with "--" may have an argument appended, separated
-with an "=", e.g. "--foo=bar".
-
-If configuration varaible $getopt_compat is set to a non-zero value,
-options that start with "+" may also include their arguments,
-e.g. "+foo=bar".
-
-A return status of 0 (false) indicates that the function detected
-one or more errors.
-
-=head1 EXAMPLES
-
-If option "one:i" (i.e. takes an optional integer argument), then
-the following situations are handled:
-
-   -one -two           -> $opt_one = '', -two is next option
-   -one -2             -> $opt_one = -2
-
-Also, assume "foo=s" and "bar:s" :
-
-   -bar -xxx           -> $opt_bar = '', '-xxx' is next option
-   -foo -bar           -> $opt_foo = '-bar'
-   -foo --             -> $opt_foo = '--'
-
-In GNU or POSIX format, option names and values can be combined:
-
-   +foo=blech          -> $opt_foo = 'blech'
-   --bar=              -> $opt_bar = ''
-   --bar=--            -> $opt_bar = '--'
-
-=over 12
-
-=item $autoabbrev      
-
-Allow option names to be abbreviated to uniqueness.
-Default is 1 unless environment variable
-POSIXLY_CORRECT has been set.
-
-=item $getopt_compat   
-
-Allow '+' to start options.
-Default is 1 unless environment variable
-POSIXLY_CORRECT has been set.
-
-=item $option_start    
-
-Regexp with option starters.
-Default is (--|-) if environment variable
-POSIXLY_CORRECT has been set, (--|-|\+) otherwise.
-
-=item $order           
-
-Whether non-options are allowed to be mixed with
-options.
-Default is $REQUIRE_ORDER if environment variable
-POSIXLY_CORRECT has been set, $PERMUTE otherwise.
-
-=item $ignorecase      
-
-Ignore case when matching options. Default is 1.
-
-=item $debug           
-
-Enable debugging output. Default is 0.
-
-=back
-
-=head1 NOTE
-
-Does not yet use the Exporter--or even packages!!
-Thus, it's not a real module.
-
diff --git a/pod/modpods/Getopt.pod b/pod/modpods/Getopt.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 9cda9ec..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,153 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-getopt - Process single-character switches with switch clustering
-
-getopts - Process single-character switches with switch clustering
-
-GetOptions - extended getopt processing
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use Getopt::Std;
-    getopt('oDI');  # -o, -D & -I take arg.  Sets opt_* as a side effect.
-    getopts('oif:');  # -o & -i are boolean flags, -f takes an argument
-                     # Sets opt_* as a side effect.
-
-    use Getopt::Long;
-    $result = GetOptions (...option-descriptions...);
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-The getopt() functions processes single-character switches with switch
-clustering.  Pass one argument which is a string containing all switches
-that take an argument.  For each switch found, sets $opt_x (where x is the
-switch name) to the value of the argument, or 1 if no argument.  Switches
-which take an argument don't care whether there is a space between the
-switch and the argument.
-
-The Getopt::Long module implements an extended getopt function called
-GetOptions(). This function adheres to the new syntax (long option names,
-no bundling).  It tries to implement the better functionality of
-traditional, GNU and POSIX getopt() functions.
-
-Each description should designate a valid Perl identifier, optionally
-followed by an argument specifier.
-
-Values for argument specifiers are:
-
-  <none>   option does not take an argument
-  !        option does not take an argument and may be negated
-  =s :s    option takes a mandatory (=) or optional (:) string argument
-  =i :i    option takes a mandatory (=) or optional (:) integer argument
-  =f :f    option takes a mandatory (=) or optional (:) real number argument
-
-If option "name" is set, it will cause the Perl variable $opt_name to
-be set to the specified value. The calling program can use this
-variable to detect whether the option has been set. Options that do
-not take an argument will be set to 1 (one).
-
-Options that take an optional argument will be defined, but set to ''
-if no actual argument has been supplied.
-
-If an "@" sign is appended to the argument specifier, the option is
-treated as an array.  Value(s) are not set, but pushed into array
-@opt_name.
-
-Options that do not take a value may have an "!" argument specifier to
-indicate that they may be negated. E.g. "foo!" will allow B<-foo> (which
-sets $opt_foo to 1) and B<-nofoo> (which will set $opt_foo to 0).
-
-The option name may actually be a list of option names, separated by
-'|'s, e.g. B<"foo|bar|blech=s". In this example, options 'bar' and
-'blech' will set $opt_foo instead.
-
-Option names may be abbreviated to uniqueness, depending on
-configuration variable $autoabbrev.
-
-Dashes in option names are allowed (e.g. pcc-struct-return) and will
-be translated to underscores in the corresponding Perl variable (e.g.
-$opt_pcc_struct_return).  Note that a lone dash "-" is considered an
-option, corresponding Perl identifier is $opt_ .
-
-A double dash "--" signals end of the options list.
-
-If the first option of the list consists of non-alphanumeric
-characters only, it is interpreted as a generic option starter.
-Everything starting with one of the characters from the starter will
-be considered an option.
-
-The default values for the option starters are "-" (traditional), "--"
-(POSIX) and "+" (GNU, being phased out).
-
-Options that start with "--" may have an argument appended, separated
-with an "=", e.g. "--foo=bar".
-
-If configuration variable $getopt_compat is set to a non-zero value,
-options that start with "+" may also include their arguments,
-e.g. "+foo=bar".
-
-A return status of 0 (false) indicates that the function detected
-one or more errors.
-
-=head1 EXAMPLES
-
-If option "one:i" (i.e. takes an optional integer argument), then
-the following situations are handled:
-
-   -one -two           -> $opt_one = '', -two is next option
-   -one -2             -> $opt_one = -2
-
-Also, assume "foo=s" and "bar:s" :
-
-   -bar -xxx           -> $opt_bar = '', '-xxx' is next option
-   -foo -bar           -> $opt_foo = '-bar'
-   -foo --             -> $opt_foo = '--'
-
-In GNU or POSIX format, option names and values can be combined:
-
-   +foo=blech          -> $opt_foo = 'blech'
-   --bar=              -> $opt_bar = ''
-   --bar=--            -> $opt_bar = '--'
-
-=over 12
-
-=item $autoabbrev      
-
-Allow option names to be abbreviated to uniqueness.
-Default is 1 unless environment variable
-POSIXLY_CORRECT has been set.
-
-=item $getopt_compat   
-
-Allow '+' to start options.
-Default is 1 unless environment variable
-POSIXLY_CORRECT has been set.
-
-=item $option_start    
-
-Regexp with option starters.
-Default is (--|-) if environment variable
-POSIXLY_CORRECT has been set, (--|-|\+) otherwise.
-
-=item $order           
-
-Whether non-options are allowed to be mixed with
-options.
-Default is $REQUIRE_ORDER if environment variable
-POSIXLY_CORRECT has been set, $PERMUTE otherwise.
-
-=item $ignorecase      
-
-Ignore case when matching options. Default is 1.
-
-=item $debug           
-
-Enable debugging output. Default is 0.
-
-=back
-
-=head1 NOTE
-
-Does not yet use the Exporter--or even packages!!
-Thus, it's not a real module.
-
diff --git a/pod/modpods/MakeMaker.pod b/pod/modpods/MakeMaker.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 0655729..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,24 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-MakeMaker - generate a Makefile for Perl extension
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use ExtUtils::MakeMaker;
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-This utility is designed to write a Makefile for an extension module from
-a Makefile.PL.  It splits the task of generating the Makefile into several
-subroutines that can be individually overridden.  Each subroutine returns
-the text it wishes to have written to the Makefile.
-
-The best way to learn to use this is to look at how some of the
-extensions are generated, such as Socket.
-
-=head1 AUTHOR
-
-Andy Dougherty <F<doughera@lafcol.lafayette.edu>>,
-Andreas Koenig <F<k@franz.ww.TU-Berlin.DE>>,
-and
-Tim Bunce <F<Tim.Bunce@ig.co.uk>>.
diff --git a/pod/modpods/Open2.pod b/pod/modpods/Open2.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 942f684..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,43 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-IPC::Open2, open2 - open a process for both reading and writing
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use IPC::Open2;
-    $pid = open2('rdr', 'wtr', 'some cmd and args');
-      # or
-    $pid = open2('rdr', 'wtr', 'some', 'cmd', 'and', 'args');
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-The open2() function spawns the given $cmd and connects $rdr for
-reading and $wtr for writing.  It's what you think should work 
-when you try
-
-    open(HANDLE, "|cmd args");
-
-open2() returns the process ID of the child process.  It doesn't return on
-failure: it just raises an exception matching C</^open2:/>.
-
-=head1 WARNING 
-
-It will not create these file handles for you.  You have to do this yourself.
-So don't pass it empty variables expecting them to get filled in for you.
-
-Additionally, this is very dangerous as you may block forever.
-It assumes it's going to talk to something like B<bc>, both writing to
-it and reading from it.  This is presumably safe because you "know"
-that commands like B<bc> will read a line at a time and output a line at
-a time.  Programs like B<sort> that read their entire input stream first,
-however, are quite apt to cause deadlock.  
-
-The big problem with this approach is that if you don't have control 
-over source code being run in the the child process, you can't control what it does 
-with pipe buffering.  Thus you can't just open a pipe to "cat -v" and continually
-read and write a line from it.
-
-=head1 SEE ALSO
-
-See L<open3> for an alternative that handles STDERR as well.
-
diff --git a/pod/modpods/Open3.pod b/pod/modpods/Open3.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 690d8ff..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,23 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-IPC::Open3, open3 - open a process for reading, writing, and error handling
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    $pid = open3('WTRFH', 'RDRFH', 'ERRFH' 
-                   'some cmd and args', 'optarg', ...);
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-Extremely similar to open2(), open3() spawns the given $cmd and
-connects RDRFH for reading, WTRFH for writing, and ERRFH for errors.  If
-ERRFH is '', or the same as RDRFH, then STDOUT and STDERR of the child are
-on the same file handle.
-
-If WTRFH begins with ">&", then WTRFH will be closed in the parent, and
-the child will read from it directly.  if RDRFH or ERRFH begins with
-">&", then the child will send output directly to that file handle.  In both
-cases, there will be a dup(2) instead of a pipe(2) made.
-
-All caveats from open2() continue to apply.  See L<open2> for details.
-
diff --git a/pod/modpods/POSIX.pod b/pod/modpods/POSIX.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 110e46b..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,53 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-POSIX - Perl interface to IEEE 1003.1 namespace
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use POSIX;
-    use POSIX 'strftime';
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-The POSIX module permits you to access all (or nearly all) the standard
-POSIX 1003.1 identifiers.  Things which are C<#defines> in C, like EINTR
-or O_NDELAY, are automatically exported into your namespace.  All
-functions are only exported if you ask for them explicitly.  Most likely
-people will prefer to use the fully-qualified function names.
-
-To get a list of all the possible identifiers available to you--and
-their semantics--you should pick up a 1003.1 spec, or look in the
-F<POSIX.pm> module.
-
-=head1 EXAMPLES
-
-    printf "EINTR is %d\n", EINTR;
-
-    POSIX::setsid(0);
-
-    $fd = POSIX::open($path, O_CREAT|O_EXCL|O_WRONLY, 0644);
-       # note: that's a filedescriptor, *NOT* a filehandle
-
-=head1 NOTE
-
-The POSIX module is probably the most complex Perl module supplied with
-the standard distribution.  It incorporates autoloading, namespace games,
-and dynamic loading of code that's in Perl, C, or both.  It's a great
-source of wisdom.
-
-=head1 CAVEATS 
-
-A few functions are not implemented because they are C specific.  If you
-attempt to call these, they will print a message telling you that they
-aren't implemented, and suggest using the Perl equivalent should one
-exist.  For example, trying to access the setjmp() call will elicit the
-message "setjmp() is C-specific: use eval {} instead".
-
-Furthermore, some evil vendors will claim 1003.1 compliance, but in fact
-are not so: they will not pass the PCTS (POSIX Compliance Test Suites).
-For example, one vendor may not define EDEADLK, or the semantics of the
-errno values set by open(2) might not be quite right.  Perl does not
-attempt to verify POSIX compliance.  That means you can currently
-successfully say "use POSIX",  and then later in your program you find
-that your vendor has been lax and there's no usable ICANON macro after
-all.  This could be construed to be a bug.
diff --git a/pod/modpods/Ping.pod b/pod/modpods/Ping.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index fc52925..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,37 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-Net::Ping, pingecho - check a host for upness
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use Net::Ping;
-    print "'jimmy' is alive and kicking\n" if pingecho('jimmy', 10) ;
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-This module contains routines to test for the reachability of remote hosts.
-Currently the only routine implemented is pingecho(). 
-
-pingecho() uses a TCP echo (I<not> an ICMP one) to determine if the
-remote host is reachable. This is usually adequate to tell that a remote
-host is available to rsh(1), ftp(1), or telnet(1) onto.
-
-=head2 Parameters
-
-=over 5
-
-=item hostname
-
-The remote host to check, specified either as a hostname or as an IP address.
-
-=item timeout
-
-The timeout in seconds. If not specified it will default to 5 seconds.
-
-=back
-
-=head1 WARNING
-
-pingecho() uses alarm to implement the timeout, so don't set another alarm
-while you are using it.
-
diff --git a/pod/modpods/Socket.pod b/pod/modpods/Socket.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 7dfab25..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,23 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-Socket - load the C socket.h defines
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use Socket;
-
-    $proto = (getprotobyname('udp'))[2];         
-    socket(Socket_Handle, PF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, $proto); 
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-This module is just a translation of the C F<socket.h> file.
-Unlike the old mechanism of requiring a translated F<socket.ph>
-file, this uses the B<h2xs> program (see the Perl source distribution)
-and your native C compiler.  This means that it has a 
-far more likely chance of getting the numbers right.
-
-=head1 NOTE
-
-Only C<#define> symbols get translated; you must still correctly
-pack up your own arguments to pass to bind(), etc.
diff --git a/pod/modpods/integer.pod b/pod/modpods/integer.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index d459bca..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,18 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-integer - Perl pragma to compute arithmetic in integer instead of double
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use integer;
-    $x = 10/3;
-    # $x is now 3, not 3.33333333333333333
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-This tells the compiler that it's okay to use integer operations
-from here to the end of the enclosing BLOCK.  On many machines, 
-this doesn't matter a great deal for most computations, but on those 
-without floating point hardware, it can make a big difference.
-
-See L<perlmod/Pragmatic Modules>.
diff --git a/pod/modpods/less.pod b/pod/modpods/less.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 37c962e..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,13 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-less - Perl pragma to request less of something from the compiler
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-Currently unimplemented, this may someday be a compiler directive
-to make certain trade-offs, such as perhaps
-
-    use less 'memory';
-    use less 'CPU';
-    use less 'fat';
-
diff --git a/pod/modpods/sigtrap.pod b/pod/modpods/sigtrap.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index ecc3542..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,19 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-sigtrap - Perl pragma to enable stack backtrace on unexpected signals
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use sigtrap;
-    use sigtrap qw(BUS SEGV PIPE SYS ABRT TRAP);
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-The C<sigtrap> pragma initializes some default signal handlers that print
-a stack dump of your Perl program, then sends itself a SIGABRT.  This
-provides a nice starting point if something horrible goes wrong.
-
-By default, handlers are installed for the ABRT, BUS, EMT, FPE, ILL, PIPE,
-QUIT, SEGV, SYS, TERM, and TRAP signals.
-
-See L<perlmod/Pragmatic Modules>.
diff --git a/pod/modpods/strict.pod b/pod/modpods/strict.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 34a9c86..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,65 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-strict - Perl pragma to restrict unsafe constructs
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use strict;
-
-    use strict "vars";
-    use strict "refs";
-    use strict "subs";
-
-    use strict;
-    no strict "vars";
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-If no import list is supplied, all possible restrictions are assumed.
-(This is the safest mode to operate in, but is sometimes too strict for
-casual programming.)  Currently, there are three possible things to be
-strict about:  "subs", "vars", and "refs".
-
-=over 6
-
-=item C<strict refs>
-
-This generates a runtime error if you 
-use symbolic references (see L<perlref>).
-
-    use strict 'refs';
-    $ref = \$foo;
-    print $$ref;       # ok
-    $ref = "foo";
-    print $$ref;       # runtime error; normally ok
-
-=item C<strict vars>
-
-This generates a compile-time error if you access a variable that wasn't
-localized via C<my()> or wasn't fully qualified.  Because this is to avoid
-variable suicide problems and subtle dynamic scoping issues, a merely
-local() variable isn't good enough.  See L<perlfunc/my> and
-L<perlfunc/local>.
-
-    use strict 'vars';
-    $X::foo = 1;        # ok, fully qualified
-    my $foo = 10;       # ok, my() var
-    local $foo = 9;     # blows up
-
-The local() generated a compile-time error because you just touched a global
-name without fully qualifying it.
-
-=item C<strict subs>
-
-This disables the poetry optimization,
-generating a compile-time error if you 
-try to use a bareword identifier that's not a subroutine.
-
-    use strict 'subs';
-    $SIG{PIPE} = Plumber;      # blows up
-    $SIG{"PIPE"} = "Plumber";  # just fine
-
-=back
-
-See L<perlmod/Pragmatic Modules>.
-
diff --git a/pod/modpods/subs.pod b/pod/modpods/subs.pod
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index b54b675..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,16 +0,0 @@
-=head1 NAME
-
-subs - Perl pragma to predeclare sub names
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-    use subs qw(frob);
-    frob 3..10;
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-This will predeclare all the subroutine whose names are 
-in the list, allowing you to use them without parentheses
-even before they're declared.
-
-See L<perlmod/Pragmatic Modules> and L<strict/subs>.