perl5133delta.pod wrapping and cleanup
authorDavid Golden <dagolden@cpan.org>
Mon, 19 Jul 2010 23:39:49 +0000 (16:39 -0700)
committerDavid Golden <dagolden@cpan.org>
Mon, 19 Jul 2010 23:39:49 +0000 (16:39 -0700)
pod/perl5133delta.pod

index 0d6ae7b..a9f5703 100644 (file)
@@ -4,8 +4,6 @@
 
 perldelta - what is new for perl v5.13.3
 
-XXX Add links around modules throughout
-
 =head1 DESCRIPTION
 
 This document describes differences between the 5.13.3 release and
@@ -19,33 +17,35 @@ L<perl5132delta>, which describes differences between 5.13.1 and
 
 =head2 \o{...}
 
-The escape sequence C<"\o"> in double-quotish contexts is now defined.  It
-must be followed by braces enclosing an octal number of at least one digit.  It
-means the character whose ordinal value is that octal number.  This construct
-allows large octal ordinals beyond the current max of 0777 to be represented.
-It also allows you to specify a character in octal which can safely be
-concatenated with other regex snippets without danger of changing its meaning,
-and one which won't ever be confused with being a backreference to a regex
-capture group.  See L<perlre/Capture groups>
+The escape sequence C<"\o"> in double-quotish contexts is now defined.
+It must be followed by braces enclosing an octal number of at least one
+digit.  It means the character whose ordinal value is that octal number.
+This construct allows large octal ordinals beyond the current max of
+0777 to be represented.  It also allows you to specify a character in
+octal which can safely be concatenated with other regex snippets without
+danger of changing its meaning, and one which won't ever be confused
+with being a backreference to a regex capture group.  See
+L<perlre/Capture groups>
 
 =head2 C<\N{I<name>}> and C<charnames> enhancements
 
-C<\N{}> and C<charnames::vianame> now know about the abbreviated character
-names listed by Unicode, such as NBSP, SHY, LRO, ZWJ, etc., as well as all the
-customary abbreviations for the C0 and C1 control characters (such as ACK, BEL,
-CAN, etc.), as well as a few new variants in common usage of some C1 full
-names.
+C<\N{}> and C<charnames::vianame> now know about the abbreviated
+character names listed by Unicode, such as NBSP, SHY, LRO, ZWJ, etc., as
+well as all the customary abbreviations for the C0 and C1 control
+characters (such as ACK, BEL, CAN, etc.), as well as a few new variants
+in common usage of some C1 full names.
 
-In the past, it was ineffective to override one of Perl's abbreviations with
-your own custom alias.  Now it works.
+In the past, it was ineffective to override one of Perl's abbreviations
+with your own custom alias.  Now it works.
 
-And you can create a custom alias directly to the ordinal of a character, known
-by C<\N{...}>, C<charnames::vianame()>, and C<charnames::viacode()>.
-Previously, an alias had to be to an official Unicode character name.  This
-made it impossible to create an alias for a code point that had no name,
-such as the ones reserved for private use.  So this change allows you to make
-more effective use of private use characters.  Only if there is no official
-name will C<charnames::viacode()> return your custom one.
+And you can create a custom alias directly to the ordinal of a
+character, known by C<\N{...}>, C<charnames::vianame()>, and
+C<charnames::viacode()>.  Previously, an alias had to be to an official
+Unicode character name.  This made it impossible to create an alias for
+a code point that had no name, such as the ones reserved for private
+use.  So this change allows you to make more effective use of private
+use characters.  Only if there is no official name will
+C<charnames::viacode()> return your custom one.
 
 See L<charnames> for details on all these changes.
 
@@ -64,15 +64,16 @@ Perl more internally consistent. A round-trip with C<eval sprintf
 
 =head2 \400 - \777
 
-Use of C<\400> - C<\777> in regexes in certain circumstances has given different,
-anomalous behavior than their use in all other double-quotish contexts.   Since
-5.10.1, a deprecated warning message has been raised when this happens.  Now,
-all double-quotish contexts have the same behavior, namely to be equivalent to
-C<\x{100}> - C<\x{1FF}>, with no deprecation warning. Use of these values in the
-command line option C<"-0"> retains the current meaning to slurp input files
-whole; previously, this was documented only for C<"-0777">.  It is recommended,
-however, because of various ambiguities, to use the new L</\o{...}> construct
-to represent characters in octal (fa1639c..f6993e9).
+Use of C<\400> - C<\777> in regexes in certain circumstances has given
+different, anomalous behavior than their use in all other double-quotish
+contexts.   Since 5.10.1, a deprecated warning message has been raised
+when this happens.  Now, all double-quotish contexts have the same
+behavior, namely to be equivalent to C<\x{100}> - C<\x{1FF}>, with no
+deprecation warning. Use of these values in the command line option
+C<"-0"> retains the current meaning to slurp input files whole;
+previously, this was documented only for C<"-0777">.  It is recommended,
+however, because of various ambiguities, to use the new L</\o{...}>
+construct to represent characters in octal (fa1639c..f6993e9).
 
 =head1 Deprecations
 
@@ -547,7 +548,7 @@ Fix pthread include error for Time::Piece (e9f284c)
 
 =item *
 
-Bug fixes involving CvGV reference counting break L<Sub::Name>.  A
+Bug fixes involving CvGV reference counting break Sub::Name.  A
 patch has been sent upstream to the maintainer.
 
 =item *