Move the init_tm() and mini_mktime() up from POSIX.xs to util.c
authorJarkko Hietaniemi <jhi@iki.fi>
Wed, 18 Apr 2001 23:11:03 +0000 (23:11 +0000)
committerJarkko Hietaniemi <jhi@iki.fi>
Wed, 18 Apr 2001 23:11:03 +0000 (23:11 +0000)
in preparation of Time::Piece.

p4raw-id: //depot/perl@9745

embed.h
embed.pl
ext/POSIX/POSIX.xs
proto.h
util.c

diff --git a/embed.h b/embed.h
index 685f9e8..a5bb53e 100644 (file)
--- a/embed.h
+++ b/embed.h
 #define ingroup                        Perl_ingroup
 #define init_debugger          Perl_init_debugger
 #define init_stacks            Perl_init_stacks
+#define init_tm                        Perl_init_tm
 #define intro_my               Perl_intro_my
 #define instr                  Perl_instr
 #define io_close               Perl_io_close
 #define mg_magical             Perl_mg_magical
 #define mg_set                 Perl_mg_set
 #define mg_size                        Perl_mg_size
+#define mini_mktime            Perl_mini_mktime
 #define mod                    Perl_mod
 #define mode_from_discipline   Perl_mode_from_discipline
 #define moreswitches           Perl_moreswitches
 #define ingroup(a,b)           Perl_ingroup(aTHX_ a,b)
 #define init_debugger()                Perl_init_debugger(aTHX)
 #define init_stacks()          Perl_init_stacks(aTHX)
+#define init_tm(a)             Perl_init_tm(aTHX_ a)
 #define intro_my()             Perl_intro_my(aTHX)
 #define instr(a,b)             Perl_instr(aTHX_ a,b)
 #define io_close(a,b)          Perl_io_close(aTHX_ a,b)
 #define mg_magical(a)          Perl_mg_magical(aTHX_ a)
 #define mg_set(a)              Perl_mg_set(aTHX_ a)
 #define mg_size(a)             Perl_mg_size(aTHX_ a)
+#define mini_mktime(a)         Perl_mini_mktime(aTHX_ a)
 #define mod(a,b)               Perl_mod(aTHX_ a,b)
 #define mode_from_discipline(a)        Perl_mode_from_discipline(aTHX_ a)
 #define moreswitches(a)                Perl_moreswitches(aTHX_ a)
 #define init_debugger          Perl_init_debugger
 #define Perl_init_stacks       CPerlObj::Perl_init_stacks
 #define init_stacks            Perl_init_stacks
+#define Perl_init_tm           CPerlObj::Perl_init_tm
+#define init_tm                        Perl_init_tm
 #define Perl_intro_my          CPerlObj::Perl_intro_my
 #define intro_my               Perl_intro_my
 #define Perl_instr             CPerlObj::Perl_instr
 #define mg_set                 Perl_mg_set
 #define Perl_mg_size           CPerlObj::Perl_mg_size
 #define mg_size                        Perl_mg_size
+#define Perl_mini_mktime       CPerlObj::Perl_mini_mktime
+#define mini_mktime            Perl_mini_mktime
 #define Perl_mod               CPerlObj::Perl_mod
 #define mod                    Perl_mod
 #define Perl_mode_from_discipline      CPerlObj::Perl_mode_from_discipline
index 8cc04b0..3d0160d 100755 (executable)
--- a/embed.pl
+++ b/embed.pl
@@ -1610,6 +1610,7 @@ Ap        |I32    |ibcmp_locale   |const char* a|const char* b|I32 len
 p      |bool   |ingroup        |Gid_t testgid|Uid_t effective
 p      |void   |init_debugger
 Ap     |void   |init_stacks
+p      |void   |init_tm        |struct tm *ptm
 p      |U32    |intro_my
 Ap     |char*  |instr          |const char* big|const char* little
 p      |bool   |io_close       |IO* io|bool not_implicit
@@ -1748,6 +1749,7 @@ Apd       |U32    |mg_length      |SV* sv
 Apd    |void   |mg_magical     |SV* sv
 Apd    |int    |mg_set         |SV* sv
 Ap     |I32    |mg_size        |SV* sv
+p      |void   |mini_mktime    |struct tm *pm
 p      |OP*    |mod            |OP* o|I32 type
 p      |int    |mode_from_discipline|SV* discp
 Ap     |char*  |moreswitches   |char* s
index 145dab7..7658b39 100644 (file)
@@ -300,246 +300,6 @@ unsigned long strtoul (const char *, char **, int);
 #define localeconv() not_here("localeconv")
 #endif
 
-#ifdef HAS_TZNAME
-#  if !defined(WIN32) && !defined(__CYGWIN__)
-extern char *tzname[];
-#  endif
-#else
-#if !defined(WIN32) || (defined(__MINGW32__) && !defined(tzname))
-char *tzname[] = { "" , "" };
-#endif
-#endif
-
-/* XXX struct tm on some systems (SunOS4/BSD) contains extra (non POSIX)
- * fields for which we don't have Configure support yet:
- *   char *tm_zone;   -- abbreviation of timezone name
- *   long tm_gmtoff;  -- offset from GMT in seconds
- * To workaround core dumps from the uninitialised tm_zone we get the
- * system to give us a reasonable struct to copy.  This fix means that
- * strftime uses the tm_zone and tm_gmtoff values returned by
- * localtime(time()). That should give the desired result most of the
- * time. But probably not always!
- *
- * This is a temporary workaround to be removed once Configure
- * support is added and NETaa14816 is considered in full.
- * It does not address tzname aspects of NETaa14816.
- */
-#ifdef HAS_GNULIBC
-# ifndef STRUCT_TM_HASZONE
-#    define STRUCT_TM_HASZONE
-# endif
-#endif
-
-#ifdef STRUCT_TM_HASZONE
-static void
-init_tm(struct tm *ptm)                /* see mktime, strftime and asctime     */
-{
-    Time_t now;
-    (void)time(&now);
-    Copy(localtime(&now), ptm, 1, struct tm);
-}
-
-#else
-# define init_tm(ptm)
-#endif
-
-/*
- * mini_mktime - normalise struct tm values without the localtime()
- * semantics (and overhead) of mktime().
- */
-static void
-mini_mktime(struct tm *ptm)
-{
-    int yearday;
-    int secs;
-    int month, mday, year, jday;
-    int odd_cent, odd_year;
-
-#define        DAYS_PER_YEAR   365
-#define        DAYS_PER_QYEAR  (4*DAYS_PER_YEAR+1)
-#define        DAYS_PER_CENT   (25*DAYS_PER_QYEAR-1)
-#define        DAYS_PER_QCENT  (4*DAYS_PER_CENT+1)
-#define        SECS_PER_HOUR   (60*60)
-#define        SECS_PER_DAY    (24*SECS_PER_HOUR)
-/* parentheses deliberately absent on these two, otherwise they don't work */
-#define        MONTH_TO_DAYS   153/5
-#define        DAYS_TO_MONTH   5/153
-/* offset to bias by March (month 4) 1st between month/mday & year finding */
-#define        YEAR_ADJUST     (4*MONTH_TO_DAYS+1)
-/* as used here, the algorithm leaves Sunday as day 1 unless we adjust it */
-#define        WEEKDAY_BIAS    6       /* (1+6)%7 makes Sunday 0 again */
-
-/*
- * Year/day algorithm notes:
- *
- * With a suitable offset for numeric value of the month, one can find
- * an offset into the year by considering months to have 30.6 (153/5) days,
- * using integer arithmetic (i.e., with truncation).  To avoid too much
- * messing about with leap days, we consider January and February to be
- * the 13th and 14th month of the previous year.  After that transformation,
- * we need the month index we use to be high by 1 from 'normal human' usage,
- * so the month index values we use run from 4 through 15.
- *
- * Given that, and the rules for the Gregorian calendar (leap years are those
- * divisible by 4 unless also divisible by 100, when they must be divisible
- * by 400 instead), we can simply calculate the number of days since some
- * arbitrary 'beginning of time' by futzing with the (adjusted) year number,
- * the days we derive from our month index, and adding in the day of the
- * month.  The value used here is not adjusted for the actual origin which
- * it normally would use (1 January A.D. 1), since we're not exposing it.
- * We're only building the value so we can turn around and get the
- * normalised values for the year, month, day-of-month, and day-of-year.
- *
- * For going backward, we need to bias the value we're using so that we find
- * the right year value.  (Basically, we don't want the contribution of
- * March 1st to the number to apply while deriving the year).  Having done
- * that, we 'count up' the contribution to the year number by accounting for
- * full quadracenturies (400-year periods) with their extra leap days, plus
- * the contribution from full centuries (to avoid counting in the lost leap
- * days), plus the contribution from full quad-years (to count in the normal
- * leap days), plus the leftover contribution from any non-leap years.
- * At this point, if we were working with an actual leap day, we'll have 0
- * days left over.  This is also true for March 1st, however.  So, we have
- * to special-case that result, and (earlier) keep track of the 'odd'
- * century and year contributions.  If we got 4 extra centuries in a qcent,
- * or 4 extra years in a qyear, then it's a leap day and we call it 29 Feb.
- * Otherwise, we add back in the earlier bias we removed (the 123 from
- * figuring in March 1st), find the month index (integer division by 30.6),
- * and the remainder is the day-of-month.  We then have to convert back to
- * 'real' months (including fixing January and February from being 14/15 in
- * the previous year to being in the proper year).  After that, to get
- * tm_yday, we work with the normalised year and get a new yearday value for
- * January 1st, which we subtract from the yearday value we had earlier,
- * representing the date we've re-built.  This is done from January 1
- * because tm_yday is 0-origin.
- *
- * Since POSIX time routines are only guaranteed to work for times since the
- * UNIX epoch (00:00:00 1 Jan 1970 UTC), the fact that this algorithm
- * applies Gregorian calendar rules even to dates before the 16th century
- * doesn't bother me.  Besides, you'd need cultural context for a given
- * date to know whether it was Julian or Gregorian calendar, and that's
- * outside the scope for this routine.  Since we convert back based on the
- * same rules we used to build the yearday, you'll only get strange results
- * for input which needed normalising, or for the 'odd' century years which
- * were leap years in the Julian calander but not in the Gregorian one.
- * I can live with that.
- *
- * This algorithm also fails to handle years before A.D. 1 gracefully, but
- * that's still outside the scope for POSIX time manipulation, so I don't
- * care.
- */
-
-    year = 1900 + ptm->tm_year;
-    month = ptm->tm_mon;
-    mday = ptm->tm_mday;
-    /* allow given yday with no month & mday to dominate the result */
-    if (ptm->tm_yday >= 0 && mday <= 0 && month <= 0) {
-       month = 0;
-       mday = 0;
-       jday = 1 + ptm->tm_yday;
-    }
-    else {
-       jday = 0;
-    }
-    if (month >= 2)
-       month+=2;
-    else
-       month+=14, year--;
-    yearday = DAYS_PER_YEAR * year + year/4 - year/100 + year/400;
-    yearday += month*MONTH_TO_DAYS + mday + jday;
-    /*
-     * Note that we don't know when leap-seconds were or will be,
-     * so we have to trust the user if we get something which looks
-     * like a sensible leap-second.  Wild values for seconds will
-     * be rationalised, however.
-     */
-    if ((unsigned) ptm->tm_sec <= 60) {
-       secs = 0;
-    }
-    else {
-       secs = ptm->tm_sec;
-       ptm->tm_sec = 0;
-    }
-    secs += 60 * ptm->tm_min;
-    secs += SECS_PER_HOUR * ptm->tm_hour;
-    if (secs < 0) {
-       if (secs-(secs/SECS_PER_DAY*SECS_PER_DAY) < 0) {
-           /* got negative remainder, but need positive time */
-           /* back off an extra day to compensate */
-           yearday += (secs/SECS_PER_DAY)-1;
-           secs -= SECS_PER_DAY * (secs/SECS_PER_DAY - 1);
-       }
-       else {
-           yearday += (secs/SECS_PER_DAY);
-           secs -= SECS_PER_DAY * (secs/SECS_PER_DAY);
-       }
-    }
-    else if (secs >= SECS_PER_DAY) {
-       yearday += (secs/SECS_PER_DAY);
-       secs %= SECS_PER_DAY;
-    }
-    ptm->tm_hour = secs/SECS_PER_HOUR;
-    secs %= SECS_PER_HOUR;
-    ptm->tm_min = secs/60;
-    secs %= 60;
-    ptm->tm_sec += secs;
-    /* done with time of day effects */
-    /*
-     * The algorithm for yearday has (so far) left it high by 428.
-     * To avoid mistaking a legitimate Feb 29 as Mar 1, we need to
-     * bias it by 123 while trying to figure out what year it
-     * really represents.  Even with this tweak, the reverse
-     * translation fails for years before A.D. 0001.
-     * It would still fail for Feb 29, but we catch that one below.
-     */
-    jday = yearday;    /* save for later fixup vis-a-vis Jan 1 */
-    yearday -= YEAR_ADJUST;
-    year = (yearday / DAYS_PER_QCENT) * 400;
-    yearday %= DAYS_PER_QCENT;
-    odd_cent = yearday / DAYS_PER_CENT;
-    year += odd_cent * 100;
-    yearday %= DAYS_PER_CENT;
-    year += (yearday / DAYS_PER_QYEAR) * 4;
-    yearday %= DAYS_PER_QYEAR;
-    odd_year = yearday / DAYS_PER_YEAR;
-    year += odd_year;
-    yearday %= DAYS_PER_YEAR;
-    if (!yearday && (odd_cent==4 || odd_year==4)) { /* catch Feb 29 */
-       month = 1;
-       yearday = 29;
-    }
-    else {
-       yearday += YEAR_ADJUST; /* recover March 1st crock */
-       month = yearday*DAYS_TO_MONTH;
-       yearday -= month*MONTH_TO_DAYS;
-       /* recover other leap-year adjustment */
-       if (month > 13) {
-           month-=14;
-           year++;
-       }
-       else {
-           month-=2;
-       }
-    }
-    ptm->tm_year = year - 1900;
-    if (yearday) {
-      ptm->tm_mday = yearday;
-      ptm->tm_mon = month;
-    }
-    else {
-      ptm->tm_mday = 31;
-      ptm->tm_mon = month - 1;
-    }
-    /* re-build yearday based on Jan 1 to get tm_yday */
-    year--;
-    yearday = year*DAYS_PER_YEAR + year/4 - year/100 + year/400;
-    yearday += 14*MONTH_TO_DAYS + 1;
-    ptm->tm_yday = jday - yearday;
-    /* fix tm_wday if not overridden by caller */
-    if ((unsigned)ptm->tm_wday > 6)
-       ptm->tm_wday = (jday + WEEKDAY_BIAS) % 7;
-}
-
 #ifdef HAS_LONG_DOUBLE
 #  if LONG_DOUBLESIZE > NVSIZE
 #    undef HAS_LONG_DOUBLE  /* XXX until we figure out how to use them */
diff --git a/proto.h b/proto.h
index 92bb520..644b6b9 100644 (file)
--- a/proto.h
+++ b/proto.h
@@ -333,6 +333,7 @@ PERL_CALLCONV I32   Perl_ibcmp_locale(pTHX_ const char* a, const char* b, I32 len)
 PERL_CALLCONV bool     Perl_ingroup(pTHX_ Gid_t testgid, Uid_t effective);
 PERL_CALLCONV void     Perl_init_debugger(pTHX);
 PERL_CALLCONV void     Perl_init_stacks(pTHX);
+PERL_CALLCONV void     Perl_init_tm(pTHX_ struct tm *ptm);
 PERL_CALLCONV U32      Perl_intro_my(pTHX);
 PERL_CALLCONV char*    Perl_instr(pTHX_ const char* big, const char* little);
 PERL_CALLCONV bool     Perl_io_close(pTHX_ IO* io, bool not_implicit);
@@ -475,6 +476,7 @@ PERL_CALLCONV U32   Perl_mg_length(pTHX_ SV* sv);
 PERL_CALLCONV void     Perl_mg_magical(pTHX_ SV* sv);
 PERL_CALLCONV int      Perl_mg_set(pTHX_ SV* sv);
 PERL_CALLCONV I32      Perl_mg_size(pTHX_ SV* sv);
+PERL_CALLCONV void     Perl_mini_mktime(pTHX_ struct tm *pm);
 PERL_CALLCONV OP*      Perl_mod(pTHX_ OP* o, I32 type);
 PERL_CALLCONV int      Perl_mode_from_discipline(pTHX_ SV* discp);
 PERL_CALLCONV char*    Perl_moreswitches(pTHX_ char* s);
diff --git a/util.c b/util.c
index c5a3af3..542d0dd 100644 (file)
--- a/util.c
+++ b/util.c
@@ -4124,3 +4124,240 @@ Perl_ebcdic_control(pTHX_ int ch)
        }
 }
 #endif
+
+#ifdef HAS_TZNAME
+#  if !defined(WIN32) && !defined(__CYGWIN__)
+extern char *tzname[];
+#  endif
+#else
+#if !defined(WIN32) || (defined(__MINGW32__) && !defined(tzname))
+char *tzname[] = { "" , "" };
+#endif
+#endif
+
+/* XXX struct tm on some systems (SunOS4/BSD) contains extra (non POSIX)
+ * fields for which we don't have Configure support yet:
+ *   char *tm_zone;   -- abbreviation of timezone name
+ *   long tm_gmtoff;  -- offset from GMT in seconds
+ * To workaround core dumps from the uninitialised tm_zone we get the
+ * system to give us a reasonable struct to copy.  This fix means that
+ * strftime uses the tm_zone and tm_gmtoff values returned by
+ * localtime(time()). That should give the desired result most of the
+ * time. But probably not always!
+ *
+ * This is a temporary workaround to be removed once Configure
+ * support is added and NETaa14816 is considered in full.
+ * It does not address tzname aspects of NETaa14816.
+ */
+#ifdef HAS_GNULIBC
+# ifndef STRUCT_TM_HASZONE
+#    define STRUCT_TM_HASZONE
+# endif
+#endif
+
+void
+init_tm(struct tm *ptm)                /* see mktime, strftime and asctime     */
+{
+#ifdef STRUCT_TM_HASZONE
+    Time_t now;
+    (void)time(&now);
+    Copy(localtime(&now), ptm, 1, struct tm);
+#endif
+}
+
+/*
+ * mini_mktime - normalise struct tm values without the localtime()
+ * semantics (and overhead) of mktime().
+ */
+void
+mini_mktime(struct tm *ptm)
+{
+    int yearday;
+    int secs;
+    int month, mday, year, jday;
+    int odd_cent, odd_year;
+
+#define        DAYS_PER_YEAR   365
+#define        DAYS_PER_QYEAR  (4*DAYS_PER_YEAR+1)
+#define        DAYS_PER_CENT   (25*DAYS_PER_QYEAR-1)
+#define        DAYS_PER_QCENT  (4*DAYS_PER_CENT+1)
+#define        SECS_PER_HOUR   (60*60)
+#define        SECS_PER_DAY    (24*SECS_PER_HOUR)
+/* parentheses deliberately absent on these two, otherwise they don't work */
+#define        MONTH_TO_DAYS   153/5
+#define        DAYS_TO_MONTH   5/153
+/* offset to bias by March (month 4) 1st between month/mday & year finding */
+#define        YEAR_ADJUST     (4*MONTH_TO_DAYS+1)
+/* as used here, the algorithm leaves Sunday as day 1 unless we adjust it */
+#define        WEEKDAY_BIAS    6       /* (1+6)%7 makes Sunday 0 again */
+
+/*
+ * Year/day algorithm notes:
+ *
+ * With a suitable offset for numeric value of the month, one can find
+ * an offset into the year by considering months to have 30.6 (153/5) days,
+ * using integer arithmetic (i.e., with truncation).  To avoid too much
+ * messing about with leap days, we consider January and February to be
+ * the 13th and 14th month of the previous year.  After that transformation,
+ * we need the month index we use to be high by 1 from 'normal human' usage,
+ * so the month index values we use run from 4 through 15.
+ *
+ * Given that, and the rules for the Gregorian calendar (leap years are those
+ * divisible by 4 unless also divisible by 100, when they must be divisible
+ * by 400 instead), we can simply calculate the number of days since some
+ * arbitrary 'beginning of time' by futzing with the (adjusted) year number,
+ * the days we derive from our month index, and adding in the day of the
+ * month.  The value used here is not adjusted for the actual origin which
+ * it normally would use (1 January A.D. 1), since we're not exposing it.
+ * We're only building the value so we can turn around and get the
+ * normalised values for the year, month, day-of-month, and day-of-year.
+ *
+ * For going backward, we need to bias the value we're using so that we find
+ * the right year value.  (Basically, we don't want the contribution of
+ * March 1st to the number to apply while deriving the year).  Having done
+ * that, we 'count up' the contribution to the year number by accounting for
+ * full quadracenturies (400-year periods) with their extra leap days, plus
+ * the contribution from full centuries (to avoid counting in the lost leap
+ * days), plus the contribution from full quad-years (to count in the normal
+ * leap days), plus the leftover contribution from any non-leap years.
+ * At this point, if we were working with an actual leap day, we'll have 0
+ * days left over.  This is also true for March 1st, however.  So, we have
+ * to special-case that result, and (earlier) keep track of the 'odd'
+ * century and year contributions.  If we got 4 extra centuries in a qcent,
+ * or 4 extra years in a qyear, then it's a leap day and we call it 29 Feb.
+ * Otherwise, we add back in the earlier bias we removed (the 123 from
+ * figuring in March 1st), find the month index (integer division by 30.6),
+ * and the remainder is the day-of-month.  We then have to convert back to
+ * 'real' months (including fixing January and February from being 14/15 in
+ * the previous year to being in the proper year).  After that, to get
+ * tm_yday, we work with the normalised year and get a new yearday value for
+ * January 1st, which we subtract from the yearday value we had earlier,
+ * representing the date we've re-built.  This is done from January 1
+ * because tm_yday is 0-origin.
+ *
+ * Since POSIX time routines are only guaranteed to work for times since the
+ * UNIX epoch (00:00:00 1 Jan 1970 UTC), the fact that this algorithm
+ * applies Gregorian calendar rules even to dates before the 16th century
+ * doesn't bother me.  Besides, you'd need cultural context for a given
+ * date to know whether it was Julian or Gregorian calendar, and that's
+ * outside the scope for this routine.  Since we convert back based on the
+ * same rules we used to build the yearday, you'll only get strange results
+ * for input which needed normalising, or for the 'odd' century years which
+ * were leap years in the Julian calander but not in the Gregorian one.
+ * I can live with that.
+ *
+ * This algorithm also fails to handle years before A.D. 1 gracefully, but
+ * that's still outside the scope for POSIX time manipulation, so I don't
+ * care.
+ */
+
+    year = 1900 + ptm->tm_year;
+    month = ptm->tm_mon;
+    mday = ptm->tm_mday;
+    /* allow given yday with no month & mday to dominate the result */
+    if (ptm->tm_yday >= 0 && mday <= 0 && month <= 0) {
+       month = 0;
+       mday = 0;
+       jday = 1 + ptm->tm_yday;
+    }
+    else {
+       jday = 0;
+    }
+    if (month >= 2)
+       month+=2;
+    else
+       month+=14, year--;
+    yearday = DAYS_PER_YEAR * year + year/4 - year/100 + year/400;
+    yearday += month*MONTH_TO_DAYS + mday + jday;
+    /*
+     * Note that we don't know when leap-seconds were or will be,
+     * so we have to trust the user if we get something which looks
+     * like a sensible leap-second.  Wild values for seconds will
+     * be rationalised, however.
+     */
+    if ((unsigned) ptm->tm_sec <= 60) {
+       secs = 0;
+    }
+    else {
+       secs = ptm->tm_sec;
+       ptm->tm_sec = 0;
+    }
+    secs += 60 * ptm->tm_min;
+    secs += SECS_PER_HOUR * ptm->tm_hour;
+    if (secs < 0) {
+       if (secs-(secs/SECS_PER_DAY*SECS_PER_DAY) < 0) {
+           /* got negative remainder, but need positive time */
+           /* back off an extra day to compensate */
+           yearday += (secs/SECS_PER_DAY)-1;
+           secs -= SECS_PER_DAY * (secs/SECS_PER_DAY - 1);
+       }
+       else {
+           yearday += (secs/SECS_PER_DAY);
+           secs -= SECS_PER_DAY * (secs/SECS_PER_DAY);
+       }
+    }
+    else if (secs >= SECS_PER_DAY) {
+       yearday += (secs/SECS_PER_DAY);
+       secs %= SECS_PER_DAY;
+    }
+    ptm->tm_hour = secs/SECS_PER_HOUR;
+    secs %= SECS_PER_HOUR;
+    ptm->tm_min = secs/60;
+    secs %= 60;
+    ptm->tm_sec += secs;
+    /* done with time of day effects */
+    /*
+     * The algorithm for yearday has (so far) left it high by 428.
+     * To avoid mistaking a legitimate Feb 29 as Mar 1, we need to
+     * bias it by 123 while trying to figure out what year it
+     * really represents.  Even with this tweak, the reverse
+     * translation fails for years before A.D. 0001.
+     * It would still fail for Feb 29, but we catch that one below.
+     */
+    jday = yearday;    /* save for later fixup vis-a-vis Jan 1 */
+    yearday -= YEAR_ADJUST;
+    year = (yearday / DAYS_PER_QCENT) * 400;
+    yearday %= DAYS_PER_QCENT;
+    odd_cent = yearday / DAYS_PER_CENT;
+    year += odd_cent * 100;
+    yearday %= DAYS_PER_CENT;
+    year += (yearday / DAYS_PER_QYEAR) * 4;
+    yearday %= DAYS_PER_QYEAR;
+    odd_year = yearday / DAYS_PER_YEAR;
+    year += odd_year;
+    yearday %= DAYS_PER_YEAR;
+    if (!yearday && (odd_cent==4 || odd_year==4)) { /* catch Feb 29 */
+       month = 1;
+       yearday = 29;
+    }
+    else {
+       yearday += YEAR_ADJUST; /* recover March 1st crock */
+       month = yearday*DAYS_TO_MONTH;
+       yearday -= month*MONTH_TO_DAYS;
+       /* recover other leap-year adjustment */
+       if (month > 13) {
+           month-=14;
+           year++;
+       }
+       else {
+           month-=2;
+       }
+    }
+    ptm->tm_year = year - 1900;
+    if (yearday) {
+      ptm->tm_mday = yearday;
+      ptm->tm_mon = month;
+    }
+    else {
+      ptm->tm_mday = 31;
+      ptm->tm_mon = month - 1;
+    }
+    /* re-build yearday based on Jan 1 to get tm_yday */
+    year--;
+    yearday = year*DAYS_PER_YEAR + year/4 - year/100 + year/400;
+    yearday += 14*MONTH_TO_DAYS + 1;
+    ptm->tm_yday = jday - yearday;
+    /* fix tm_wday if not overridden by caller */
+    if ((unsigned)ptm->tm_wday > 6)
+       ptm->tm_wday = (jday + WEEKDAY_BIAS) % 7;
+}