remove documentation for the now-removed lexical topic
authorRicardo Signes <rjbs@cpan.org>
Fri, 2 Oct 2015 16:16:40 +0000 (12:16 -0400)
committerRicardo Signes <rjbs@cpan.org>
Fri, 2 Oct 2015 17:49:32 +0000 (13:49 -0400)
pod/perldiag.pod
pod/perlfunc.pod
pod/perlsyn.pod
regen/op_private

index b89ba40..db21861 100644 (file)
@@ -6742,12 +6742,6 @@ for historical reasons.
 it already went past any symlink you are presumably trying to look for.
 The operation returned C<undef>.  Use a filename instead.
 
-=item Use of my $_ is experimental
-
-(S experimental::lexical_topic) Lexical $_ is an experimental feature and
-its behavior may change or even be removed in any future release of perl.
-See the explanation under L<perlvar/$_>.
-
 =item Use of %s on a handle without * is deprecated
 
 (D deprecated) You used C<tie>, C<tied> or C<untie> on a scalar but that scalar
index 18cabfe..f0a2abb 100644 (file)
@@ -3021,12 +3021,6 @@ element of a list returned by grep (for example, in a C<foreach>, C<map>
 or another C<grep>) actually modifies the element in the original list.
 This is usually something to be avoided when writing clear code.
 
-If C<$_> is lexical in the scope where the C<grep> appears (because it has
-been declared with the deprecated C<my $_> construct)
-then, in addition to being locally aliased to
-the list elements, C<$_> keeps being lexical inside the block; i.e., it
-can't be seen from the outside, avoiding any potential side-effects.
-
 See also L</map> for a list composed of the results of the BLOCK or EXPR.
 
 =item hex EXPR
@@ -3659,12 +3653,6 @@ Using a regular C<foreach> loop for this purpose would be clearer in
 most cases.  See also L</grep> for an array composed of those items of
 the original list for which the BLOCK or EXPR evaluates to true.
 
-If C<$_> is lexical in the scope where the C<map> appears (because it has
-been declared with the deprecated C<my $_> construct),
-then, in addition to being locally aliased to
-the list elements, C<$_> keeps being lexical inside the block; that is, it
-can't be seen from the outside, avoiding any potential side-effects.
-
 C<{> starts both hash references and blocks, so C<map { ...> could be either
 the start of map BLOCK LIST or map EXPR, LIST.  Because Perl doesn't look
 ahead for the closing C<}> it has to take a guess at which it's dealing with
index f29f7aa..01425d2 100644 (file)
@@ -685,13 +685,8 @@ and 5.16, under those implementations the version of C<$_> governed by
 C<given> is merely a lexically scoped copy of the original, not a
 dynamically scoped alias to the original, as it would be if it were a
 C<foreach> or under both the original and the current Perl 6 language
-specification.  This bug was fixed in Perl
-5.18.  If you really want a lexical C<$_>,
-specify that explicitly, but note that C<my $_>
-is now deprecated and will warn unless warnings
-have been disabled:
-
-    given(my $_ = EXPR) { ... }
+specification.  This bug was fixed in Perl 5.18 (and lexicalized C<$_> itself
+was removed in Perl 5.24).
 
 If your code still needs to run on older versions,
 stick to C<foreach> for your topicalizer and
index aef0e4d..ab63e11 100644 (file)
@@ -622,7 +622,7 @@ addbits('rv2gv',
 
 addbits('enteriter',
                     2 => qw(OPpITER_REVERSED REVERSED),# for (reverse ...)
-                    3 => qw(OPpITER_DEF      DEF),     # 'for $_' or 'for my $_'
+                    3 => qw(OPpITER_DEF      DEF),     # 'for $_'
 );
 addbits('iter',     2 => qw(OPpITER_REVERSED REVERSED));