perldelta: import changes from perl5218delta.pod
authorRicardo Signes <rjbs@cpan.org>
Fri, 13 Mar 2015 23:23:59 +0000 (19:23 -0400)
committerRicardo Signes <rjbs@cpan.org>
Wed, 6 May 2015 01:14:59 +0000 (21:14 -0400)
Porting/perl5220delta.pod

index 38662e3..f46569e 100644 (file)
@@ -18,6 +18,39 @@ XXX Any important notices here
 
 =head1 Core Enhancements
 
+=head2 Non-Capturing Regular Expression Flag
+
+Regular expressions now support a C</n> flag that disables capturing
+and filling in C<$1>, C<$2>, etc... inside of groups:
+
+  "hello" =~ /(hi|hello)/n; # $1 is not set
+
+This is equivalent to putting C<?:> at the beginning of every capturing group.
+
+See L<perlre/"n"> for more information.
+
+=head2 C<prototype> with no arguments
+
+C<prototype()> with no arguments now infers C<$_>.  [perl #123514]
+
+=head2 C<use re 'strict'>
+
+This applies stricter syntax rules to regular expression patterns
+compiled within its scope, which hopefully will alert you to typos and
+other unintentional behavior that backwards-compatibility issues prevent
+us from doing in normal regular expression compilations.  Because the
+behavior of this is subject to change in future Perl releases as we gain
+experience, using this pragma will raise a category
+C<experimental:re_strict> warning.
+See L<'strict' in re|re/'strict' mode>.
+
+=head2 New "const" subroutine attribute
+
+The "const" attribute can be applied to an anonymous subroutine.  It causes
+it to be executed immediately when it is cloned.  Its value is captured and
+used to create a new constant subroutine that is returned.  This feature is
+experimental.  See L<perlsub/Constant Functions>.
+
 =head2 C<fileno> now works on directory handles
 
 When the relevant support is available in the operating system, the
@@ -201,6 +234,13 @@ and OS X has enforced the same for many years.
 
 =head1 Incompatible Changes
 
+=head2 Subroutine signatures moved before attributes
+
+The experimental sub signatures feature, as introduced in 5.20, parsed
+signatures after attributes.  In this release, the positioning has been
+moved such that signatures occur after the subroutine name (if any) and
+before the attribute list (if any).
+
 =head2 C<&> and C<\&> prototypes accepts only subs
 
 The C<&> prototype character now accepts only anonymous subs (C<sub {...}>)
@@ -641,11 +681,10 @@ XXX
 
 =head2 New Documentation
 
-XXX Changes which create B<new> files in F<pod/> go here.
-
-=head3 L<XXX>
+=head3 L<perlunicook>
 
-XXX Description of the purpose of the new file here
+This document, by Tom Christiansen, provides examples of handling Unicode in
+Perl.
 
 =head2 Changes to Existing Documentation
 
@@ -915,6 +954,21 @@ and New Warnings
 
 =item *
 
+L<Bad symbol for scalar|perldiag/"Bad symbol for scalar">
+
+(P) An internal request asked to add a scalar entry to something that
+wasn't a symbol table entry.
+
+=item *
+
+L<:const is not permitted on named subroutines|perldiag/":const is not permitted on named subroutines">
+
+(F) The "const" attribute causes an anonymous subroutine to be run and
+its value captured at the time that it is cloned.  Names subroutines are
+not cloned like this, so the attribute does not make sense on them.
+
+=item *
+
 L<Cannot chr %f|perldiag/"Cannot chr %f">
 
 =item *
@@ -1043,6 +1097,137 @@ L<Illegal suidscript|perldiag/"Illegal suidscript">
 
 =item *
 
+L<:const is experimental|perldiag/":const is experimental">
+
+(S experimental::const_attr) The "const" attribute is experimental.
+If you want to use the feature, disable the warning with C<no warnings
+'experimental::const_attr'>, but know that in doing so you are taking
+the risk that your code may break in a future Perl version.
+
+=item *
+
+L<Non-finite repeat count does nothing|perldiag/"Non-finite repeat count does nothing">
+
+(W numeric) You tried to execute the
+L<C<x>|perlop/Multiplicative Operators> repetition operator C<Inf> (or
+C<-Inf>) or C<NaN> times, which doesn't make sense.
+
+=item *
+
+L<Useless use of attribute "const"|perldiag/Useless use of attribute "const">
+
+(W misc) The "const" attribute has no effect except
+on anonymous closure prototypes.  You applied it to
+a subroutine via L<attributes.pm|attributes>.  This is only useful
+inside an attribute handler for an anonymous subroutine.
+
+=item *
+
+L<Unusual use of %s in void context|perldiag/"Unusual use of %s in void context">
+
+(W void_unusual) Similar to the "Useless use of %s in void context"
+warning, but only turned on by the top-level "pedantic" warning
+category, used for e.g. C<grep> in void context, which may indicate a
+bug, but could also just be someone using C<grep> for its side-effects
+as a loop.
+
+Enabled as part of "extra" warnings, not in the "all" category. See
+L<warnings> for details
+
+=item *
+
+L<E<quot>use re 'strict'E<quot> is experimental|perldiag/"use re 'strict'" is experimental>
+
+(S experimental::re_strict) The things that are different when a regular
+expression pattern is compiled under C<'strict'> are subject to change
+in future Perl releases in incompatible ways.  This means that a pattern
+that compiles today may not in a future Perl release.  This warning is
+to alert you to that risk.
+
+L<Wide character (U+%X) in %s|perldiag/"Wide character (U+%X) in %s">
+
+(W locale) While in a single-byte locale (I<i.e.>, a non-UTF-8
+one), a multi-byte character was encountered.   Perl considers this
+character to be the specified Unicode code point.  Combining non-UTF8
+locales and Unicode is dangerous.  Almost certainly some characters
+will have two different representations.  For example, in the ISO 8859-7
+(Greek) locale, the code point 0xC3 represents a Capital Gamma.  But so
+also does 0x393.  This will make string comparisons unreliable.
+
+You likely need to figure out how this multi-byte character got mixed up
+with your single-byte locale (or perhaps you thought you had a UTF-8
+locale, but Perl disagrees).
+
+=item *
+
+L<Both or neither range ends should be Unicode in regex; marked by E<lt>-- HERE in mE<sol>%sE<sol>|perldiag/"Both or neither range ends should be Unicode in regex; marked by <-- HERE in m/%s/">
+
+(W regexp) (only under C<S<use re 'strict'>> or within C<(?[...])>)
+
+In a bracketed character class in a regular expression pattern, you
+had a range which has exactly one end of it specified using C<\N{}>, and
+the other end is specified using a non-portable mechanism.  Perl treats
+the range as a Unicode range, that is, all the characters in it are
+considered to be the Unicode characters, and which may be different code
+points on some platforms Perl runs on.  For example, C<[\N{U+06}-\x08]>
+is treated as if you had instead said C<[\N{U+06}-\N{U+08}]>, that is it
+matches the characters whose code points in Unicode are 6, 7, and 8.
+But that C<\x08> might indicate that you meant something different, so
+the warning gets raised.
+
+=item *
+
+L<Ranges of ASCII printables should be some subset of "0-9", "A-Z", or "a-z" in regex; marked by E<lt>-- HERE in mE<sol>%sE<sol>|perldiag/"Ranges of ASCII printables should be some subset of "0-9", "A-Z", or "a-z" in regex; marked by <-- HERE in mE<sol>%sE<sol>">
+
+(W regexp) (only under C<S<use re 'strict'>> or within C<(?[...])>)
+
+Stricter rules help to find typos and other errors.  Perhaps you didn't
+even intend a range here, if the C<"-"> was meant to be some other
+character, or should have been escaped (like C<"\-">).  If you did
+intend a range, the one that was used is not portable between ASCII and
+EBCDIC platforms, and doesn't have an obvious meaning to a casual
+reader.
+
+ [3-7]    # OK; Obvious and portable
+ [d-g]    # OK; Obvious and portable
+ [A-Y]    # OK; Obvious and portable
+ [A-z]    # WRONG; Not portable; not clear what is meant
+ [a-Z]    # WRONG; Not portable; not clear what is meant
+ [%-.]    # WRONG; Not portable; not clear what is meant
+ [\x41-Z] # WRONG; Not portable; not obvious to non-geek
+
+(You can force portability by specifying a Unicode range, which means that
+the endpoints are specified by
+L<C<\N{...}>|perlrecharclass/Character Ranges>, but the meaning may
+still not be obvious.)
+The stricter rules require that ranges that start or stop with an ASCII
+character that is not a control have all their endpoints be the literal
+character, and not some escape sequence (like C<"\x41">), and the ranges
+must be all digits, or all uppercase letters, or all lowercase letters.
+
+=item *
+
+L<Ranges of digits should be from the same group in regex; marked by E<lt>-- HERE in mE<sol>%sE<sol>|perldiag/"Ranges of digits should be from the same group in regex; marked by <-- HERE in m/%s/">
+
+(W regexp) (only under C<S<use re 'strict'>> or within C<(?[...])>)
+
+Stricter rules help to find typos and other errors.  You included a
+range, and at least one of the end points is a decimal digit.  Under the
+stricter rules, when this happens, both end points should be digits in
+the same group of 10 consecutive digits.
+
+=item *
+
+L<"%s" is more clearly written simply as "%s" in regex; marked by E<lt>-- HERE in mE<sol>%sE<sol>|perldiag/"%s" is more clearly written simply as "%s" in regex; marked by <-- HERE in mE<sol>%sE<sol>>
+
+(W regexp) (only under C<S<use re 'strict'>> or within C<(?[...])>)
+
+You specified a character that has the given plainer way of writing it,
+and which is also portable to platforms running with different character
+sets.
+
+=item *
+
 L<Use of literal non-graphic characters in variable names is deprecated|perldiag/"Use of literal non-graphic characters in variable names is deprecated">
 
 =item *
@@ -1360,6 +1545,12 @@ F<Configure> with C<-Dmksymlinks> should now be faster. [perl #122002]
 
 =item *
 
+pthreads and lcl will be linked by default if present. This allows XS modules
+that require threading to work on non-threaded perls. Note that you must still
+pass C<-Dusethreads> if you want a threaded perl.
+
+=item *
+
 For long doubles (to get more precision and range for floating point numbers)
 one can now use the GCC quadmath library which implements the quadruple
 precision floating point numbers in x86 and ia64 platforms.  See F<INSTALL> for
@@ -1493,12 +1684,31 @@ C<finite>, C<finitel>, and C<isfinite> detection has been added to
 C<configure.com>, environment handling has had some minor changes, and
 a fix for legacy feature checking status.
 
-=item Windows
+=item Win32
 
 =over 4
 
 =item *
 
+Previously, on Visual C++ for Win64 built Perls only, when compiling every Perl
+XS module (including CPAN ones) and Perl aware .c file with a 64 bit Visual C++,
+would unconditionally have around a dozen warnings from hv_func.h.  These
+warnings have been silenced.  GCC all bitness and Visual C++ for Win32 were
+not affected.
+
+=item *
+
+Support for building without PerlIO has been removed from the Windows
+makefiles.  Non-PerlIO builds were all but deprecated in Perl 5.18.0 and are
+already not supported by F<Configure> on POSIX systems.
+
+=item *
+
+Between 2 and 6 ms and 7 I/O calls have been saved per attempt to open a perl
+module for each path in C<@INC>.
+
+=item *
+
 Intel C builds are now always built with C99 mode on.
 
 =item *
@@ -1556,6 +1766,14 @@ as well as C<SUNWspro>, and support for native C<setenv> has been added.
 
 =item *
 
+Added Perl_sv_get_backrefs() to determine if an SV is a weak-referent.
+
+Function either returns an SV * of type AV, which contains the set of
+weakreferences which reference the passed in SV, or a simple RV * which
+is the only weakref to this item.
+
+=item *
+
 C<screaminstr> has been removed. Although marked as public API, it is
 undocumented and has no usage in modern perl versions on CPAN Grep. Calling it
 has been fatal since 5.17.0.
@@ -1798,6 +2016,78 @@ index is still done using C<aelemfast>.
 
 =item *
 
+A bug in regular expression patterns that could lead to segfaults and
+other crashes has been fixed.  This occurred only in patterns compiled
+with C<"/i">, while taking into account the current POSIX locale (this usually
+means they have to be compiled within the scope of C<S<"use locale">>),
+and there must be a string of at least 128 consecutive bytes to match.
+[perl #123539]
+
+=item *
+
+C<s///> now works on very long strings instead of dying with 'Substitution
+loop'.  [perl #103260] [perl #123071]
+
+=item *
+
+C<gmtime> no longer crashes with not-a-number values.  [perl #123495]
+
+=item *
+
+C<\()> (reference to an empty list) and C<y///> with lexical $_ in scope
+could do a bad write past the end of the stack.  They have been fixed
+to extend the stack first.
+
+=item *
+
+C<prototype()> with no arguments used to read the previous item on the
+stack, so C<print "foo", prototype()> would print foo's prototype.  It has
+been fixed to infer $_ instead.  [perl #123514]
+
+=item *
+
+Some cases of lexical state subs inside predeclared subs could crash but no
+longer do.
+
+=item *
+
+Some cases of nested lexical state subs inside anonymous subs could cause
+'Bizarre copy' errors or possibly even crash.
+
+=item *
+
+When trying to emit warnings, perl's default debugger (F<perl5db.pl>) was
+sometimes giving 'Undefined subroutine &DB::db_warn called' instead.  This
+bug, which started to occur in Perl 5.18, has been fixed.  [perl #123553]
+
+=item *
+
+Certain syntax errors in substitutions, such as C<< s/${E<lt>E<gt>{})// >>, would
+crash, and had done so since Perl 5.10.  (In some cases the crash did not
+start happening till 5.16.)  The crash has, of course, been fixed.
+[perl #123542]
+
+=item *
+
+A repeat expression like C<33 x ~3> could cause a large buffer
+overflow since the new output buffer size was not correctly handled by
+SvGROW().  An expression like this now properly produces a memory wrap
+panic.  [perl 123554]
+
+=item *
+
+C<< formline("@...", "a"); >> would crash.  The C<FF_CHECKNL> case in
+pp_formline() didn't set the pointer used to mark the chop position,
+which led to the C<FF_MORE> case crashing with a segmentation fault.
+This has been fixed.  [perl #123538]
+
+=item *
+
+A possible buffer overrun and crash when parsing a literal pattern during
+regular expression compilation has been fixed.  [perl #123604]
+
+=item *
+
 fchmod() and futimes() now set C<$!> when they fail due to being
 passed a closed file handle.  [perl #122703]
 
@@ -2302,7 +2592,7 @@ Fatal warnings no longer prevent the output of syntax errors.
 
 Fixed a NaN double to long double conversion error on VMS. For quiet NaNs
 (and only on Itanium, not Alpha) negative infinity instead of NaN was
-produced. 
+produced.
 
 =item *