patches suggested by John Bley <jbb6@acpub.duke.edu> (with minor edits)
authorGurusamy Sarathy <gsar@cpan.org>
Mon, 15 Feb 1999 04:06:50 +0000 (04:06 +0000)
committerGurusamy Sarathy <gsar@cpan.org>
Mon, 15 Feb 1999 04:06:50 +0000 (04:06 +0000)
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 1999 05:24:55 -0500 (EST)
Message-ID: <Pine.SOL.3.91.990203051924.302A-100000@soc11.acpub.duke.edu>
Subject: [PATCH]5.005_54 (DOC) fix many typos
--
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 1999 08:53:53 -0500 (EST)
Message-ID: <Pine.SOL.3.91.990203085157.895A-100000@soc11.acpub.duke.edu>
Subject: [PATCH]5.005_54 (DOC) typos

p4raw-id: //depot/perl@2929

23 files changed:
pod/perl5004delta.pod
pod/perl5005delta.pod
pod/perlcall.pod
pod/perldebug.pod
pod/perlfaq1.pod
pod/perlfaq2.pod
pod/perlfaq3.pod
pod/perlfaq4.pod
pod/perlfaq5.pod
pod/perlfaq6.pod
pod/perlfaq7.pod
pod/perlfaq8.pod
pod/perlfaq9.pod
pod/perlfunc.pod
pod/perlguts.pod
pod/perllol.pod
pod/perlmod.pod
pod/perlref.pod
pod/perlrun.pod
pod/perlsub.pod
pod/perltoc.pod
pod/perlvar.pod
pod/perlxs.pod

index f1b6c8f..323830b 100644 (file)
@@ -1432,7 +1432,7 @@ subscript, which can do weird things if you're expecting only one subscript.
 =item Stub found while resolving method `%s' overloading `%s' in package `%s'
 
 (P) Overloading resolution over @ISA tree may be broken by importing stubs.
-Stubs should never be implicitely created, but explicit calls to C<can>
+Stubs should never be implicitly created, but explicit calls to C<can>
 may break this.
 
 =item Too late for "B<-T>" option
index 6f67653..3766681 100644 (file)
@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ Perl has a new Social Contract for contributors.  See F<Porting/Contract>.
 The license included in much of the Perl documentation has changed.
 Most of the Perl documentation was previously under the implicit GNU
 General Public License or the Artistic License (at the user's choice).
-Now much of the documentation unambigously states the terms under which
+Now much of the documentation unambiguously states the terms under which
 it may be distributed.  Those terms are in general much less restrictive
 than the GNU GPL.  See L<perl> and the individual perl man pages listed
 therein.
@@ -484,7 +484,7 @@ In previous versions, this would print "hello", but it now prints "g'bye".
 
 =head2 E<lt>E<gt> now reads in records
 
-If C<$/> is a referenence to an integer, or a scalar that holds an integer,
+If C<$/> is a reference to an integer, or a scalar that holds an integer,
 E<lt>E<gt> will read in records instead of lines. For more info, see
 L<perlvar/$/>.
 
index 8771be8..2b83780 100644 (file)
@@ -1925,8 +1925,8 @@ refers to the last.
 =head2 Creating and calling an anonymous subroutine in C
 
 As we've already shown, C<perl_call_sv> can be used to invoke an
-anonymous subroutine.  However, our example showed how Perl script
-invoking an XSUB to preform this operation.  Let's see how it can be
+anonymous subroutine.  However, our example showed a Perl script
+invoking an XSUB to perform this operation.  Let's see how it can be
 done inside our C code:
 
  ...
index 7a6e814..760d517 100644 (file)
@@ -1109,7 +1109,7 @@ or B<pop>, the stack backtrace will not show the original values.
 
 Perl is I<very> frivolous with memory.  There is a saying that to
 estimate memory usage of Perl, assume a reasonable algorithm of
-allocation, and multiply your estimages by 10.  This is not absolutely
+allocation, and multiply your estimates by 10.  This is not absolutely
 true, but may give you a good grasp of what happens.
 
 Say, an integer cannot take less than 20 bytes of memory, a float
@@ -1161,7 +1161,7 @@ in the following example:
   Total sbrk(): 215040/47:145. Odd ends: pad+heads+chain+tail: 0+2192+0+6144.
 
 It is possible to ask for such a statistic at arbitrary moment by
-usind Devel::Peek::mstats() (module Devel::Peek is available on CPAN).
+using Devel::Peek::mstats() (module Devel::Peek is available on CPAN).
 
 Here is the explanation of different parts of the format:
 
@@ -1195,7 +1195,7 @@ memory footprints of the buckets are between memory footprints of two
 buckets "above".  
 
 Say, with the above example the memory footprints are (with current
-algorith)
+algorithm)
 
      free:    8     16    32    64    128  256 512 1024 2048 4096 8192
           4     12    24    48    80
@@ -1328,7 +1328,7 @@ though the subroutine itself is not defined yet).
 
 It also creates C arrays to keep data for the stash (this is one HV,
 but it grows, thus there are 4 big allocations: the big chunks are not
-freeed, but are kept as additional arenas for C<SV> allocations).
+freed, but are kept as additional arenas for C<SV> allocations).
 
 =item C<054>
 
index 6a752b9..d4cac42 100644 (file)
@@ -313,7 +313,7 @@ Copyright (c) 1997-1999 Tom Christiansen and Nathan Torkington.
 All rights reserved.
 
 When included as an integrated part of the Standard Distribution
-of Perl or of its documentation (printed or otherwise), this works is
+of Perl or of its documentation (printed or otherwise), this work is
 covered under Perl's Artistic Licence.  For separate distributions of
 all or part of this FAQ outside of that, see L<perlfaq>.
 
index 13a2907..32970af 100644 (file)
@@ -447,7 +447,7 @@ Copyright (c) 1997-1999 Tom Christiansen and Nathan Torkington.
 All rights reserved.
 
 When included as an integrated part of the Standard Distribution
-of Perl or of its documentation (printed or otherwise), this works is
+of Perl or of its documentation (printed or otherwise), this work is
 covered under Perl's Artistic Licence.  For separate distributions of
 all or part of this FAQ outside of that, see L<perlfaq>.
 
index 4c38016..34c4518 100644 (file)
@@ -640,7 +640,7 @@ Copyright (c) 1997-1999 Tom Christiansen and Nathan Torkington.
 All rights reserved.
 
 When included as an integrated part of the Standard Distribution
-of Perl or of its documentation (printed or otherwise), this works is
+of Perl or of its documentation (printed or otherwise), this work is
 covered under Perl's Artistic Licence.  For separate distributions of
 all or part of this FAQ outside of that, see L<perlfaq>.
 
index c477b9d..875eb36 100644 (file)
@@ -1662,7 +1662,7 @@ All rights reserved.
 
 When included as part of the Standard Version of Perl, or as part of
 its complete documentation whether printed or otherwise, this work
-may be distributed only under the terms of Perl's Artistic License.
+may be distributed only under the terms of Perl's Artistic Licence.
 Any distribution of this file or derivatives thereof I<outside>
 of that package require that special arrangements be made with
 copyright holder.
index 119ffa4..99c25b7 100644 (file)
@@ -1121,7 +1121,7 @@ Copyright (c) 1997-1999 Tom Christiansen and Nathan Torkington.
 All rights reserved.
 
 When included as an integrated part of the Standard Distribution
-of Perl or of its documentation (printed or otherwise), this works is
+of Perl or of its documentation (printed or otherwise), this work is
 covered under Perl's Artistic Licence.  For separate distributions of
 all or part of this FAQ outside of that, see L<perlfaq>.
 
index 834fd89..234570d 100644 (file)
@@ -620,7 +620,7 @@ All rights reserved.
 
 When included as part of the Standard Version of Perl, or as part of
 its complete documentation whether printed or otherwise, this work
-may be distributed only under the terms of Perl's Artistic License.
+may be distributed only under the terms of Perl's Artistic Licence.
 Any distribution of this file or derivatives thereof I<outside>
 of that package require that special arrangements be made with
 copyright holder.
index 5794bfe..a4ea872 100644 (file)
@@ -488,7 +488,7 @@ could conceivably have several packages in that same file all
 accessing the same private variable, but another file with the same
 package couldn't get to it.
 
-See L<perlsub/"Peristent Private Variables"> for details.
+See L<perlsub/"Persistent Private Variables"> for details.
 
 =head2 What's the difference between dynamic and lexical (static) scoping?  Between local() and my()?
 
@@ -833,7 +833,7 @@ All rights reserved.
 
 When included as part of the Standard Version of Perl, or as part of
 its complete documentation whether printed or otherwise, this work
-may be distributed only under the terms of Perl's Artistic License.
+may be distributed only under the terms of Perl's Artistic Licence.
 Any distribution of this file or derivatives thereof I<outside>
 of that package require that special arrangements be made with
 copyright holder.
index d35a3b3..9ef41af 100644 (file)
@@ -1064,7 +1064,7 @@ Here are the suggested ways of modifying your include path:
 
     the PERLLIB environment variable
     the PERL5LIB environment variable
-    the perl -Idir commpand line flag
+    the perl -Idir command line flag
     the use lib pragma, as in
         use lib "$ENV{HOME}/myown_perllib";
 
@@ -1085,7 +1085,7 @@ All rights reserved.
 
 When included as part of the Standard Version of Perl, or as part of
 its complete documentation whether printed or otherwise, this work
-may be distributed only under the terms of Perl's Artistic License.
+may be distributed only under the terms of Perl's Artistic Licence.
 Any distribution of this file or derivatives thereof I<outside>
 of that package require that special arrangements be made with
 copyright holder.
index 46c487b..68f536f 100644 (file)
@@ -213,7 +213,7 @@ Here's an example of decoding:
     $string =~ s/%([a-fA-F0-9]{2})/chr(hex($1))/ge;
 
 Encoding is a bit harder, because you can't just blindly change
-all the non-alphanumunder character (C<\W>) into their hex escapes.
+all the non-alphanumeric characters (C<\W>) into their hex escapes.
 It's important that characters with special meaning like C</> and C<?>
 I<not> be translated.  Probably the easiest way to get this right is
 to avoid reinventing the wheel and just use the URI::Escape module,
@@ -541,7 +541,7 @@ All rights reserved.
 
 When included as part of the Standard Version of Perl, or as part of
 its complete documentation whether printed or otherwise, this work
-may be distributed only under the terms of Perl's Artistic License.
+may be distributed only under the terms of Perl's Artistic Licence.
 Any distribution of this file or derivatives thereof I<outside>
 of that package require that special arrangements be made with
 copyright holder.
index 0d09e85..07e1b7e 100644 (file)
@@ -1923,7 +1923,7 @@ system:
     ($retval = ioctl(...)) || ($retval = -1);
     printf "System returned %d\n", $retval;
 
-The special string "C<0> but true" is excempt from B<-w> complaints
+The special string "C<0> but true" is exempt from B<-w> complaints
 about improper numeric conversions.
 
 =item join EXPR,LIST
index c41778c..28adb36 100644 (file)
@@ -68,7 +68,7 @@ C<sv_setpvfn> is an analogue of C<vsprintf>, but it allows you to specify
 either a pointer to a variable argument list or the address and length of
 an array of SVs.  The last argument points to a boolean; on return, if that
 boolean is true, then locale-specific information has been used to format
-the string, and the string's contents are therefore untrustworty (see
+the string, and the string's contents are therefore untrustworthy (see
 L<perlsec>).  This pointer may be NULL if that information is not
 important.  Note that this function requires you to specify the length of
 the format.
@@ -1791,7 +1791,7 @@ method's CV, which can be obtained from the GV with the C<GvCV> macro.
 =item gv_fetchmethod_autoload
 
 Returns the glob which contains the subroutine to call to invoke the
-method on the C<stash>.  In fact in the presense of autoloading this may
+method on the C<stash>.  In fact in the presence of autoloading this may
 be the glob for "AUTOLOAD".  In this case the corresponding variable
 $AUTOLOAD is already setup.
 
index 0e6796b..56f08c2 100644 (file)
@@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ but rather just a reference to it, you could do something more like this:
     $ref_to_LoL = [
        [ "fred", "barney", "pebbles", "bambam", "dino", ],
        [ "homer", "bart", "marge", "maggie", ],
-       [ "george", "jane", "alroy", "judy", ],
+       [ "george", "jane", "elroy", "judy", ],
     ];
 
     print $ref_to_LoL->[2][2];
index 6da31de..48ebf23 100644 (file)
@@ -243,7 +243,7 @@ a file called Some/Module.pm and start with this template:
     # non-exported package globals go here
     use vars      qw(@more $stuff);
 
-    # initalize package globals, first exported ones
+    # initialize package globals, first exported ones
     $Var1   = '';
     %Hashit = ();
 
index b59b4a8..df85013 100644 (file)
@@ -559,7 +559,7 @@ access to those variables even though it doesn't get run until later,
 such as in a signal handler or a Tk callback.
 
 Using a closure as a function template allows us to generate many functions
-that act similarly.  Suppopose you wanted functions named after the colors
+that act similarly.  Suppose you wanted functions named after the colors
 that generated HTML font changes for the various colors:
 
     print "Be ", red("careful"), "with that ", green("light");
index 8a57257..7cb9aed 100644 (file)
@@ -507,7 +507,7 @@ makes it iterate over filename arguments somewhat like B<sed>:
 
 If a file named by an argument cannot be opened for some reason, Perl
 warns you about it, and moves on to the next file.  Note that the
-lines are printed automatically.  An error occuring during printing is
+lines are printed automatically.  An error occurring during printing is
 treated as fatal.  To suppress printing use the B<-n> switch.  A B<-p>
 overrides a B<-n> switch.
 
index 6f9bb7f..ef5a3c5 100644 (file)
@@ -381,7 +381,7 @@ unqualified and unqualifiable.
 This does not work with object methods, however; all object methods have
 to be in the symbol table of some package to be found.
 
-=head2 Peristent Private Variables
+=head2 Persistent Private Variables
 
 Just because a lexical variable is lexically (also called statically)
 scoped to its enclosing block, C<eval>, or C<do> FILE, this doesn't mean that
index 980ca8f..4abd0da 100644 (file)
@@ -1353,7 +1353,7 @@ $BASETIME, $^T, $WARNING, $^W, $EXECUTABLE_NAME, $^X, $ARGV, @ARGV, @INC,
 
 =item Private Variables via C<my()>
 
-=item Peristent Private Variables
+=item Persistent Private Variables
 
 =item Temporary Values via local()
 
index 44124d6..38d6d32 100644 (file)
@@ -275,7 +275,7 @@ get the record back in pieces.
 On VMS, record reads are done with the equivalent of C<sysread>, so it's
 best not to mix record and non-record reads on the same file. (This is
 likely not a problem, as any file you'd want to read in record mode is
-proably usable in line mode) Non-VMS systems perform normal I/O, so
+probably usable in line mode) Non-VMS systems perform normal I/O, so
 it's safe to mix record and non-record reads of a file.
 
 =item autoflush HANDLE EXPR
@@ -771,7 +771,7 @@ Start with single-step on.
 
 =back
 
-Note that some bits may be relevent at compile-time only, some at
+Note that some bits may be relevant at compile-time only, some at
 run-time only. This is a new mechanism and the details may change.
 
 =item $^R
@@ -932,7 +932,7 @@ respect: they may be called to report (probable) errors found by the
 parser.  In such a case the parser may be in inconsistent state, so
 any attempt to evaluate Perl code from such a handler will probably
 result in a segfault.  This means that calls which result/may-result
-in parsing Perl should be used with extreme causion, like this:
+in parsing Perl should be used with extreme caution, like this:
 
     require Carp if defined $^S;
     Carp::confess("Something wrong") if defined &Carp::confess;
index 89ddf3e..98a9834 100644 (file)
@@ -181,10 +181,10 @@ directive is used which sets ST(0) explicitly.
 
 Older versions of this document recommended to use C<void> return
 value in such cases. It was discovered that this could lead to
-segfaults in cases when XSUB was I<truely> C<void>. This practice is
+segfaults in cases when XSUB was I<truly> C<void>. This practice is
 now deprecated, and may be not supported at some future version. Use
 the return value C<SV *> in such cases. (Currently C<xsubpp> contains
-some heuristic code which tries to disambiguate between "truely-void"
+some heuristic code which tries to disambiguate between "truly-void"
 and "old-practice-declared-as-void" functions. Hence your code is at
 mercy of this heuristics unless you use C<SV *> as return value.)
 
@@ -387,9 +387,9 @@ the same line where the input variable is declared.  If the
 initialization begins with C<;> or C<+>, then it is output after
 all of the input variables have been declared.  The C<=> and C<;>
 cases replace the initialization normally supplied from the typemap.
-For the C<+> case, the initialization from the typemap will preceed
+For the C<+> case, the initialization from the typemap will precede
 the initialization code included after the C<+>.  A global
-variable, C<%v>, is available for the truely rare case where
+variable, C<%v>, is available for the truly rare case where
 information from one initialization is needed in another
 initialization.