Minor pod fixes to make Pod::Checker happy with the core pod
authorAlex Vandiver <alexmv@mit.edu>
Wed, 22 Oct 2008 05:17:15 +0000 (01:17 -0400)
committerDavid Mitchell <davem@iabyn.com>
Thu, 26 Feb 2009 00:09:23 +0000 (00:09 +0000)
Applied with some amendments to the perlfunc corrections.
PerlFAQ modifications will be applied separately.

(cherry picked from commit f4084e3915fd9d0f0ed59d0dddeb6888f64af93e)

pod/perl590delta.pod
pod/perl595delta.pod
pod/perlebcdic.pod
pod/perlform.pod
pod/perlfunc.pod

index fdc6c31..db6f599 100644 (file)
@@ -485,8 +485,6 @@ of Perl in OS/400 PASE.
 
 perlreref has been added: it is a regular expressions quick reference.
 
-=head1 Performance Enhancements
-
 =head1 Installation and Configuration Improvements
 
 The UNIX standard Perl location, F</usr/bin/perl>, is no longer
index 96d061a..246b2cc 100644 (file)
@@ -464,8 +464,6 @@ CSS. Some formatting problems were also corrected. (Jari Aalto)
 A new manual page, L<perlunifaq> (the Perl Unicode FAQ), has been added
 (Juerd Waalboer).
 
-=head1 Performance Enhancements
-
 =head1 Installation and Configuration Improvements
 
 =head2 C++ compatibility
@@ -563,10 +561,6 @@ an hash/array when the op is flagged with OPf_SPECIAL (Nicholas Clark).
 
 =for p5p XXX new BIND SV type, #29544, #29642
 
-=head1 Known Problems
-
-=head2 Platform Specific Problems
-
 =head1 Reporting Bugs
 
 If you find what you think is a bug, you might check the articles
index ca695a6..ca4ef84 100644 (file)
@@ -73,7 +73,7 @@ E.g. CCSID 0037 may be referred to as 37 in places.
 Perl can be compiled on platforms that run any of three commonly used EBCDIC
 character sets, listed below.
 
-=head2 13 variant characters
+=head2 The 13 variant characters
 
 Among IBM EBCDIC character code sets there are 13 characters that
 are often mapped to different integer values.  Those characters
index 6bff194..3cfa1b7 100644 (file)
@@ -59,7 +59,7 @@ characters for field definitions:
 X<format, picture line>
 X<@> X<^> X<< < >> X<< | >> X<< > >> X<#> X<0> X<.> X<...>
 X<@*> X<^*> X<~> X<~~>
-  
+
    @    start of regular field
    ^    start of special field
    <    pad character for left justification
index b08f21a..084f103 100644 (file)
@@ -2112,7 +2112,7 @@ C<Linux::Pid>.
 X<getpriority> X<priority> X<nice>
 
 Returns the current priority for a process, a process group, or a user.
-(See L<getpriority(2)>.)  Will raise a fatal exception if used on a
+(See C<getpriority(2)>.)  Will raise a fatal exception if used on a
 machine that doesn't implement getpriority(2).
 
 =item getpwnam NAME
@@ -3265,7 +3265,7 @@ See L<perliol> for detailed info on PerlIO.
 You may also, in the Bourne shell tradition, specify an EXPR beginning
 with C<< '>&' >>, in which case the rest of the string is interpreted
 as the name of a filehandle (or file descriptor, if numeric) to be
-duped (as L<dup(2)>) and opened.  You may use C<&> after C<< > >>,
+duped (as C<dup(2)>) and opened.  You may use C<&> after C<< > >>,
 C<<< >> >>>, C<< < >>, C<< +> >>, C<<< +>> >>>, and C<< +< >>.
 The mode you specify should match the mode of the original filehandle.
 (Duping a filehandle does not take into account any existing contents
@@ -3296,7 +3296,7 @@ C<STDERR> using various methods:
 
 If you specify C<< '<&=X' >>, where C<X> is a file descriptor number
 or a filehandle, then Perl will do an equivalent of C's C<fdopen> of
-that file descriptor (and not call L<dup(2)>); this is more
+that file descriptor (and not call C<dup(2)>); this is more
 parsimonious of file descriptors.  For example:
 
     # open for input, reusing the fileno of $fd
@@ -3409,7 +3409,7 @@ but will not work on a filename which happens to have a trailing space, while
 
 will have exactly the opposite restrictions.
 
-If you want a "real" C C<open> (see L<open(2)> on your system), then you
+If you want a "real" C C<open> (see C<open(2)> on your system), then you
 should use the C<sysopen> function, which involves no such magic (but
 may use subtly different filemodes than Perl open(), which is mapped
 to C fopen()).  This is
@@ -5552,7 +5552,7 @@ X<sprintf>
 
 Returns a string formatted by the usual C<printf> conventions of the C
 library function C<sprintf>.  See below for more details
-and see L<sprintf(3)> or L<printf(3)> on your system for an explanation of
+and see C<sprintf(3)> or C<printf(3)> on your system for an explanation of
 the general principles.
 
 For example: