minimal removal of 8 bit chrs from perlebcdic.pod
authorPeter Prymmer <PPrymmer@factset.com>
Fri, 1 Sep 2000 15:50:57 +0000 (08:50 -0700)
committerJarkko Hietaniemi <jhi@iki.fi>
Fri, 1 Sep 2000 23:00:13 +0000 (23:00 +0000)
Message-ID: <Pine.OSF.4.10.10009011542550.147696-100000@aspara.forte.com>

plus rework the http: spots as suggested by Tom Christiansen,
plus regen perltoc.

p4raw-id: //depot/perl@7001

README.os2
pod/perl56delta.pod
pod/perlebcdic.pod
pod/perlguts.pod
pod/perltoc.pod
pod/perlxs.pod

index 88f45a9..b46fa7a 100644 (file)
@@ -724,8 +724,7 @@ can be constructed using C<pod2latex>.
 =head1 BUILD
 
 Here we discuss how to build Perl under OS/2. There is an alternative
-(but maybe older) view on
-L<http://www.shadow.net/~troc/os2perl.html|http://www.shadow.net/~troc/os2perl.html>.
+(but maybe older) view on http://www.shadow.net/~troc/os2perl.html
 
 =head2 Prerequisites
 
index 5eb9d2c..9f30314 100644 (file)
@@ -789,9 +789,8 @@ already.  The fatal error has been downgraded to an optional warning:
         
 This warns you that C<"fred@example.com"> is going to turn into
 C<fred.com> if you don't backslash the C<@>.
-
-See L<http://www.plover.com/~mjd/perl/at-error.html|http://www.plover.com/~mjd/perl/at-error.html>
-for more details about the history here.
+See http://www.plover.com/~mjd/perl/at-error.html for more details
+about the history here.
 
 =head1 Modules and Pragmata
 
index cdf929e..9cd1a08 100644 (file)
@@ -701,8 +701,8 @@ See the discussion of pack() above.
 
 As of perl 5.005_03 the letter range regular expression such as 
 [A-Z] and [a-z] have been especially coded to not pick up gap 
-characters.  For example, characters such as '�' C<o WITH CIRCUMFLEX> 
-(or E<ocirc>) that lie between I and J would not be matched by the 
+characters.  For example, characters such as E<ocirc> C<o WITH CIRCUMFLEX> 
+that lie between I and J would not be matched by the 
 regular expression range C</[H-K]/>.  
 
 If you do want to match the alphabet gap characters in a single octet 
@@ -844,12 +844,12 @@ for drive, that is:
 
 The property of lower case before uppercase letters in EBCDIC is
 even carried to the Latin 1 EBCDIC pages such as 0037 and 1047.
-An example would be that '�' (or E<Euml>) C<E WITH DIAERESIS> (203) comes 
-before '�' (or E<euml>) C<e WITH DIAERESIS> (235) on and ASCII machine, but 
+An example would be that E<Euml> C<E WITH DIAERESIS> (203) comes 
+before E<euml> C<e WITH DIAERESIS> (235) on an ASCII machine, but 
 the latter (83) comes before the former (115) on an EBCDIC machine.  
-(Astute readers will note that the upper case version of '�' (or E<szlig>) 
+(Astute readers will note that the upper case version of E<szlig> 
 C<SMALL LETTER SHARP S> is simply "SS" and that the upper case version of 
-'^?' (or E<yuml>) C<y WITH DIAERESIS> is not in the 0..255 range but it is 
+E<yuml> C<y WITH DIAERESIS> is not in the 0..255 range but it is 
 at U+x0178 in Unicode, or C<"\x{178}"> in a Unicode enabled Perl).
 
 The sort order will cause differences between results obtained on
@@ -875,8 +875,8 @@ and include Latin-1 characters then apply:
     s/�/SS/g; 
 
 then sort().  Do note however that such Latin-1 manipulation does not 
-address the '^?' (or E<yuml>) C<y WITH DIAERESIS> character that will 
-remain at code point 255 on ASCII machines, but 223 on most EBCDIC machines 
+address the E<yuml> C<y WITH DIAERESIS> character that will remain at 
+code point 255 on ASCII machines, but 223 on most EBCDIC machines 
 where it will sort to a place less than the EBCDIC numerals.  With a 
 Unicode enabled Perl you might try:
 
@@ -1010,7 +1010,8 @@ translation difficulties.  In particular one popular nroff implementation
 was known to strip accented characters to their unaccented counterparts 
 while attempting to view this document through the B<pod2man> program 
 (for example, you may see a plain C<y> rather than one with a diaeresis 
-as in C<^?> or E<yuml> ).
+as in E<yuml>).  Another nroff truncated the resultant man page at
+the first occurence of 8 bit characters.
 
 Not all shells will allow multiple C<-e> string arguments to perl to
 be concatenated together properly as recipes 2, 3, and 4 might seem
@@ -1018,12 +1019,14 @@ to imply.
 
 Perl does not yet work with any Unicode features on EBCDIC platforms.
 
+=head1 SEE ALSO
+
+L<perllocale>, L<perlfunc>.
+
 =head1 REFERENCES
 
 http://anubis.dkuug.dk/i18n/charmaps
 
-L<perllocale>, L<perlfunc>.
-
 http://www.unicode.org/
 
 http://www.unicode.org/unicode/reports/tr16/
@@ -1047,10 +1050,10 @@ ISSN 1523-0309; Multilingual Computing Inc. Sandpoint ID, USA.
 
 =head1 AUTHOR
 
-Peter Prymmer E<lt>pvhp@best.comE<gt> wrote this in 1999 and 2000 
+Peter Prymmer pvhp@best.com wrote this in 1999 and 2000 
 with CCSID 0819 and 0037 help from Chris Leach and 
-AndrE<eacute> Pirard E<lt>A.Pirard@ulg.ac.beE<gt> as well as POSIX-BC 
-help from Thomas Dorner E<lt>Thomas.Dorner@start.deE<gt>.
+AndrE<eacute> Pirard A.Pirard@ulg.ac.be as well as POSIX-BC 
+help from Thomas Dorner Thomas.Dorner@start.de.
 Thanks also to Philip Newton and Vickie Cooper.  Trademarks, registered 
 trademarks, service marks and registered service marks used in this 
 document are the property of their respective owners.
index 2f75cff..bd681a1 100644 (file)
@@ -4,10 +4,10 @@ perlguts - Introduction to the Perl API
 
 =head1 DESCRIPTION
 
-This document attempts to describe how to use the Perl API, as well as containing 
-some info on the basic workings of the Perl core. It is far from complete 
-and probably contains many errors. Please refer any questions or 
-comments to the author below.
+This document attempts to describe how to use the Perl API, as well as
+containing some info on the basic workings of the Perl core. It is far
+from complete and probably contains many errors. Please refer any
+questions or comments to the author below.
 
 =head1 Variables
 
@@ -1972,8 +1972,7 @@ produced a new character set containing all the characters you can
 possibly think of and more. There are several ways of representing these
 characters, and the one Perl uses is called UTF8. UTF8 uses
 a variable number of bytes to represent a character, instead of just
-one. You can learn more about Unicode at
-L<http://www.unicode.org/|http://www.unicode.org/>
+one. You can learn more about Unicode at http://www.unicode.org/
 
 =head2 How can I recognise a UTF8 string?
 
index 8ce7806..04ecccb 100644 (file)
@@ -2404,6 +2404,8 @@ chcp, dataset access, iconv, locales
 
 =item BUGS
 
+=item SEE ALSO
+
 =item REFERENCES
 
 =item AUTHOR
@@ -4683,8 +4685,12 @@ accidentally using the context of the sort() itself)
 
 =item ftmp-security tests warn 'system possibly insecure'
 
+=item Test lib/posix Subtest 9 Fails In LP64-Configured HP-UX
+
 =item Long Doubles Still Don't Work In Solaris
 
+=item Linux With Sfio Fails op/misc Test 48
+
 =item Storable tests fail in some platforms
 
 =item Threads Are Still Experimental
index e350294..06b8230 100644 (file)
@@ -71,9 +71,8 @@ is usually referred to as the XS language.
 See L<perlxstut> for a tutorial on the whole extension creation process.
 
 Note: For some extensions, Dave Beazley's SWIG system may provide a
-significantly more convenient mechanism for creating the extension glue
-code. See L<http://www.swig.org/|http://www.swig.org/> for more 
-information.
+significantly more convenient mechanism for creating the extension
+glue code.  See http://www.swig.org/ for more information.
 
 =head2 On The Road