Trivial doc patch
authorAndreas König <a.koenig@mind.de>
Fri, 2 Nov 2001 06:11:35 +0000 (07:11 +0100)
committerJarkko Hietaniemi <jhi@iki.fi>
Fri, 2 Nov 2001 04:17:04 +0000 (04:17 +0000)
Message-ID: <m37kt94v08.fsf@anima.de>

p4raw-id: //depot/perl@12805

pod/perlport.pod

index 8e94e22..287eaf5 100644 (file)
@@ -423,13 +423,13 @@ simple, platform-independent mailing.
 The Unix System V IPC (C<msg*(), sem*(), shm*()>) is not available
 even on all Unix platforms.
 
-Do not use either the bare result of C<pack("N", 10, 20, 30, 40)>
-or bare v-strings (such as C<v10.20.30.40>) or to represent
-IPv4 addresses: both forms just pack the four bytes into network order.
-That this would be equal to the C language C<in_addr> struct (which is
-what the socket code internally uses) is not guaranteed.  To be
-portable use the routines of the Socket extension, such as
-C<inet_aton()>, C<inet_ntoa()>, and C<sockaddr_in()>.
+Do not use either the bare result of C<pack("N", 10, 20, 30, 40)> or
+bare v-strings (such as C<v10.20.30.40>) to represent IPv4 addresses:
+both forms just pack the four bytes into network order.  That this
+would be equal to the C language C<in_addr> struct (which is what the
+socket code internally uses) is not guaranteed.  To be portable use
+the routines of the Socket extension, such as C<inet_aton()>,
+C<inet_ntoa()>, and C<sockaddr_in()>.
 
 The rule of thumb for portable code is: Do it all in portable Perl, or
 use a module (that may internally implement it with platform-specific