pod cleanups.
authorJarkko Hietaniemi <jhi@iki.fi>
Wed, 29 May 2002 01:16:23 +0000 (01:16 +0000)
committerJarkko Hietaniemi <jhi@iki.fi>
Wed, 29 May 2002 01:16:23 +0000 (01:16 +0000)
p4raw-id: //depot/perl@16849

17 files changed:
README.aix
README.cygwin
README.jp
README.ko
README.macos
README.tw
pod/perl561delta.pod
pod/perldelta.pod
pod/perlfaq4.pod
pod/perlfaq5.pod
pod/perlfunc.pod
pod/perlhack.pod
pod/perlipc.pod
pod/perlsub.pod
pod/perlthrtut.pod
pod/perlunicode.pod
pod/perluniintro.pod

index c8cdadb..6da0cb2 100644 (file)
@@ -175,7 +175,7 @@ Follow the messages ... and you're done.
 Using gcc-3.0 (tested with 3.0.4) now works out of the box, as do
 recent gcc-2.9 builds available directly from IBM as part of their Linux
 compatibility packages, available here:
+
   http://www.ibm.com/servers/aix/products/aixos/linux/
 
 =head2 Using Large Files with Perl
index baa4fe1..c09eeab 100644 (file)
@@ -403,7 +403,7 @@ access by native Win32 programs).
 
 Inplace editing ( perl -i ) of files doesn't work without doing a backup 
 of the file being edited ( perl -i.bak ).
-  
+
 =back
 
 =head1 INSTALL PERL ON CYGWIN
index e05c50d..36ffc9b 100644 (file)
--- a/README.jp
+++ b/README.jp
@@ -103,11 +103,11 @@ Perl5.8
 Jperl �ߴ��������ץ�
 
  ��������"shebang"���ѹ����������ǡ�Jperl�Ѥ�script�ΤۤȤ��ɤ��ѹ��ʤ������Ѳ�ǽ���Ȼפ����ޤ���
+
    #!/path/to/jperl
    ��
    #!/path/to/perl -Mencoding=euc-jp
-   
+
  �ܤ����� perldoc encoding �򻲾Ȥ��Ƥ���������
 
 =back
index fb3a4a9..29c7730 100644 (file)
--- a/README.ko
+++ b/README.ko
@@ -165,7 +165,7 @@ Perl 
   Home for Korean Perlmanias
 
 =item L<http://www.oreilly.co.kr/perl/>
-  
+
   O'Reilly���� ���� �ѱ��� Perl ���� ����
 
 =item L<http://www.perlschool.net/>
@@ -195,7 +195,7 @@ Character Set)
 
   �ѱ��� ���� ���� �� ���ڵ��� ���� �ȳ�.
 
-=item L<htp://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/unicode.html>
+=item L<http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/unicode.html>
 
   ���н�/���������� �����ڵ��� UTF-8 ���뿡 ���� ������(FAQ)
 
index 5df494c..d0ac88e 100644 (file)
@@ -6,7 +6,6 @@ designed to be readable as is.
 
 README.macos - Perl under Mac OS (Classic)
 
-
 =head1 SYNOPSIS
 
 This document briefly describes perl under Mac OS (Classic).
index 9110264..bbb6e8f 100644 (file)
--- a/README.tw
+++ b/README.tw
@@ -141,8 +141,12 @@ Unicode 
 
 Unix/Linux �W�� UTF-8 �� Unicode ���Ȱ�
 
+=back
+
 =head2 �����Ƹ��T
 
+=over 4
+
 =item �������s "���餤��" ���s "�c�餤��"?
 
 L<http://www.csie.ntu.edu.tw/~b7506051/mozilla/faq.html#faqglossary>
index cc411dc..ddc2509 100644 (file)
@@ -3444,7 +3444,7 @@ is executed:
 
 =over
 
-=item 
+=item *
 
 64-bit builds
 
@@ -3459,7 +3459,7 @@ in 64-bit HP-UX.  The test attempts to create and connect to
 
 Note that 64-bit support is still experimental.
 
-=item 
+=item *
 
 Failure of Thread tests
 
@@ -3468,7 +3468,7 @@ fundamental problems in the 5.005 threading implementation.  These are
 not new failures--Perl 5.005_0x has the same bugs, but didn't have these
 tests.  (Note that support for 5.005-style threading remains experimental.)
 
-=item
+=item *
 
 NEXTSTEP 3.3 POSIX test failure
 
@@ -3477,7 +3477,7 @@ operating system libraries is buggy: the %j format numbers the days of
 a month starting from zero, which, while being logical to programmers,
 will cause the subtests 19 to 27 of the lib/posix test may fail.
 
-=item 
+=item *
 
 Tru64 (aka Digital UNIX, aka DEC OSF/1) lib/sdbm test failure with gcc
 
index 7df5050..251ec20 100644 (file)
@@ -2010,7 +2010,7 @@ exist, if that's what they were.
     # Nothing has set the FOO element so far
 
     { local $tied_hash{FOO} = 'Bar' }
-    
+
     # This used to print, but not now.
     print "exists!\n" if exists $tied_hash{FOO};
 
index ab71cb1..365bdbd 100644 (file)
@@ -135,7 +135,9 @@ functions is that it works with numbers of ANY size, that it is
 optimized for speed on some operations, and for at least some
 programmers the notation might be familiar.
 
-=item B<How do I convert hexadecimal into decimal:>
+=over 4
+
+=item How do I convert hexadecimal into decimal
 
 Using perl's built in conversion of 0x notation:
 
@@ -158,7 +160,7 @@ Using the CPAN module Bit::Vector:
     $vec = Bit::Vector->new_Hex(32, "DEADBEEF");
     $dec = $vec->to_Dec();
 
-=item B<How do I convert from decimal to hexadecimal:>
+=item How do I convert from decimal to hexadecimal
 
 Using sprint:
 
@@ -181,7 +183,7 @@ And Bit::Vector supports odd bit counts:
     $vec->Resize(32); # suppress leading 0 if unwanted
     $hex = $vec->to_Hex();
 
-=item B<How do I convert from octal to decimal:>
+=item How do I convert from octal to decimal
 
 Using Perl's built in conversion of numbers with leading zeros:
 
@@ -200,7 +202,7 @@ Using Bit::Vector:
     $vec->Chunk_List_Store(3, split(//, reverse "33653337357"));
     $dec = $vec->to_Dec();
 
-=item B<How do I convert from decimal to octal:>
+=item How do I convert from decimal to octal
 
 Using sprintf:
 
@@ -212,7 +214,7 @@ Using Bit::Vector
     $vec = Bit::Vector->new_Dec(32, -559038737);
     $oct = reverse join('', $vec->Chunk_List_Read(3));
 
-=item B<How do I convert from binary to decimal:>
+=item How do I convert from binary to decimal
 
 Perl 5.6 lets you write binary numbers directly with
 the 0b notation:
@@ -236,7 +238,7 @@ Using Bit::Vector:
     $vec = Bit::Vector->new_Bin(32, "11011110101011011011111011101111");
     $dec = $vec->to_Dec();
 
-=item B<How do I convert from decimal to binary:>
+=item How do I convert from decimal to binary
 
 Using unpack;
 
@@ -251,6 +253,7 @@ Using Bit::Vector:
 The remaining transformations (e.g. hex -> oct, bin -> hex, etc.)
 are left as an exercise to the inclined reader.
 
+=back
 
 =head2 Why doesn't & work the way I want it to?
 
@@ -1404,12 +1407,12 @@ case), you modify the value.
     for $orbit ( values %orbits ) {
        ($orbit **= 3) *= (4/3) * 3.14159; 
     }
-    
+
 Prior to perl 5.6 C<values> returned copies of the values,
 so older perl code often contains constructions such as
 C<@orbits{keys %orbits}> instead of C<values %orbits> where
 the hash is to be modified.
-    
+
 =head2 How do I select a random element from an array?
 
 Use the rand() function (see L<perlfunc/rand>):
index d3c8c96..7773508 100644 (file)
@@ -42,7 +42,7 @@ per-filehandle variables.
 Some idioms can handle this in a single statement:
 
     select((select(OUTPUT_HANDLE), $| = 1)[0]);
-    
+
     $| = 1, select $_ for select OUTPUT_HANDLE;
 
 Some modules offer object-oriented access to handles and their
@@ -162,11 +162,11 @@ You can then pass these references just like any other scalar,
 and use them in the place of named handles.
 
        open my    $fh, $file_name;
-       
+
        open local $fh, $file_name;
-       
+
        print $fh "Hello World!\n";
-       
+
        process_file( $fh );
 
 Before perl5.6, you had to deal with various typeglob idioms
@@ -175,7 +175,7 @@ which you may see in older code.
        open FILE, "> $filename";
        process_typeglob(   *FILE );
        process_reference( \*FILE );
-       
+
        sub process_typeglob  { local *FH = shift; print FH  "Typeglob!" }
        sub process_reference { local $fh = shift; print $fh "Reference!" }
 
index 0b40eb7..7982c0b 100644 (file)
@@ -2889,7 +2889,7 @@ C<STDERR> using various methods:
     #!/usr/bin/perl
     open my $oldout, ">&STDOUT"     or die "Can't dup STDOUT: $!";
     open OLDERR,     ">&", \*STDERR or die "Can't dup STDERR: $!";
+
     open STDOUT, '>', "foo.out" or die "Can't redirect STDOUT: $!";
     open STDERR, ">&STDOUT"     or die "Can't dup STDOUT: $!";
 
index 66023bd..8837328 100644 (file)
@@ -495,10 +495,6 @@ For more info on the web see
 
        http://bugs.perl.org/perlbug.cgi?req=spec
 
-
-B<The interfaces:>
-
-
 =item 1 http://bugs.perl.org
 
 Login via the web, (remove B<admin/> if only browsing), where interested Cc's, tests, patches and change-ids, etc. may be assigned.
index 58e063f..3b997ac 100644 (file)
@@ -304,7 +304,7 @@ those signals (it does not do the C<wait>). Again the failure will
 look like a loop as the operating system will re-issue the signal as
 there are un-waited-for completed child processes.
 
-=back 4
+=back
 
 =head1 Using open() for IPC
 
index 2b33bd8..b92c63a 100644 (file)
@@ -686,7 +686,7 @@ subroutine never gets that chance.  Consider;
 
     # set_arr_lv cannot stop this !
     set_arr_lv() = { a => 1 };
-       
+
 =back
 
 =head2 Passing Symbol Table Entries (typeglobs)
index b1f29c8..6fda10f 100644 (file)
@@ -331,7 +331,7 @@ Perl's threading package provides the yield() function that does
 this. yield() is pretty straightforward, and works like this:
 
     use threads; 
-       
+
     sub loop {
            my $thread = shift;
            my $foo = 50;
@@ -344,7 +344,7 @@ this. yield() is pretty straightforward, and works like this:
     my $thread1 = threads->new(\&loop, 'first');
     my $thread2 = threads->new(\&loop, 'second');
     my $thread3 = threads->new(\&loop, 'third');
-       
+
 It is important to remember that yield() is only a hint to give up the CPU,
 it depends on your hardware, OS and threading libraries what actually happens.
 Therefore it is important to note that one should not build the scheduling of 
@@ -433,7 +433,7 @@ L<threads::shared> module and the C< : shared> attribute:
     my $foo : shared = 1;
     my $bar = 1;
     threads->new(sub { $foo++; $bar++ })->join;
-    
+
     print "$foo\n";  #prints 2 since $foo is shared
     print "$bar\n";  #prints 1 since $bar is not shared
 
index 260dc0f..25d512e 100644 (file)
@@ -765,7 +765,7 @@ But in this particular example, you probably really want
 
 which will match assigned characters known to be part of the Greek script.
 
-[b] See L</User-defined Character Properties>.
+[b] See L</"User-Defined Character Properties">.
 
 =item *
 
index 0d840d1..8222e70 100644 (file)
@@ -588,7 +588,7 @@ than ASCII 0 to 9 (and ASCII a to f for hexadecimal).
 
 =over 4
 
-=item 
+=item *
 
 Will My Old Scripts Break?
 
@@ -600,7 +600,7 @@ produced a character modulo 255.  C<chr(300)>, for example, was equal
 to C<chr(45)> or "-" (in ASCII), now it is LATIN CAPITAL LETTER I WITH
 BREVE.
 
-=item 
+=item *
 
 How Do I Make My Scripts Work With Unicode?
 
@@ -608,7 +608,7 @@ Very little work should be needed since nothing changes until you
 generate Unicode data.  The most important thing is getting input as
 Unicode; for that, see the earlier I/O discussion.
 
-=item 
+=item *
 
 How Do I Know Whether My String Is In Unicode?
 
@@ -655,7 +655,7 @@ defined function C<length()>:
     print length($unicode), "\n"; # will also print 2
                                   # (the 0xC4 0x80 of the UTF-8)
 
-=item 
+=item *
 
 How Do I Detect Data That's Not Valid In a Particular Encoding?
 
@@ -679,7 +679,7 @@ warning is produced. The "U0" means "expect strictly UTF-8 encoded
 Unicode".  Without that the C<unpack("U*", ...)> would accept also
 data like C<chr(0xFF>), similarly to the C<pack> as we saw earlier.
 
-=item 
+=item *
 
 How Do I Convert Binary Data Into a Particular Encoding, Or Vice Versa?
 
@@ -734,14 +734,14 @@ B<Any random collection of bytes isn't well-formed UTF-8>.  You can
 use C<unpack("C*", $string)> for the former, and you can create
 well-formed Unicode data by C<pack("U*", 0xff, ...)>.
 
-=item 
+=item *
 
 How Do I Display Unicode?  How Do I Input Unicode?
 
 See http://www.alanwood.net/unicode/ and
 http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/unicode.html
 
-=item 
+=item *
 
 How Does Unicode Work With Traditional Locales?