perl 5.003_06: lib/Math/Complex.pm
authorRaphael Manfredi <Raphael_Manfredi@grenoble.hp.com>
Thu, 3 Oct 1996 16:38:08 +0000 (18:38 +0200)
committerAndy Dougherty <doughera@lafcol.lafayette.edu>
Thu, 3 Oct 1996 16:38:08 +0000 (18:38 +0200)
Date: Thu, 03 Oct 96 18:38:08 +0200
From: Raphael Manfredi <Raphael_Manfredi@grenoble.hp.com>
# Complex numbers and associated mathematical functions
# -- Raphael Manfredi, Sept 1996
# New version.  Should be backwards compatible, but please
# check it out if you use it.

lib/Math/Complex.pm

index 2a571aa..5ec4a56 100644 (file)
-package Math::Complex;
+# $RCSFile$
+#
+# Complex numbers and associated mathematical functions
+# -- Raphael Manfredi, Sept 1996
 
 require Exporter;
+package Math::Complex; @ISA = qw(Exporter);
 
-@ISA = ('Exporter');
-
-# just to make use happy
+@EXPORT = qw(
+       pi i Re Im arg
+       log10 logn cbrt root
+       tan cotan asin acos atan acotan
+       sinh cosh tanh cotanh asinh acosh atanh acotanh
+       cplx cplxe
+);
 
 use overload
-    '+'   => sub  { my($x1,$y1,$x2,$y2) = (@{$_[0]},@{$_[1]});
-                      bless [ $x1+$x2, $y1+$y2];
-             },
-
-    '-'   => sub  { my($x1,$y1,$x2,$y2) = (@{$_[0]},@{$_[1]});
-                      bless [ $x1-$x2, $y1-$y2];
-             },
-
-    '*'   => sub  { my($x1,$y1,$x2,$y2) = (@{$_[0]},@{$_[1]});
-                    bless [ $x1*$x2-$y1*$y2,$x1*$y2+$x2*$y1];
-             },
-
-    '/'   => sub  { my($x1,$y1,$x2,$y2) = (@{$_[0]},@{$_[1]});
-                    my $q = $x2*$x2+$y2*$y2;
-                    bless [($x1*$x2+$y1*$y2)/$q, ($y1*$x2-$y2*$x1)/$q];
-             },
-
-    'neg' => sub  { my($x,$y) = @{$_[0]}; bless [ -$x, -$y];
-             },
-
-    '~'   => sub  { my($x,$y) = @{$_[0]}; bless [ $x, -$y];
-             },
-
-    'abs'   => sub  { my($x,$y) = @{$_[0]}; sqrt $x*$x+$y*$y;
-             },
-
-    'cos' => sub { my($x,$y) = @{$_[0]};
-                   my ($ab,$c,$s) = (exp $y, cos $x, sin $x);
-                   my $abr = 1/(2*$ab); $ab /= 2;
-                   bless [ ($abr+$ab)*$c, ($abr-$ab)*$s];
-             },
-
-    'sin' => sub { my($x,$y) = @{$_[0]};
-                   my ($ab,$c,$s) = (exp $y, cos $x, sin $x);
-                   my $abr = 1/(2*$ab); $ab /= 2;
-                   bless [ (-$abr-$ab)*$s, ($abr-$ab)*$c];
-             },
-
-    'exp' => sub { my($x,$y) = @{$_[0]};
-                   my ($ab,$c,$s) = (exp $x, cos $y, sin $y);
-                   bless [ $ab*$c, $ab*$s ];
-              },
-
-    'sqrt' => sub { 
-       my($zr,$zi) = @{$_[0]};
-       my ($x, $y, $r, $w);
-       my $c = new Math::Complex (0,0);
-        if (($zr == 0) && ($zi == 0)) { 
-           # nothing, $c already set
+       '+'             => \&plus,
+       '-'             => \&minus,
+       '*'             => \&multiply,
+       '/'             => \&divide,
+       '**'    => \&power,
+       '<=>'   => \&spaceship,
+       'neg'   => \&negate,
+       '~'             => \&conjugate,
+       'abs'   => \&abs,
+       'sqrt'  => \&sqrt,
+       'exp'   => \&exp,
+       'log'   => \&log,
+       'sin'   => \&sin,
+       'cos'   => \&cos,
+       'atan2' => \&atan2,
+       qw("" stringify);
+
+#
+# Package globals
+#
+
+$package = 'Math::Complex';            # Package name
+$display = 'cartesian';                        # Default display format
+
+#
+# Object attributes (internal):
+#      cartesian       [real, imaginary] -- cartesian form
+#      polar           [rho, theta] -- polar form
+#      c_dirty         cartesian form not up-to-date
+#      p_dirty         polar form not up-to-date
+#      display         display format (package's global when not set)
+#
+
+#
+# ->make
+#
+# Create a new complex number (cartesian form)
+#
+sub make {
+       my $self = bless {}, shift;
+       my ($re, $im) = @_;
+       $self->{cartesian} = [$re, $im];
+       $self->{c_dirty} = 0;
+       $self->{p_dirty} = 1;
+       return $self;
+}
+
+#
+# ->emake
+#
+# Create a new complex number (exponential form)
+#
+sub emake {
+       my $self = bless {}, shift;
+       my ($rho, $theta) = @_;
+       $theta += pi() if $rho < 0;
+       $self->{polar} = [abs($rho), $theta];
+       $self->{p_dirty} = 0;
+       $self->{c_dirty} = 1;
+       return $self;
+}
+
+sub new { &make }              # For backward compatibility only.
+
+#
+# cplx
+#
+# Creates a complex number from a (re, im) tuple.
+# This avoids the burden of writing Math::Complex->make(re, im).
+#
+sub cplx {
+       my ($re, $im) = @_;
+       return $package->make($re, $im);
+}
+
+#
+# cplxe
+#
+# Creates a complex number from a (rho, theta) tuple.
+# This avoids the burden of writing Math::Complex->emake(rho, theta).
+#
+sub cplxe {
+       my ($rho, $theta) = @_;
+       return $package->emake($rho, $theta);
+}
+
+#
+# pi
+#
+# The number defined as 2 * pi = 360 degrees
+#
+sub pi () {
+       $pi = 4 * atan2(1, 1) unless $pi;
+       return $pi;
+}
+
+#
+# i
+#
+# The number defined as i*i = -1;
+#
+sub i () {
+       $i = bless {} unless $i;                # There can be only one i
+       $i->{cartesian} = [0, 1];
+       $i->{polar} = [1, pi/2];
+       $i->{c_dirty} = 0;
+       $i->{p_dirty} = 0;
+       return $i;
+}
+
+#
+# Attribute access/set routines
+#
+
+sub cartesian {$_[0]->{c_dirty} ? $_[0]->update_cartesian : $_[0]->{cartesian}}
+sub polar     {$_[0]->{p_dirty} ? $_[0]->update_polar : $_[0]->{polar}}
+
+sub set_cartesian { $_[0]->{p_dirty}++; $_[0]->{cartesian} = $_[1] }
+sub set_polar     { $_[0]->{c_dirty}++; $_[0]->{polar} = $_[1] }
+
+#
+# ->update_cartesian
+#
+# Recompute and return the cartesian form, given accurate polar form.
+#
+sub update_cartesian {
+       my $self = shift;
+       my ($r, $t) = @{$self->{polar}};
+       $self->{c_dirty} = 0;
+       return $self->{cartesian} = [$r * cos $t, $r * sin $t];
+}
+
+#
+#
+# ->update_polar
+#
+# Recompute and return the polar form, given accurate cartesian form.
+#
+sub update_polar {
+       my $self = shift;
+       my ($x, $y) = @{$self->{cartesian}};
+       $self->{p_dirty} = 0;
+       return $self->{polar} = [0, 0] if $x == 0 && $y == 0;
+       return $self->{polar} = [sqrt($x*$x + $y*$y), atan2($y, $x)];
+}
+
+#
+# (plus)
+#
+# Computes z1+z2.
+#
+sub plus {
+       my ($z1, $z2, $regular) = @_;
+       my ($re1, $im1) = @{$z1->cartesian};
+       my ($re2, $im2) = ref $z2 ? @{$z2->cartesian} : ($z2);
+       unless (defined $regular) {
+               $z1->set_cartesian([$re1 + $re2, $im1 + $im2]);
+               return $z1;
+       }
+       return (ref $z1)->make($re1 + $re2, $im1 + $im2);
+}
+
+#
+# (minus)
+#
+# Computes z1-z2.
+#
+sub minus {
+       my ($z1, $z2, $inverted) = @_;
+       my ($re1, $im1) = @{$z1->cartesian};
+       my ($re2, $im2) = ref $z2 ? @{$z2->cartesian} : ($z2);
+       unless (defined $inverted) {
+               $z1->set_cartesian([$re1 - $re2, $im1 - $im2]);
+               return $z1;
+       }
+       return $inverted ?
+               (ref $z1)->make($re2 - $re1, $im2 - $im1) :
+               (ref $z1)->make($re1 - $re2, $im1 - $im2);
+}
+
+#
+# (multiply)
+#
+# Computes z1*z2.
+#
+sub multiply {
+       my ($z1, $z2, $regular) = @_;
+       my ($r1, $t1) = @{$z1->polar};
+       my ($r2, $t2) = ref $z2 ? @{$z2->polar} : (abs($z2), $z2 >= 0 ? 0 : pi);
+       unless (defined $regular) {
+               $z1->set_polar([$r1 * $r2, $t1 + $t2]);
+               return $z1;
+       }
+       return (ref $z1)->emake($r1 * $r2, $t1 + $t2);
+}
+
+#
+# (divide)
+#
+# Computes z1/z2.
+#
+sub divide {
+       my ($z1, $z2, $inverted) = @_;
+       my ($r1, $t1) = @{$z1->polar};
+       my ($r2, $t2) = ref $z2 ? @{$z2->polar} : (abs($z2), $z2 >= 0 ? 0 : pi);
+       unless (defined $inverted) {
+               $z1->set_polar([$r1 / $r2, $t1 - $t2]);
+               return $z1;
+       }
+       return $inverted ?
+               (ref $z1)->emake($r2 / $r1, $t2 - $t1) :
+               (ref $z1)->emake($r1 / $r2, $t1 - $t2);
+}
+
+#
+# (power)
+#
+# Computes z1**z2 = exp(z2 * log z1)).
+#
+sub power {
+       my ($z1, $z2, $inverted) = @_;
+       return exp($z1 * log $z2) if defined $inverted && $inverted;
+       return exp($z2 * log $z1);
+}
+
+#
+# (spaceship)
+#
+# Computes z1 <=> z2.
+# Sorts on the real part first, then on the imaginary part. Thus 2-4i > 3+8i.
+#
+sub spaceship {
+       my ($z1, $z2, $inverted) = @_;
+       my ($re1, $im1) = @{$z1->cartesian};
+       my ($re2, $im2) = ref $z2 ? @{$z2->cartesian} : ($z2);
+       my $sgn = $inverted ? -1 : 1;
+       return $sgn * ($re1 <=> $re2) if $re1 != $re2;
+       return $sgn * ($im1 <=> $im2);
+}
+
+#
+# (negate)
+#
+# Computes -z.
+#
+sub negate {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       if ($z->{c_dirty}) {
+               my ($r, $t) = @{$z->polar};
+               return (ref $z)->emake($r, pi + $t);
+       }
+       my ($re, $im) = @{$z->cartesian};
+       return (ref $z)->make(-$re, -$im);
+}
+
+#
+# (conjugate)
+#
+# Compute complex's conjugate.
+#
+sub conjugate {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       if ($z->{c_dirty}) {
+               my ($r, $t) = @{$z->polar};
+               return (ref $z)->emake($r, -$t);
+       }
+       my ($re, $im) = @{$z->cartesian};
+       return (ref $z)->make($re, -$im);
+}
+
+#
+# (abs)
+#
+# Compute complex's norm (rho).
+#
+sub abs {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       my ($r, $t) = @{$z->polar};
+       return abs($r);
+}
+
+#
+# arg
+#
+# Compute complex's argument (theta).
+#
+sub arg {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       return 0 unless ref $z;
+       my ($r, $t) = @{$z->polar};
+       return $t;
+}
+
+#
+# (sqrt)
+#
+# Compute sqrt(z) (positive only).
+#
+sub sqrt {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       my ($r, $t) = @{$z->polar};
+       return (ref $z)->emake(sqrt($r), $t/2);
+}
+
+#
+# cbrt
+#
+# Compute cbrt(z) (cubic root, primary only).
+#
+sub cbrt {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       return $z ** (1/3) unless ref $z;
+       my ($r, $t) = @{$z->polar};
+       return (ref $z)->emake($r**(1/3), $t/3);
+}
+
+#
+# root
+#
+# Computes all nth root for z, returning an array whose size is n.
+# `n' must be a positive integer.
+#
+# The roots are given by (for k = 0..n-1):
+#
+# z^(1/n) = r^(1/n) (cos ((t+2 k pi)/n) + i sin ((t+2 k pi)/n))
+#
+sub root {
+       my ($z, $n) = @_;
+       $n = int($n + 0.5);
+       return undef unless $n > 0;
+       my ($r, $t) = ref $z ? @{$z->polar} : (abs($z), $z >= 0 ? 0 : pi);
+       my @root;
+       my $k;
+       my $theta_inc = 2 * pi / $n;
+       my $rho = $r ** (1/$n);
+       my $theta;
+       my $complex = ref($z) || $package;
+       for ($k = 0, $theta = $t / $n; $k < $n; $k++, $theta += $theta_inc) {
+               push(@root, $complex->emake($rho, $theta));
        }
-        else {
-         $x = abs($zr);
-         $y = abs($zi);
-         if ($x >= $y) { 
-             $r = $y/$x; 
-             $w = sqrt(0.5 * $x * (1.0+sqrt(1.0+$r*$r))); 
-         }
-         else { 
-             $r = $x/$y; 
-             $w = sqrt(0.5 * ($x + $y*sqrt(1.0+$r*$r))); 
-         }
-         if ( $zr >= 0) { 
-             @$c = ($w, $zi/(2 * $w) ); 
-         }
-         else { 
-             $c->[1] = ($zi >= 0) ? $w : -$w;
-             $c->[0] = $zi/(2.0* $c->[1]); 
-         }
-        } 
-        return $c;
-      },
-
-    qw("" stringify)
-;
-
-sub new {
-    my $class = shift;
-    my @C = @_;
-    bless \@C, $class;
+       return @root;
 }
 
+#
+# Re
+#
+# Return Re(z).
+#
 sub Re {
-    my($x,$y) = @{$_[0]};
-    $x;
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       return $z unless ref $z;
+       my ($re, $im) = @{$z->cartesian};
+       return $re;
 }
 
+#
+# Im
+#
+# Return Im(z).
+#
 sub Im {
-    my($x,$y) = @{$_[0]};
-    $y;
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       return 0 unless ref $z;
+       my ($re, $im) = @{$z->cartesian};
+       return $im;
 }
 
-sub arg {
-    my($x,$y) = @{$_[0]};
-    atan2($y,$x);
+#
+# (exp)
+#
+# Computes exp(z).
+#
+sub exp {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       my ($x, $y) = @{$z->cartesian};
+       return (ref $z)->emake(exp($x), $y);
+}
+
+#
+# (log)
+#
+# Compute log(z).
+#
+sub log {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       my ($r, $t) = @{$z->polar};
+       return (ref $z)->make(log($r), $t);
+}
+
+#
+# log10
+#
+# Compute log10(z).
+#
+sub log10 {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       $log10 = log(10) unless defined $log10;
+       return log($z) / $log10 unless ref $z;
+       my ($r, $t) = @{$z->polar};
+       return (ref $z)->make(log($r) / $log10, $t / $log10);
+}
+
+#
+# logn
+#
+# Compute logn(z,n) = log(z) / log(n)
+#
+sub logn {
+       my ($z, $n) = @_;
+       my $logn = $logn{$n};
+       $logn = $logn{$n} = log($n) unless defined $logn;       # Cache log(n)
+       return log($z) / log($n);
+}
+
+#
+# (cos)
+#
+# Compute cos(z) = (exp(iz) + exp(-iz))/2.
+#
+sub cos {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       my ($x, $y) = @{$z->cartesian};
+       my $ey = exp($y);
+       my $ey_1 = 1 / $ey;
+       return (ref $z)->make(cos($x) * ($ey + $ey_1)/2, sin($x) * ($ey_1 - $ey)/2);
+}
+
+#
+# (sin)
+#
+# Compute sin(z) = (exp(iz) - exp(-iz))/2.
+#
+sub sin {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       my ($x, $y) = @{$z->cartesian};
+       my $ey = exp($y);
+       my $ey_1 = 1 / $ey;
+       return (ref $z)->make(sin($x) * ($ey + $ey_1)/2, cos($x) * ($ey - $ey_1)/2);
+}
+
+#
+# tan
+#
+# Compute tan(z) = sin(z) / cos(z).
+#
+sub tan {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       return sin($z) / cos($z);
+}
+
+#
+# cotan
+#
+# Computes cotan(z) = 1 / tan(z).
+#
+sub cotan {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       return cos($z) / sin($z);
+}
+
+#
+# acos
+#
+# Computes the arc cosine acos(z) = -i log(z + sqrt(z*z-1)).
+#
+sub acos {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       my $cz = $z*$z - 1;
+       $cz = cplx($cz, 0) if !ref $cz && $cz < 0;      # Force complex if <0
+       return ~i * log($z + sqrt $cz);                         # ~i is -i
+}
+
+#
+# asin
+#
+# Computes the arc sine asin(z) = -i log(iz + sqrt(1-z*z)).
+#
+sub asin {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       my $cz = 1 - $z*$z;
+       $cz = cplx($cz, 0) if !ref $cz && $cz < 0;      # Force complex if <0
+       return ~i * log(i * $z + sqrt $cz);                     # ~i is -i
+}
+
+#
+# atan
+#
+# Computes the arc tagent atan(z) = i/2 log((i+z) / (i-z)).
+#
+sub atan {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       return i/2 * log((i + $z) / (i - $z));
 }
 
+#
+# acotan
+#
+# Computes the arc cotangent acotan(z) = -i/2 log((i+z) / (z-i))
+#
+sub acotan {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       return i/-2 * log((i + $z) / ($z - i));
+}
+
+#
+# cosh
+#
+# Computes the hyperbolic cosine cosh(z) = (exp(z) + exp(-z))/2.
+#
+sub cosh {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       my ($x, $y) = ref $z ? @{$z->cartesian} : ($z);
+       my $ex = exp($x);
+       my $ex_1 = 1 / $ex;
+       return ($ex + $ex_1)/2 unless ref $z;
+       return (ref $z)->make(cos($y) * ($ex + $ex_1)/2, sin($y) * ($ex - $ex_1)/2);
+}
+
+#
+# sinh
+#
+# Computes the hyperbolic sine sinh(z) = (exp(z) - exp(-z))/2.
+#
+sub sinh {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       my ($x, $y) = ref $z ? @{$z->cartesian} : ($z);
+       my $ex = exp($x);
+       my $ex_1 = 1 / $ex;
+       return ($ex - $ex_1)/2 unless ref $z;
+       return (ref $z)->make(cos($y) * ($ex - $ex_1)/2, sin($y) * ($ex + $ex_1)/2);
+}
+
+#
+# tanh
+#
+# Computes the hyperbolic tangent tanh(z) = sinh(z) / cosh(z).
+#
+sub tanh {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       return sinh($z) / cosh($z);
+}
+
+#
+# cotanh
+#
+# Comptutes the hyperbolic cotangent cotanh(z) = cosh(z) / sinh(z).
+#
+sub cotanh {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       return cosh($z) / sinh($z);
+}
+
+#
+# acosh
+#
+# Computes the arc hyperbolic cosine acosh(z) = log(z + sqrt(z*z-1)).
+#
+sub acosh {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       my $cz = $z*$z - 1;
+       $cz = cplx($cz, 0) if !ref $cz && $cz < 0;      # Force complex if <0
+       return log($z + sqrt $cz);
+}
+
+#
+# asinh
+#
+# Computes the arc hyperbolic sine asinh(z) = log(z + sqrt(z*z-1))
+#
+sub asinh {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       my $cz = $z*$z + 1;                                                     # Already complex if <0
+       return log($z + sqrt $cz);
+}
+
+#
+# atanh
+#
+# Computes the arc hyperbolic tangent atanh(z) = 1/2 log((1+z) / (1-z)).
+#
+sub atanh {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       my $cz = (1 + $z) / (1 - $z);
+       $cz = cplx($cz, 0) if !ref $cz && $cz < 0;      # Force complex if <0
+       return log($cz) / 2;
+}
+
+#
+# acotanh
+#
+# Computes the arc hyperbolic cotangent acotanh(z) = 1/2 log((1+z) / (z-1)).
+#
+sub acotanh {
+       my ($z) = @_;
+       my $cz = (1 + $z) / ($z - 1);
+       $cz = cplx($cz, 0) if !ref $cz && $cz < 0;      # Force complex if <0
+       return log($cz) / 2;
+}
+
+#
+# (atan2)
+#
+# Compute atan(z1/z2).
+#
+sub atan2 {
+       my ($z1, $z2, $inverted) = @_;
+       my ($re1, $im1) = @{$z1->cartesian};
+       my ($re2, $im2) = ref $z2 ? @{$z2->cartesian} : ($z2);
+       my $tan;
+       if (defined $inverted && $inverted) {   # atan(z2/z1)
+               return pi * ($re2 > 0 ? 1 : -1) if $re1 == 0 && $im1 == 0;
+               $tan = $z2 / $z1;
+       } else {
+               return pi * ($re1 > 0 ? 1 : -1) if $re2 == 0 && $im2 == 0;
+               $tan = $z1 / $z2;
+       }
+       return atan($tan);
+}
+
+#
+# display_format
+# ->display_format
+#
+# Set (fetch if no argument) display format for all complex numbers that
+# don't happen to have overrriden it via ->display_format
+#
+# When called as a method, this actually sets the display format for
+# the current object.
+#
+# Valid object formats are 'c' and 'p' for cartesian and polar. The first
+# letter is used actually, so the type can be fully spelled out for clarity.
+#
+sub display_format {
+       my $self = shift;
+       my $format = undef;
+
+       if (ref $self) {                        # Called as a method
+               $format = shift;
+       } else {                                        # Regular procedure call
+               $format = $self;
+               undef $self;
+       }
+
+       if (defined $self) {
+               return defined $self->{display} ? $self->{display} : $display
+                       unless defined $format;
+               return $self->{display} = $format;
+       }
+
+       return $display unless defined $format;
+       return $display = $format;
+}
+
+#
+# (stringify)
+#
+# Show nicely formatted complex number under its cartesian or polar form,
+# depending on the current display format:
+#
+# . If a specific display format has been recorded for this object, use it.
+# . Otherwise, use the generic current default for all complex numbers,
+#   which is a package global variable.
+#
 sub stringify {
-    my($x,$y) = @{$_[0]};
-    my($re,$im);
+       my ($z) = shift;
+       my $format;
+
+       $format = $display;
+       $format = $z->{display} if defined $z->{display};
+
+       return $z->stringify_polar if $format =~ /^p/i;
+       return $z->stringify_cartesian;
+}
+
+#
+# ->stringify_cartesian
+#
+# Stringify as a cartesian representation 'a+bi'.
+#
+sub stringify_cartesian {
+       my $z  = shift;
+       my ($x, $y) = @{$z->cartesian};
+       my ($re, $im);
+
+       $re = "$x" if abs($x) >= 1e-14;
+       if ($y == 1)                            { $im = 'i' }
+       elsif ($y == -1)                        { $im = '-i' }
+       elsif (abs($y) >= 1e-14)        { $im = "${y}i" }
+
+       my $str;
+       $str = $re if defined $re;
+       $str .= "+$im" if defined $im;
+       $str =~ s/\+-/-/;
+       $str =~ s/^\+//;
+       $str = '0' unless $str;
+
+       return $str;
+}
+
+#
+# ->stringify_polar
+#
+# Stringify as a polar representation '[r,t]'.
+#
+sub stringify_polar {
+       my $z  = shift;
+       my ($r, $t) = @{$z->polar};
+       my $theta;
+
+       return '[0,0]' if $r <= 1e-14;
 
-    $re = $x if ($x);
-    if ($y == 1) {$im = 'i';}  
-    elsif ($y == -1){$im = '-i';} 
-    elsif ($y) {$im = $y . 'i'; }
+       my $tpi = 2 * pi;
+       my $nt = $t / $tpi;
+       $nt = ($nt - int($nt)) * $tpi;
+       $nt += $tpi if $nt < 0;                 # Range [0, 2pi]
 
-    local $_ = $re.'+'.$im;
-    s/\+-/-/;
-    s/^\+//;
-    s/[\+-]$//;
-    $_ = 0 if ($_ eq '');
-    return $_;
+       if (abs($nt) <= 1e-14)                  { $theta = 0 }
+       elsif (abs(pi-$nt) <= 1e-14)    { $theta = 'pi' }
+
+       return "\[$r,$theta\]" if defined $theta;
+
+       #
+       # Okay, number is not a real. Try to identify pi/n and friends...
+       #
+
+       $nt -= $tpi if $nt > pi;
+       my ($n, $k, $kpi);
+       
+       for ($k = 1, $kpi = pi; $k < 10; $k++, $kpi += pi) {
+               $n = int($kpi / $nt + ($nt > 0 ? 1 : -1) * 0.5);
+               if (abs($kpi/$n - $nt) <= 1e-14) {
+                       $theta = ($nt < 0 ? '-':'').($k == 1 ? 'pi':"${k}pi").'/'.abs($n);
+                       last;
+               }
+       }
+
+       $theta = $nt unless defined $theta;
+
+       return "\[$r,$theta\]";
 }
 
 1;
@@ -125,39 +761,333 @@ __END__
 
 =head1 NAME
 
-Math::Complex - complex numbers package
+Math::Complex - complex numbers and associated mathematical functions
 
 =head1 SYNOPSIS
 
-  use Math::Complex;
-  $i = new Math::Complex;
+       use Math::Complex;
+       $z = Math::Complex->make(5, 6);
+       $t = 4 - 3*i + $z;
+       $j = cplxe(1, 2*pi/3);
 
 =head1 DESCRIPTION
 
-Complex numbers declared as
+This package lets you create and manipulate complex numbers. By default,
+I<Perl> limits itself to real numbers, but an extra C<use> statement brings
+full complex support, along with a full set of mathematical functions
+typically associated with and/or extended to complex numbers.
+
+If you wonder what complex numbers are, they were invented to be able to solve
+the following equation:
+
+       x*x = -1
+
+and by definition, the solution is noted I<i> (engineers use I<j> instead since
+I<i> usually denotes an intensity, but the name does not matter). The number
+I<i> is a pure I<imaginary> number.
+
+The arithmetics with pure imaginary numbers works just like you would expect
+it with real numbers... you just have to remember that
+
+       i*i = -1
+
+so you have:
+
+       5i + 7i = i * (5 + 7) = 12i
+       4i - 3i = i * (4 - 3) = i
+       4i * 2i = -8
+       6i / 2i = 3
+       1 / i = -i
+
+Complex numbers are numbers that have both a real part and an imaginary
+part, and are usually noted:
+
+       a + bi
+
+where C<a> is the I<real> part and C<b> is the I<imaginary> part. The
+arithmetic with complex numbers is straightforward. You have to
+keep track of the real and the imaginary parts, but otherwise the
+rules used for real numbers just apply:
+
+       (4 + 3i) + (5 - 2i) = (4 + 5) + i(3 - 2) = 9 + i
+       (2 + i) * (4 - i) = 2*4 + 4i -2i -i*i = 8 + 2i + 1 = 9 + 2i
+
+A graphical representation of complex numbers is possible in a plane
+(also called the I<complex plane>, but it's really a 2D plane).
+The number
+
+       z = a + bi
+
+is the point whose coordinates are (a, b). Actually, it would
+be the vector originating from (0, 0) to (a, b). It follows that the addition
+of two complex numbers is a vectorial addition.
+
+Since there is a bijection between a point in the 2D plane and a complex
+number (i.e. the mapping is unique and reciprocal), a complex number
+can also be uniquely identified with polar coordinates:
+
+       [rho, theta]
+
+where C<rho> is the distance to the origin, and C<theta> the angle between
+the vector and the I<x> axis. There is a notation for this using the
+exponential form, which is:
+
+       rho * exp(i * theta)
+
+where I<i> is the famous imaginary number introduced above. Conversion
+between this form and the cartesian form C<a + bi> is immediate:
+
+       a = rho * cos(theta)
+       b = rho * sin(theta)
+
+which is also expressed by this formula:
+
+       z = rho * exp(i * theta) = rho * (cos theta + i * sin theta) 
+
+In other words, it's the projection of the vector onto the I<x> and I<y>
+axes. Mathematicians call I<rho> the I<norm> or I<modulus> and I<theta>
+the I<argument> of the complex number. The I<norm> of C<z> will be
+noted C<abs(z)>.
+
+The polar notation (also known as the trigonometric
+representation) is much more handy for performing multiplications and
+divisions of complex numbers, whilst the cartesian notation is better
+suited for additions and substractions. Real numbers are on the I<x>
+axis, and therefore I<theta> is zero.
+
+All the common operations that can be performed on a real number have
+been defined to work on complex numbers as well, and are merely
+I<extensions> of the operations defined on real numbers. This means
+they keep their natural meaning when there is no imaginary part, provided
+the number is within their definition set.
+
+For instance, the C<sqrt> routine which computes the square root of
+its argument is only defined for positive real numbers and yields a
+positive real number (it is an application from B<R+> to B<R+>).
+If we allow it to return a complex number, then it can be extended to
+negative real numbers to become an application from B<R> to B<C> (the
+set of complex numbers):
+
+       sqrt(x) = x >= 0 ? sqrt(x) : sqrt(-x)*i
+
+It can also be extended to be an application from B<C> to B<C>,
+whilst its restriction to B<R> behaves as defined above by using
+the following definition:
+
+       sqrt(z = [r,t]) = sqrt(r) * exp(i * t/2)
+
+Indeed, a negative real number can be noted C<[x,pi]>
+(the modulus I<x> is always positive, so C<[x,pi]> is really C<-x>, a
+negative number)
+and the above definition states that
+
+       sqrt([x,pi]) = sqrt(x) * exp(i*pi/2) = [sqrt(x),pi/2] = sqrt(x)*i
+
+which is exactly what we had defined for negative real numbers above.
 
-    $i = Math::Complex->new(1,1);
+All the common mathematical functions defined on real numbers that
+are extended to complex numbers share that same property of working
+I<as usual> when the imaginary part is zero (otherwise, it would not
+be called an extension, would it?).
 
-can be manipulated with overloaded math operators. The operators
+A I<new> operation possible on a complex number that is
+the identity for real numbers is called the I<conjugate>, and is noted
+with an horizontal bar above the number, or C<~z> here.
 
-  + - * / neg ~ abs cos sin exp sqrt
+        z = a + bi
+       ~z = a - bi
 
-are supported as well as
+Simple... Now look:
 
-  "" (stringify)
+       z * ~z = (a + bi) * (a - bi) = a*a + b*b
 
-The methods
+We saw that the norm of C<z> was noted C<abs(z)> and was defined as the
+distance to the origin, also known as:
 
-  Re Im arg
+       rho = abs(z) = sqrt(a*a + b*b)
 
-are also provided.
+so
+
+       z * ~z = abs(z) ** 2
+
+If z is a pure real number (i.e. C<b == 0>), then the above yields:
+
+       a * a = abs(a) ** 2
+
+which is true (C<abs> has the regular meaning for real number, i.e. stands
+for the absolute value). This example explains why the norm of C<z> is
+noted C<abs(z)>: it extends the C<abs> function to complex numbers, yet
+is the regular C<abs> we know when the complex number actually has no
+imaginary part... This justifies I<a posteriori> our use of the C<abs>
+notation for the norm.
+
+=head1 OPERATIONS
+
+Given the following notations:
+
+       z1 = a + bi = r1 * exp(i * t1)
+       z2 = c + di = r2 * exp(i * t2)
+       z = <any complex or real number>
+
+the following (overloaded) operations are supported on complex numbers:
+
+       z1 + z2 = (a + c) + i(b + d)
+       z1 - z2 = (a - c) + i(b - d)
+       z1 * z2 = (r1 * r2) * exp(i * (t1 + t2))
+       z1 / z2 = (r1 / r2) * exp(i * (t1 - t2))
+       z1 ** z2 = exp(z2 * log z1)
+       ~z1 = a - bi
+       abs(z1) = r1 = sqrt(a*a + b*b)
+       sqrt(z1) = sqrt(r1) * exp(i * t1/2)
+       exp(z1) = exp(a) * exp(i * b)
+       log(z1) = log(r1) + i*t1
+       sin(z1) = 1/2i (exp(i * z1) - exp(-i * z1))
+       cos(z1) = 1/2 (exp(i * z1) + exp(-i * z1))
+       abs(z1) = r1
+       atan2(z1, z2) = atan(z1/z2)
+
+The following extra operations are supported on both real and complex
+numbers:
+
+       Re(z) = a
+       Im(z) = b
+       arg(z) = t
+
+       cbrt(z) = z ** (1/3)
+       log10(z) = log(z) / log(10)
+       logn(z, n) = log(z) / log(n)
+
+       tan(z) = sin(z) / cos(z)
+       cotan(z) = 1 / tan(z)
+
+       asin(z) = -i * log(i*z + sqrt(1-z*z))
+       acos(z) = -i * log(z + sqrt(z*z-1))
+       atan(z) = i/2 * log((i+z) / (i-z))
+       acotan(z) = -i/2 * log((i+z) / (z-i))
+
+       sinh(z) = 1/2 (exp(z) - exp(-z))
+       cosh(z) = 1/2 (exp(z) + exp(-z))
+       tanh(z) = sinh(z) / cosh(z)
+       cotanh(z) = 1 / tanh(z)
+       
+       asinh(z) = log(z + sqrt(z*z+1))
+       acosh(z) = log(z + sqrt(z*z-1))
+       atanh(z) = 1/2 * log((1+z) / (1-z))
+       acotanh(z) = 1/2 * log((1+z) / (z-1))
+
+The I<root> function is available to compute all the I<n>th
+roots of some complex, where I<n> is a strictly positive integer.
+There are exactly I<n> such roots, returned as a list. Getting the
+number mathematicians call C<j> such that:
+
+       1 + j + j*j = 0;
+
+is a simple matter of writing:
+
+       $j = ((root(1, 3))[1];
+
+The I<k>th root for C<z = [r,t]> is given by:
+
+       (root(z, n))[k] = r**(1/n) * exp(i * (t + 2*k*pi)/n)
+
+The I<spaceshift> operation is also defined. In order to ensure its
+restriction to real numbers is conform to what you would expect, the
+comparison is run on the real part of the complex number first,
+and imaginary parts are compared only when the real parts match. 
+
+=head1 CREATION
+
+To create a complex number, use either:
+
+       $z = Math::Complex->make(3, 4);
+       $z = cplx(3, 4);
+
+if you know the cartesian form of the number, or
+
+       $z = 3 + 4*i;
+
+if you like. To create a number using the trigonometric form, use either:
+
+       $z = Math::Complex->emake(5, pi/3);
+       $x = cplxe(5, pi/3);
+
+instead. The first argument is the modulus, the second is the angle (in radians).
+(Mnmemonic: C<e> is used as a notation for complex numbers in the trigonometric
+form).
+
+It is possible to write:
+
+       $x = cplxe(-3, pi/4);
+
+but that will be silently converted into C<[3,-3pi/4]>, since the modulus
+must be positive (it represents the distance to the origin in the complex
+plane).
+
+=head1 STRINGIFICATION
+
+When printed, a complex number is usually shown under its cartesian
+form I<a+bi>, but there are legitimate cases where the polar format
+I<[r,t]> is more appropriate.
+
+By calling the routine C<Math::Complex::display_format> and supplying either
+C<"polar"> or C<"cartesian">, you override the default display format,
+which is C<"cartesian">. Not supplying any argument returns the current
+setting.
+
+This default can be overridden on a per-number basis by calling the
+C<display_format> method instead. As before, not supplying any argument
+returns the current display format for this number. Otherwise whatever you
+specify will be the new display format for I<this> particular number.
+
+For instance:
+
+       use Math::Complex;
+
+       Math::Complex::display_format('polar');
+       $j = ((root(1, 3))[1];
+       print "j = $j\n";               # Prints "j = [1,2pi/3]
+       $j->display_format('cartesian');
+       print "j = $j\n";               # Prints "j = -0.5+0.866025403784439i"
+
+The polar format attempts to emphasize arguments like I<k*pi/n>
+(where I<n> is a positive integer and I<k> an integer within [-9,+9]).
+
+=head1 USAGE
+
+Thanks to overloading, the handling of arithmetics with complex numbers
+is simple and almost transparent.
+
+Here are some examples:
+
+       use Math::Complex;
+
+       $j = cplxe(1, 2*pi/3);  # $j ** 3 == 1
+       print "j = $j, j**3 = ", $j ** 3, "\n";
+       print "1 + j + j**2 = ", 1 + $j + $j**2, "\n";
+
+       $z = -16 + 0*i;                 # Force it to be a complex
+       print "sqrt($z) = ", sqrt($z), "\n";
+
+       $k = exp(i * 2*pi/3);
+       print "$j - $k = ", $j - $k, "\n";
 
 =head1 BUGS
 
-sqrt() should return two roots, but only returns one.
+Saying C<use Math::Complex;> exports many mathematical routines in the caller
+environment.  This is construed as a feature by the Author, actually... ;-)
+
+The code is not optimized for speed, although we try to use the cartesian
+form for addition-like operators and the trigonometric form for all
+multiplication-like operators.
+
+The arg() routine does not ensure the angle is within the range [-pi,+pi]
+(a side effect caused by multiplication and division using the trigonometric
+representation).
 
-=head1 AUTHORS
+All routines expect to be given real or complex numbers. Don't attempt to
+use BigFloat, since Perl has currently no rule to disambiguate a '+'
+operation (for instance) between two overloaded entities.
 
-Dave Nadler, Tom Christiansen, Tim Bunce, Larry Wall.
+=head1 AUTHOR
 
-=cut
+Raphael Manfredi <F<Raphael_Manfredi@grenoble.hp.com>>