Re: AW: [PATCH pod/*] Use Direct Object Constructor Calls
authorchromatic <chromatic@wgz.org>
Fri, 1 Sep 2006 09:12:45 +0000 (02:12 -0700)
committerRafael Garcia-Suarez <rgarciasuarez@gmail.com>
Mon, 4 Sep 2006 12:41:39 +0000 (12:41 +0000)
Message-Id: <200609010912.46314.chromatic@wgz.org>

p4raw-id: //depot/perl@28778

pod/perllexwarn.pod
pod/perlmodlib.PL
pod/perlop.pod
pod/perlothrtut.pod
pod/perlref.pod
pod/perltie.pod

index 20f1875..93ec769 100644 (file)
@@ -503,9 +503,9 @@ C<Derived>.
     use Original;
     use Derived;
     use warnings 'Derived';
-    my $a = new Original;
+    my $a = Original->new();
     $a->doit(1);
-    my $b = new Derived;
+    my $b = Derived->new();
     $a->doit(1);
 
 When this code is run only the C<Derived> object, C<$b>, will generate
index 969dde9..a574543 100644 (file)
@@ -1070,8 +1070,8 @@ the module after __END__ either using AutoSplit or by saying:
 Does your module pass the 'empty subclass' test? If you say
 C<@SUBCLASS::ISA = qw(YOURCLASS);> your applications should be able
 to use SUBCLASS in exactly the same way as YOURCLASS.  For example,
-does your application still work if you change:  C<$obj = new YOURCLASS;>
-into: C<$obj = new SUBCLASS;> ?
+does your application still work if you change:  C<< $obj = YOURCLASS->new(); >>
+into: C<< $obj = SUBCLASS->new(); >> ?
 
 Avoid keeping any state information in your packages. It makes it
 difficult for multiple other packages to use yours. Keep state
index f69b8bb..3a8de2a 100644 (file)
@@ -1217,7 +1217,7 @@ doing different actions depending on which regexp matched.  Each
 regexp tries to match where the previous one leaves off.
 
  $_ = <<'EOL';
-      $url = new URI::URL "http://www/";   die if $url eq "xXx";
+      $url = URI::URL->new( "http://www/" );   die if $url eq "xXx";
  EOL
  LOOP:
     {
index 322ff8e..a481e9f 100644 (file)
@@ -260,7 +260,7 @@ The simplest, straightforward way to create a thread is with new():
 
     use Thread; 
 
-    $thr = new Thread \&sub1;
+    $thr = Thread->new( \&sub1 );
 
     sub sub1 { 
         print "In the thread\n"; 
@@ -276,9 +276,9 @@ part of the C<Thread::new> call, like this:
 
     use Thread; 
     $Param3 = "foo"; 
-    $thr = new Thread \&sub1, "Param 1", "Param 2", $Param3; 
-    $thr = new Thread \&sub1, @ParamList; 
-    $thr = new Thread \&sub1, qw(Param1 Param2 $Param3);
+    $thr = Thread->new( \&sub1, "Param 1", "Param 2", $Param3 );
+    $thr = Thread->new( \&sub1, @ParamList );
+    $thr = Thread->new( \&sub1, qw(Param1 Param2 $Param3) );
 
     sub sub1 { 
         my @InboundParameters = @_; 
@@ -358,7 +358,7 @@ for a thread to exit and extract any scalars it might return, you can
 use the join() method.
 
     use Thread; 
-    $thr = new Thread \&sub1;
+    $thr = Thread->new( \&sub1 );
 
     @ReturnData = $thr->join; 
     print "Thread returned @ReturnData"; 
@@ -409,7 +409,7 @@ it'll run until it's finished, then Perl will clean up after it
 automatically.
 
     use Thread; 
-    $thr = new Thread \&sub1; # Spawn the thread
+    $thr = Thread->new( \&sub1 ); # Spawn the thread
 
     $thr->detach; # Now we officially don't care any more
 
@@ -595,7 +595,7 @@ this:
     use Thread qw(async); 
     use Thread::Queue;
 
-    my $DataQueue = new Thread::Queue; 
+    my $DataQueue = Thread::Queue->new();
     $thr = async { 
         while ($DataElement = $DataQueue->dequeue) { 
             print "Popped $DataElement off the queue\n";
@@ -644,12 +644,12 @@ gives a quick demonstration:
 
     use Thread qw(yield); 
     use Thread::Semaphore; 
-    my $semaphore = new Thread::Semaphore; 
+    my $semaphore = Thread::Semaphore->new();
     $GlobalVariable = 0;
 
-    $thr1 = new Thread \&sample_sub, 1; 
-    $thr2 = new Thread \&sample_sub, 2; 
-    $thr3 = new Thread \&sample_sub, 3;
+    $thr1 = Thread->new( \&sample_sub, 1 );
+    $thr2 = Thread->new( \&sample_sub, 2 );
+    $thr3 = Thread->new( \&sample_sub, 3 );
 
     sub sample_sub { 
         my $SubNumber = shift @_; 
@@ -777,7 +777,7 @@ method attribute indicates whether the subroutine is really a method.
 
     sub tester { 
         my $thrnum = shift @_; 
-        my $bar = new Foo; 
+        my $bar = Foo->new();
         foreach (1..10) {      
             print "$thrnum calling per_object\n"; 
             $bar->per_object($thrnum);         
@@ -914,8 +914,8 @@ things we've covered.  This program finds prime numbers using threads.
     6  use Thread;
     7  use Thread::Queue;
     8
-    9  my $stream = new Thread::Queue;
-    10 my $kid    = new Thread(\&check_num, $stream, 2);
+    9  my $stream = Thread::Queue->new();
+    10 my $kid    = Thread->new(\&check_num, $stream, 2);
     11
     12 for my $i ( 3 .. 1000 ) {
     13     $stream->enqueue($i);
@@ -927,14 +927,14 @@ things we've covered.  This program finds prime numbers using threads.
     19 sub check_num {
     20     my ($upstream, $cur_prime) = @_;
     21     my $kid;
-    22     my $downstream = new Thread::Queue;
+    22     my $downstream = Thread::Queue->new();
     23     while (my $num = $upstream->dequeue) {
     24         next unless $num % $cur_prime;
     25         if ($kid) {
     26            $downstream->enqueue($num);
     27                 } else {
     28            print "Found prime $num\n";
-    29               $kid = new Thread(\&check_num, $downstream, $num);
+    29               $kid = Thread->new(\&check_num, $downstream, $num);
     30         }
     31     } 
     32     $downstream->enqueue(undef) if $kid;
index 21f15d4..afc1671 100644 (file)
@@ -210,17 +210,18 @@ that most Perl programmers need trouble themselves about to begin with.
 =item 5.
 X<constructor> X<new>
 
-References are often returned by special subroutines called constructors.
-Perl objects are just references to a special type of object that happens to know
-which package it's associated with.  Constructors are just special
-subroutines that know how to create that association.  They do so by
-starting with an ordinary reference, and it remains an ordinary reference
-even while it's also being an object.  Constructors are often
-named new() and called indirectly:
-
-    $objref = new Doggie (Tail => 'short', Ears => 'long');
-
-But don't have to be:
+References are often returned by special subroutines called constructors.  Perl
+objects are just references to a special type of object that happens to know
+which package it's associated with.  Constructors are just special subroutines
+that know how to create that association.  They do so by starting with an
+ordinary reference, and it remains an ordinary reference even while it's also
+being an object.  Constructors are often named C<new()>.  You I<can> call them
+indirectly:
+
+    $objref = new Doggie( Tail => 'short', Ears => 'long' );
+
+But that can produce ambiguous syntax in certain cases, so it's often
+better to use the direct method invocation approach:
 
     $objref   = Doggie->new(Tail => 'short', Ears => 'long');
 
index b4c2baf..9ee5b2c 100644 (file)
@@ -1010,7 +1010,7 @@ a scalar.
     sub TIESCALAR {
         my $class = shift;
         my $filename = shift;
-        my $handle = new IO::File "> $filename"
+        my $handle = IO::File->new( "> $filename" )
                          or die "Cannot open $filename: $!\n";
 
         print $handle "The Start\n";