Fixed verbatim lines in POD over 79 characters
authorBrian Gottreu <gottreu@gmail.com>
Sun, 16 Jun 2013 18:37:33 +0000 (13:37 -0500)
committerFather Chrysostomos <sprout@cpan.org>
Sun, 23 Jun 2013 05:11:44 +0000 (22:11 -0700)
56 files changed:
Porting/how_to_write_a_perldelta.pod
Porting/pumpkin.pod
dist/Cwd/lib/File/Spec/VMS.pm
dist/Cwd/lib/File/Spec/Win32.pm
dist/ExtUtils-ParseXS/lib/perlxs.pod
dist/Module-CoreList/corelist
dist/Safe/Safe.pm
ext/B/B/Concise.pm
ext/Devel-Peek/Peek.pm
ext/Hash-Util-FieldHash/lib/Hash/Util/FieldHash.pm
ext/I18N-Langinfo/Langinfo.pm
ext/VMS-DCLsym/DCLsym.pm
ext/VMS-Stdio/Stdio.pm
ext/XS-APItest/APItest.pm
installhtml
lib/Benchmark.pm
lib/Class/Struct.pm
lib/DB.pm
lib/DBM_Filter.pm
lib/DBM_Filter/compress.pm
lib/DBM_Filter/encode.pm
lib/DBM_Filter/int32.pm
lib/DBM_Filter/null.pm
lib/DBM_Filter/utf8.pm
lib/English.pm
lib/ExtUtils/XSSymSet.pm
lib/File/Basename.pm
lib/Getopt/Std.pm
lib/PerlIO.pm
lib/Tie/Array.pm
lib/Tie/Hash.pm
lib/Tie/Scalar.pm
lib/deprecate.pm
lib/integer.pm
lib/perl5db.pl
lib/strict.pm
lib/version.pod
lib/version/Internals.pod
lib/vmsish.pm
pod/perldbmfilter.pod
pod/perldiag.pod
pod/perlfunc.pod
pod/perlhack.pod
pod/perlhist.pod
pod/perlmod.pod
pod/perlmodstyle.pod
pod/perlpacktut.pod
pod/perlpodspec.pod
pod/perlpodstyle.pod
pod/perlref.pod
pod/perlrequick.pod
pod/perlretut.pod
pod/perlsub.pod
pod/perlthrtut.pod
pod/perlvms.pod
symbian/PerlUtil.pod

index c9b5ea6..a7bfc4a 100644 (file)
@@ -86,13 +86,13 @@ Follows this formula:
 
 For a release on a stable branch, follows this formula:
 
-    This document describes differences between the 5.10.3 release and
-    the 5.10.4 release.
+    This document describes differences between the 5.10.3 release
+    and the 5.10.4 release.
 
 For the start of a new stable branch, follows this formula:
 
-    This document describes differences between the 5.12.0 release and
-    the 5.10.0 release.
+    This document describes differences between the 5.12.0 release
+    and the 5.10.0 release.
 
 Clearly this sets the scope of which changes are to be summarised in the rest
 of the document.
@@ -106,8 +106,8 @@ notice.
 
 For a release on a stable branch, this section aspires to be
 
-    There are no changes intentionally incompatible with 5.10.3. If any exist,
-    they are bugs and reports are welcome.
+    There are no changes intentionally incompatible with 5.10.3.
+    If any exist, they are bugs and reports are welcome.
 
 =item Core Enhancements
 
index 8afc720..89c5a46 100644 (file)
@@ -659,8 +659,8 @@ must be compiled in a specific way for optimal testing with Purify.
 
 Use the following commands to test perl with Purify:
 
-       sh Configure -des -Doptimize=-g -Uusemymalloc -Dusemultiplicity \
-           -Accflags=-DPURIFY
+       sh Configure -des -Doptimize=-g -Uusemymalloc \
+            -Dusemultiplicity -Accflags=-DPURIFY
        setenv PURIFYOPTIONS "-chain-length=25"
        make all pureperl
        cd t
@@ -680,8 +680,8 @@ a windowing environment or if you simply want the Purify output to
 unobtrusively go to a log file instead of to the interactive window,
 use the following options instead:
 
-       setenv PURIFYOPTIONS "-chain-length=25 -windows=no -log-file=perl.log \
-           -append-logfile=yes"
+       setenv PURIFYOPTIONS "-chain-length=25 -windows=no \
+            -log-file=perl.log -append-logfile=yes"
 
 The only currently known leaks happen when there are compile-time errors
 within eval or require.  (Fixing these is non-trivial, unfortunately, but
@@ -859,18 +859,18 @@ The "fix" is to give the function a different name.  The one
 implemented in 5.003_05 isn't optimal, but here's what was done:
 
     #ifdef HAS_CHSIZE
-    # ifdef my_chsize  /* Probably #defined to Perl_my_chsize in embed.h */
-    #   undef my_chsize
+    # ifdef my_chsize      /* Probably #defined to Perl_my_chsize */
+    #   undef my_chsize    /* in embed.h */
     # endif
     # define my_chsize chsize
     #endif
 
 My explanatory comment in patch 5.003_05 said:
 
-     Undef and then re-define my_chsize from Perl_my_chsize to
-     just plain chsize if this system HAS_CHSIZE.  This probably only
-     applies to SCO.  This shows the perils of having internal
-     functions with the same name as external library functions :-).
+    Undef and then re-define my_chsize from Perl_my_chsize to
+    just plain chsize if this system HAS_CHSIZE.  This probably only
+    applies to SCO.  This shows the perils of having internal
+    functions with the same name as external library functions :-).
 
 Now, we can safely put C<my_chsize> in C<embed.fnc>, export it, and
 hide it with F<embed.h>.
@@ -1053,16 +1053,17 @@ documented in config_h.SH).  Here's what APPLLIB_EXP is for, from
 a mail message from Larry:
 
     The main intent of APPLLIB_EXP is for folks who want to send out a
-    version of Perl embedded in their product.  They would set the symbol
-    to be the name of the library containing the files needed to run or to
-    support their particular application.  This works at the "override"
-    level to make sure they get their own versions of any library code that
-    they absolutely must have configuration control over.
+    version of Perl embedded in their product.  They would set the
+    symbol to be the name of the library containing the files needed
+    to run or to support their particular application.  This works at
+    the "override" level to make sure they get their own versions of
+    any library code that they absolutely must have configuration
+    control over.
 
     As such, I don't see any conflict with a sysadmin using it for a
-    override-ish sort of thing, when installing a generic Perl.  It should
-    probably have been named something to do with overriding though.  Since
-    it's undocumented we could still change it...  :-)
+    override-ish sort of thing, when installing a generic Perl.  It
+    should probably have been named something to do with overriding
+    though.  Since it's undocumented we could still change it...  :-)
 
 Given that it's already there, you can use it to override distribution modules.
 One way to do that is to add
index 92f85a6..f0ce56f 100644 (file)
@@ -341,9 +341,9 @@ sub file_name_is_absolute {
 
 =item splitpath (override)
 
-    ($volume,$directories,$file) = File::Spec->splitpath( $path );
-    ($volume,$directories,$file) = File::Spec->splitpath( $path,
-                                                          $no_file );
+   ($volume,$directories,$file) = File::Spec->splitpath( $path );
+   ($volume,$directories,$file) = File::Spec->splitpath( $path,
+                                                         $no_file );
 
 Passing a true value for C<$no_file> indicates that the path being
 split only contains directory components, even on systems where you
index 763d09f..304ef89 100644 (file)
@@ -189,9 +189,9 @@ sub canonpath {
 
 =item splitpath
 
-    ($volume,$directories,$file) = File::Spec->splitpath( $path );
-    ($volume,$directories,$file) = File::Spec->splitpath( $path,
-                                                          $no_file );
+   ($volume,$directories,$file) = File::Spec->splitpath( $path );
+   ($volume,$directories,$file) = File::Spec->splitpath( $path,
+                                                         $no_file );
 
 Splits a path into volume, directory, and filename portions. Assumes that 
 the last file is a path unless the path ends in '\\', '\\.', '\\..'
index 4d67aaf..5952c95 100644 (file)
@@ -1691,7 +1691,7 @@ called and C<THIS> will be given as its parameter.  The generated C++ code for
 
 will look like this:
 
-     color *THIS = ...;        // Initialized as in typemap
+     color *THIS = ...;  // Initialized as in typemap
 
      delete THIS;
 
@@ -1711,22 +1711,23 @@ The following is an example of a typemap that could be used for this C++
 example.
 
     TYPEMAP
-    color *            O_OBJECT
+    color *  O_OBJECT
 
     OUTPUT
     # The Perl object is blessed into 'CLASS', which should be a
     # char* having the name of the package for the blessing.
     O_OBJECT
-       sv_setref_pv( $arg, CLASS, (void*)$var );
+        sv_setref_pv( $arg, CLASS, (void*)$var );
 
     INPUT
     O_OBJECT
-       if( sv_isobject($arg) && (SvTYPE(SvRV($arg)) == SVt_PVMG) )
-               $var = ($type)SvIV((SV*)SvRV( $arg ));
-       else{
-               warn( \"${Package}::$func_name() -- $var is not a blessed SV reference\" );
-               XSRETURN_UNDEF;
-       }
+        if( sv_isobject($arg) && (SvTYPE(SvRV($arg)) == SVt_PVMG) )
+            $var = ($type)SvIV((SV*)SvRV( $arg ));
+        else{
+            warn("${Package}::$func_name() -- " .
+                "$var is not a blessed SV reference");
+            XSRETURN_UNDEF;
+        }
 
 =head2 Interface Strategy
 
index 448b77b..ec8c7d6 100644 (file)
@@ -10,13 +10,13 @@ See L<Module::CoreList> for one.
 
 =head1 SYNOPSIS
 
-    corelist -v
-    corelist [-a|-d] <ModuleName> | /<ModuleRegex>/ [<ModuleVersion>] ...
-    corelist [-v <PerlVersion>] [ <ModuleName> | /<ModuleRegex>/ ] ...
-    corelist [-r <PerlVersion>] ...
-    corelist --feature <FeatureName> [<FeatureName>] ...
-    corelist --diff PerlVersion PerlVersion
-    corelist --upstream <ModuleName>
+   corelist -v
+   corelist [-a|-d] <ModuleName> | /<ModuleRegex>/ [<ModuleVersion>] ...
+   corelist [-v <PerlVersion>] [ <ModuleName> | /<ModuleRegex>/ ] ...
+   corelist [-r <PerlVersion>] ...
+   corelist --feature <FeatureName> [<FeatureName>] ...
+   corelist --diff PerlVersion PerlVersion
+   corelist --upstream <ModuleName>
 
 =head1 OPTIONS
 
index bee3718..4c624cd 100644 (file)
@@ -528,7 +528,7 @@ outside the compartment) placed into the compartment. For example,
 
     $cpt = new Safe;
     sub wrapper {
-        # vet arguments and perform potentially unsafe operations
+      # vet arguments and perform potentially unsafe operations
     }
     $cpt->share('&wrapper');
 
index 72ac3f9..3478cd7 100644 (file)
@@ -1803,13 +1803,13 @@ B<walk_output> lets you change the print destination from STDOUT to
 another open filehandle, or into a string passed as a ref (unless
 you've built perl with -Uuseperlio).
 
-    my $walker = B::Concise::compile('-terse','aFuncName', \&aSubRef);  # 1
-    walk_output(\my $buf);
-    $walker->();                       # 1 renders -terse
-    set_style_standard('concise');     # 2
-    $walker->();                       # 2 renders -concise
-    $walker->(@new);                   # 3 renders whatever
-    print "3 different renderings: terse, concise, and @new: $buf\n";
+  my $walker = B::Concise::compile('-terse','aFuncName', \&aSubRef); # 1
+  walk_output(\my $buf);
+  $walker->();                         # 1 renders -terse
+  set_style_standard('concise');       # 2
+  $walker->();                         # 2 renders -concise
+  $walker->(@new);                     # 3 renders whatever
+  print "3 different renderings: terse, concise, and @new: $buf\n";
 
 When $walker is called, it traverses the subroutines supplied when it
 was created, and renders them using the current style.  You can change
index 7869c81..ca80a8f 100644 (file)
@@ -145,8 +145,9 @@ Three additional functions allow access to this statistic from Perl.
 First, use C<mstats_fillhash(%hash)> to get the information contained
 in the output of mstat() into %hash. The field of this hash are
 
-  minbucket nbuckets sbrk_good sbrk_slack sbrked_remains sbrks start_slack
-  topbucket topbucket_ev topbucket_odd total total_chain total_sbrk totfree
+  minbucket nbuckets sbrk_good sbrk_slack sbrked_remains sbrks
+  start_slack topbucket topbucket_ev topbucket_odd total total_chain
+  total_sbrk totfree
 
 Two additional fields C<free>, C<used> contain array references which
 provide per-bucket count of free and used chunks.  Two other fields
index 5a6528d..a7492a7 100644 (file)
@@ -522,8 +522,8 @@ to a file F<Example.pm>.
     use strict; use warnings;
 
     {
-        package Name_hash; # standard implementation: the object is a hash
-
+        package Name_hash;  # standard implementation: the
+                            # object is a hash
         sub init {
             my $obj = shift;
             my ($first, $last) = @_;
@@ -714,7 +714,7 @@ incompatibility of object bodies.
 
     {
         package Name;
-        use base 'Name_id';      # define here which implementation to run
+        use base 'Name_id';  # define here which implementation to run
     }
 
 
index ee9d63c..96fae3d 100644 (file)
@@ -103,7 +103,8 @@ answers for a yes/no question in the current locale.
 
     use I18N::Langinfo qw(langinfo ABDAY_1 YESSTR NOSTR);
 
-    my ($abday_1, $yesstr, $nostr) = map { langinfo($_) } (ABDAY_1, YESSTR, NOSTR);
+    my ($abday_1, $yesstr, $nostr) =
+        map { langinfo($_) } (ABDAY_1, YESSTR, NOSTR);
 
     print "$abday_1? [$yesstr/$nostr] ";
 
index 9bbfd91..6548223 100644 (file)
@@ -161,8 +161,9 @@ VMS::DCLsym - Perl extension to manipulate DCL symbols
 
   $handle = new VMS::DCLsym;
   $value = $handle->getsym($name);
-  $handle->setsym($name,$value,'GLOBAL') or die "Can't create symbol: $!\n";
-  $handle->delsym($name,'LOCAL') or die "Can't delete symbol: $!\n";
+  $handle->setsym($name, $value, 'GLOBAL')
+      or die "Can't create symbol: $!\n";
+  $handle->delsym($name, 'LOCAL') or die "Can't delete symbol: $!\n";
   $handle->clearcache();
 
 =head1 DESCRIPTION
index 54f37c9..1b8a4f7 100644 (file)
@@ -82,8 +82,8 @@ VMS::Stdio - standard I/O functions via VMS extensions
 
 =head1 SYNOPSIS
 
-  use VMS::Stdio qw( &flush &getname &remove &rewind &setdef &sync &tmpnam
-                     &vmsopen &vmssysopen &waitfh &writeof );
+  use VMS::Stdio qw( &flush &getname &remove &rewind &setdef &sync
+                     &tmpnam &vmsopen &vmssysopen &waitfh &writeof );
   setdef("new:[default.dir]");
   $uniquename = tmpnam;
   $fh = vmsopen("my.file","rfm=var","alq=100",...) or die $!;
index a59e223..4844577 100644 (file)
@@ -226,8 +226,10 @@ arg is passed as the args to the called function. They return whatever
 the C function itself pushed onto the stack, plus the return value from
 the function; for example
 
-    call_sv( sub { @_, 'c' }, G_ARRAY,  'a', 'b'); # returns 'a', 'b', 'c', 3
-    call_sv( sub { @_ },      G_SCALAR, 'a', 'b'); # returns 'b', 1
+    call_sv( sub { @_, 'c' }, G_ARRAY,  'a', 'b');
+    # returns 'a', 'b', 'c', 3
+    call_sv( sub { @_ },      G_SCALAR, 'a', 'b');
+    # returns 'b', 1
 
 =item B<eval_sv>
 
index 75d6adc..3b1eda8 100644 (file)
@@ -15,10 +15,10 @@ installhtml - converts a collection of POD pages to HTML format.
 
 =head1 SYNOPSIS
 
-    installhtml  [--help] [--podpath=<name>:...:<name>] [--podroot=<name>]
-         [--htmldir=<name>] [--htmlroot=<name>]  [--norecurse] [--recurse]
-         [--splithead=<name>,...,<name>]   [--splititem=<name>,...,<name>]
-         [--ignore=<name>,...,<name>]  [--verbose]
+  installhtml  [--help] [--podpath=<name>:...:<name>] [--podroot=<name>]
+       [--htmldir=<name>] [--htmlroot=<name>]  [--norecurse] [--recurse]
+       [--splithead=<name>,...,<name>]   [--splititem=<name>,...,<name>]
+       [--ignore=<name>,...,<name>]  [--verbose]
 
 =head1 DESCRIPTION
 
index f507efa..836669c 100644 (file)
@@ -221,7 +221,8 @@ difference between each pair of tests.
 
 C<cmpthese> can also be passed the data structure that timethese() returns:
 
-    $results = timethese( -1, { a => "++\$i", b => "\$i *= 2" } ) ;
+    $results = timethese( -1,
+        { a => "++\$i", b => "\$i *= 2" } ) ;
     cmpthese( $results );
 
 in case you want to see both sets of results.
@@ -231,7 +232,8 @@ that is RESULTSHASHREF; otherwise that is COUNT.
 Returns a reference to an ARRAY of rows, each row is an ARRAY of cells from the
 above chart, including labels. This:
 
-    my $rows = cmpthese( -1, { a => '++$i', b => '$i *= 2' }, "none" );
+    my $rows = cmpthese( -1,
+        { a => '++$i', b => '$i *= 2' }, "none" );
 
 returns a data structure like:
 
index ecb6231..0bd0486 100644 (file)
@@ -262,10 +262,11 @@ Class::Struct - declare struct-like datatypes as Perl classes
     struct( ELEMENT_NAME => ELEMENT_TYPE, ... );
 
     # Declare struct at compile time
-    use Class::Struct CLASS_NAME => [ ELEMENT_NAME => ELEMENT_TYPE, ... ];
-    use Class::Struct CLASS_NAME => { ELEMENT_NAME => ELEMENT_TYPE, ... };
+    use Class::Struct CLASS_NAME => [ELEMENT_NAME => ELEMENT_TYPE, ...];
+    use Class::Struct CLASS_NAME => {ELEMENT_NAME => ELEMENT_TYPE, ...};
 
-    # declare struct at compile time, based on array, implicit class name:
+    # declare struct at compile time, based on array, implicit
+    # class name:
     package CLASS_NAME;
     use Class::Struct ELEMENT_NAME => ELEMENT_TYPE, ... ;
 
@@ -475,11 +476,12 @@ type C<Timeval>.
         tv_usecs => '$',        # microseconds
     ]);
 
-        # create an object:
-    my $t = Rusage->new(ru_utime=>Timeval->new(), ru_stime=>Timeval->new());
+    # create an object:
+    my $t = Rusage->new(ru_utime=>Timeval->new(),
+        ru_stime=>Timeval->new());
 
-        # $t->ru_utime and $t->ru_stime are objects of type Timeval.
-        # set $t->ru_utime to 100.0 sec and $t->ru_stime to 5.0 sec.
+    # $t->ru_utime and $t->ru_stime are objects of type Timeval.
+    # set $t->ru_utime to 100.0 sec and $t->ru_stime to 5.0 sec.
     $t->ru_utime->tv_secs(100);
     $t->ru_utime->tv_usecs(0);
     $t->ru_stime->tv_secs(5);
@@ -549,16 +551,16 @@ that are passed on to the nested struct's constructor.
     ];
 
 
-    my $cat = Cat->new( name     => 'Socks',
-                        kittens  => ['Monica', 'Kenneth'],
-                        markings => { socks=>1, blaze=>"white" },
-                        breed    => Breed->new(name=>'short-hair', cross=>1),
-                   or:  breed    => {name=>'short-hair', cross=>1},
+    my $cat = Cat->new( name => 'Socks',
+               kittens  => ['Monica', 'Kenneth'],
+               markings => { socks=>1, blaze=>"white" },
+               breed    => Breed->new(name=>'short-hair', cross=>1),
+          or:  breed    => {name=>'short-hair', cross=>1},
                       );
 
     print "Once a cat called ", $cat->name, "\n";
     print "(which was a ", $cat->breed->name, ")\n";
-    print "had two kittens: ", join(' and ', @{$cat->kittens}), "\n";
+    print "had 2 kittens: ", join(' and ', @{$cat->kittens}), "\n";
 
 =back
 
@@ -629,7 +631,7 @@ Originally C<Class::Template> by Dean Roehrich.
     #  - Now using my() rather than local().
     #
     # Uses perl5 classes to create nested data types.
-    # This is offered as one implementation of Tom Christiansen's "structs.pl"
-    # idea.
+    # This is offered as one implementation of Tom Christiansen's
+    # "structs.pl" idea.
 
 =cut
index 63e6f10..c183d12 100644 (file)
--- a/lib/DB.pm
+++ b/lib/DB.pm
@@ -559,7 +559,8 @@ DB - programmatic interface to the Perl debugging API
     CLIENT->register()      # register a client package name
     CLIENT->done()          # de-register from the debugging API
     CLIENT->skippkg('hide::hide')  # ask DB not to stop in this package
-    CLIENT->cont([WHERE])       # run some more (until BREAK or another breakpt)
+    CLIENT->cont([WHERE])       # run some more (until BREAK or 
+                                # another breakpointt)
     CLIENT->step()              # single step
     CLIENT->next()              # step over
     CLIENT->ret()               # return from current subroutine
@@ -588,7 +589,8 @@ DB - programmatic interface to the Perl debugging API
     CLIENT->stop(FILE,LINE) # when execution stops
     CLIENT->idle()          # while stopped (can be a client event loop)
     CLIENT->cleanup()       # just before exit
-    CLIENT->output(LIST)    # called to print any output that API must show
+    CLIENT->output(LIST)    # called to print any output that
+                            # the API must show
 
 =head1 DESCRIPTION
 
index 3421848..07a501e 100644 (file)
@@ -230,7 +230,7 @@ DBM_Filter -- Filter DBM keys/values
 =head1 SYNOPSIS
 
     use DBM_Filter ;
-    use SDBM_File; # or DB_File, or GDBM_File, or NDBM_File, or ODBM_File
+    use SDBM_File; # or DB_File, GDBM_File, NDBM_File, or ODBM_File
 
     $db = tie %hash, ...
 
index b9f7dea..7331559 100644 (file)
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ DBM_Filter::compress - filter for DBM_Filter
 
 =head1 SYNOPSIS
 
-    use SDBM_File; # or DB_File, or GDBM_File, or NDBM_File, or ODBM_File
+    use SDBM_File; # or DB_File, GDBM_File, NDBM_File, ODBM_File
     use DBM_Filter ;
 
     $db = tie %hash, ...
index fedb692..5da7b35 100644 (file)
@@ -46,7 +46,7 @@ DBM_Filter::encode - filter for DBM_Filter
 
 =head1 SYNOPSIS
 
-    use SDBM_File; # or DB_File, or GDBM_File, or NDBM_File, or ODBM_File
+    use SDBM_File; # or DB_File, GDBM_File, NDBM_File, ODBM_File
     use DBM_Filter ;
 
     $db = tie %hash, ...
index d8fa542..916523f 100644 (file)
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ DBM_Filter::int32 - filter for DBM_Filter
 
 =head1 SYNOPSIS
 
-    use SDBM_File; # or DB_File, or GDBM_File, or NDBM_File, or ODBM_File
+    use SDBM_File; # or DB_File, GDBM_File, NDBM_File, or ODBM_File
     use DBM_Filter ;
 
     $db = tie %hash, ...
index ffa10e9..fa63945 100644 (file)
@@ -27,7 +27,7 @@ DBM_Filter::null - filter for DBM_Filter
 
 =head1 SYNOPSIS
 
-    use SDBM_File; # or DB_File, or GDBM_File, or NDBM_File, or ODBM_File
+    use SDBM_File; # or DB_File, GDBM_File, NDBM_File, or ODBM_File
     use DBM_Filter ;
 
     $db = tie %hash, ...
index 677e661..f13fd8b 100644 (file)
@@ -28,8 +28,8 @@ DBM_Filter::utf8 - filter for DBM_Filter
 
 =head1 SYNOPSIS
 
-    use SDBM_File; # or DB_File, or GDBM_File, or NDBM_File, or ODBM_File
-    use DBM_Filter ;
+    use SDBM_File; # or DB_File, GDBM_File, NDBM_File, or ODBM_File
+    use DBM_Filter;
 
     $db = tie %hash, ...
     $db->Filter_Push('utf8');
index f629068..a1da704 100644 (file)
@@ -12,8 +12,9 @@ English - use nice English (or awk) names for ugly punctuation variables
 =head1 SYNOPSIS
 
     use English;
-    use English qw( -no_match_vars ) ;  # Avoids regex performance penalty
-                                        # in perl 5.16 and earlier
+    use English qw( -no_match_vars ) ;  # Avoids regex performance
+                                        # penalty in perl 5.16 and
+                                        # earlier
     ...
     if ($ERRNO =~ /denied/) { ... }
 
index 7ef2df3..1aee2d7 100644 (file)
@@ -143,7 +143,8 @@ ExtUtils::XSSymSet - keep sets of symbol names palatable to the VMS linker
   $set = new ExtUtils::XSSymSet;
   while ($sym = make_symbol()) { $set->addsym($sym); }
   foreach $safesym ($set->all_trimmed) {
-    print "Processing $safesym (derived from ",$self->get_orig($safesym),")\n";
+    print "Processing $safesym (derived from ",
+        $self->get_orig($safesym), ")\n";
     do_stuff($safesym);
   }
 
index ad98d24..4783192 100644 (file)
@@ -64,14 +64,14 @@ fileparse_set_fstype($^O);
 =item C<fileparse>
 X<fileparse>
 
-    my($filename, $directories, $suffix) = fileparse($path);
-    my($filename, $directories, $suffix) = fileparse($path, @suffixes);
-    my $filename                         = fileparse($path, @suffixes);
+    my($filename, $dirs, $suffix) = fileparse($path);
+    my($filename, $dirs, $suffix) = fileparse($path, @suffixes);
+    my $filename                  = fileparse($path, @suffixes);
 
-The C<fileparse()> routine divides a file path into its $directories, $filename
+The C<fileparse()> routine divides a file path into its $dirs, $filename
 and (optionally) the filename $suffix.
 
-$directories contains everything up to and including the last
+$dirs contains everything up to and including the last
 directory separator in the $path including the volume (if applicable).
 The remainder of the $path is the $filename.
 
@@ -95,7 +95,7 @@ If type is non-Unix (see L</fileparse_set_fstype>) then the pattern
 matching for suffix removal is performed case-insensitively, since
 those systems are not case-sensitive when opening existing files.
 
-You are guaranteed that C<$directories . $filename . $suffix> will
+You are guaranteed that C<$dirs . $filename . $suffix> will
 denote the same location as the original $path.
 
 =cut
@@ -250,10 +250,10 @@ C<fileparse()>.
 Only on VMS (where there is no ambiguity between the file and directory
 portions of a path) and AmigaOS (possibly due to an implementation quirk in
 this module) does C<dirname()> work like C<fileparse($path)>, returning just the
-$directories.
+$dirs.
 
     # On VMS and AmigaOS
-    my $directories = dirname($path);
+    my $dirs = dirname($path);
 
 When using Unix or MSDOS syntax this emulates the C<dirname(1)> shell function
 which is subtly different from how C<fileparse()> works.  It returns all but
index 01968b3..2f0f659 100644 (file)
@@ -13,7 +13,8 @@ getopt, getopts - Process single-character switches with switch clustering
     getopts('oif:');  # -o & -i are boolean flags, -f takes an argument
                      # Sets $opt_* as a side effect.
     getopts('oif:', \%opts);  # options as above. Values in %opts
-    getopt('oDI');    # -o, -D & -I take arg.  Sets $opt_* as a side effect.
+    getopt('oDI');    # -o, -D & -I take arg.
+                      # Sets $opt_* as a side effect.
     getopt('oDI', \%opts);    # -o, -D & -I take arg.  Values in %opts
 
 =head1 DESCRIPTION
index c94685b..f45116f 100644 (file)
@@ -35,9 +35,10 @@ PerlIO - On demand loader for PerlIO layers and root of PerlIO::* name space
 
 =head1 SYNOPSIS
 
-  open($fh,"<:crlf", "my.txt"); # support platform-native and CRLF text files
+  open($fh, "<:crlf", "my.txt"); # support platform-native and 
+                                 # CRLF text files
 
-  open($fh,"<","his.jpg");      # portably open a binary file for reading
+  open($fh, "<", "his.jpg"); # portably open a binary file for reading
   binmode($fh);
 
   Shell:
index 767cfdd..aa8cd40 100644 (file)
@@ -128,10 +128,10 @@ Tie::Array - base class for tied arrays
     sub FETCH { ... }
     sub FETCHSIZE { ... }
 
-    sub STORE { ... }        # mandatory if elements writeable
-    sub STORESIZE { ... }    # mandatory if elements can be added/deleted
-    sub EXISTS { ... }       # mandatory if exists() expected to work
-    sub DELETE { ... }       # mandatory if delete() expected to work
+    sub STORE { ... }       # mandatory if elements writeable
+    sub STORESIZE { ... }   # mandatory if elements can be added/deleted
+    sub EXISTS { ... }      # mandatory if exists() expected to work
+    sub DELETE { ... }      # mandatory if delete() expected to work
 
     # optional methods - for efficiency
     sub CLEAR { ... }
index 1acd829..d944cd1 100644 (file)
@@ -22,7 +22,8 @@ Tie::Hash, Tie::StdHash, Tie::ExtraHash - base class definitions for tied hashes
 
     @ISA = qw(Tie::StdHash);
 
-    # All methods provided by default, define only those needing overrides
+    # All methods provided by default, define
+    # only those needing overrides
     # Accessors access the storage in %{$_[0]};
     # TIEHASH should return a reference to the actual storage
     sub DELETE { ... }
@@ -32,10 +33,11 @@ Tie::Hash, Tie::StdHash, Tie::ExtraHash - base class definitions for tied hashes
 
     @ISA = qw(Tie::ExtraHash);
 
-    # All methods provided by default, define only those needing overrides
+    # All methods provided by default, define 
+    # only those needing overrides
     # Accessors access the storage in %{$_[0][0]};
-    # TIEHASH should return an array reference with the first element being
-    # the reference to the actual storage 
+    # TIEHASH should return an array reference with the first element
+    # being the reference to the actual storage 
     sub DELETE { 
       $_[0][1]->('del', $_[0][0], $_[1]); # Call the report writer
       delete $_[0][0]->{$_[1]};                  #  $_[0]->SUPER::DELETE($_[1])
index 24e4ae7..48bd9ac 100644 (file)
@@ -22,7 +22,8 @@ Tie::Scalar, Tie::StdScalar - base class definitions for tied scalars
 
     @ISA = qw(Tie::StdScalar);
 
-    # All methods provided by default, so define only what needs be overridden
+    # All methods provided by default, so define
+    # only what needs be overridden
     sub FETCH { ... }
 
 
index 7562c69..9d7436e 100644 (file)
@@ -75,9 +75,9 @@ deprecate - Perl pragma for deprecating the core version of a module
 
 =head1 SYNOPSIS
 
-    use deprecate;     # always deprecate the module in which this occurs
+    use deprecate;  # always deprecate the module in which this occurs
 
-    use if $] > 5.010, 'deprecate';    # conditionally deprecate the module
+    use if $] > 5.010, 'deprecate'; # conditionally deprecate the module
 
 
 =head1 DESCRIPTION
index caa1ea6..df39e76 100644 (file)
@@ -38,7 +38,7 @@ integers, i.e., -(2**31) .. (2**31-1) on 32-bit architectures, and
     $z = 2.7;
     $a = 2**31 - 1;  # Largest positive integer on 32-bit machines
     $, = ", ";
-    print $x, -$x, $x + $y, $x - $y, $x / $y, $x * $y, $y == $z, $a, $a + 1;
+    print $x, -$x, $x+$y, $x-$y, $x/$y, $x*$y, $y==$z, $a, $a+1;
 
 will print:  5.8, -5, 7, 3, 2, 10, 1, 2147483647, -2147483648
 
index ee272a8..a26151b 100644 (file)
@@ -1362,7 +1362,8 @@ the R command stuffed into the environment variables.
   PERLDB_RESTART   - flag only, contains no restart data itself.
   PERLDB_HIST      - command history, if it's available
   PERLDB_ON_LOAD   - breakpoints set by the rc file
-  PERLDB_POSTPONE  - subs that have been loaded/not executed, and have actions
+  PERLDB_POSTPONE  - subs that have been loaded/not executed,
+                     and have actions
   PERLDB_VISITED   - files that had breakpoints
   PERLDB_FILE_...  - breakpoints for a file
   PERLDB_OPT       - active options
index 63a89dd..5093e8c 100644 (file)
@@ -129,9 +129,9 @@ is a simple identifier (no colons) and that it appears in curly braces or
 on the left hand side of the C<< => >> symbol.
 
     use strict 'subs';
-    $SIG{PIPE} = Plumber;      # blows up
-    $SIG{PIPE} = "Plumber";    # just fine: quoted string is always ok
-    $SIG{PIPE} = \&Plumber;    # preferred form
+    $SIG{PIPE} = Plumber;   # blows up
+    $SIG{PIPE} = "Plumber"; # fine: quoted string is always ok
+    $SIG{PIPE} = \&Plumber; # preferred form
 
 =back
 
index f4328f5..40ceee2 100644 (file)
@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@ version - Perl extension for Version Objects
 
   # Declaring an old-style decimal $VERSION (use quotes!)
 
-  our $VERSION = "1.0203";                                     # recommended
+  our $VERSION = "1.0203";                                # recommended
   use version; our $VERSION = version->parse("1.0203");   # formal
   use version; our $VERSION = version->parse("1.02_03");  # alpha
 
@@ -251,7 +251,7 @@ True if and only if the version object was created with a underscore, e.g.
 
 True only if the version object is a dotted-decimal version, e.g.
 
-  version->parse('v1.2.0')->is_qv;        # TRUE
+  version->parse('v1.2.0')->is_qv;       # TRUE
   version->declare('v1.2')->is_qv;       # TRUE
   qv('1.2')->is_qv;                      # TRUE
   version->parse('1.2')->is_qv;          # FALSE
index f2b3e81..d0b2c13 100644 (file)
@@ -548,7 +548,8 @@ a normalized or reduced form (no extraneous zeros), and with a leading 'v':
   print $ver->stringify;      # ditto
   print $ver;                 # ditto
   print $nver->normal;        # prints as v1.2.0
-  print $nver->stringify;     # prints as 1.002, see "Stringification"
+  print $nver->stringify;     # prints as 1.002,
+                              # see "Stringification"
 
 In order to preserve the meaning of the processed version, the
 normalized representation will always contain at least three sub terms.
index 653f840..0dd24b7 100644 (file)
@@ -60,12 +60,12 @@ symbol $STATUS will still have the termination status, but with a
 high-order bit set:
 
 EXAMPLE:
-    $ perl -e"exit 44;"                             Non-hushed error exit
-    %SYSTEM-F-ABORT, abort                          DCL message
+    $ perl -e"exit 44;"                          Non-hushed error exit
+    %SYSTEM-F-ABORT, abort                       DCL message
     $ show sym $STATUS
       $STATUS == "%X0000002C"
 
-    $ perl -e"use vmsish qw(hushed); exit 44;"      Hushed error exit
+    $ perl -e"use vmsish qw(hushed); exit 44;"   Hushed error exit
     $ show sym $STATUS
       $STATUS == "%X1000002C"
 
index 0413bf9..4130a9f 100644 (file)
@@ -140,8 +140,8 @@ Here is a DBM Filter that does it:
     unlink $filename;
 
 
-    my $db = tie %hash, 'DB_File', $filename, O_CREAT|O_RDWR, 0666, $DB_HASH 
-      or die "Cannot open $filename: $!\n";
+    my $db = tie %hash, 'DB_File', $filename, O_CREAT|O_RDWR, 0666,
+        $DB_HASH or die "Cannot open $filename: $!\n";
 
     $db->filter_fetch_key  ( sub { $_ = unpack("i", $_) } );
     $db->filter_store_key  ( sub { $_ = pack ("i", $_) } );
index 111e9b2..07fc417 100644 (file)
@@ -4087,7 +4087,8 @@ are as follows.
   --------+---------------+-----------------------------------------
   0       | NO            | Disables key traversal randomization
   1       | RANDOM        | Enables full key traversal randomization
-  2       | DETERMINISTIC | Enables repeatable key traversal randomization
+  2       | DETERMINISTIC | Enables repeatable key traversal
+          |               | randomization
 
 Both numeric and string values are accepted, but note that string values are
 case sensitive.  The default for this setting is "RANDOM" or 1.
index 756ea77..1acd6f2 100644 (file)
@@ -2272,9 +2272,11 @@ same underlying descriptor:
     if (fileno(THIS) != -1 && fileno(THIS) == fileno(THAT)) {
         print "THIS and THAT are dups\n";
     } elsif (fileno(THIS) != -1 && fileno(THAT) != -1) {
-        print "THIS and THAT have different underlying file descriptors\n";
+        print "THIS and THAT have different " .
+            "underlying file descriptors\n";
     } else {
-        print "At least one of THIS and THAT does not have a real file descriptor\n";
+        print "At least one of THIS and THAT does " .
+            "not have a real file descriptor\n";
     }
 
 =item flock FILEHANDLE,OPERATION
index e5347ff..6984bcb 100644 (file)
@@ -60,8 +60,8 @@ Assuming your patch consists of a single git commit, the following
 writes the file as a MIME attachment, and sends it with a meaningful
 subject:
 
 % git format-patch -1 --attach
 % perlbug -s "[PATCH] $(git log -1 --oneline HEAD)" -f 0001-*.patch
+ % git format-patch -1 --attach
+ % perlbug -s "[PATCH] $(git log -1 --oneline HEAD)" -f 0001-*.patch
 
 The perlbug program will ask you a few questions about your email
 address and the patch you're submitting. Once you've answered them it
index aebcaa8..b56786c 100644 (file)
@@ -12,15 +12,15 @@ This document aims to record the Perl source code releases.
 
 Perl history in brief, by Larry Wall:
 
-    Perl 0 introduced Perl to my officemates.
-    Perl 1 introduced Perl to the world, and changed /\(...\|...\)/ to
-        /(...|...)/.  \(Dan Faigin still hasn't forgiven me. :-\)
-    Perl 2 introduced Henry Spencer's regular expression package.
-    Perl 3 introduced the ability to handle binary data (embedded nulls).
-    Perl 4 introduced the first Camel book.  Really.  We mostly just
-        switched version numbers so the book could refer to 4.000.
-    Perl 5 introduced everything else, including the ability to
-        introduce everything else.
+   Perl 0 introduced Perl to my officemates.
+   Perl 1 introduced Perl to the world, and changed /\(...\|...\)/ to
+       /(...|...)/.  \(Dan Faigin still hasn't forgiven me. :-\)
+   Perl 2 introduced Henry Spencer's regular expression package.
+   Perl 3 introduced the ability to handle binary data (embedded nulls).
+   Perl 4 introduced the first Camel book.  Really.  We mostly just
+       switched version numbers so the book could refer to 4.000.
+   Perl 5 introduced everything else, including the ability to
+       introduce everything else.
 
 =head1 THE KEEPERS OF THE PUMPKIN
 
index 7f243fa..f708cc0 100644 (file)
@@ -195,7 +195,8 @@ in a subroutine that gets passed typeglobs as arguments:
 
     sub identify_typeglob {
         my $glob = shift;
-        print 'You gave me ', *{$glob}{PACKAGE}, '::', *{$glob}{NAME}, "\n";
+        print 'You gave me ', *{$glob}{PACKAGE},
+            '::', *{$glob}{NAME}, "\n";
     }
     identify_typeglob *foo;
     identify_typeglob *bar::baz;
@@ -368,7 +369,7 @@ The B<begincheck> program makes it all clear, eventually:
   }
   INIT { print  " 9.   You'll see the difference right away.\n" }
 
-  print         "13.   It merely _looks_ like it should be confusing.\n";
+  print         "13.   It only _looks_ like it should be confusing.\n";
 
   __END__
 
index df813a0..558642c 100644 (file)
@@ -390,7 +390,7 @@ backward compatibility, and this will probably make your list order
 unintuitive.  Also, if many elements may be undefined you may see the
 following unattractive method calls:
 
-    $obj->do_something(undef, undef, undef, undef, undef, undef, 1024);
+    $obj->do_something(undef, undef, undef, undef, undef, 1024);
 
 Provide sensible defaults for parameters which have them.  Don't make
 your users specify parameters which will almost always be the same.
index 3b138ef..7beee32 100644 (file)
@@ -176,7 +176,8 @@ template doesn't match the incoming data, Perl will scream and die.
 
 Hence, putting it all together:
 
-    my($date,$description,$income,$expend) = unpack("A10xA27xA7xA*", $_);
+    my ($date, $description, $income, $expend) =
+        unpack("A10xA27xA7xA*", $_);
 
 Now, that's our data parsed. I suppose what we might want to do now is
 total up our income and expenditure, and add another line to the end of
@@ -184,7 +185,8 @@ our ledger - in the same format - saying how much we've brought in and
 how much we've spent:
 
     while (<>) {
-        my($date, $desc, $income, $expend) = unpack("A10xA27xA7xA*", $_);
+        my ($date, $desc, $income, $expend) =
+            unpack("A10xA27xA7xA*", $_);
         $tot_income += $income;
         $tot_expend += $expend;
     }
@@ -196,7 +198,8 @@ how much we've spent:
 
     # OK, let's go:
 
-    print pack("A10xA27xA7xA*", $date, "Totals", $tot_income, $tot_expend);
+    print pack("A10xA27xA7xA*", $date, "Totals",
+        $tot_income, $tot_expend);
 
 Oh, hmm. That didn't quite work. Let's see what happened:
 
@@ -219,7 +222,8 @@ What we actually need to do is expand the width of the fields. The C<A>
 format pads any non-existent characters with spaces, so we can use the
 additional spaces to line up our fields, like this:
 
-    print pack("A11 A28 A8 A*", $date, "Totals", $tot_income, $tot_expend);
+    print pack("A11 A28 A8 A*", $date, "Totals",
+        $tot_income, $tot_expend);
 
 (Note that you can put spaces in the template to make it more readable,
 but they don't translate to spaces in the output.) Here's what we got
@@ -238,7 +242,8 @@ can get C<sprintf> to do it:
     $tot_income = sprintf("%.2f", $tot_income); 
     $tot_expend = sprintf("%12.2f", $tot_expend);
     $date = POSIX::strftime("%m/%d/%Y", localtime); 
-    print pack("A11 A28 A8 A*", $date, "Totals", $tot_income, $tot_expend);
+    print pack("A11 A28 A8 A*", $date, "Totals",
+        $tot_income, $tot_expend);
 
 This time we get the right answer:
 
@@ -791,7 +796,8 @@ C</> is not implemented in Perls before 5.6, so if your code is required to
 work on older Perls you'll need to C<unpack( 'Z* Z* C')> to get the length,
 then use it to make a new unpack string. For example
 
-   # pack a message: ASCIIZ, ASCIIZ, length, string, byte (5.005 compatible)
+   # pack a message: ASCIIZ, ASCIIZ, length, string, byte
+   # (5.005 compatible)
    my $msg = pack( 'Z* Z* C A* C', $src, $dst, length $sm, $sm, $prio );
 
    # unpack
index 89fd9ba..67f74b6 100644 (file)
@@ -684,13 +684,13 @@ text identifying its name and version number, and the name and
 version numbers of any modules it might be using to process the Pod.
 Minimal examples:
 
 %% POD::Pod2PS v3.14159, using POD::Parser v1.92
+ %% POD::Pod2PS v3.14159, using POD::Parser v1.92
 
 <!-- Pod::HTML v3.14159, using POD::Parser v1.92 -->
+ <!-- Pod::HTML v3.14159, using POD::Parser v1.92 -->
 
 {\doccomm generated by Pod::Tree::RTF 3.14159 using Pod::Tree 1.08}
+ {\doccomm generated by Pod::Tree::RTF 3.14159 using Pod::Tree 1.08}
 
 .\" Pod::Man version 3.14159, using POD::Parser version 1.92
+ .\" Pod::Man version 3.14159, using POD::Parser version 1.92
 
 Formatters may also insert additional comments, including: the
 release date of the Pod formatter program, the contact address for
@@ -1178,59 +1178,60 @@ a requirement that these be passed as an actual list or array.)
 For example:
 
   L<Foo::Bar>
-    =>  undef,                          # link text
-        "Foo::Bar",                     # possibly inferred link text
-        "Foo::Bar",                     # name
-        undef,                          # section
-        'pod',                          # what sort of link
-        "Foo::Bar"                      # original content
+    =>  undef,                         # link text
+        "Foo::Bar",                    # possibly inferred link text
+        "Foo::Bar",                    # name
+        undef,                         # section
+        'pod',                         # what sort of link
+        "Foo::Bar"                     # original content
 
   L<Perlport's section on NL's|perlport/Newlines>
-    =>  "Perlport's section on NL's",   # link text
-        "Perlport's section on NL's",   # possibly inferred link text
-        "perlport",                     # name
-        "Newlines",                     # section
-        'pod',                          # what sort of link
-        "Perlport's section on NL's|perlport/Newlines" # orig. content
+    =>  "Perlport's section on NL's",  # link text
+        "Perlport's section on NL's",  # possibly inferred link text
+        "perlport",                    # name
+        "Newlines",                    # section
+        'pod',                         # what sort of link
+        "Perlport's section on NL's|perlport/Newlines"
+                                       # original content
 
   L<perlport/Newlines>
-    =>  undef,                          # link text
-        '"Newlines" in perlport',       # possibly inferred link text
-        "perlport",                     # name
-        "Newlines",                     # section
-        'pod',                          # what sort of link
-        "perlport/Newlines"             # original content
+    =>  undef,                         # link text
+        '"Newlines" in perlport',      # possibly inferred link text
+        "perlport",                    # name
+        "Newlines",                    # section
+        'pod',                         # what sort of link
+        "perlport/Newlines"            # original content
 
   L<crontab(5)/"DESCRIPTION">
-    =>  undef,                          # link text
-        '"DESCRIPTION" in crontab(5)',  # possibly inferred link text
-        "crontab(5)",                   # name
-        "DESCRIPTION",                  # section
-        'man',                          # what sort of link
-        'crontab(5)/"DESCRIPTION"'      # original content
+    =>  undef,                         # link text
+        '"DESCRIPTION" in crontab(5)', # possibly inferred link text
+        "crontab(5)",                  # name
+        "DESCRIPTION",                 # section
+        'man',                         # what sort of link
+        'crontab(5)/"DESCRIPTION"'     # original content
 
   L</Object Attributes>
-    =>  undef,                          # link text
-        '"Object Attributes"',          # possibly inferred link text
-        undef,                          # name
-        "Object Attributes",            # section
-        'pod',                          # what sort of link
-        "/Object Attributes"            # original content
+    =>  undef,                         # link text
+        '"Object Attributes"',         # possibly inferred link text
+        undef,                         # name
+        "Object Attributes",           # section
+        'pod',                         # what sort of link
+        "/Object Attributes"           # original content
 
   L<http://www.perl.org/>
-    =>  undef,                          # link text
-        "http://www.perl.org/",         # possibly inferred link text
-        "http://www.perl.org/",         # name
-        undef,                          # section
-        'url',                          # what sort of link
-        "http://www.perl.org/"          # original content
+    =>  undef,                         # link text
+        "http://www.perl.org/",        # possibly inferred link text
+        "http://www.perl.org/",        # name
+        undef,                         # section
+        'url',                         # what sort of link
+        "http://www.perl.org/"         # original content
 
   L<Perl.org|http://www.perl.org/>
-    =>  "Perl.org",                     # link text
-        "http://www.perl.org/",         # possibly inferred link text
-        "http://www.perl.org/",         # name
-        undef,                          # section
-        'url',                          # what sort of link
+    =>  "Perl.org",                    # link text
+        "http://www.perl.org/",        # possibly inferred link text
+        "http://www.perl.org/",        # name
+        undef,                         # section
+        'url',                         # what sort of link
         "Perl.org|http://www.perl.org/" # original content
 
 Note that you can distinguish URL-links from anything else by the
index 6c4cfa0..c65c16b 100644 (file)
@@ -218,8 +218,8 @@ For copyright
 
 For licensing the easiest way is to use the same licensing as Perl itself:
 
-    This library is free software; you may redistribute it and/or modify
-    it under the same terms as Perl itself.
+    This library is free software; you may redistribute it and/or
+    modify it under the same terms as Perl itself.
 
 This makes it easy for people to use your module with Perl.  Note that
 this licensing example is neither an endorsement or a requirement, you are
index c20d20a..4ed7e95 100644 (file)
@@ -149,7 +149,8 @@ reference to it, you have these options:
 
 On the other hand, if you want the other meaning, you can do this:
 
-    sub showem {        { @_ } }   # ambiguous (currently ok, but may change)
+    sub showem {        { @_ } }   # ambiguous (currently ok,
+                                   # but may change)
     sub showem {       {; @_ } }   # ok
     sub showem { { return @_ } }   # ok
 
index bd44d01..008ef33 100644 (file)
@@ -85,8 +85,9 @@ for a carriage return.  Arbitrary bytes are represented by octal
 escape sequences, e.g., C<\033>, or hexadecimal escape sequences,
 e.g., C<\x1B>:
 
-    "1000\t2000" =~ m(0\t2)      # matches
-    "cat"      =~ /\143\x61\x74/ # matches in ASCII, but a weird way to spell cat
+    "1000\t2000" =~ m(0\t2)  # matches
+    "cat" =~ /\143\x61\x74/  # matches in ASCII, but 
+                             # a weird way to spell cat
 
 Regexes are treated mostly as double-quoted strings, so variable
 substitution works:
@@ -353,7 +354,7 @@ Here are some examples:
     /(\w+)\s+\g1/;    # match doubled words of arbitrary length
     $year =~ /^\d{2,4}$/;  # make sure year is at least 2 but not more
                            # than 4 digits
-    $year =~ /^\d{4}$|^\d{2}$/;    # better match; throw out 3 digit dates
+    $year =~ /^\d{4}$|^\d{2}$/; # better match; throw out 3 digit dates
 
 These quantifiers will try to match as much of the string as possible,
 while still allowing the regex to match.  So we have
@@ -437,7 +438,8 @@ substitute was bound to with C<=~>):
     print "$x $y\n"; # prints "I like dogs. I like cats."
 
     $x = "Cats are great.";
-    print $x =~ s/Cats/Dogs/r =~ s/Dogs/Frogs/r =~ s/Frogs/Hedgehogs/r, "\n";
+    print $x =~ s/Cats/Dogs/r =~ s/Dogs/Frogs/r =~
+        s/Frogs/Hedgehogs/r, "\n";
     # prints "Hedgehogs are great."
 
     @foo = map { s/[a-z]/X/r } qw(a b c 1 2 3);
index 7e0ff74..0cbbe1f 100644 (file)
@@ -859,9 +859,9 @@ well, and this is exactly what the parenthesized construct C<(?|...)>,
 set around an alternative achieves. Here is an extended version of the
 previous pattern:
 
-    if ( $time =~ /(?|(\d\d|\d):(\d\d)|(\d\d)(\d\d))\s+([A-Z][A-Z][A-Z])/ ){
-       print "hour=$1 minute=$2 zone=$3\n";
-    }
+  if($time =~ /(?|(\d\d|\d):(\d\d)|(\d\d)(\d\d))\s+([A-Z][A-Z][A-Z])/){
+      print "hour=$1 minute=$2 zone=$3\n";
+  }
 
 Within the alternative numbering group, group numbers start at the same
 position for each alternative. After the group, numbering continues
@@ -879,8 +879,8 @@ this code
 
     $x = "Mmm...donut, thought Homer";
     $x =~ /^(Mmm|Yech)\.\.\.(donut|peas)/; # matches
-    foreach $expr (1..$#-) {
-        print "Match $expr: '${$expr}' at position ($-[$expr],$+[$expr])\n";
+    foreach $exp (1..$#-) {
+        print "Match $exp: '${$exp}' at position ($-[$exp],$+[$exp])\n";
     }
 
 prints
@@ -1005,10 +1005,10 @@ Here are some examples:
     /y(es)?/i;       # matches 'y', 'Y', or a case-insensitive 'yes'
     $year =~ /^\d{2,4}$/;  # make sure year is at least 2 but not more
                            # than 4 digits
-    $year =~ /^\d{4}$|^\d{2}$/;    # better match; throw out 3-digit dates
-    $year =~ /^\d{2}(\d{2})?$/;  # same thing written differently. However,
-                                 # this captures the last two digits in $1
-                                 # and the other does not.
+    $year =~ /^\d{4}$|^\d{2}$/; # better match; throw out 3-digit dates
+    $year =~ /^\d{2}(\d{2})?$/; # same thing written differently.
+                                # However, this captures the last two
+                                # digits in $1 and the other does not.
 
     % simple_grep '^(\w+)\g1$' /usr/dict/words   # isn't this easier?
     beriberi
@@ -1744,7 +1744,8 @@ One other interesting thing that the C<s///r> flag allows is chaining
 substitutions:
 
     $x = "Cats are great.";
-    print $x =~ s/Cats/Dogs/r =~ s/Dogs/Frogs/r =~ s/Frogs/Hedgehogs/r, "\n";
+    print $x =~ s/Cats/Dogs/r =~ s/Dogs/Frogs/r =~
+        s/Frogs/Hedgehogs/r, "\n";
     # prints "Hedgehogs are great."
 
 A modifier available specifically to search and replace is the
@@ -1756,7 +1757,7 @@ computation in the process of replacing text.  This example counts
 character frequencies in a line:
 
     $x = "Bill the cat";
-    $x =~ s/(.)/$chars{$1}++;$1/eg;  # final $1 replaces char with itself
+    $x =~ s/(.)/$chars{$1}++;$1/eg; # final $1 replaces char with itself
     print "frequency of '$_' is $chars{$_}\n"
         foreach (sort {$chars{$b} <=> $chars{$a}} keys %chars);
 
@@ -1961,23 +1962,24 @@ example, to match lower and uppercase characters,
 Here is the association between some Perl named classes and the
 traditional Unicode classes:
 
-    Perl class name  Unicode class name or regular expression
-
-    IsAlpha          /^[LM]/
-    IsAlnum          /^[LMN]/
-    IsASCII          $code <= 127
-    IsCntrl          /^C/
-    IsBlank          $code =~ /^(0020|0009)$/ || /^Z[^lp]/
-    IsDigit          Nd
-    IsGraph          /^([LMNPS]|Co)/
-    IsLower          Ll
-    IsPrint          /^([LMNPS]|Co|Zs)/
-    IsPunct          /^P/
-    IsSpace          /^Z/ || ($code =~ /^(0009|000A|000B|000C|000D)$/
-    IsSpacePerl      /^Z/ || ($code =~ /^(0009|000A|000C|000D|0085|2028|2029)$/
-    IsUpper          /^L[ut]/
-    IsWord           /^[LMN]/ || $code eq "005F"
-    IsXDigit         $code =~ /^00(3[0-9]|[46][1-6])$/
+  Perl class  Unicode class name or regular expression
+  name  
+
+  IsAlpha     /^[LM]/
+  IsAlnum     /^[LMN]/
+  IsASCII     $code <= 127
+  IsCntrl     /^C/
+  IsBlank     $code =~ /^(0020|0009)$/ || /^Z[^lp]/
+  IsDigit     Nd
+  IsGraph     /^([LMNPS]|Co)/
+  IsLower     Ll
+  IsPrint     /^([LMNPS]|Co|Zs)/
+  IsPunct     /^P/
+  IsSpace     /^Z/ || ($code =~ /^(0009|000A|000B|000C|000D)$/
+  IsSpacePerl /^Z/ || ($code =~ /^(0009|000A|000C|000D|0085|2028|2029)$/
+  IsUpper     /^L[ut]/
+  IsWord      /^[LMN]/ || $code eq "005F"
+  IsXDigit    $code =~ /^00(3[0-9]|[46][1-6])$/
 
 You can also use the official Unicode class names with C<\p> and
 C<\P>, like C<\p{L}> for Unicode 'letters', C<\p{Lu}> for uppercase
@@ -2139,14 +2141,14 @@ algorithm.
     % cat > keymatch
     #!/usr/bin/perl
     $kwds = 'copy compare list print';
-    while( $command = <> ){
-        $command =~ s/^\s+|\s+$//g;  # trim leading and trailing spaces
-        if( ( @matches = $kwds =~ /\b$command\w*/g ) == 1 ){
+    while( $cmd = <> ){
+        $cmd =~ s/^\s+|\s+$//g;  # trim leading and trailing spaces
+        if( ( @matches = $kwds =~ /\b$cmd\w*/g ) == 1 ){
             print "command: '@matches'\n";
         } elsif( @matches == 0 ){
-            print "no such command: '$command'\n";
+            print "no such command: '$cmd'\n";
         } else {
-            print "not unique: '$command' (could be one of: @matches)\n";
+            print "not unique: '$cmd' (could be one of: @matches)\n";
         }
     }
     ^D
@@ -2161,7 +2163,7 @@ algorithm.
 
 Rather than trying to match the input against the keywords, we match the
 combined set of keywords against the input.  The pattern matching
-operation S<C<$kwds =~ /\b($command\w*)/g>> does several things at the
+operation S<C<$kwds =~ /\b($cmd\w*)/g>> does several things at the
 same time. It makes sure that the given command begins where a keyword
 begins (C<\b>). It tolerates abbreviations due to the added C<\w*>. It
 tells us the number of matches (C<scalar @matches>) and all the keywords
@@ -2812,14 +2814,14 @@ termcap color sequences.  Here is example output:
     Guessed: match at offset 0
     Matching REx 'a*b+c' against 'abc'
       Setting an EVAL scope, savestack=3
-       0 <> <abc>             |  1:  STAR
-                               EXACT <a> can match 1 times out of 32767...
+       0 <> <abc>           |  1:  STAR
+                             EXACT <a> can match 1 times out of 32767...
       Setting an EVAL scope, savestack=3
-       1 <a> <bc>             |  4:    PLUS
-                               EXACT <b> can match 1 times out of 32767...
+       1 <a> <bc>           |  4:    PLUS
+                             EXACT <b> can match 1 times out of 32767...
       Setting an EVAL scope, savestack=3
-       2 <ab> <c>             |  7:      EXACT <c>
-       3 <abc> <>             |  9:      END
+       2 <ab> <c>           |  7:      EXACT <c>
+       3 <abc> <>           |  9:      END
     Match successful!
     Freeing REx: 'a*b+c'
 
@@ -2851,14 +2853,14 @@ process:
 
     Matching REx 'a*b+c' against 'abc'
       Setting an EVAL scope, savestack=3
-       0 <> <abc>             |  1:  STAR
-                               EXACT <a> can match 1 times out of 32767...
+       0 <> <abc>           |  1:  STAR
+                             EXACT <a> can match 1 times out of 32767...
       Setting an EVAL scope, savestack=3
-       1 <a> <bc>             |  4:    PLUS
-                               EXACT <b> can match 1 times out of 32767...
+       1 <a> <bc>           |  4:    PLUS
+                             EXACT <b> can match 1 times out of 32767...
       Setting an EVAL scope, savestack=3
-       2 <ab> <c>             |  7:      EXACT <c>
-       3 <abc> <>             |  9:      END
+       2 <ab> <c>           |  7:      EXACT <c>
+       3 <abc> <>           |  9:      END
     Match successful!
     Freeing REx: 'a*b+c'
 
index 8a6ea6e..85ba8d5 100644 (file)
@@ -561,23 +561,23 @@ Synopsis:
 
     # localization of values
 
-    local $foo;                        # make $foo dynamically local
-    local (@wid, %get);                # make list of variables local
-    local $foo = "flurp";      # make $foo dynamic, and init it
-    local @oof = @bar;         # make @oof dynamic, and init it
+    local $foo;                       # make $foo dynamically local
+    local (@wid, %get);               # make list of variables local
+    local $foo = "flurp";      # make $foo dynamic, and init it
+    local @oof = @bar;        # make @oof dynamic, and init it
 
-    local $hash{key} = "val";  # sets a local value for this hash entry
-    delete local $hash{key};    # delete this entry for the current block
-    local ($cond ? $v1 : $v2); # several types of lvalues support
-                               # localization
+    local $hash{key} = "val";  # sets a local value for this hash entry
+    delete local $hash{key};   # delete this entry for the current block
+    local ($cond ? $v1 : $v2); # several types of lvalues support
+                              # localization
 
     # localization of symbols
 
-    local *FH;                 # localize $FH, @FH, %FH, &FH  ...
-    local *merlyn = *randal;   # now $merlyn is really $randal, plus
-                                #     @merlyn is really @randal, etc
-    local *merlyn = 'randal';  # SAME THING: promote 'randal' to *randal
-    local *merlyn = \$randal;   # just alias $merlyn, not @merlyn etc
+    local *FH;                # localize $FH, @FH, %FH, &FH  ...
+    local *merlyn = *randal;   # now $merlyn is really $randal, plus
+                               #     @merlyn is really @randal, etc
+    local *merlyn = 'randal';  # SAME THING: promote 'randal' to *randal
+    local *merlyn = \$randal;  # just alias $merlyn, not @merlyn etc
 
 A C<local> modifies its listed variables to be "local" to the
 enclosing block, C<eval>, or C<do FILE>--and to I<any subroutine
@@ -997,10 +997,10 @@ a local alias.
 
     {
         local *grow = \&shrink; # only until this block exits
-        grow();                 # really calls shrink()
-       move();                 # if move() grow()s, it shrink()s too
+        grow();                # really calls shrink()
+       move();                # if move() grow()s, it shrink()s too
     }
-    grow();                    # get the real grow() again
+    grow();                   # get the real grow() again
 
 See L<perlref/"Function Templates"> for more about manipulating
 functions by name in this way.
@@ -1164,22 +1164,22 @@ subroutines that work like built-in functions, here are prototypes
 for some other functions that parse almost exactly like the
 corresponding built-in.
 
-    Declared as                        Called as
-
-    sub mylink ($$)         mylink $old, $new
-    sub myvec ($$$)         myvec $var, $offset, 1
-    sub myindex ($$;$)      myindex &getstring, "substr"
-    sub mysyswrite ($$$;$)   mysyswrite $buf, 0, length($buf) - $off, $off
-    sub myreverse (@)       myreverse $a, $b, $c
-    sub myjoin ($@)         myjoin ":", $a, $b, $c
-    sub mypop (+)           mypop @array
-    sub mysplice (+$$@)             mysplice @array, 0, 2, @pushme
-    sub mykeys (+)          mykeys %{$hashref}
-    sub myopen (*;$)        myopen HANDLE, $name
-    sub mypipe (**)         mypipe READHANDLE, WRITEHANDLE
-    sub mygrep (&@)         mygrep { /foo/ } $a, $b, $c
-    sub myrand (;$)         myrand 42
-    sub mytime ()           mytime
+   Declared as            Called as
+
+   sub mylink ($$)        mylink $old, $new
+   sub myvec ($$$)        myvec $var, $offset, 1
+   sub myindex ($$;$)     myindex &getstring, "substr"
+   sub mysyswrite ($$$;$)  mysyswrite $buf, 0, length($buf) - $off, $off
+   sub myreverse (@)      myreverse $a, $b, $c
+   sub myjoin ($@)        myjoin ":", $a, $b, $c
+   sub mypop (+)          mypop @array
+   sub mysplice (+$$@)    mysplice @array, 0, 2, @pushme
+   sub mykeys (+)         mykeys %{$hashref}
+   sub myopen (*;$)       myopen HANDLE, $name
+   sub mypipe (**)        mypipe READHANDLE, WRITEHANDLE
+   sub mygrep (&@)        mygrep { /foo/ } $a, $b, $c
+   sub myrand (;$)        myrand 42
+   sub mytime ()          mytime
 
 Any backslashed prototype character represents an actual argument
 that must start with that character (optionally preceded by C<my>,
index c1372a3..e885bb2 100644 (file)
@@ -173,7 +173,8 @@ enabled. If your program can't run without them, you can say something
 like:
 
     use Config;
-    $Config{useithreads} or die('Recompile Perl with threads to run this program.');
+    $Config{useithreads} or
+        die('Recompile Perl with threads to run this program.');
 
 A possibly-threaded program using a possibly-threaded module might
 have code like this:
index c3223d6..27178b7 100644 (file)
@@ -518,14 +518,14 @@ Perl functions were implemented in the VMS port of Perl
     caller, chdir, chmod, chown, chomp, chop, chr,
     close, closedir, cos, crypt*, defined, delete, die, do, dump*, 
     each, endgrent, endpwent, eof, eval, exec*, exists, exit, exp, 
-    fileno, flock  getc, getgrent*, getgrgid*, getgrnam, getlogin, getppid,
-    getpwent*, getpwnam*, getpwuid*, glob, gmtime*, goto,
+    fileno, flock  getc, getgrent*, getgrgid*, getgrnam, getlogin,
+    getppid, getpwent*, getpwnam*, getpwuid*, glob, gmtime*, goto,
     grep, hex, ioctl, import, index, int, join, keys, kill*,
-    last, lc, lcfirst, lchown*, length, link*, local, localtime, log, lstat, m//,
-    map, mkdir, my, next, no, oct, open, opendir, ord, pack,
-    pipe, pop, pos, print, printf, push, q//, qq//, qw//,
-    qx//*, quotemeta, rand, read, readdir, readlink*, redo, ref, rename,
-    require, reset, return, reverse, rewinddir, rindex,
+    last, lc, lcfirst, lchown*, length, link*, local, localtime, log,
+    lstat, m//, map, mkdir, my, next, no, oct, open, opendir, ord,
+    pack, pipe, pop, pos, print, printf, push, q//, qq//, qw//,
+    qx//*, quotemeta, rand, read, readdir, readlink*, redo, ref,
+    rename, require, reset, return, reverse, rewinddir, rindex,
     rmdir, s///, scalar, seek, seekdir, select(internal),
     select (system call)*, setgrent, setpwent, shift, sin, sleep,
     socketpair, sort, splice, split, sprintf, sqrt, srand, stat,
index 095d592..3215d19 100644 (file)
@@ -4,36 +4,37 @@ PerlUtil - a C++ utility class for Perl/Symbian
 
 =head1 SYNOPSIS
 
-       // in your App.mmp
-       USERINCLUDE     \symbian\perl\x.y.z\include
-       LIBRARY         perlXYZ.lib
-
-       // in your App
-       #include "PerlUtil.h" // includes also EXTERN.h and perl.h
-
-       // Static methods for moving between Perl strings (SvPV)
-       // and Symbian strings (HBufC and TDes).
-
-        static SV*       newSvPVfromTDesC8(const TDesC8& aDes);
-        static void      setSvPVfromTDesC8(SV* sv, const TDesC8& aDes);
-        static HBufC8*   newHBufC8fromSvPV(SV* sv);
-        static void      setTDes8fromSvPV(TDes8* aDes8, SV* sv);
-
-        static SV*       newSvPVfromTDesC16(const TDesC16& aDes);
-        static void      setSvPVfromTDesC16(SV* sv, const TDesC16& aDes);
-        static HBufC16*  newHBufC16fromSvPV(SV* sv);
-        static void      setTDes16fromSvPV(TDes16* aDes16, SV* sv);
-
-        static HBufC8*   newHBufC8fromPVn(const U8* s, STRLEN n);
-        static void      setTDes8fromPVn(TDes8* aDes8, const U8* s, STRLEN n);
-        static HBufC16*  newHBufC16fromPVn(const U8* s, STRLEN n, bool utf8);
-        static void      setTDes16fromPVn(TDes16* aDes16, const U8* s, STRLEN n);
-       // An example
-
-       const U8* s = (const U8 *)"foo";
-       HBufC16* b = PerlUtil::newHBufC16fromPVn(s, 3, 0);
-       someCallWithConstTDesCRefArgument(*b);
-       delete b;
+   // in your App.mmp
+   USERINCLUDE \symbian\perl\x.y.z\include
+   LIBRARY     perlXYZ.lib
+
+   // in your App
+   #include "PerlUtil.h" // includes also EXTERN.h and perl.h
+
+   // Static methods for moving between Perl strings (SvPV)
+   // and Symbian strings (HBufC and TDes).
+
+   static SV*      newSvPVfromTDesC8(const TDesC8& aDes);
+   static void     setSvPVfromTDesC8(SV* sv, const TDesC8& aDes);
+   static HBufC8*  newHBufC8fromSvPV(SV* sv);
+   static void     setTDes8fromSvPV(TDes8* aDes8, SV* sv);
+
+   static SV*      newSvPVfromTDesC16(const TDesC16& aDes);
+   static void     setSvPVfromTDesC16(SV* sv, const TDesC16& aDes);
+   static HBufC16* newHBufC16fromSvPV(SV* sv);
+   static void     setTDes16fromSvPV(TDes16* aDes16, SV* sv);
+
+   static HBufC8*  newHBufC8fromPVn(const U8* s, STRLEN n);
+   static void     setTDes8fromPVn(TDes8* aDes8, const U8* s, STRLEN n);
+   static HBufC16* newHBufC16fromPVn(const U8* s, STRLEN n, bool utf8);
+   static void  setTDes16fromPVn(TDes16* aDes16, const U8* s, STRLEN n);
+
+   // An example
+
+   const U8* s = (const U8 *)"foo";
+   HBufC16* b = PerlUtil::newHBufC16fromPVn(s, 3, 0);
+   someCallWithConstTDesCRefArgument(*b);
+   delete b;
 
 =cut