Pod style
authorNathan Torkington <gnat@prometheus.frii.com>
Wed, 2 Apr 1997 20:34:15 +0000 (08:34 +1200)
committerChip Salzenberg <chip@atlantic.net>
Wed, 2 Apr 1997 22:03:25 +0000 (10:03 +1200)
15 files changed:
pod/perlcall.pod
pod/perldata.pod
pod/perldebug.pod
pod/perldiag.pod
pod/perlform.pod
pod/perlfunc.pod
pod/perlipc.pod
pod/perllocale.pod
pod/perlmod.pod
pod/perlop.pod
pod/perlre.pod
pod/perlrun.pod
pod/perlstyle.pod
pod/perltoc.pod
pod/perlvar.pod

index b69c539..0bfd142 100644 (file)
@@ -1795,7 +1795,7 @@ series of C functions to act as the interface to Perl, thus
 
 In this case the functions C<fn1>, C<fn2>, and C<fn3> are used to
 remember the Perl subroutine to be called. Each of the functions holds
-a separate hardwired index which is used in the function C<Pcb> to
+a separate hard-wired index which is used in the function C<Pcb> to
 access the C<Map> array and actually call the Perl subroutine.
 
 There are some obvious disadvantages with this technique.
@@ -1803,7 +1803,7 @@ There are some obvious disadvantages with this technique.
 Firstly, the code is considerably more complex than with the previous
 example.
 
-Secondly, there is a hardwired limit (in this case 3) to the number of
+Secondly, there is a hard-wired limit (in this case 3) to the number of
 callbacks that can exist simultaneously. The only way to increase the
 limit is by modifying the code to add more functions and then
 recompiling.  None the less, as long as the number of functions is
index 2a43319..0dbb92a 100644 (file)
@@ -190,7 +190,7 @@ intervening values.  Lengthening an array that was previously shortened
 I<NO LONGER> recovers the values that were in those elements.  (It used to
 in Perl 4, but we had to break this to make sure destructors were
 called when expected.)  You can also gain some measure of efficiency by
-preextending an array that is going to get big.  (You can also extend
+pre-extending an array that is going to get big.  (You can also extend
 an array by assigning to an element that is off the end of the array.)
 You can truncate an array down to nothing by assigning the null list ()
 to it.  The following are equivalent:
index 25abfd6..86a3216 100644 (file)
@@ -468,37 +468,37 @@ See L<"Debugger Internals"> below for more details.
 =item E<lt> [ command ]
 
 Set an action (Perl command) to happen before every debugger prompt.
-A multiline command may be entered by backslashing the newlines.  If
+A multi-line command may be entered by backslashing the newlines.  If
 C<command> is missing, resets the list of actions.
 
 =item E<lt>E<lt> command
 
 Add an action (Perl command) to happen before every debugger prompt.
-A multiline command may be entered by backslashing the newlines.
+A multi-line command may be entered by backslashing the newlines.
 
 =item E<gt> command
 
 Set an action (Perl command) to happen after the prompt when you've
-just given a command to return to executing the script.  A multiline
+just given a command to return to executing the script.  A multi-line
 command may be entered by backslashing the newlines.  If C<command> is
 missing, resets the list of actions.
 
 =item E<gt>E<gt> command
 
 Adds an action (Perl command) to happen after the prompt when you've
-just given a command to return to executing the script.  A multiline
+just given a command to return to executing the script.  A multi-line
 command may be entered by backslashing the newlines.
 
 =item { [ command ]
 
 Set an action (debugger command) to happen before every debugger prompt.
-A multiline command may be entered by backslashing the newlines.  If
+A multi-line command may be entered by backslashing the newlines.  If
 C<command> is missing, resets the list of actions.
 
 =item {{ command
 
 Add an action (debugger command) to happen before every debugger prompt.
-A multiline command may be entered by backslashing the newlines.
+A multi-line command may be entered by backslashing the newlines.
 
 =item ! number
 
@@ -602,7 +602,7 @@ expression via C<s/n/t expression> command.
 
 =item Multiline commands
 
-If you want to enter a multiline command, such as a subroutine
+If you want to enter a multi-line command, such as a subroutine
 definition with several statements, or a format, you may escape the
 newline that would normally end the debugger command with a backslash.
 Here's an example:
index 49eb22e..89c8a2a 100644 (file)
@@ -2454,7 +2454,7 @@ Use an explicit printf() or sprintf() instead.
 
 =item Use of $* is deprecated
 
-(D) This variable magically turned on multiline pattern matching, both for
+(D) This variable magically turned on multi-line pattern matching, both for
 you and for any luckless subroutine that you happen to call.  You should
 use the new C<//m> and C<//s> modifiers now to do that without the dangerous
 action-at-a-distance effects of C<$*>.
index 75351b6..7e540b8 100644 (file)
@@ -53,7 +53,7 @@ that substitute values into the line.  Each field in a picture line starts
 with either "@" (at) or "^" (caret).  These lines do not undergo any kind
 of variable interpolation.  The at field (not to be confused with the array
 marker @) is the normal kind of field; the other kind, caret fields, are used
-to do rudimentary multiline text block filling.  The length of the field
+to do rudimentary multi-line text block filling.  The length of the field
 is supplied by padding out the field with multiple "E<lt>", "E<gt>", or "|"
 characters to specify, respectively, left justification, right
 justification, or centering.  If the variable would exceed the width
@@ -63,7 +63,7 @@ As an alternate form of right justification, you may also use "#"
 characters (with an optional ".") to specify a numeric field.  This way
 you can line up the decimal points.  If any value supplied for these
 fields contains a newline, only the text up to the newline is printed.
-Finally, the special field "@*" can be used for printing multiline,
+Finally, the special field "@*" can be used for printing multi-line,
 nontruncated values; it should appear by itself on a line.
 
 The values are specified on the following line in the same order as
index be75e87..84a794a 100644 (file)
@@ -3805,7 +3805,7 @@ examples.
 
 =item write
 
-Writes a formatted record (possibly multiline) to the specified file,
+Writes a formatted record (possibly multi-line) to the specified file,
 using the format associated with that file.  By default the format for
 a file is the one having the same name as the filehandle, but the
 format for the current output channel (see the select() function) may be set
index 7dc1c7a..86dda59 100644 (file)
@@ -483,7 +483,7 @@ If you're not writing a server/client for an existing protocol like
 NNTP or SMTP, you should give some thought to how your server will
 know when the client has finished talking, and vice-versa.  Most
 protocols are based on one-line messages and responses (so one party
-knows the other has finished when a "\n" is received) or multiline
+knows the other has finished when a "\n" is received) or multi-line
 messages and responses that end with a period on an empty line
 ("\n.\n" terminates a message/response).
 
index ca8518f..e1bf5f0 100644 (file)
@@ -46,7 +46,7 @@ B<Definitions for the locales which you use must be installed>.  You, or
 your system administrator, must make sure that this is the case. The
 available locales, the location in which they are kept, and the manner
 in which they are installed, vary from system to system.  Some systems
-provide only a few, hardwired, locales, and do not allow more to be
+provide only a few, hard-wired, locales, and do not allow more to be
 added; others allow you to add "canned" locales provided by the system
 supplier; still others allow you or the system administrator to define
 and add arbitrary locales.  (You may have to ask your supplier to
index 29f9059..0b384ab 100644 (file)
@@ -1106,7 +1106,7 @@ Inherit methods from other modules if appropriate.
 
 Avoid class name tests like: C<die "Invalid" unless ref $ref eq 'FOO'>.
 Generally you can delete the "C<eq 'FOO'>" part with no harm at all.
-Let the objects look after themselves! Generally, avoid hardwired
+Let the objects look after themselves! Generally, avoid hard-wired
 class names as far as possible.
 
 Avoid C<$r-E<gt>Class::func()> where using C<@ISA=qw(... Class ...)> and
index 8555b6c..45dafaa 100644 (file)
@@ -797,7 +797,7 @@ A double-quoted, interpolated string.
 
 A string which is interpolated and then executed as a system command.
 The collected standard output of the command is returned.  In scalar
-context, it comes back as a single (potentially multiline) string.
+context, it comes back as a single (potentially multi-line) string.
 In list context, returns a list of lines (however you've defined lines
 with $/ or $INPUT_RECORD_SEPARATOR).
 
index 68964a0..f881a3b 100644 (file)
@@ -80,13 +80,13 @@ beginning of the string, the "$" character at only the end (or before the
 newline at the end) and Perl does certain optimizations with the
 assumption that the string contains only one line.  Embedded newlines
 will not be matched by "^" or "$".  You may, however, wish to treat a
-string as a multiline buffer, such that the "^" will match after any
+string as a multi-line buffer, such that the "^" will match after any
 newline within the string, and "$" will match before any newline.  At the
 cost of a little more overhead, you can do this by using the /m modifier
 on the pattern match operator.  (Older programs did this by setting C<$*>,
 but this practice is now deprecated.)
 
-To facilitate multiline substitutions, the "." character never matches a
+To facilitate multi-line substitutions, the "." character never matches a
 newline unless you use the C</s> modifier, which in effect tells Perl to pretend
 the string is a single line--even if it isn't.  The C</s> modifier also
 overrides the setting of C<$*>, in case you have some (badly behaved) older
index dd467a5..33beee7 100644 (file)
@@ -113,7 +113,7 @@ distribution for more information).
 The Win95/NT installation, when using the Activeware port of Perl,
 will modify the Registry to associate the .pl extension with the perl
 interpreter.  If you install another port of Perl, including the one
-in the win32 directory of the Perl distribution, then you'll have to
+in the Win32 directory of the Perl distribution, then you'll have to
 modify the Registry yourself.
 
 =item Macintosh
@@ -258,7 +258,7 @@ may be used to enter one line of script.
 If B<-e> is given, Perl
 will not look for a script filename in the argument list.
 Multiple B<-e> commands may
-be given to build up a multiline script.
+be given to build up a multi-line script.
 Make sure to use semicolons where you would in a normal program.
 
 =item B<-F>I<pattern>
index 8adb901..bfc94a9 100644 (file)
@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@ useful.
 
 Regarding aesthetics of code lay out, about the only thing Larry
 cares strongly about is that the closing curly brace of
-a multiline BLOCK should line up with the keyword that started the construct.
+a multi-line BLOCK should line up with the keyword that started the construct.
 Beyond that, he has other preferences that aren't so strong:
 
 =over 4
@@ -32,7 +32,7 @@ Opening curly on same line as keyword, if possible, otherwise line up.
 
 =item *
 
-Space before the opening curly of a multiline BLOCK.
+Space before the opening curly of a multi-line BLOCK.
 
 =item *
 
index 20465c5..467f02c 100644 (file)
@@ -897,6 +897,8 @@ constant NAME => VALUE, use locale, use ops, use vmsish
 
 =item Math::Complex
 
+=item Math::Trig
+
 =item DB_File
 
 =item Net::Ping
@@ -2681,7 +2683,7 @@ C<strict refs>, C<strict vars>, C<strict subs>
 
 =item SEE ALSO
 
-=head2 AutoLoader - load functions only on demand
+=head2 AutoLoader - load subroutines only on demand
 
 =item SYNOPSIS
 
@@ -2689,17 +2691,21 @@ C<strict refs>, C<strict vars>, C<strict subs>
 
 =over
 
-=item __END__
+=item Subroutine Stubs
+
+=item Using B<AutoLoader>'s AUTOLOAD Subroutine
 
-=item Loading Stubs
+=item Overriding B<AutoLoader>'s AUTOLOAD Subroutine
 
 =item Package Lexicals
 
-=item AutoLoader vs. SelfLoader
+=item B<AutoLoader> vs. B<SelfLoader>
 
 =back
 
-=item CAVEAT
+=item CAVEATS
+
+=item SEE ALSO
 
 =head2 AutoSplit - split a package for autoloading
 
@@ -4087,10 +4093,28 @@ functions
 
 =item USAGE
 
+=item CAVEATS
+
 =item BUGS
 
 =item AUTHORS
 
+=head2 Math::Trig - trigonometric functions
+
+=item SYNOPSIS
+
+=item DESCRIPTION
+
+=item TRIGONOMETRIC FUNCTIONS
+
+=over
+
+=item SIMPLE ARGUMENTS, COMPLEX RESULTS
+
+=back
+
+=item ANGLE CONVERSIONS
+
 =head2 NDBM_File - Tied access to ndbm files
 
 =item SYNOPSIS
index b569465..00b97ba 100644 (file)
@@ -162,7 +162,7 @@ This variable is read-only.
 
 =item $*
 
-Set to 1 to do multiline matching within a string, 0 to tell Perl
+Set to 1 to do multi-line matching within a string, 0 to tell Perl
 that it can assume that strings contain a single line, for the purpose
 of optimizing pattern matches.  Pattern matches on strings containing
 multiple newlines can produce confusing results when "C<$*>" is 0.  Default
@@ -200,7 +200,7 @@ number.)
 The input record separator, newline by default.  Works like B<awk>'s RS
 variable, including treating empty lines as delimiters if set to the
 null string.  (Note: An empty line cannot contain any spaces or tabs.)
-You may set it to a multicharacter string to match a multicharacter
+You may set it to a multi-character string to match a multi-character
 delimiter, or to C<undef> to read to end of file.  Note that setting it
 to C<"\n\n"> means something slightly different than setting it to
 C<"">, if the file contains consecutive empty lines.  Setting it to