Update podlators to CPAN version 2.4.0
authorChris 'BinGOs' Williams <chris@bingosnet.co.uk>
Mon, 18 Oct 2010 14:00:04 +0000 (15:00 +0100)
committerChris 'BinGOs' Williams <chris@bingosnet.co.uk>
Mon, 18 Oct 2010 14:03:19 +0000 (15:03 +0100)
  The new perlpodstyle.pod has been located to pod/

  Changes were necessary to mkppport because of a new dependency on
  Encode in podlators that stopped it being built before Encode was built.

  [DELTA]

  2010-10-10  Russ Allbery  <rra@stanford.edu>

  * VERSION: podlators 2.4.0 released.

  * scripts/pod2man: Remove the code to generate the #! line and
  supporting code and instead rely on ExtUtils::MakeMaker to handle
  that during package build.
  * scripts/pod2text: Likewise.
  * scripts/pod2man.PL: Renamed to pod2man.
  * scripts/pod2text.PL: Renamed to pod2text.
  * Makefile.PL: Remove PL_FILES section.

  * pod/perlpodstyle.pod: New style guide for POD documentation,
  split mostly from the NOTES section of the pod2man man page.
  * scripts/pod2man.PL: Remove NOTES section, now maintained as the
  separate perlpodstyle document.
  * Makefile.PL: Add perlpodstyle.1 to the generated man pages.

  * lib/Pod/Man.pm (cmd_para): Do not strip escaped trailing
  whitespace, such as that created by S<> at the end of a line,
  since the backslash is then taken by *roff as escaping the
  newline.  Thanks, Kevin Ryde.
  * t/man.t: Test S<> at the end of lines.

  * lib/Pod/Man.pm (output): If the utf8 option is given, encode
  output in UTF-8 if there is no encoding layer.  Now requires the
  Encode module.
  (start_document): Rather than forcibly change the PerlIO encoding
  layer, probe the PerlIO layers with protection for Perl versions
  without PerlIO and set a flag indicating whether to encode on the
  fly on output.
  * lib/Pod/Text.pm: Likewise.
  * Makefile.PL: Mark Encode as required.
  * t/man-perlio.t: Test Pod::Man output to a file handle with a
  PerlIO encoding layer already applied.
  * t/text-perlio.t: Likewise for Pod::Text.

16 files changed:
MANIFEST
Porting/Maintainers.pl
cpan/podlators/Makefile.PL [new file with mode: 0644]
cpan/podlators/VERSION
cpan/podlators/lib/Pod/Man.pm
cpan/podlators/lib/Pod/Text.pm
cpan/podlators/scripts/pod2man [new file with mode: 0644]
cpan/podlators/scripts/pod2man.PL [deleted file]
cpan/podlators/scripts/pod2text [moved from cpan/podlators/scripts/pod2text.PL with 85% similarity]
cpan/podlators/t/man-perlio.t [new file with mode: 0644]
cpan/podlators/t/man-utf8.t
cpan/podlators/t/man.t
cpan/podlators/t/text-perlio.t [new file with mode: 0644]
mkppport
pod/perldelta.pod
pod/perlpodstyle.pod [new file with mode: 0644]

index df1c2b7..db0ba97 100644 (file)
--- a/MANIFEST
+++ b/MANIFEST
@@ -1644,8 +1644,9 @@ cpan/podlators/lib/Pod/Text/Color.pm              Convert POD data to color ASCII text
 cpan/podlators/lib/Pod/Text/Overstrike.pm      Convert POD data to formatted overstrike text
 cpan/podlators/lib/Pod/Text.pm                 Pod-Parser - convert POD data to formatted ASCII text
 cpan/podlators/lib/Pod/Text/Termcap.pm         Convert POD data to ASCII text with format escapes
-cpan/podlators/scripts/pod2man.PL      Precursor for translator to turn pod into manpage
-cpan/podlators/scripts/pod2text.PL     Precursor for translator to turn pod into text
+cpan/podlators/Makefile.PL                     Convert POD data to *roff
+cpan/podlators/scripts/pod2man Precursor for translator to turn pod into manpage
+cpan/podlators/scripts/pod2text        Precursor for translator to turn pod into text
 cpan/podlators/t/basic.cap                     podlators test
 cpan/podlators/t/basic.clr                     podlators test
 cpan/podlators/t/basic.man                     podlators test
@@ -1658,6 +1659,7 @@ cpan/podlators/t/devise-date.t                    podlators test
 cpan/podlators/t/filehandle.t                  podlators test
 cpan/podlators/t/man-heading.t                 podlators test
 cpan/podlators/t/man-options.t                 podlators test
+cpan/podlators/t/man-perlio.t                          podlators test
 cpan/podlators/t/man.t                         podlators test
 cpan/podlators/t/man-utf8.t                    podlators test
 cpan/podlators/t/overstrike.t                  podlators test
@@ -1668,6 +1670,7 @@ cpan/podlators/t/pod.t                            podlators test
 cpan/podlators/t/termcap.t                     podlators test
 cpan/podlators/t/text-encoding.t               podlators test
 cpan/podlators/t/text-options.t                        podlators test
+cpan/podlators/t/text-perlio.t                 podlators test
 cpan/podlators/t/text.t                                podlators test
 cpan/podlators/t/text-utf8.t                   podlators test
 cpan/podlators/VERSION                         podlators distribution version
@@ -4138,6 +4141,7 @@ pod/perlperf.pod          Perl Performance and Optimization Techniques
 pod/perl.pod                   Perl overview (this section)
 pod/perlpod.pod                        Perl plain old documentation
 pod/perlpodspec.pod            Perl plain old documentation format specification
+pod/perlpodstyle.pod           Perl POD style guide
 pod/perlpolicy.pod             Perl development policies
 pod/perlport.pod               Perl portability guide
 pod/perlpragma.pod             Perl modules: writing a user pragma
index 84d9d17..ea94d2b 100755 (executable)
@@ -1201,8 +1201,9 @@ use File::Glob qw(:case);
     'podlators' =>
        {
        'MAINTAINER'    => 'rra',
-       'DISTRIBUTION'  => 'RRA/podlators-2.3.1.tar.gz',
+       'DISTRIBUTION'  => 'RRA/podlators-2.4.0.tar.gz',
        'FILES'         => q[cpan/podlators],
+       'MAP'           => { 'pod/perlpodstyle.pod'     => 'pod/perlpodstyle.pod', },
        'UPSTREAM'      => 'cpan',
        },
 
diff --git a/cpan/podlators/Makefile.PL b/cpan/podlators/Makefile.PL
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..7b8566d
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,12 @@
+use strict;
+use ExtUtils::MakeMaker;
+
+WriteMakefile (
+    NAME            => 'Pod',
+    DISTNAME        => 'podlators',
+    VERSION_FROM    => 'VERSION', # finds $VERSION
+    EXE_FILES       => [ 'scripts/pod2man', 'scripts/pod2text' ],
+    INSTALLDIRS     => ( $] >= 5.006 ? 'perl' : 'site' ),
+    AUTHOR          => 'Russ Allbery (rra@stanford.edu)',
+    ABSTRACT        => 'Convert POD data to various other formats'
+);
index 18d2b72..fd896ea 100644 (file)
@@ -1 +1 @@
-$VERSION = '2.3.1';
+$VERSION = '2.4.0';
index 9339f83..96f3fcc 100644 (file)
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
 # Pod::Man -- Convert POD data to formatted *roff input.
 #
-# Copyright 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009
-#     Russ Allbery <rra@stanford.edu>
+# Copyright 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009,
+#     2010 Russ Allbery <rra@stanford.edu>
 # Substantial contributions by Sean Burke <sburke@cpan.org>
 #
 # This program is free software; you may redistribute it and/or modify it
@@ -31,11 +31,12 @@ use subs qw(makespace);
 use vars qw(@ISA %ESCAPES $PREAMBLE $VERSION);
 
 use Carp qw(croak);
+use Encode qw(encode);
 use Pod::Simple ();
 
 @ISA = qw(Pod::Simple);
 
-$VERSION = '2.23';
+$VERSION = '2.25';
 
 # Set the debugging level.  If someone has inserted a debug function into this
 # class already, use that.  Otherwise, use any Pod::Simple debug function
@@ -723,7 +724,11 @@ sub outindex {
 # Output some text, without any additional changes.
 sub output {
     my ($self, @text) = @_;
-    print { $$self{output_fh} } @text;
+    if ($$self{ENCODE}) {
+        print { $$self{output_fh} } encode ('UTF-8', join ('', @text));
+    } else {
+        print { $$self{output_fh} } @text;
+    }
 }
 
 ##############################################################################
@@ -740,17 +745,19 @@ sub start_document {
         return;
     }
 
-    # If we were given the utf8 option, set an output encoding on our file
-    # handle.  Wrap in an eval in case we're using a version of Perl too old
-    # to understand this.
-    #
-    # This is evil because it changes the global state of a file handle that
-    # we may not own.  However, we can't just blindly encode all output, since
-    # there may be a pre-applied output encoding (such as from PERL_UNICODE)
-    # and then we would double-encode.  This seems to be the least bad
-    # approach.
+    # When UTF-8 output is set, check whether our output file handle already
+    # has a PerlIO encoding layer set.  If it does not, we'll need to encode
+    # our output before printing it (handled in the output() sub).  Wrap the
+    # check in an eval to handle versions of Perl without PerlIO.
+    $$self{ENCODE} = 0;
     if ($$self{utf8}) {
-        eval { binmode ($$self{output_fh}, ':encoding(UTF-8)') };
+        $$self{ENCODE} = 1;
+        eval {
+            my @layers = PerlIO::get_layers ($$self{output_fh});
+            if (grep { $_ eq 'utf8' } @layers) {
+                $$self{ENCODE} = 0;
+            }
+        }
     }
 
     # Determine information for the preamble and then output it.
@@ -949,8 +956,9 @@ sub cmd_para {
         if defined ($line) && DEBUG && !$$self{IN_NAME};
 
     # Force exactly one newline at the end and strip unwanted trailing
-    # whitespace at the end.
-    $text =~ s/\s*$/\n/;
+    # whitespace at the end, but leave "\ " backslashed space from an S< >
+    # at the end of a line.
+    $text =~ s/((?:\\ )*)\s*$/$1\n/;
 
     # Output the paragraph.
     $self->output ($self->protect ($self->textmapfonts ($text)));
index c68313c..cc02820 100644 (file)
@@ -29,6 +29,7 @@ use strict;
 use vars qw(@ISA @EXPORT %ESCAPES $VERSION);
 
 use Carp qw(carp croak);
+use Encode qw(encode);
 use Exporter ();
 use Pod::Simple ();
 
@@ -37,7 +38,7 @@ use Pod::Simple ();
 # We have to export pod2text for backward compatibility.
 @EXPORT = qw(pod2text);
 
-$VERSION = '3.14';
+$VERSION = '3.15';
 
 ##############################################################################
 # Initialization
@@ -250,7 +251,8 @@ sub reformat {
 # necessary to match the input encoding unless UTF-8 output is forced.  This
 # preserves the traditional pass-through behavior of Pod::Text.
 sub output {
-    my ($self, $text) = @_;
+    my ($self, @text) = @_;
+    my $text = join ('', @text);
     $text =~ tr/\240\255/ /d;
     unless ($$self{opt_utf8} || $$self{CHECKED_ENCODING}) {
         my $encoding = $$self{encoding} || '';
@@ -259,7 +261,11 @@ sub output {
         }
         $$self{CHECKED_ENCODING} = 1;
     }
-    print { $$self{output_fh} } $text;
+    if ($$self{ENCODE}) {
+        print { $$self{output_fh} } encode ('UTF-8', $text);
+    } else {
+        print { $$self{output_fh} } $text;
+    }
 }
 
 # Output a block of code (something that isn't part of the POD text).  Called
@@ -284,17 +290,19 @@ sub start_document {
     # We have to redo encoding handling for each document.
     delete $$self{CHECKED_ENCODING};
 
-    # If we were given the utf8 option, set an output encoding on our file
-    # handle.  Wrap in an eval in case we're using a version of Perl too old
-    # to understand this.
-    #
-    # This is evil because it changes the global state of a file handle that
-    # we may not own.  However, we can't just blindly encode all output, since
-    # there may be a pre-applied output encoding (such as from PERL_UNICODE)
-    # and then we would double-encode.  This seems to be the least bad
-    # approach.
+    # When UTF-8 output is set, check whether our output file handle already
+    # has a PerlIO encoding layer set.  If it does not, we'll need to encode
+    # our output before printing it (handled in the output() sub).  Wrap the
+    # check in an eval to handle versions of Perl without PerlIO.
+    $$self{ENCODE} = 0;
     if ($$self{opt_utf8}) {
-        eval { binmode ($$self{output_fh}, ':encoding(UTF-8)') };
+        $$self{ENCODE} = 1;
+        eval {
+            my @layers = PerlIO::get_layers ($$self{output_fh});
+            if (grep { $_ eq 'utf8' } @layers) {
+                $$self{ENCODE} = 0;
+            }
+        };
     }
 
     return '';
diff --git a/cpan/podlators/scripts/pod2man b/cpan/podlators/scripts/pod2man
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..0a0ec4a
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,303 @@
+#!perl
+
+# pod2man -- Convert POD data to formatted *roff input.
+#
+# Copyright 1999, 2000, 2001, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010
+#     Russ Allbery <rra@stanford.edu>
+#
+# This program is free software; you may redistribute it and/or modify it
+# under the same terms as Perl itself.
+
+require 5.004;
+
+use Getopt::Long qw(GetOptions);
+use Pod::Man ();
+use Pod::Usage qw(pod2usage);
+
+use strict;
+
+# Insert -- into @ARGV before any single dash argument to hide it from
+# Getopt::Long; we want to interpret it as meaning stdin.
+my $stdin;
+@ARGV = map { $_ eq '-' && !$stdin++ ? ('--', $_) : $_ } @ARGV;
+
+# Parse our options, trying to retain backward compatibility with pod2man but
+# allowing short forms as well.  --lax is currently ignored.
+my %options;
+$options{errors} = 'pod';
+Getopt::Long::config ('bundling_override');
+GetOptions (\%options, 'center|c=s', 'date|d=s', 'fixed=s', 'fixedbold=s',
+            'fixeditalic=s', 'fixedbolditalic=s', 'help|h', 'lax|l',
+            'name|n=s', 'official|o', 'quotes|q=s', 'release|r:s',
+            'section|s=s', 'stderr', 'verbose|v', 'utf8|u') or exit 1;
+pod2usage (0) if $options{help};
+
+# Official sets --center, but don't override things explicitly set.
+if ($options{official} && !defined $options{center}) {
+    $options{center} = 'Perl Programmers Reference Guide';
+}
+
+# Verbose is only our flag, not a Pod::Man flag.
+my $verbose = $options{verbose};
+delete $options{verbose};
+
+# This isn't a valid Pod::Man option and is only accepted for backward
+# compatibility.
+delete $options{lax};
+
+# Initialize and run the formatter, pulling a pair of input and output off at
+# a time.
+my $parser = Pod::Man->new (%options);
+my @files;
+do {
+    @files = splice (@ARGV, 0, 2);
+    print "  $files[1]\n" if $verbose;
+    $parser->parse_from_file (@files);
+} while (@ARGV);
+
+__END__
+
+=head1 NAME
+
+pod2man - Convert POD data to formatted *roff input
+
+=for stopwords
+en em --stderr stderr --utf8 UTF-8 overdo markup MT-LEVEL Allbery Solaris
+URL troff troff-specific formatters uppercased Christiansen
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+pod2man [B<--center>=I<string>] [B<--date>=I<string>]
+    [B<--fixed>=I<font>] [B<--fixedbold>=I<font>] [B<--fixeditalic>=I<font>]
+    [B<--fixedbolditalic>=I<font>] [B<--name>=I<name>] [B<--official>]
+    [B<--quotes>=I<quotes>] [B<--release>[=I<version>]]
+    [B<--section>=I<manext>] [B<--stderr>] [B<--utf8>] [B<--verbose>]
+    [I<input> [I<output>] ...]
+
+pod2man B<--help>
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+B<pod2man> is a front-end for Pod::Man, using it to generate *roff input
+from POD source.  The resulting *roff code is suitable for display on a
+terminal using nroff(1), normally via man(1), or printing using troff(1).
+
+I<input> is the file to read for POD source (the POD can be embedded in
+code).  If I<input> isn't given, it defaults to C<STDIN>.  I<output>, if
+given, is the file to which to write the formatted output.  If I<output>
+isn't given, the formatted output is written to C<STDOUT>.  Several POD
+files can be processed in the same B<pod2man> invocation (saving module
+load and compile times) by providing multiple pairs of I<input> and
+I<output> files on the command line.
+
+B<--section>, B<--release>, B<--center>, B<--date>, and B<--official> can
+be used to set the headers and footers to use; if not given, Pod::Man will
+assume various defaults.  See below or L<Pod::Man> for details.
+
+B<pod2man> assumes that your *roff formatters have a fixed-width font
+named C<CW>.  If yours is called something else (like C<CR>), use
+B<--fixed> to specify it.  This generally only matters for troff output
+for printing.  Similarly, you can set the fonts used for bold, italic, and
+bold italic fixed-width output.
+
+Besides the obvious pod conversions, Pod::Man, and therefore pod2man also
+takes care of formatting func(), func(n), and simple variable references
+like $foo or @bar so you don't have to use code escapes for them; complex
+expressions like C<$fred{'stuff'}> will still need to be escaped, though.
+It also translates dashes that aren't used as hyphens into en dashes, makes
+long dashes--like this--into proper em dashes, fixes "paired quotes," and
+takes care of several other troff-specific tweaks.  See L<Pod::Man> for
+complete information.
+
+=head1 OPTIONS
+
+=over 4
+
+=item B<-c> I<string>, B<--center>=I<string>
+
+Sets the centered page header to I<string>.  The default is "User
+Contributed Perl Documentation", but also see B<--official> below.
+
+=item B<-d> I<string>, B<--date>=I<string>
+
+Set the left-hand footer string to this value.  By default, the modification
+date of the input file will be used, or the current date if input comes from
+C<STDIN>.
+
+=item B<--fixed>=I<font>
+
+The fixed-width font to use for verbatim text and code.  Defaults to
+C<CW>.  Some systems may want C<CR> instead.  Only matters for troff(1)
+output.
+
+=item B<--fixedbold>=I<font>
+
+Bold version of the fixed-width font.  Defaults to C<CB>.  Only matters
+for troff(1) output.
+
+=item B<--fixeditalic>=I<font>
+
+Italic version of the fixed-width font (actually, something of a misnomer,
+since most fixed-width fonts only have an oblique version, not an italic
+version).  Defaults to C<CI>.  Only matters for troff(1) output.
+
+=item B<--fixedbolditalic>=I<font>
+
+Bold italic (probably actually oblique) version of the fixed-width font.
+Pod::Man doesn't assume you have this, and defaults to C<CB>.  Some
+systems (such as Solaris) have this font available as C<CX>.  Only matters
+for troff(1) output.
+
+=item B<-h>, B<--help>
+
+Print out usage information.
+
+=item B<-l>, B<--lax>
+
+No longer used.  B<pod2man> used to check its input for validity as a
+manual page, but this should now be done by L<podchecker(1)> instead.
+Accepted for backward compatibility; this option no longer does anything.
+
+=item B<-n> I<name>, B<--name>=I<name>
+
+Set the name of the manual page to I<name>.  Without this option, the manual
+name is set to the uppercased base name of the file being converted unless
+the manual section is 3, in which case the path is parsed to see if it is a
+Perl module path.  If it is, a path like C<.../lib/Pod/Man.pm> is converted
+into a name like C<Pod::Man>.  This option, if given, overrides any
+automatic determination of the name.
+
+Note that this option is probably not useful when converting multiple POD
+files at once.  The convention for Unix man pages for commands is for the
+man page title to be in all-uppercase even if the command isn't.
+
+=item B<-o>, B<--official>
+
+Set the default header to indicate that this page is part of the standard
+Perl release, if B<--center> is not also given.
+
+=item B<-q> I<quotes>, B<--quotes>=I<quotes>
+
+Sets the quote marks used to surround CE<lt>> text to I<quotes>.  If
+I<quotes> is a single character, it is used as both the left and right
+quote; if I<quotes> is two characters, the first character is used as the
+left quote and the second as the right quoted; and if I<quotes> is four
+characters, the first two are used as the left quote and the second two as
+the right quote.
+
+I<quotes> may also be set to the special value C<none>, in which case no
+quote marks are added around CE<lt>> text (but the font is still changed for
+troff output).
+
+=item B<-r>, B<--release>
+
+Set the centered footer.  By default, this is the version of Perl you run
+B<pod2man> under.  Note that some system an macro sets assume that the
+centered footer will be a modification date and will prepend something like
+"Last modified: "; if this is the case, you may want to set B<--release> to
+the last modified date and B<--date> to the version number.
+
+=item B<-s>, B<--section>
+
+Set the section for the C<.TH> macro.  The standard section numbering
+convention is to use 1 for user commands, 2 for system calls, 3 for
+functions, 4 for devices, 5 for file formats, 6 for games, 7 for
+miscellaneous information, and 8 for administrator commands.  There is a lot
+of variation here, however; some systems (like Solaris) use 4 for file
+formats, 5 for miscellaneous information, and 7 for devices.  Still others
+use 1m instead of 8, or some mix of both.  About the only section numbers
+that are reliably consistent are 1, 2, and 3.
+
+By default, section 1 will be used unless the file ends in C<.pm>, in
+which case section 3 will be selected.
+
+=item B<--stderr>
+
+By default, B<pod2man> puts any errors detected in the POD input in a POD
+ERRORS section in the output manual page.  If B<--stderr> is given, errors
+are sent to standard error instead and the POD ERRORS section is
+suppressed.
+
+=item B<-u>, B<--utf8>
+
+By default, B<pod2man> produces the most conservative possible *roff
+output to try to ensure that it will work with as many different *roff
+implementations as possible.  Many *roff implementations cannot handle
+non-ASCII characters, so this means all non-ASCII characters are converted
+either to a *roff escape sequence that tries to create a properly accented
+character (at least for troff output) or to C<X>.
+
+This option says to instead output literal UTF-8 characters.  If your
+*roff implementation can handle it, this is the best output format to use
+and avoids corruption of documents containing non-ASCII characters.
+However, be warned that *roff source with literal UTF-8 characters is not
+supported by many implementations and may even result in segfaults and
+other bad behavior.
+
+Be aware that, when using this option, the input encoding of your POD
+source must be properly declared unless it is US-ASCII or Latin-1.  POD
+input without an C<=encoding> command will be assumed to be in Latin-1,
+and if it's actually in UTF-8, the output will be double-encoded.  See
+L<perlpod(1)> for more information on the C<=encoding> command.
+
+=item B<-v>, B<--verbose>
+
+Print out the name of each output file as it is being generated.
+
+=back
+
+=head1 DIAGNOSTICS
+
+If B<pod2man> fails with errors, see L<Pod::Man> and L<Pod::Simple> for
+information about what those errors might mean.
+
+=head1 EXAMPLES
+
+    pod2man program > program.1
+    pod2man SomeModule.pm /usr/perl/man/man3/SomeModule.3
+    pod2man --section=7 note.pod > note.7
+
+If you would like to print out a lot of man page continuously, you probably
+want to set the C and D registers to set contiguous page numbering and
+even/odd paging, at least on some versions of man(7).
+
+    troff -man -rC1 -rD1 perl.1 perldata.1 perlsyn.1 ...
+
+To get index entries on C<STDERR>, turn on the F register, as in:
+
+    troff -man -rF1 perl.1
+
+The indexing merely outputs messages via C<.tm> for each major page,
+section, subsection, item, and any C<XE<lt>E<gt>> directives.  See
+L<Pod::Man> for more details.
+
+=head1 BUGS
+
+Lots of this documentation is duplicated from L<Pod::Man>.
+
+=head1 SEE ALSO
+
+L<Pod::Man>, L<Pod::Simple>, L<man(1)>, L<nroff(1)>, L<perlpod(1)>,
+L<podchecker(1)>, L<perlpodstyle(1)>, L<troff(1)>, L<man(7)>
+
+The man page documenting the an macro set may be L<man(5)> instead of
+L<man(7)> on your system.
+
+The current version of this script is always available from its web site at
+L<http://www.eyrie.org/~eagle/software/podlators/>.  It is also part of the
+Perl core distribution as of 5.6.0.
+
+=head1 AUTHOR
+
+Russ Allbery <rra@stanford.edu>, based I<very> heavily on the original
+B<pod2man> by Larry Wall and Tom Christiansen.
+
+=head1 COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE
+
+Copyright 1999, 2000, 2001, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010 Russ Allbery
+<rra@stanford.edu>.
+
+This program is free software; you may redistribute it and/or modify it
+under the same terms as Perl itself.
+
+=cut
diff --git a/cpan/podlators/scripts/pod2man.PL b/cpan/podlators/scripts/pod2man.PL
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 7d7d68f..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,589 +0,0 @@
-#!/usr/local/bin/perl
-
-use Config;
-use File::Basename qw(&basename &dirname);
-use Cwd;
-
-# List explicitly here the variables you want Configure to
-# generate.  Metaconfig only looks for shell variables, so you
-# have to mention them as if they were shell variables, not
-# %Config entries.  Thus you write
-#  $startperl
-# to ensure Configure will look for $Config{startperl}.
-
-# This forces PL files to create target in same directory as PL file.
-# This is so that make depend always knows where to find PL derivatives.
-$origdir = cwd;
-chdir dirname($0);
-$file = basename($0, '.PL');
-$file .= '.com' if $^O eq 'VMS';
-
-open OUT,">$file" or die "Can't create $file: $!";
-
-print "Extracting $file (with variable substitutions)\n";
-
-# In this section, perl variables will be expanded during extraction.
-# You can use $Config{...} to use Configure variables.
-
-print OUT <<"!GROK!THIS!";
-$Config{startperl}
-    eval 'exec $Config{perlpath} -S \$0 \${1+"\$@"}'
-        if \$running_under_some_shell;
-!GROK!THIS!
-
-# In the following, perl variables are not expanded during extraction.
-
-print OUT <<'!NO!SUBS!';
-
-# pod2man -- Convert POD data to formatted *roff input.
-#
-# Copyright 1999, 2000, 2001, 2004, 2006, 2008 Russ Allbery <rra@stanford.edu>
-#
-# This program is free software; you may redistribute it and/or modify it
-# under the same terms as Perl itself.
-
-require 5.004;
-
-use Getopt::Long qw(GetOptions);
-use Pod::Man ();
-use Pod::Usage qw(pod2usage);
-
-use strict;
-
-# Silence -w warnings.
-use vars qw($running_under_some_shell);
-
-# Insert -- into @ARGV before any single dash argument to hide it from
-# Getopt::Long; we want to interpret it as meaning stdin.
-my $stdin;
-@ARGV = map { $_ eq '-' && !$stdin++ ? ('--', $_) : $_ } @ARGV;
-
-# Parse our options, trying to retain backward compatibility with pod2man but
-# allowing short forms as well.  --lax is currently ignored.
-my %options;
-$options{errors} = 'pod';
-Getopt::Long::config ('bundling_override');
-GetOptions (\%options, 'center|c=s', 'date|d=s', 'fixed=s', 'fixedbold=s',
-            'fixeditalic=s', 'fixedbolditalic=s', 'help|h', 'lax|l',
-            'name|n=s', 'official|o', 'quotes|q=s', 'release|r:s',
-            'section|s=s', 'stderr', 'verbose|v', 'utf8|u') or exit 1;
-pod2usage (0) if $options{help};
-
-# Official sets --center, but don't override things explicitly set.
-if ($options{official} && !defined $options{center}) {
-    $options{center} = 'Perl Programmers Reference Guide';
-}
-
-# Verbose is only our flag, not a Pod::Man flag.
-my $verbose = $options{verbose};
-delete $options{verbose};
-
-# This isn't a valid Pod::Man option and is only accepted for backward
-# compatibility.
-delete $options{lax};
-
-# Initialize and run the formatter, pulling a pair of input and output off at
-# a time.
-my $parser = Pod::Man->new (%options);
-my @files;
-do {
-    @files = splice (@ARGV, 0, 2);
-    print "  $files[1]\n" if $verbose;
-    $parser->parse_from_file (@files);
-} while (@ARGV);
-
-__END__
-
-=head1 NAME
-
-pod2man - Convert POD data to formatted *roff input
-
-=for stopwords
-en em --stderr stderr --utf8 UTF-8 overdo markup MT-LEVEL Allbery Solaris
-URL troff troff-specific formatters uppercased Christiansen
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-pod2man [B<--center>=I<string>] [B<--date>=I<string>]
-    [B<--fixed>=I<font>] [B<--fixedbold>=I<font>] [B<--fixeditalic>=I<font>]
-    [B<--fixedbolditalic>=I<font>] [B<--name>=I<name>] [B<--official>]
-    [B<--quotes>=I<quotes>] [B<--release>[=I<version>]]
-    [B<--section>=I<manext>] [B<--stderr>] [B<--utf8>] [B<--verbose>]
-    [I<input> [I<output>] ...]
-
-pod2man B<--help>
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-B<pod2man> is a front-end for Pod::Man, using it to generate *roff input
-from POD source.  The resulting *roff code is suitable for display on a
-terminal using nroff(1), normally via man(1), or printing using troff(1).
-
-I<input> is the file to read for POD source (the POD can be embedded in
-code).  If I<input> isn't given, it defaults to C<STDIN>.  I<output>, if
-given, is the file to which to write the formatted output.  If I<output>
-isn't given, the formatted output is written to C<STDOUT>.  Several POD
-files can be processed in the same B<pod2man> invocation (saving module
-load and compile times) by providing multiple pairs of I<input> and
-I<output> files on the command line.
-
-B<--section>, B<--release>, B<--center>, B<--date>, and B<--official> can
-be used to set the headers and footers to use; if not given, Pod::Man will
-assume various defaults.  See below or L<Pod::Man> for details.
-
-B<pod2man> assumes that your *roff formatters have a fixed-width font
-named C<CW>.  If yours is called something else (like C<CR>), use
-B<--fixed> to specify it.  This generally only matters for troff output
-for printing.  Similarly, you can set the fonts used for bold, italic, and
-bold italic fixed-width output.
-
-Besides the obvious pod conversions, Pod::Man, and therefore pod2man also
-takes care of formatting func(), func(n), and simple variable references
-like $foo or @bar so you don't have to use code escapes for them; complex
-expressions like C<$fred{'stuff'}> will still need to be escaped, though.
-It also translates dashes that aren't used as hyphens into en dashes, makes
-long dashes--like this--into proper em dashes, fixes "paired quotes," and
-takes care of several other troff-specific tweaks.  See L<Pod::Man> for
-complete information.
-
-=head1 OPTIONS
-
-=over 4
-
-=item B<-c> I<string>, B<--center>=I<string>
-
-Sets the centered page header to I<string>.  The default is "User
-Contributed Perl Documentation", but also see B<--official> below.
-
-=item B<-d> I<string>, B<--date>=I<string>
-
-Set the left-hand footer string to this value.  By default, the modification
-date of the input file will be used, or the current date if input comes from
-C<STDIN>.
-
-=item B<--fixed>=I<font>
-
-The fixed-width font to use for verbatim text and code.  Defaults to
-C<CW>.  Some systems may want C<CR> instead.  Only matters for troff(1)
-output.
-
-=item B<--fixedbold>=I<font>
-
-Bold version of the fixed-width font.  Defaults to C<CB>.  Only matters
-for troff(1) output.
-
-=item B<--fixeditalic>=I<font>
-
-Italic version of the fixed-width font (actually, something of a misnomer,
-since most fixed-width fonts only have an oblique version, not an italic
-version).  Defaults to C<CI>.  Only matters for troff(1) output.
-
-=item B<--fixedbolditalic>=I<font>
-
-Bold italic (probably actually oblique) version of the fixed-width font.
-Pod::Man doesn't assume you have this, and defaults to C<CB>.  Some
-systems (such as Solaris) have this font available as C<CX>.  Only matters
-for troff(1) output.
-
-=item B<-h>, B<--help>
-
-Print out usage information.
-
-=item B<-l>, B<--lax>
-
-No longer used.  B<pod2man> used to check its input for validity as a
-manual page, but this should now be done by L<podchecker(1)> instead.
-Accepted for backward compatibility; this option no longer does anything.
-
-=item B<-n> I<name>, B<--name>=I<name>
-
-Set the name of the manual page to I<name>.  Without this option, the manual
-name is set to the uppercased base name of the file being converted unless
-the manual section is 3, in which case the path is parsed to see if it is a
-Perl module path.  If it is, a path like C<.../lib/Pod/Man.pm> is converted
-into a name like C<Pod::Man>.  This option, if given, overrides any
-automatic determination of the name.
-
-Note that this option is probably not useful when converting multiple POD
-files at once.  The convention for Unix man pages for commands is for the
-man page title to be in all-uppercase even if the command isn't.
-
-=item B<-o>, B<--official>
-
-Set the default header to indicate that this page is part of the standard
-Perl release, if B<--center> is not also given.
-
-=item B<-q> I<quotes>, B<--quotes>=I<quotes>
-
-Sets the quote marks used to surround CE<lt>> text to I<quotes>.  If
-I<quotes> is a single character, it is used as both the left and right
-quote; if I<quotes> is two characters, the first character is used as the
-left quote and the second as the right quoted; and if I<quotes> is four
-characters, the first two are used as the left quote and the second two as
-the right quote.
-
-I<quotes> may also be set to the special value C<none>, in which case no
-quote marks are added around CE<lt>> text (but the font is still changed for
-troff output).
-
-=item B<-r>, B<--release>
-
-Set the centered footer.  By default, this is the version of Perl you run
-B<pod2man> under.  Note that some system an macro sets assume that the
-centered footer will be a modification date and will prepend something like
-"Last modified: "; if this is the case, you may want to set B<--release> to
-the last modified date and B<--date> to the version number.
-
-=item B<-s>, B<--section>
-
-Set the section for the C<.TH> macro.  The standard section numbering
-convention is to use 1 for user commands, 2 for system calls, 3 for
-functions, 4 for devices, 5 for file formats, 6 for games, 7 for
-miscellaneous information, and 8 for administrator commands.  There is a lot
-of variation here, however; some systems (like Solaris) use 4 for file
-formats, 5 for miscellaneous information, and 7 for devices.  Still others
-use 1m instead of 8, or some mix of both.  About the only section numbers
-that are reliably consistent are 1, 2, and 3.
-
-By default, section 1 will be used unless the file ends in C<.pm>, in
-which case section 3 will be selected.
-
-=item B<--stderr>
-
-By default, B<pod2man> puts any errors detected in the POD input in a POD
-ERRORS section in the output manual page.  If B<--stderr> is given, errors
-are sent to standard error instead and the POD ERRORS section is
-suppressed.
-
-=item B<-u>, B<--utf8>
-
-By default, B<pod2man> produces the most conservative possible *roff
-output to try to ensure that it will work with as many different *roff
-implementations as possible.  Many *roff implementations cannot handle
-non-ASCII characters, so this means all non-ASCII characters are converted
-either to a *roff escape sequence that tries to create a properly accented
-character (at least for troff output) or to C<X>.
-
-This option says to instead output literal UTF-8 characters.  If your
-*roff implementation can handle it, this is the best output format to use
-and avoids corruption of documents containing non-ASCII characters.
-However, be warned that *roff source with literal UTF-8 characters is not
-supported by many implementations and may even result in segfaults and
-other bad behavior.
-
-Be aware that, when using this option, the input encoding of your POD
-source must be properly declared unless it is US-ASCII or Latin-1.  POD
-input without an C<=encoding> command will be assumed to be in Latin-1,
-and if it's actually in UTF-8, the output will be double-encoded.  See
-L<perlpod(1)> for more information on the C<=encoding> command.
-
-=item B<-v>, B<--verbose>
-
-Print out the name of each output file as it is being generated.
-
-=back
-
-=head1 DIAGNOSTICS
-
-If B<pod2man> fails with errors, see L<Pod::Man> and L<Pod::Simple> for
-information about what those errors might mean.
-
-=head1 EXAMPLES
-
-    pod2man program > program.1
-    pod2man SomeModule.pm /usr/perl/man/man3/SomeModule.3
-    pod2man --section=7 note.pod > note.7
-
-If you would like to print out a lot of man page continuously, you probably
-want to set the C and D registers to set contiguous page numbering and
-even/odd paging, at least on some versions of man(7).
-
-    troff -man -rC1 -rD1 perl.1 perldata.1 perlsyn.1 ...
-
-To get index entries on C<STDERR>, turn on the F register, as in:
-
-    troff -man -rF1 perl.1
-
-The indexing merely outputs messages via C<.tm> for each major page,
-section, subsection, item, and any C<XE<lt>E<gt>> directives.  See
-L<Pod::Man> for more details.
-
-=head1 BUGS
-
-Lots of this documentation is duplicated from L<Pod::Man>.
-
-=head1 NOTES
-
-For those not sure of the proper layout of a man page, here are some notes
-on writing a proper man page.
-
-The name of the program being documented is conventionally written in bold
-(using BE<lt>E<gt>) wherever it occurs, as are all program options.
-Arguments should be written in italics (IE<lt>E<gt>).  Functions are
-traditionally written in italics; if you write a function as function(),
-Pod::Man will take care of this for you.  Literal code or commands should
-be in CE<lt>E<gt>.  References to other man pages should be in the form
-C<manpage(section)>, and Pod::Man will automatically format those
-appropriately.  As an exception, it's traditional not to use this form when
-referring to module documentation; use C<LE<lt>Module::NameE<gt>> instead.
-
-References to other programs or functions are normally in the form of man
-page references so that cross-referencing tools can provide the user with
-links and the like.  It's possible to overdo this, though, so be careful not
-to clutter your documentation with too much markup.
-
-The major headers should be set out using a C<=head1> directive, and are
-historically written in the rather startling ALL UPPER CASE format, although
-this is not mandatory.  Minor headers may be included using C<=head2>, and
-are typically in mixed case.
-
-The standard sections of a manual page are:
-
-=over 4
-
-=item NAME
-
-Mandatory section; should be a comma-separated list of programs or functions
-documented by this POD page, such as:
-
-    foo, bar - programs to do something
-
-Manual page indexers are often extremely picky about the format of this
-section, so don't put anything in it except this line.  A single dash, and
-only a single dash, should separate the list of programs or functions from
-the description.  Do not use any markup such as CE<lt>E<gt> or
-BE<lt>E<gt>.  Functions should not be qualified with C<()> or the like.
-The description should ideally fit on a single line, even if a man program
-replaces the dash with a few tabs.
-
-=item SYNOPSIS
-
-A short usage summary for programs and functions.  This section is mandatory
-for section 3 pages.
-
-=item DESCRIPTION
-
-Extended description and discussion of the program or functions, or the body
-of the documentation for man pages that document something else.  If
-particularly long, it's a good idea to break this up into subsections
-C<=head2> directives like:
-
-    =head2 Normal Usage
-
-    =head2 Advanced Features
-
-    =head2 Writing Configuration Files
-
-or whatever is appropriate for your documentation.
-
-=item OPTIONS
-
-Detailed description of each of the command-line options taken by the
-program.  This should be separate from the description for the use of things
-like L<Pod::Usage|Pod::Usage>.  This is normally presented as a list, with
-each option as a separate C<=item>.  The specific option string should be
-enclosed in BE<lt>E<gt>.  Any values that the option takes should be
-enclosed in IE<lt>E<gt>.  For example, the section for the option
-B<--section>=I<manext> would be introduced with:
-
-    =item B<--section>=I<manext>
-
-Synonymous options (like both the short and long forms) are separated by a
-comma and a space on the same C<=item> line, or optionally listed as their
-own item with a reference to the canonical name.  For example, since
-B<--section> can also be written as B<-s>, the above would be:
-
-    =item B<-s> I<manext>, B<--section>=I<manext>
-
-(Writing the short option first is arguably easier to read, since the long
-option is long enough to draw the eye to it anyway and the short option can
-otherwise get lost in visual noise.)
-
-=item RETURN VALUE
-
-What the program or function returns, if successful.  This section can be
-omitted for programs whose precise exit codes aren't important, provided
-they return 0 on success as is standard.  It should always be present for
-functions.
-
-=item ERRORS
-
-Exceptions, error return codes, exit statuses, and errno settings.
-Typically used for function documentation; program documentation uses
-DIAGNOSTICS instead.  The general rule of thumb is that errors printed to
-C<STDOUT> or C<STDERR> and intended for the end user are documented in
-DIAGNOSTICS while errors passed internal to the calling program and
-intended for other programmers are documented in ERRORS.  When documenting
-a function that sets errno, a full list of the possible errno values
-should be given here.
-
-=item DIAGNOSTICS
-
-All possible messages the program can print out--and what they mean.  You
-may wish to follow the same documentation style as the Perl documentation;
-see perldiag(1) for more details (and look at the POD source as well).
-
-If applicable, please include details on what the user should do to correct
-the error; documenting an error as indicating "the input buffer is too
-small" without telling the user how to increase the size of the input buffer
-(or at least telling them that it isn't possible) aren't very useful.
-
-=item EXAMPLES
-
-Give some example uses of the program or function.  Don't skimp; users often
-find this the most useful part of the documentation.  The examples are
-generally given as verbatim paragraphs.
-
-Don't just present an example without explaining what it does.  Adding a
-short paragraph saying what the example will do can increase the value of
-the example immensely.
-
-=item ENVIRONMENT
-
-Environment variables that the program cares about, normally presented as a
-list using C<=over>, C<=item>, and C<=back>.  For example:
-
-    =over 6
-
-    =item HOME
-
-    Used to determine the user's home directory.  F<.foorc> in this
-    directory is read for configuration details, if it exists.
-
-    =back
-
-Since environment variables are normally in all uppercase, no additional
-special formatting is generally needed; they're glaring enough as it is.
-
-=item FILES
-
-All files used by the program or function, normally presented as a list, and
-what it uses them for.  File names should be enclosed in FE<lt>E<gt>.  It's
-particularly important to document files that will be potentially modified.
-
-=item CAVEATS
-
-Things to take special care with, sometimes called WARNINGS.
-
-=item BUGS
-
-Things that are broken or just don't work quite right.
-
-=item RESTRICTIONS
-
-Bugs you don't plan to fix.  :-)
-
-=item NOTES
-
-Miscellaneous commentary.
-
-=item AUTHOR
-
-Who wrote it (use AUTHORS for multiple people).  Including your current
-e-mail address (or some e-mail address to which bug reports should be sent)
-so that users have a way of contacting you is a good idea.  Remember that
-program documentation tends to roam the wild for far longer than you expect
-and pick an e-mail address that's likely to last if possible.
-
-=item HISTORY
-
-Programs derived from other sources sometimes have this, or you might keep
-a modification log here.  If the log gets overly long or detailed,
-consider maintaining it in a separate file, though.
-
-=item COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE
-
-For copyright
-
-    Copyright YEAR(s) by YOUR NAME(s)
-
-(No, (C) is not needed.  No, "all rights reserved" is not needed.)
-
-For licensing the easiest way is to use the same licensing as Perl itself:
-
-    This library is free software; you may redistribute it and/or modify
-    it under the same terms as Perl itself.
-
-This makes it easy for people to use your module with Perl.  Note that
-this licensing is neither an endorsement or a requirement, you are of
-course free to choose any licensing.
-
-=item SEE ALSO
-
-Other man pages to check out, like man(1), man(7), makewhatis(8), or
-catman(8).  Normally a simple list of man pages separated by commas, or a
-paragraph giving the name of a reference work.  Man page references, if they
-use the standard C<name(section)> form, don't have to be enclosed in
-LE<lt>E<gt> (although it's recommended), but other things in this section
-probably should be when appropriate.
-
-If the package has a mailing list, include a URL or subscription
-instructions here.
-
-If the package has a web site, include a URL here.
-
-=back
-
-In addition, some systems use CONFORMING TO to note conformance to relevant
-standards and MT-LEVEL to note safeness for use in threaded programs or
-signal handlers.  These headings are primarily useful when documenting parts
-of a C library.  Documentation of object-oriented libraries or modules may
-use CONSTRUCTORS and METHODS sections for detailed documentation of the
-parts of the library and save the DESCRIPTION section for an overview; other
-large modules may use FUNCTIONS for similar reasons.  Some people use
-OVERVIEW to summarize the description if it's quite long.
-
-Section ordering varies, although NAME should I<always> be the first section
-(you'll break some man page systems otherwise), and NAME, SYNOPSIS,
-DESCRIPTION, and OPTIONS generally always occur first and in that order if
-present.  In general, SEE ALSO, AUTHOR, and similar material should be left
-for last.  Some systems also move WARNINGS and NOTES to last.  The order
-given above should be reasonable for most purposes.
-
-Finally, as a general note, try not to use an excessive amount of markup.
-As documented here and in L<Pod::Man>, you can safely leave Perl variables,
-function names, man page references, and the like unadorned by markup and
-the POD translators will figure it out for you.  This makes it much easier
-to later edit the documentation.  Note that many existing translators
-(including this one currently) will do the wrong thing with e-mail addresses
-when wrapped in LE<lt>E<gt>, so don't do that.
-
-For additional information that may be more accurate for your specific
-system, see either L<man(5)> or L<man(7)> depending on your system manual
-section numbering conventions.
-
-=head1 SEE ALSO
-
-L<Pod::Man>, L<Pod::Simple>, L<man(1)>, L<nroff(1)>, L<perlpod(1)>,
-L<podchecker(1)>, L<troff(1)>, L<man(7)>
-
-The man page documenting the an macro set may be L<man(5)> instead of
-L<man(7)> on your system.
-
-The current version of this script is always available from its web site at
-L<http://www.eyrie.org/~eagle/software/podlators/>.  It is also part of the
-Perl core distribution as of 5.6.0.
-
-=head1 AUTHOR
-
-Russ Allbery <rra@stanford.edu>, based I<very> heavily on the original
-B<pod2man> by Larry Wall and Tom Christiansen.  Large portions of this
-documentation, particularly the sections on the anatomy of a proper man
-page, are taken from the B<pod2man> documentation by Tom.
-
-=head1 COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE
-
-Copyright 1999, 2000, 2001, 2004, 2006, 2008 Russ Allbery
-<rra@stanford.edu>.
-
-This program is free software; you may redistribute it and/or modify it
-under the same terms as Perl itself.
-
-=cut
-!NO!SUBS!
-#'# (cperl-mode)
-
-close OUT or die "Can't close $file: $!";
-chmod 0755, $file or die "Can't reset permissions for $file: $!\n";
-exec("$Config{'eunicefix'} $file") if $Config{'eunicefix'} ne ':';
-chdir $origdir;
similarity index 85%
rename from cpan/podlators/scripts/pod2text.PL
rename to cpan/podlators/scripts/pod2text
index ede0fe7..210d6bd 100644 (file)
@@ -1,43 +1,9 @@
-#!/usr/local/bin/perl
-
-use Config;
-use File::Basename qw(&basename &dirname);
-use Cwd;
-
-# List explicitly here the variables you want Configure to
-# generate.  Metaconfig only looks for shell variables, so you
-# have to mention them as if they were shell variables, not
-# %Config entries.  Thus you write
-#  $startperl
-# to ensure Configure will look for $Config{startperl}.
-
-# This forces PL files to create target in same directory as PL file.
-# This is so that make depend always knows where to find PL derivatives.
-$origdir = cwd;
-chdir dirname($0);
-$file = basename($0, '.PL');
-$file .= '.com' if $^O eq 'VMS';
-
-open OUT,">$file" or die "Can't create $file: $!";
-
-print "Extracting $file (with variable substitutions)\n";
-
-# In this section, perl variables will be expanded during extraction.
-# You can use $Config{...} to use Configure variables.
-
-print OUT <<"!GROK!THIS!";
-$Config{startperl}
-    eval 'exec $Config{perlpath} -S \$0 \${1+"\$@"}'
-        if \$running_under_some_shell;
-!GROK!THIS!
-
-# In the following, perl variables are not expanded during extraction.
-
-print OUT <<'!NO!SUBS!';
+#!perl
 
 # pod2text -- Convert POD data to formatted ASCII text.
 #
-# Copyright 1999, 2000, 2001, 2004, 2006, 2008 Russ Allbery <rra@stanford.edu>
+# Copyright 1999, 2000, 2001, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010
+#     Russ Allbery <rra@stanford.edu>
 #
 # This program is free software; you may redistribute it and/or modify it
 # under the same terms as Perl itself.
@@ -53,9 +19,6 @@ use Pod::Usage qw(pod2usage);
 
 use strict;
 
-# Silence -w warnings.
-use vars qw($running_under_some_shell);
-
 # Take an initial pass through our options, looking for one of the form
 # -<number>.  We turn that into -w <number> for compatibility with the
 # original pod2text script.
@@ -297,16 +260,10 @@ Russ Allbery <rra@stanford.edu>.
 
 =head1 COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE
 
-Copyright 1999, 2000, 2001, 2004, 2006, 2008 Russ Allbery
+Copyright 1999, 2000, 2001, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010 Russ Allbery
 <rra@stanford.edu>.
 
 This program is free software; you may redistribute it and/or modify it
 under the same terms as Perl itself.
 
 =cut
-!NO!SUBS!
-
-close OUT or die "Can't close $file: $!";
-chmod 0755, $file or die "Can't reset permissions for $file: $!\n";
-exec("$Config{'eunicefix'} $file") if $Config{'eunicefix'} ne ':';
-chdir $origdir;
diff --git a/cpan/podlators/t/man-perlio.t b/cpan/podlators/t/man-perlio.t
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..04450c2
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,134 @@
+#!/usr/bin/perl -w
+#
+# man-perlio.t -- Test Pod::Man with a PerlIO UTF-8 encoding layer.
+#
+# Copyright 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010 Russ Allbery <rra@stanford.edu>
+#
+# This program is free software; you may redistribute it and/or modify it
+# under the same terms as Perl itself.
+
+BEGIN {
+    chdir 't' if -d 't';
+    if ($ENV{PERL_CORE}) {
+        @INC = '../lib';
+    }
+    unshift (@INC, '../blib/lib');
+    $| = 1;
+}
+
+use strict;
+
+use Test::More;
+
+# UTF-8 support requires Perl 5.8 or later.
+BEGIN {
+    if ($] < 5.008) {
+        plan skip_all => 'Perl 5.8 required for UTF-8 support';
+    } else {
+        plan tests => 7;
+    }
+}
+BEGIN { use_ok ('Pod::Man') }
+
+# Force UTF-8 on all relevant file handles.  Do this inside eval in case the
+# encoding parameter doesn't work.
+eval { binmode (\*DATA, ':encoding(utf-8)') };
+eval { binmode (\*STDOUT, ':encoding(utf-8)') };
+my $builder = Test::More->builder;
+eval { binmode ($builder->output, ':encoding(utf-8)') };
+eval { binmode ($builder->failure_output, ':encoding(utf-8)') };
+
+my $n = 1;
+while (<DATA>) {
+    my %options;
+    next until $_ eq "###\n";
+    while (<DATA>) {
+        last if $_ eq "###\n";
+        my ($option, $value) = split;
+        $options{$option} = $value;
+    }
+    open (TMP, '> tmp.pod') or die "Cannot create tmp.pod: $!\n";
+    eval { binmode (\*TMP, ':encoding(utf-8)') };
+    print TMP "=encoding utf-8\n\n";
+    while (<DATA>) {
+        last if $_ eq "###\n";
+        print TMP $_;
+    }
+    close TMP;
+    my $parser = Pod::Man->new (%options);
+    isa_ok ($parser, 'Pod::Man', 'Parser object');
+    open (OUT, '> out.tmp') or die "Cannot create out.tmp: $!\n";
+    eval { binmode (\*OUT, ':encoding(utf-8)') };
+    $parser->parse_from_file ('tmp.pod', \*OUT);
+    close OUT;
+    my $accents = 0;
+    open (TMP, 'out.tmp') or die "Cannot open out.tmp: $!\n";
+    eval { binmode (\*TMP, ':encoding(utf-8)') };
+    while (<TMP>) {
+        $accents = 1 if /Accent mark definitions/;
+        last if /^\.nh/;
+    }
+    my $output;
+    {
+        local $/;
+        $output = <TMP>;
+    }
+    close TMP;
+    1 while unlink ('tmp.pod', 'out.tmp');
+    if ($options{utf8}) {
+        ok (!$accents, "Saw no accent definitions for test $n");
+    } else {
+        ok ($accents, "Saw accent definitions for test $n");
+    }
+    my $expected = '';
+    while (<DATA>) {
+        last if $_ eq "###\n";
+        $expected .= $_;
+    }
+    is ($output, $expected, "Output correct for test $n");
+    $n++;
+}
+
+# Below the marker are bits of POD and corresponding expected text output.
+# This is used to test specific features or problems with Pod::Man.  The
+# input and output are separated by lines containing only ###.
+
+__DATA__
+
+###
+utf8 1
+###
+=head1 BEYONCÉ
+
+Beyoncé!  Beyoncé!  Beyoncé!!
+
+    Beyoncé!  Beyoncé!
+      Beyoncé!  Beyoncé!
+        Beyoncé!  Beyoncé!
+
+Older versions did not convert Beyoncé in verbatim.
+###
+.SH "BEYONCÉ"
+.IX Header "BEYONCÉ"
+Beyoncé!  Beyoncé!  Beyoncé!!
+.PP
+.Vb 3
+\&    Beyoncé!  Beyoncé!
+\&      Beyoncé!  Beyoncé!
+\&        Beyoncé!  Beyoncé!
+.Ve
+.PP
+Older versions did not convert Beyoncé in verbatim.
+###
+
+###
+utf8 1
+###
+=head1 SE<lt>E<gt> output with UTF-8
+
+This is S<non-breaking output>.
+###
+.SH "S<> output with UTF\-8"
+.IX Header "S<> output with UTF-8"
+This is non-breaking output.
+###
index 05a1505..6c03fbe 100644 (file)
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
 #!/usr/bin/perl -w
 #
-# man-options.t -- Additional tests for Pod::Man options.
+# man-utf8.t -- Test Pod::Man with UTF-8 input.
 #
 # Copyright 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2009 Russ Allbery <rra@stanford.edu>
 #
index ea5a636..a6b96a2 100644 (file)
@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
 #
 # man.t -- Additional specialized tests for Pod::Man.
 #
-# Copyright 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009
+# Copyright 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010
 #     Russ Allbery <rra@stanford.edu>
 #
 # This program is free software; you may redistribute it and/or modify it
@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ BEGIN {
 
 use strict;
 
-use Test::More tests => 30;
+use Test::More tests => 31;
 BEGIN { use_ok ('Pod::Man') }
 
 # Test whether we can use binmode to set encoding.
@@ -510,3 +510,21 @@ test - B<test> I<italics> F<file>
 .SH "NAME"
 test \- test italics file
 ###
+
+###
+=head1 TRAILING SPACE
+
+HelloS< >
+
+worldS<   >
+
+.
+###
+.SH "TRAILING SPACE"
+.IX Header "TRAILING SPACE"
+Hello\ 
+.PP
+world\ \ \ 
+.PP
+\&.
+###
diff --git a/cpan/podlators/t/text-perlio.t b/cpan/podlators/t/text-perlio.t
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..c9599bd
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,123 @@
+#!/usr/bin/perl -w
+#
+# text-perlio.t -- Test Pod::Text with a PerlIO UTF-8 encoding layer.
+#
+# Copyright 2002, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010
+#     Russ Allbery <rra@stanford.edu>
+#
+# This program is free software; you may redistribute it and/or modify it
+# under the same terms as Perl itself.
+
+BEGIN {
+    chdir 't' if -d 't';
+    if ($ENV{PERL_CORE}) {
+        @INC = '../lib';
+    }
+    unshift (@INC, '../blib/lib');
+    $| = 1;
+}
+
+use strict;
+
+use Test::More;
+
+# UTF-8 support requires Perl 5.8 or later.
+BEGIN {
+    if ($] < 5.008) {
+        plan skip_all => 'Perl 5.8 required for UTF-8 support';
+    } else {
+        plan tests => 4;
+    }
+}
+BEGIN { use_ok ('Pod::Text') }
+
+my $parser = Pod::Text->new (utf8 => 1);
+isa_ok ($parser, 'Pod::Text', 'Parser object');
+my $n = 1;
+eval { binmode (\*DATA, ':encoding(utf-8)') };
+eval { binmode (\*STDOUT, ':encoding(utf-8)') };
+my $builder = Test::More->builder;
+eval { binmode ($builder->output, ':encoding(utf-8)') };
+eval { binmode ($builder->failure_output, ':encoding(utf-8)') };
+while (<DATA>) {
+    next until $_ eq "###\n";
+    open (TMP, '> tmp.pod') or die "Cannot create tmp.pod: $!\n";
+    eval { binmode (\*TMP, ':encoding(utf-8)') };
+    print TMP "=encoding UTF-8\n\n";
+    while (<DATA>) {
+        last if $_ eq "###\n";
+        print TMP $_;
+    }
+    close TMP;
+    open (OUT, '> out.tmp') or die "Cannot create out.tmp: $!\n";
+    eval { binmode (\*OUT, ':encoding(utf-8)') };
+    $parser->parse_from_file ('tmp.pod', \*OUT);
+    close OUT;
+    open (TMP, 'out.tmp') or die "Cannot open out.tmp: $!\n";
+    eval { binmode (\*TMP, ':encoding(utf-8)') };
+    my $output;
+    {
+        local $/;
+        $output = <TMP>;
+    }
+    close TMP;
+    1 while unlink ('tmp.pod', 'out.tmp');
+    my $expected = '';
+    while (<DATA>) {
+        last if $_ eq "###\n";
+        $expected .= $_;
+    }
+    is ($output, $expected, "Output correct for test $n");
+    $n++;
+}
+
+# Below the marker are bits of POD and corresponding expected text output.
+# This is used to test specific features or problems with Pod::Text.  The
+# input and output are separated by lines containing only ###.
+
+__DATA__
+
+###
+=head1 Test of SE<lt>E<gt>
+
+This is S<some whitespace>.
+###
+Test of S<>
+    This is some whitespace.
+
+###
+
+###
+=head1 I can eat glass
+
+=over 4
+
+=item Esperanto
+
+Mi povas manĝi vitron, ĝi ne damaĝas min.
+
+=item Braille
+
+⠊⠀⠉⠁⠝⠀⠑⠁⠞⠀⠛⠇⠁⠎⠎⠀⠁⠝⠙⠀⠊⠞⠀⠙⠕⠑⠎⠝⠞⠀⠓⠥⠗⠞⠀⠍⠑
+
+=item Hindi
+
+मैं काँच खा सकता हूँ और मुझे उससे कोई चोट नहीं पहुंचती.
+
+=back
+
+See L<http://www.columbia.edu/kermit/utf8.html>
+###
+I can eat glass
+    Esperanto
+        Mi povas manĝi vitron, ĝi ne damaĝas min.
+
+    Braille
+        ⠊⠀⠉⠁⠝⠀⠑⠁⠞⠀⠛⠇⠁⠎⠎⠀⠁⠝⠙⠀⠊⠞⠀⠙⠕⠑⠎⠝⠞⠀⠓⠥⠗⠞⠀⠍⠑
+
+    Hindi
+        मैं काँच खा सकता हूँ और मुझे उससे कोई चोट नहीं पहुंचती.
+
+    See <http://www.columbia.edu/kermit/utf8.html>
+
+###
index 6d65992..55a74fa 100644 (file)
--- a/mkppport
+++ b/mkppport
@@ -2,7 +2,6 @@ use strict;
 use warnings;
 
 use Getopt::Long;
-use Pod::Usage;
 use File::Spec;
 use File::Compare qw( compare );
 use File::Copy qw( copy );
@@ -22,7 +21,10 @@ my %opt = (
   clean  => 0,
 );
 
-GetOptions(\%opt, qw( clean list=s )) or pod2usage(2);
+unless ( GetOptions(\%opt, qw( clean list=s )) ) {
+  require Pod::Usage;
+  Pod::Usage::pod2usage(2);
+}
 
 my $absroot = File::Spec->rel2abs($rootdir);
 my @destdirs = readlist($opt{list});
index e1e1e64..975742e 100644 (file)
@@ -338,6 +338,10 @@ C<PathTools> has been upgraded from version 3.31_01 to 3.34.
 
 =item *
 
+C<podlators> has been upgraded from version 2.3.1 to 2.4.0
+
+=item *
+
 C<sigtrap> has been upgraded from version 1.04 to 1.05.
 
 It no longer tries to modify read-only arguments when generating a
diff --git a/pod/perlpodstyle.pod b/pod/perlpodstyle.pod
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..6c4cfa0
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,295 @@
+=head1 NAME
+
+perlpodstyle - Perl POD style guide
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+These are general guidelines for how to write POD documentation for Perl
+scripts and modules, based on general guidelines for writing good UNIX man
+pages.  All of these guidelines are, of course, optional, but following
+them will make your documentation more consistent with other documentation
+on the system.
+
+The name of the program being documented is conventionally written in bold
+(using BE<lt>E<gt>) wherever it occurs, as are all program options.
+Arguments should be written in italics (IE<lt>E<gt>).  Function names are
+traditionally written in italics; if you write a function as function(),
+Pod::Man will take care of this for you.  Literal code or commands should
+be in CE<lt>E<gt>.  References to other man pages should be in the form
+C<manpage(section)> or C<LE<lt>manpage(section)E<gt>>, and Pod::Man will
+automatically format those appropriately.  The second form, with
+LE<lt>E<gt>, is used to request that a POD formatter make a link to the
+man page if possible.  As an exception, one normally omits the section
+when referring to module documentation since it's not clear what section
+module documentation will be in; use C<LE<lt>Module::NameE<gt>> for module
+references instead.
+
+References to other programs or functions are normally in the form of man
+page references so that cross-referencing tools can provide the user with
+links and the like.  It's possible to overdo this, though, so be careful not
+to clutter your documentation with too much markup.  References to other
+programs that are not given as man page references should be enclosed in
+BE<lt>E<gt>.
+
+The major headers should be set out using a C<=head1> directive, and are
+historically written in the rather startling ALL UPPER CASE format; this
+is not mandatory, but it's strongly recommended so that sections have
+consistent naming across different software packages.  Minor headers may
+be included using C<=head2>, and are typically in mixed case.
+
+The standard sections of a manual page are:
+
+=over 4
+
+=item NAME
+
+Mandatory section; should be a comma-separated list of programs or
+functions documented by this POD page, such as:
+
+    foo, bar - programs to do something
+
+Manual page indexers are often extremely picky about the format of this
+section, so don't put anything in it except this line.  Every program or
+function documented by this POD page should be listed, separated by a
+comma and a space.  For a Perl module, just give the module name.  A
+single dash, and only a single dash, should separate the list of programs
+or functions from the description.  Do not use any markup such as
+CE<lt>E<gt> or BE<lt>E<gt> anywhere in this line.  Functions should not be
+qualified with C<()> or the like.  The description should ideally fit on a
+single line, even if a man program replaces the dash with a few tabs.
+
+=item SYNOPSIS
+
+A short usage summary for programs and functions.  This section is
+mandatory for section 3 pages.  For Perl module documentation, it's
+usually convenient to have the contents of this section be a verbatim
+block showing some (brief) examples of typical ways the module is used.
+
+=item DESCRIPTION
+
+Extended description and discussion of the program or functions, or the
+body of the documentation for man pages that document something else.  If
+particularly long, it's a good idea to break this up into subsections
+C<=head2> directives like:
+
+    =head2 Normal Usage
+
+    =head2 Advanced Features
+
+    =head2 Writing Configuration Files
+
+or whatever is appropriate for your documentation.
+
+For a module, this is generally where the documentation of the interfaces
+provided by the module goes, usually in the form of a list with an
+C<=item> for each interface.  Depending on how many interfaces there are,
+you may want to put that documentation in separate METHODS, FUNCTIONS,
+CLASS METHODS, or INSTANCE METHODS sections instead and save the
+DESCRIPTION section for an overview.
+
+=item OPTIONS
+
+Detailed description of each of the command-line options taken by the
+program.  This should be separate from the description for the use of
+parsers like L<Pod::Usage>.  This is normally presented as a list, with
+each option as a separate C<=item>.  The specific option string should be
+enclosed in BE<lt>E<gt>.  Any values that the option takes should be
+enclosed in IE<lt>E<gt>.  For example, the section for the option
+B<--section>=I<manext> would be introduced with:
+
+    =item B<--section>=I<manext>
+
+Synonymous options (like both the short and long forms) are separated by a
+comma and a space on the same C<=item> line, or optionally listed as their
+own item with a reference to the canonical name.  For example, since
+B<--section> can also be written as B<-s>, the above would be:
+
+    =item B<-s> I<manext>, B<--section>=I<manext>
+
+Writing the short option first is recommended because it's easier to read.
+The long option is long enough to draw the eye to it anyway and the short
+option can otherwise get lost in visual noise.
+
+=item RETURN VALUE
+
+What the program or function returns, if successful.  This section can be
+omitted for programs whose precise exit codes aren't important, provided
+they return 0 on success and non-zero on failure as is standard.  It
+should always be present for functions.  For modules, it may be useful to
+summarize return values from the module interface here, or it may be more
+useful to discuss return values separately in the documentation of each
+function or method the module provides.
+
+=item ERRORS
+
+Exceptions, error return codes, exit statuses, and errno settings.
+Typically used for function or module documentation; program documentation
+uses DIAGNOSTICS instead.  The general rule of thumb is that errors
+printed to C<STDOUT> or C<STDERR> and intended for the end user are
+documented in DIAGNOSTICS while errors passed internal to the calling
+program and intended for other programmers are documented in ERRORS.  When
+documenting a function that sets errno, a full list of the possible errno
+values should be given here.
+
+=item DIAGNOSTICS
+
+All possible messages the program can print out and what they mean.  You
+may wish to follow the same documentation style as the Perl documentation;
+see perldiag(1) for more details (and look at the POD source as well).
+
+If applicable, please include details on what the user should do to
+correct the error; documenting an error as indicating "the input buffer is
+too small" without telling the user how to increase the size of the input
+buffer (or at least telling them that it isn't possible) aren't very
+useful.
+
+=item EXAMPLES
+
+Give some example uses of the program or function.  Don't skimp; users
+often find this the most useful part of the documentation.  The examples
+are generally given as verbatim paragraphs.
+
+Don't just present an example without explaining what it does.  Adding a
+short paragraph saying what the example will do can increase the value of
+the example immensely.
+
+=item ENVIRONMENT
+
+Environment variables that the program cares about, normally presented as
+a list using C<=over>, C<=item>, and C<=back>.  For example:
+
+    =over 6
+
+    =item HOME
+
+    Used to determine the user's home directory.  F<.foorc> in this
+    directory is read for configuration details, if it exists.
+
+    =back
+
+Since environment variables are normally in all uppercase, no additional
+special formatting is generally needed; they're glaring enough as it is.
+
+=item FILES
+
+All files used by the program or function, normally presented as a list,
+and what it uses them for.  File names should be enclosed in FE<lt>E<gt>.
+It's particularly important to document files that will be potentially
+modified.
+
+=item CAVEATS
+
+Things to take special care with, sometimes called WARNINGS.
+
+=item BUGS
+
+Things that are broken or just don't work quite right.
+
+=item RESTRICTIONS
+
+Bugs you don't plan to fix.  :-)
+
+=item NOTES
+
+Miscellaneous commentary.
+
+=item AUTHOR
+
+Who wrote it (use AUTHORS for multiple people).  It's a good idea to
+include your current e-mail address (or some e-mail address to which bug
+reports should be sent) or some other contact information so that users
+have a way of contacting you.  Remember that program documentation tends
+to roam the wild for far longer than you expect and pick a contact method
+that's likely to last.
+
+=item HISTORY
+
+Programs derived from other sources sometimes have this.  Some people keep
+a modification log here, but that usually gets long and is normally better
+maintained in a separate file.
+
+=item COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE
+
+For copyright
+
+    Copyright YEAR(s) YOUR NAME(s)
+
+(No, (C) is not needed.  No, "all rights reserved" is not needed.)
+
+For licensing the easiest way is to use the same licensing as Perl itself:
+
+    This library is free software; you may redistribute it and/or modify
+    it under the same terms as Perl itself.
+
+This makes it easy for people to use your module with Perl.  Note that
+this licensing example is neither an endorsement or a requirement, you are
+of course free to choose any licensing.
+
+=item SEE ALSO
+
+Other man pages to check out, like man(1), man(7), makewhatis(8), or
+catman(8).  Normally a simple list of man pages separated by commas, or a
+paragraph giving the name of a reference work.  Man page references, if
+they use the standard C<name(section)> form, don't have to be enclosed in
+LE<lt>E<gt> (although it's recommended), but other things in this section
+probably should be when appropriate.
+
+If the package has a mailing list, include a URL or subscription
+instructions here.
+
+If the package has a web site, include a URL here.
+
+=back
+
+Documentation of object-oriented libraries or modules may want to use
+CONSTRUCTORS and METHODS sections, or CLASS METHODS and INSTANCE METHODS
+sections, for detailed documentation of the parts of the library and save
+the DESCRIPTION section for an overview.  Large modules with a function
+interface may want to use FUNCTIONS for similar reasons.  Some people use
+OVERVIEW to summarize the description if it's quite long.
+
+Section ordering varies, although NAME must always be the first section
+(you'll break some man page systems otherwise), and NAME, SYNOPSIS,
+DESCRIPTION, and OPTIONS generally always occur first and in that order if
+present.  In general, SEE ALSO, AUTHOR, and similar material should be
+left for last.  Some systems also move WARNINGS and NOTES to last.  The
+order given above should be reasonable for most purposes.
+
+Some systems use CONFORMING TO to note conformance to relevant standards
+and MT-LEVEL to note safeness for use in threaded programs or signal
+handlers.  These headings are primarily useful when documenting parts of a
+C library.
+
+Finally, as a general note, try not to use an excessive amount of markup.
+As documented here and in L<Pod::Man>, you can safely leave Perl
+variables, function names, man page references, and the like unadorned by
+markup and the POD translators will figure it out for you.  This makes it
+much easier to later edit the documentation.  Note that many existing
+translators will do the wrong thing with e-mail addresses when wrapped in
+LE<lt>E<gt>, so don't do that.
+
+=head1 SEE ALSO
+
+For additional information that may be more accurate for your specific
+system, see either L<man(5)> or L<man(7)> depending on your system manual
+section numbering conventions.
+
+This documentation is maintained as part of the podlators distribution.
+The current version is always available from its web site at
+<http://www.eyrie.org/~eagle/software/podlators/>.
+
+=head1 AUTHOR
+
+Russ Allbery <rra@stanford.edu>, with large portions of this documentation
+taken from the documentation of the original B<pod2man> implementation by
+Larry Wall and Tom Christiansen.
+
+=head1 COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE
+
+Copyright 1999, 2000, 2001, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010 Russ Allbery
+<rra@stanford.edu>.
+
+This documentation is free software; you may redistribute it and/or modify
+it under the same terms as Perl itself.
+
+=cut