Spelling corrections from Ville Skytt.
authorJames E Keenan <jkeenan@cpan.org>
Sun, 8 Apr 2018 13:49:22 +0000 (09:49 -0400)
committerJames E Keenan <jkeenan@cpan.org>
Sun, 8 Apr 2018 13:49:22 +0000 (09:49 -0400)
For: RT # 133071

17 files changed:
pod/perl5100delta.pod
pod/perl5120delta.pod
pod/perl5140delta.pod
pod/perl5180delta.pod
pod/perl5181delta.pod
pod/perl5184delta.pod
pod/perl5200delta.pod
pod/perl5240delta.pod
pod/perl581delta.pod
pod/perl588delta.pod
pod/perldeprecation.pod
pod/perldiag.pod
pod/perlebcdic.pod
pod/perlfunc.pod
pod/perlop.pod
pod/perlreref.pod
pod/perlvar.pod

index 10d71d6..6728559 100644 (file)
@@ -1015,7 +1015,7 @@ The L<perlreapi> manpage describes the interface to the perl interpreter
 used to write pluggable regular expression engines (by Ævar Arnfjörð
 Bjarmason).
 
-The L<perlunitut> manpage is an tutorial for programming with Unicode and
+The L<perlunitut> manpage is a tutorial for programming with Unicode and
 string encodings in Perl, courtesy of Juerd Waalboer.
 
 A new manual page, L<perlunifaq> (the Perl Unicode FAQ), has been added
@@ -1576,7 +1576,7 @@ inherits from C<B::SV> (it used to inherit from C<B::IV>).
 
 The anonymous hash and array constructors now take 1 op in the optree
 instead of 3, now that pp_anonhash and pp_anonlist return a reference to
-an hash/array when the op is flagged with OPf_SPECIAL. (Nicholas Clark)
+a hash/array when the op is flagged with OPf_SPECIAL. (Nicholas Clark)
 
 =head1 Known Problems
 
index 988662f..5b5eac0 100644 (file)
@@ -1707,7 +1707,7 @@ Two flag bits are currently supported.
 =item *
 
 C<SVf_UTF8> will call C<SvUTF8_on()> for you. (Note that this does
-not convert an sequence of ISO 8859-1 characters to UTF-8). A wrapper,
+not convert a sequence of ISO 8859-1 characters to UTF-8). A wrapper,
 C<newSVpvn_utf8()> is available for this.
 
 =item *
index 26df41c..0f4fa6f 100644 (file)
@@ -2461,7 +2461,7 @@ parser's API in a detectable way.
 
 =item refcnt: fd %d%s
 
-This new error only occurs if a internal consistency check fails when a
+This new error only occurs if an internal consistency check fails when a
 pipe is about to be closed.
 
 =item Regexp modifier "/%c" may not appear twice
index a5a3cae..79d2af3 100644 (file)
@@ -540,7 +540,7 @@ inherited by child processes.
 In this release, when assigning to C<%ENV>, values are immediately stringified,
 and converted to be only a byte string.
 
-First, it is forced to be only a string.  Then if the string is utf8 and the
+First, it is forced to be only a string.  Then if the string is utf8 and the
 equivalent of C<utf8::downgrade()> works, that result is used; otherwise, the
 equivalent of C<utf8::encode()> is used, and a warning is issued about wide
 characters (L</Diagnostics>).
@@ -2759,7 +2759,7 @@ The use of C<PL_stashcache>, the stash name lookup cache for method calls, has
 been restored,
 
 Commit da6b625f78f5f133 in August 2011 inadvertently broke the code that looks
-up values in C<PL_stashcache>. As it's a only cache, quite correctly everything
+up values in C<PL_stashcache>. As it's only a cache, quite correctly everything
 carried on working without it.
 
 =item *
index 93fb251..64bb9d0 100644 (file)
@@ -48,7 +48,7 @@ Module::CoreList has been upgraded from 2.89 to 2.96.
 
 =item AIX
 
-A rarely-encounted configuration bug in the AIX hints file has been corrected.
+A rarely-encountered configuration bug in the AIX hints file has been corrected.
 
 =item MidnightBSD
 
index 3f1b3a3..4a043a1 100644 (file)
@@ -48,7 +48,7 @@ Introduced by
 L<perl #113536|https://rt.perl.org/Public/Bug/Display.html?id=113536>, a memory
 leak on every call to C<system> and backticks (C< `` >), on most Win32 Perls
 starting from 5.18.0 has been fixed.  The memory leak only occurred if you
-enabled psuedo-fork in your build of Win32 Perl, and were running that build on
+enabled pseudo-fork in your build of Win32 Perl, and were running that build on
 Server 2003 R2 or newer OS.  The leak does not appear on WinXP SP3.
 [L<perl #121676|https://rt.perl.org/Public/Bug/Display.html?id=121676>]
 
index 874d8d1..427a2a0 100644 (file)
@@ -2247,7 +2247,7 @@ Introduced by
 L<perl #113536|https://rt.perl.org/Public/Bug/Display.html?id=113536>, a memory
 leak on every call to C<system> and backticks (C< `` >), on most Win32 Perls
 starting from 5.18.0 has been fixed.  The memory leak only occurred if you
-enabled psuedo-fork in your build of Win32 Perl, and were running that build on
+enabled pseudo-fork in your build of Win32 Perl, and were running that build on
 Server 2003 R2 or newer OS.  The leak does not appear on WinXP SP3.
 [L<perl #121676|https://rt.perl.org/Public/Bug/Display.html?id=121676>]
 
@@ -2736,7 +2736,7 @@ don't depend on the locale. [perl #120675]
 
 =item *
 
-Under certain conditions, Perl would throw an error if in an lookbehind
+Under certain conditions, Perl would throw an error if in a lookbehind
 assertion in a regexp, the assertion referred to a named subpattern,
 complaining the lookbehind was variable when it wasn't. This has been
 fixed. [perl #120600], [perl #120618]. The current fix may be improved
index a1e065d..f1468ee 100644 (file)
@@ -96,7 +96,7 @@ platform.
 
 Previously perl would redirect to another interpreter if it found a
 hashbang path unless the path contains "perl" (see L<perlrun>). To improve
-compatability with Perl 6 this behavior has been extended to also redirect
+compatibility with Perl 6 this behavior has been extended to also redirect
 if "perl" is followed by "6".
 
 =head1 Security
index a5a960c..f870172 100644 (file)
@@ -559,7 +559,7 @@ to build a Perl for PASE is to use an AIX host as a cross-compilation
 environment.  See README.os400.
 
 Yet another cross-compilation option has been added: now Perl builds
-on OpenZaurus, an Linux distribution based on Mandrake + Embedix for
+on OpenZaurus, a Linux distribution based on Mandrake + Embedix for
 the Sharp Zaurus PDA.  See the Cross/README file.
 
 Tru64 when using gcc 3 drops the optimisation for F<toke.c> to C<-O2>
index 8c79527..5299272 100644 (file)
@@ -1535,7 +1535,7 @@ This is a new warning, produced in situations such as this:
 
 =head2 Non-string passed as bitmask
 
-This is a new warning, produced when number has been passed as a argument to
+This is a new warning, produced when number has been passed as an argument to
 select(), instead of a bitmask.
 
     # Wrong, will now warn
index a00ceac..40ad2ec 100644 (file)
@@ -131,7 +131,7 @@ used functionality was removed in Perl 5.10. In order to free up
 the variable for a future special meaning, its use will be a fatal
 error in Perl 5.30.
 
-To specify how numbers are formatted when printed, one is adviced
+To specify how numbers are formatted when printed, one is advised
 to use C<< printf >> or C<< sprintf >> instead.
 
 =head3 Assigning non-zero to C<< $[ >> will be fatal
@@ -320,7 +320,7 @@ here-document end at the first empty line. This practise was deprecated
 in Perl 5.000; as of Perl 5.28, using a bare here-document terminator
 throws a fatal error.
 
-You are encouraged to use the explictly quoted form if you wish to
+You are encouraged to use the explicitly quoted form if you wish to
 use an empty line as the terminator of the here-document:
 
   print <<"";
index 860b049..ce8ea11 100644 (file)
@@ -7359,7 +7359,7 @@ of the returned sequence, which is not likely what you want.
 (W regexp) You used a Unicode boundary (C<\b{...}> or C<\B{...}>) in a
 portion of a regular expression where the character set modifiers C</a>
 or C</aa> are in effect.  These two modifiers indicate an ASCII
-interpretation, and this doesn't make sense for a Unicode defintion.
+interpretation, and this doesn't make sense for a Unicode definition.
 The generated regular expression will compile so that the boundary uses
 all of Unicode.  No other portion of the regular expression is affected.
 
index 288a71f..188d01f 100644 (file)
@@ -1524,7 +1524,7 @@ some user education.
 
 This is completely general, but the most computationally expensive
 strategy.  Choose one or the other character set and transform to that
-for every sort comparision.  Here's a complete example that transforms
+for every sort comparison.  Here's a complete example that transforms
 to ASCII sort order:
 
  sub native_to_uni($) {
index 990f7e8..d505bc2 100644 (file)
@@ -7535,7 +7535,7 @@ With proper care you may mix package and my (or state) C<$a> and/or C<$b>:
 
    # prints tinysmallnormalbighuge
 
-C<$a> and C<$b> are implicitely local to the sort() execution and regain their
+C<$a> and C<$b> are implicitly local to the sort() execution and regain their
 former values upon completing the sort.
 
 Sort subroutines written using C<$a> and C<$b> are bound to their calling
index 4b8d7e2..7f0faaa 100644 (file)
@@ -570,7 +570,7 @@ The standard C<L<Unicode::Collate>> and
 C<L<Unicode::Collate::Locale>> modules offer much more powerful
 solutions to collation issues.
 
-For case-insensitive comparisions, look at the L<perlfunc/fc> case-folding
+For case-insensitive comparisons, look at the L<perlfunc/fc> case-folding
 function, available in Perl v5.16 or later:
 
     if ( fc($x) eq fc($y) ) { ... }
index aaac153..a2fb855 100644 (file)
@@ -135,7 +135,7 @@ and L<perlunicode> for details.
    \W      A non-word character
    \s      A whitespace character
    \S      A non-whitespace character
-   \h      An horizontal whitespace
+   \h      A horizontal whitespace
    \H      A non horizontal whitespace
    \N      A non newline (when not followed by '{NAME}';;
            not valid in a character class; equivalent to [^\n]; it's
index ba23771..df1d0ed 100644 (file)
@@ -874,9 +874,9 @@ this:
 
     $str =~ /pattern/;
 
-    print $`, $&, $'; # bad: perfomance hit
+    print $`, $&, $'; # bad: performance hit
 
-    print             # good: no perfomance hit
+    print             # good: no performance hit
        substr($str, 0,     $-[0]),
        substr($str, $-[0], $+[0]-$-[0]),
        substr($str, $+[0]);