[PATCH] Doc spellcheck + podcheck
authorAbhijit Menon-Sen <ams@wiw.org>
Fri, 16 Nov 2001 12:11:14 +0000 (12:11 +0000)
committerAbhijit Menon-Sen <ams@wiw.org>
Fri, 16 Nov 2001 12:11:14 +0000 (12:11 +0000)
From: Autrijus Tang <autrijus@egb.elixus.org>
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 22:49:05 -0800
Message-Id: <20011116064905.GA44092@egb.elixus.org>

Subject: [PATCH] podcheck+spellcheck, the rest of the story
From: Autrijus Tang <autrijus@egb.elixus.org>
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 00:42:20 -0800
Message-Id: <20011116084220.GA44295@egb.elixus.org>

Subject: Re: [PATCH] podcheck+spellcheck, the rest of the story
From: Nicholas Clark <nick@ccl4.org>
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 10:32:01 +0000
Message-Id: <20011116103200.F62891@plum.flirble.org>
(Applied after suitable de-mangling.)

p4raw-id: //depot/perl@13041

35 files changed:
README.aix
README.dgux
README.dos
README.epoc
README.hpux
README.mint
README.mpeix
README.netware
README.os2
README.os390
README.plan9
README.qnx
README.solaris
README.threads
doio.c
pod/perl571delta.pod
pod/perl572delta.pod
pod/perlapi.pod
pod/perlapio.pod
pod/perldata.pod
pod/perlebcdic.pod
pod/perlfaq4.pod
pod/perlfunc.pod
pod/perlguts.pod
pod/perlhack.pod
pod/perliol.pod
pod/perlpod.pod
pod/perlpodspec.pod
pod/perlrequick.pod
pod/perlretut.pod
pod/perltodo.pod
pod/perlunicode.pod
pod/perlvar.pod
pp_ctl.c
sharedsv.c

index 45a0621..b58b668 100644 (file)
@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ an ANSI compliant C-compiler with AIX by default, but binary builds of
 gcc for AIX are widely available.
 
 At the moment of writing, AIX supports two different native C compilers,
-for which you have to pay: B<xlc> and B<VAC>. If you decide to use eiter
+for which you have to pay: B<xlc> and B<VAC>. If you decide to use either
 of these two (which is quite a lot easier than using gcc), be sure to
 upgrade to the latest available patch level. Currently:
 
@@ -154,7 +154,7 @@ Follow the messages ... and you're done.
 
 =head2 Using GNU's gcc for building perl
 
-We're woking on this using gcc-3.0 ... (any input highly appreciated)
+We're working on this using gcc-3.0 ... (any input highly appreciated)
 
 =head2 Using Large Files with Perl
 
index b033b03..640abab 100644 (file)
@@ -57,10 +57,10 @@ machine is to run the command:
 This will automatically accept all the defaults and
 in particular /usr/local/ as installation directory.
 Note that GCC-2.95.x rev(DG/UX) knows the switch
--pthread whcih allows it to link correctly DG/UX's
+-pthread which allows it to link correctly DG/UX's
 -lthread library.
 
-If you want to change the installtion directory or
+If you want to change the installation directory or
 have a standard DG/UX with C compiler GCC-2.7.2.x
 then you have no choice than to do an interactive
 build by issuing the command:
index 9c444a4..2b40636 100644 (file)
@@ -312,7 +312,7 @@ Note that the MAP_TARGET value *must* have the ".exe" extension or you
 will not create a "perl.exe" to replace the one in C<($DJDIR)/bin>.
 
 When you are done, the XS-module install process will have added information
-to yout "perllocal" information telling that the perl binary has been replaced,
+to your "perllocal" information telling that the perl binary has been replaced,
 and what module was installed.  you can view this information at any time
 by using the command:
 
index d7d7bf7..3078df1 100644 (file)
@@ -50,7 +50,7 @@ start perl with a double click on the camel icon. Be sure to configure
 the perl installation drive first. You can even provide a script with
 a special commandline, if needed.
 
-Alternativly you can get ESHELL from symbian: 
+Alternatively you can get ESHELL from symbian: 
 http://developer.epocworld.com/downloads/progs/Eshell.zip
 
 Running ESHELL you can enter: perl -de 0 in order to run the perl
@@ -68,7 +68,7 @@ command line switch '-x'. See L<perlrun> for details.
 
 You can stop a running perl process in the task list by closing the
 application `STDOUT'. You cannot stop a running perl process if it has
-not written anyting to stdout or stderr! Be very cautious with I/O
+not written anything to stdout or stderr! Be very cautious with I/O
 redirection. You will have to reboot the PDA!
 
 =head1 USING PERL ON EPOC
@@ -129,7 +129,7 @@ backquoting, pipes etc.
 
 =item *
 
-system() does not inherit ressources like: file descriptors,
+system() does not inherit resources like: file descriptors,
 environment etc.
 
 =item *
index c4fd97d..bc004f1 100644 (file)
@@ -15,7 +15,7 @@ compiled and/or runs.
 =head2 Using perl as shipped with HP-UX
 
 As of application release September 2001, HP-UX 11.00 is shipped with
-perl-5.6.1 in /opt/perl. The first occurrance is on CD 5012-7954 and
+perl-5.6.1 in /opt/perl. The first occurrence is on CD 5012-7954 and
 can be installed using
 
     swinstall -s /cdrom perl
@@ -298,7 +298,7 @@ is listed before -lc in the list of libraries to link Perl with. The
 hints provided for HP-UX during Configure will try very hard to get
 this right for you.
 
-HP-UX versions before 10.30 require a seperate installation of a POSIX
+HP-UX versions before 10.30 require a separate installation of a POSIX
 threads library package. Two examples are the HP DCE package, available
 on "HP-UX Hardware Extensions 3.0, Install and Core OS, Release 10.20,
 April 1999 (B3920-13941)" or the Freely available PTH package, available
index b395509..91a6b30 100644 (file)
@@ -79,14 +79,14 @@ increase cc1's stacksize, if you run out of memory you should
 either decrease the stacksize or follow some more hints:
 
 Perl's building process is very handy on machines with a lot
-of virtual memory but may result in a desaster if you are short
+of virtual memory but may result in a disaster if you are short
 of memory.  If gcc fails to compile many source files you should
 reduce the optimization.  Grep for "optimize" in the file
 config.sh and change the flags.
 
 If only several huge files cause problems (actually it is not a
 matter of the file size resp. the amount of code but depends on
-the size of the individual funtions) it is useful to bypass
+the size of the individual functions) it is useful to bypass
 the make program and compile these files directly from the
 command line.  For example if you got something like the
 following from make:
@@ -103,7 +103,7 @@ Please note that you have to add the name of the source file
 (here toke.c) at the end.
 
 If none of this helps, you're helpless.  Wait for a binary
-release.  If you have succeded you may encounter another problem
+release.  If you have succeeded you may encounter another problem
 at the linking process.  If gcc complains that it can't find
 some libraries within the perl distribution you probably have
 an old linker.  If it complains for example about "file not
index 6f9ee14..a7ec09d 100644 (file)
@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@ README.mpeix - Perl/iX for HP e3000 MPE
 This is a podified version of the above-mentioned web page,
 podified by Jarkko Hietaniemi 2001-Jan-01.
 
-=head1 What's New in Perl ffor MPE/iX
+=head1 What's New in Perl for MPE/iX
 
 June 1, 2000
 
index ac9a19e..196e032 100644 (file)
@@ -61,11 +61,11 @@ The make process runs only under WinNT shell.
 The NetWare makefile is located under the NetWare folder.
 The makefile for NetWare makes use of miniperl.exe to run some of
 the Perl scripts.  To create miniperl.exe, run nmake from
-win32 folder through WinNT commond prompt.  The build process
+win32 folder through WinNT command prompt.  The build process
 can be stopped after miniperl.exe is created.  Then run nmake
 from NetWare folder through WinNT command prompt.
 
-Currently the follwing two build types are tested on NetWare
+Currently the following two build types are tested on NetWare
 
 =over 4
 
index f2c4a12..ab501ba 100644 (file)
@@ -1847,7 +1847,7 @@ same as for Perl 5.005_53 (same as in a popular binary release).  Thus
 new Perls will be able to I<resolve the names> of old extension DLLs
 if @INC allows finding their directories.
 
-However, this still does not guarantie that these DLL may be loaded.
+However, this still does not guarantee that these DLL may be loaded.
 The reason is the mangling of the name of the I<Perl DLL>.  And since
 the extension DLLs link with the Perl DLL, extension DLLs for older
 versions would load an older Perl DLL, and would most probably
@@ -1872,7 +1872,7 @@ Old perl executable is started when a new executable is running has
 loaded an extension compiled for the old executable (ouph!).  In this
 case the old executable will get a forwarder DLL instead of the old
 perl DLL, so would link with the new perl DLL.  While not directly
-fatal, it will behave the same as new excutable.  This beats the whole
+fatal, it will behave the same as new executable.  This beats the whole
 purpose of explicitly starting an old executable.
 
 =item *
index 578d5a3..cc550f0 100644 (file)
@@ -253,16 +253,16 @@ Out of Memory!
 Recent perl test suite is quite memory hunrgy. In addition to the comments
 above on memory limitations it is also worth checking for _CEE_RUNOPTS
 in your environment. Perl now has (in miniperlmain.c) a C #pragma
-to set CEE run options, but the enviroment variable wins.
+to set CEE run options, but the environment variable wins.
 
-The C code ask for:
+The C code asks for:
 
  #pragma runopts(HEAP(2M,500K,ANYWHERE,KEEP,8K,4K) STACK(,,ANY,) ALL31(ON))
 
 The important parts of that are the second argument (the increment) to HEAP,
 and allowing the stack to be "Above the (16M) line". If the heap
-increment is too small then when perl (for example loading unicode/Name.pl) trys
-to create a "big" (400K+) string it cannot fit in a single segement
+increment is too small then when perl (for example loading unicode/Name.pl) tries
+to create a "big" (400K+) string it cannot fit in a single segment
 and you get "Out of Memory!" - even if there is still plenty of memory
 available.
 
index 5395ed0..5e53c05 100644 (file)
@@ -84,7 +84,7 @@ WELCOME to Plan 9 Perl, brave soul!
    This is a preliminary alpha version of Plan 9 Perl. Still to be
 implemented are MakeMaker and DynaLoader. Many perl commands are
 missing or currently behave in an inscrutable manner. These gaps will,
-with perserverance and a modicum of luck, be remedied in the near
+with perseverance and a modicum of luck, be remedied in the near
 future.To install this software:
 
 1. Create the source directories and libraries for perl by running the
index 9c4e39a..ef3377d 100644 (file)
@@ -109,6 +109,8 @@ generate a similar cover, but it doesn't handle all the command-line
 options that perl throws at it. This might be reasonably placed in
 /usr/local/bin.
 
+=back
+
 =head2 Outstanding issues with perl under QNX6
 
 The following tests are still failing for Perl 5.7.1 under QNX 6.1.0:
@@ -118,8 +120,6 @@ The following tests are still failing for Perl 5.7.1 under QNX 6.1.0:
   ext/IO/lib/IO/t/io_sock............FAILED at test 12
   ext/IO/lib/IO/t/io_udp.............FAILED at test 4
 
-=back
-
 =head1 AUTHOR
 
 Norton T. Allen (allen@huarp.harvard.edu)
index 627bc73..0caad9b 100644 (file)
@@ -381,7 +381,7 @@ need to use perl's malloc, you can rebuild Perl from the sources
 and Configure the build with 
 
        sh Configure -Dusemymalloc
-  
+
 You should not use perl's malloc if you are building with gcc.  There
 are reports of core dumps, especially in the PDL module.  The problem
 appears to go away under -DDEBUGGING, so it has been difficult to
index de95e10..414ca5a 100644 (file)
@@ -98,7 +98,7 @@ For Digital Unix 4.x:
     Add -lpthread -lc_r to lddlflags
 
     For some reason, the extra includes for pthreads make Digital UNIX
-    complain fatally about the sbrk() delcaration in perl's malloc.c
+    complain fatally about the sbrk() declaration in perl's malloc.c
     so use the native malloc, e.g.  sh Configure -Uusemymalloc, or
     manually edit your config.sh as follows:
        Change usemymalloc to n
@@ -145,7 +145,7 @@ Now you can do a
     make
 
 When you succeed in compiling and testing ("make test" after your
-build) a threaded Perl in a platform previosuly unknown to support
+build) a threaded Perl in a platform previously unknown to support
 threaded perl, please let perlbug@perl.com know about your victory.
 Explain what you did in painful detail.
 
@@ -265,7 +265,7 @@ their associated mutex is held. (This constraint simplifies the
 implementation of condition variables in certain porting situations.)
 For POSIX threads, perl mutexes and condition variables correspond to
 POSIX ones.  For FAKE_THREADS, mutexes are stubs and condition variables
-are implmented as lists of waiting threads. For FAKE_THREADS, a thread
+are implemented as lists of waiting threads. For FAKE_THREADS, a thread
 waits on a condition variable by removing itself from the runnable
 list, calling SCHEDULE to change thr to the next appropriate
 runnable thread and returning op (i.e. the new threads next op).
diff --git a/doio.c b/doio.c
index 98ff640..58df123 100644 (file)
--- a/doio.c
+++ b/doio.c
@@ -2102,7 +2102,7 @@ Perl_do_shmio(pTHX_ I32 optype, SV **mark, SV **sp)
 
 Function called by C<do_readline> to spawn a glob (or do the glob inside
 perl on VMS). This code used to be inline, but now perl uses C<File::Glob>
-this glob starter is only used by miniperl during the build proccess.
+this glob starter is only used by miniperl during the build process.
 Moving it away shrinks pp_hot.c; shrinking pp_hot.c helps speed perl up.
 
 =cut
index df132cc..8047871 100644 (file)
@@ -420,7 +420,7 @@ parsing algorithms.  See L<Text::Balanced> for more information.
 =item *
 
 Tie::RefHash::Nestable, by Edward Avis, allows storing hash references
-(unlike the standard Tie::Refhash)  The module is contained within
+(unlike the standard Tie::RefHash)  The module is contained within
 Tie::RefHash.
 
 =item *
index bfe44c4..1e7251e 100644 (file)
@@ -599,7 +599,7 @@ Don't panic.  Read INSTALL 'make test' section instead.
 
 The subtests 11 and 12 sometimes fail and sometimes work.
 
-=head2 HP-UX lib/io_multihomed Fails When LP64-Configur
+=head2 HP-UX lib/io_multihomed Fails When LP64-Configured
 
 The lib/io_multihomed test may hang in HP-UX if Perl has been
 configured to be 64-bit. Because other 64-bit platforms do not hang in
@@ -726,7 +726,7 @@ Compaq C V6.2-008 on OpenVMS Alpha V7.1
   [.lib]vmsish............................FAILED on test 13
   Failed 4/399 tests, 92.48% okay.
 
-Compac C V6.4-005 on OpenVMS Alpha 7.2.1
+Compaq C V6.4-005 on OpenVMS Alpha 7.2.1
 
   [-.ext.b]showlex........................FAILED on test 1
   [-.ext.list.util.t]tainted..............FAILED on test 3
index ef4ab30..dba60c4 100644 (file)
@@ -2041,7 +2041,6 @@ Found in file sharedsv.c
 
 =item sortsv
 
-   
 Sort an array. Here is an example:
 
     sortsv(AvARRAY(av), av_len(av)+1, Perl_sv_cmp_locale); 
index ad80a6c..d378e6e 100644 (file)
@@ -104,7 +104,7 @@ above abstraction which allows perl more control over how IO is done
 as it decouples IO from the way the operating system and C library
 choose to do things. For USE_PERLIO PerlIO * has an extra layer of
 indirection - it is a pointer-to-a-pointer.  This allows the PerlIO *
-to remain with a known value while swapping the implementation arround
+to remain with a known value while swapping the implementation around
 underneath I<at run time>. In this case all the above are true (but
 very simple) functions which call the underlying implementation.
 
@@ -138,7 +138,7 @@ These correspond to fopen()/fdopen() and the arguments are the same.
 Return C<NULL> and set C<errno> if there is an error.  There may be an
 implementation limit on the number of open handles, which may be lower
 than the limit on the number of open files - C<errno> may not be set
-when C<NULL> is returned if this limnit is exceeded.
+when C<NULL> is returned if this limit is exceeded.
 
 =item B<PerlIO_reopen(path,mode,f)>
 
@@ -289,7 +289,7 @@ problem. However in other cases then mechanisms must exist to create a
 FILE * which can be passed to library code which is going to use stdio
 calls.
 
-The fisrt step is to add this line:
+The first step is to add this line:
 
    #define PERLIO_NOT_STDIO 0
 
@@ -432,7 +432,7 @@ case.
 =item PerlIO_binmode(f,ptype,imode,layers)
 
 The hook used by perl's C<binmode> operator.
-B<ptype> is perl's charcter for the kind of IO:
+B<ptype> is perl's character for the kind of IO:
 
 =over 8
 
index 3e2482e..f2484db 100644 (file)
@@ -219,7 +219,7 @@ an array that was previously shortened does not recover values
 that were in those elements.  (It used to do so in Perl 4, but we
 had to break this to make sure destructors were called when expected.)
 
-You can also gain some miniscule measure of efficiency by pre-extending
+You can also gain some minuscule measure of efficiency by pre-extending
 an array that is going to get big.  You can also extend an array
 by assigning to an element that is off the end of the array.  You
 can truncate an array down to nothing by assigning the null list
@@ -416,8 +416,8 @@ plain paranoid, you can force the correct interpretation with curly
 braces as above.
 
 If you're looking for the information on how to use here-documents,
-which used to be here, that's been moved to L<perlop> in the section on
-L<Quote and Quote-like Operators>.
+which used to be here, that's been moved to
+L<perlop/Quote and Quote-like Operators>.
 
 =head2 List value constructors
 
index c98b46c..86dcba2 100644 (file)
@@ -1054,7 +1054,7 @@ following will print "Yes indeed\n" on either an ASCII or EBCDIC computer:
     $all_byte_chrs = '';
     for (0..255) { $all_byte_chrs .= chr($_); }
     $uuencode_byte_chrs = pack('u', $all_byte_chrs);
-    ($uu = <<'    ENDOFHEREDOC') =~ s/^\s*//gm;
+    ($uu = <<'ENDOFHEREDOC') =~ s/^\s*//gm;
     M``$"`P0%!@<("0H+#`T.#Q`1$A,4%187&!D:&QP='A\@(2(C)"4F)R@I*BLL
     M+2XO,#$R,S0U-C<X.3H[/#T^/T!!0D-$149'2$E*2TQ-3D]045)35%565UA9
     M6EM<75Y?8&%B8V1E9F=H:6IK;&UN;W!Q<G-T=79W>'EZ>WQ]?G^`@8*#A(6&
index f602d24..0196407 100644 (file)
@@ -136,13 +136,15 @@ functions is that it works with numbers of ANY size, that it is
 optimized for speed on some operations, and for at least some
 programmers the notation might be familiar.
 
+=over 4
+
 =item B<How do I convert Hexadecimal into decimal:>
 
 Using perl's built in conversion of 0x notation:
 
     $int = 0xDEADBEEF;
     $dec = sprintf("%d", $int);
+
 Using the hex function:
 
     $int = hex("DEADBEEF");
@@ -247,6 +249,7 @@ Using Bit::Vector:
 The remaining transformations (e.g. hex -> oct, bin -> hex, etc.)
 are left as an exercise to the inclined reader.
 
+=back
 
 =head2 Why doesn't & work the way I want it to?
 
@@ -1849,7 +1852,7 @@ in L<perltoot>.
 
 =head2 How can I use a reference as a hash key?
 
-You can't do this directly, but you could use the standard Tie::Refhash
+You can't do this directly, but you could use the standard Tie::RefHash
 module distributed with Perl.
 
 =head1 Data: Misc
index 74778ac..679fe37 100644 (file)
@@ -1201,7 +1201,7 @@ C code have superseded it.
 If you're looking to use L<dump> to speed up your program, consider
 generating bytecode or native C code as described in L<perlcc>.  If
 you're just trying to accelerate a CGI script, consider using the
-C<mod_perl> extension to B<Apache>, or the CPAN module, Fast::CGI.
+C<mod_perl> extension to B<Apache>, or the CPAN module, CGI::Fast.
 You might also consider autoloading or selfloading, which at least
 make your program I<appear> to run faster.
 
index 148ae96..8a1d511 100644 (file)
@@ -1695,7 +1695,7 @@ C<sv_dump> to produce debugging output from Perl-space, so users of that
 module should already be familiar with its format.
 
 C<Perl_op_dump> can be used to dump an C<OP> structure or any of its
-derivatives, and produces output similiar to C<perl -Dx>; in fact,
+derivatives, and produces output similar to C<perl -Dx>; in fact,
 C<Perl_dump_eval> will dump the main root of the code being evaluated,
 exactly like C<-Dx>.
 
index 66a8ea0..49d7625 100644 (file)
@@ -1638,7 +1638,7 @@ extremely important to test any addition thoroughly and add new tests
 to explore all boundary conditions that your new function is expected
 to handle.  If your new function is used only by one module (e.g. toke),
 then it should probably be named S_your_function (for static); on the
-other hand, if you expect it to accessable from other functions in
+other hand, if you expect it to accessible from other functions in
 Perl, you should name it Perl_your_function.  See L<perlguts/Internal Functions>
 for more details.
 
@@ -1679,7 +1679,7 @@ Lastly, TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST any code before posting to p5p.
 Test on as many platforms as you can find.  Test as many perl
 Configure options as you can (e.g. MULTIPLICITY).  If you have
 profiling or memory tools, see L<EXTERNAL TOOLS FOR DEBUGGING PERL>
-below for how to use them to futher test your code.  Remember that
+below for how to use them to further test your code.  Remember that
 most of the people on P5P are doing this on their own time and
 don't have the time to debug your code.
 
index a31ffd1..e51f309 100644 (file)
@@ -69,9 +69,13 @@ A "layer" is composed of two parts:
 
 =over 4
 
-=item 1. The functions and attributes of the "layer class".
+=item 1.
+
+The functions and attributes of the "layer class".
+
+=item 2.
 
-=item 2. The per-instance data for a particular handle.
+The per-instance data for a particular handle.
 
 =back
 
index 91cc81a..80c9ba1 100644 (file)
@@ -173,21 +173,21 @@ usually used just when you want to start a Pod block with an ordinary
 paragraph or a verbatim paragraph.  For example:
 
   =item stuff()
-  
+
   This function does stuff.
-  
+
   =cut
-  
+
   sub stuff {
     ...
   }
-  
+
   =pod
-  
+
   Remember to check its return value, as in:
-  
-    stuff() || die "Couldn't do stufF!";
-  
+
+    stuff() || die "Couldn't do stuff!";
+
   =cut
 
 =item C<=begin I<formatname>>
@@ -208,10 +208,10 @@ is meant for formatters that understand the special format
 called I<formatname>.  For example,
 
   =begin html
-  
+
   <hr> <img src="thang.png">
   <p> This is a raw HTML paragraph </p>
-  
+
   =end html
 
 The command "=for I<formatname> I<text...>"
@@ -613,7 +613,7 @@ wish to work around.
 =item *
 
 If you're more familiar with writing in HTML than with writing in Pod, you
-can try your hand at writing documentation in simple HTML, and coverting
+can try your hand at writing documentation in simple HTML, and converting
 it to Pod with the experimental L<Pod::HTML2Pod|Pod::HTML2Pod> module,
 (available in CPAN), and looking at the resulting code.  The experimental
 L<Pod::PXML|Pod::PXML> module in CPAN might also be useful.
@@ -626,7 +626,7 @@ line.  Having something like this:
 
  # - - - - - - - - - - - -
  =item $firecracker->boom()
+
  This noisily detonates the firecracker object.
  =cut
  sub boom {
@@ -638,13 +638,13 @@ at all.
 Instead, have it like this:
 
  # - - - - - - - - - - - -
+
  =item $firecracker->boom()
+
  This noisily detonates the firecracker object.
+
  =cut
+
  sub boom {
  ...
 
index 46d3ec8..145309c 100644 (file)
@@ -121,7 +121,7 @@ But they may span several (non-blank) lines:
   =for comment
   Hm, I wonder what it would look like if
   you tried to write a BNF for Pod from this.
-  
+
   =head3 Dr. Strangelove, or: How I Learned to
   Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
 
@@ -176,11 +176,11 @@ For example: consider the following paragraphs:
   # <- that's the 0th column
 
   =head1 Foo
-  
+
   Stuff
-  
+
     $foo->bar
-  
+
   =cut
 
 Here, "=head1 Foo" and "=cut" are command paragraphs because the first
@@ -208,7 +208,7 @@ This command indicates that the text in the remainder of the paragraph
 is a heading.  That text may contain formatting codes.  Examples:
 
   =head1 Object Attributes
-  
+
   =head3 What B<Not> to Do!
 
 =item "=pod"
@@ -219,9 +219,9 @@ all.)  If there is any text in this command paragraph after "=pod",
 it must be ignored.  Examples:
 
   =pod
-  
+
   This is a plain Pod paragraph.
-  
+
   =pod This text is ignored.
 
 =item "=cut"
@@ -251,9 +251,9 @@ explained in the L</"About =over...=back Regions"> section, further
 below.  Formatting codes are not expanded.  Examples:
 
   =over 3
-  
+
   =over 3.5
-  
+
   =over
 
 =item "=item"
@@ -265,20 +265,20 @@ explained in the L</"About =over...=back Regions"> section, further
 below.  Examples:
 
   =item
-  
+
   =item *
-  
+
   =item      *    
-  
+
   =item 14
-  
+
   =item   3.
-  
+
   =item C<< $thing->stuff(I<dodad>) >>
-  
+
   =item For transporting us beyond seas to be tried for pretended
   offenses
-  
+
   =item He is at this time transporting large armies of foreign
   mercenaries to complete the works of death, desolation and
   tyranny, already begun with circumstances of cruelty and perfidy
@@ -320,9 +320,9 @@ L</About Data Paragraphs and "=beginE<sol>=end" Regions>.
 This is synonymous with:
 
      =begin formatname
-     
+
      text...
-     
+
      =end formatname
 
 That is, it creates a region consisting of a single paragraph; that
@@ -517,7 +517,7 @@ starting at line 123: 'Time objects are not...'").  So these
 two paragraphs:
 
   I<I told you not to do this!
-  
+
   Don't make me say it again!>
 
 ...must I<not> be parsed as two paragraphs in italics (with the I
@@ -526,7 +526,7 @@ the first paragraph should generate a warning, but that aside, the
 above code must parse as if it were:
 
   I<I told you not to do this!>
-  
+
   Don't make me say it again!E<gt>
 
 (In SGMLish jargon, all Pod commands are like block-level
@@ -645,11 +645,11 @@ version numbers of any modules it might be using to process the Pod.
 Minimal examples:
 
   %% POD::Pod2PS v3.14159, using POD::Parser v1.92
-  
+
   <!-- Pod::HTML v3.14159, using POD::Parser v1.92 -->
-  
+
   {\doccomm generated by Pod::Tree::RTF 3.14159 using Pod::Tree 1.08}
-  
+
   .\" Pod::Man version 3.14159, using POD::Parser version 1.92
 
 Formatters may also insert additional comments, including: the
@@ -802,7 +802,7 @@ characters (also defined there by Unicode, with the same meaning),
 which all Pod formatters must render faithfully.  Characters
 in the ranges 0-31 and 127-159 should not be used (neither as
 literals, nor as EE<lt>number> codes), except for the
-literal byte-sequences for newline (13, 13 10, or 13), and tab (9).
+literal byte-sequences for newline (13, 13 10, or 10), and tab (9).
 
 Characters in the range 160-255 refer to Latin-1 characters (also
 defined there by Unicode, with the same meaning).  Characters above
@@ -861,7 +861,7 @@ it contains spaces, which aren't alphanumeric characters.  This
 presumably does not I<need> special treatment by a Pod processor;
 " 0 1 2 3 " doesn't look like a number in any base, so it would
 presumably be looked up in the table of HTML-like names.  Since
-there is (and cannot be) an HTML-like entity called " 0 1 2 3 ",
+there isn't (and cannot be) an HTML-like entity called " 0 1 2 3 ",
 this will be treated as an error.  However, Pod processors may
 treat "EE<lt> 0 1 2 3 >" or "EE<lt>e-acute>" as I<syntactically>
 invalid, potentially earning a different error message than the
@@ -942,7 +942,7 @@ unknown EE<lt>thing> sequence that the parser couldn't resolve to
 anything, renderable or not).  It is good practice to map Latin letters
 with diacritics (like "EE<lt>eacute>"/"EE<lt>233>") to the corresponding
 unaccented US-ASCII letters (like a simple character 101, "e"), but
-clearly this is often not feasable, and an unrenderable character may
+clearly this is often not feasible, and an unrenderable character may
 be represented as "?", or the like.  In attempting a sane fallback
 (as from EE<lt>233> to "e"), Pod formatters may use the
 %Latin1Code_to_fallback table in L<Pod::Escapes|Pod::Escapes>, or
@@ -987,7 +987,7 @@ representation that maps best to what the output format demands.
 
 =item *
 
-Some processors may find it the C<SE<lt>...E<gt>> code easiest to
+Some processors may find that the C<SE<lt>...E<gt>> code is easiest to
 implement by replacing each space in the parse tree under the content
 of the S, with an NBSP.  But note: the replacement should apply I<not> to
 spaces in I<all> text, but I<only> to spaces in I<printable> text.  (This
@@ -1018,7 +1018,7 @@ character/code and no code for "don't break this stuff across lines".
 
 Besides the NBSP character discussed above, implementors are reminded
 of the existence of the other "special" character in Latin-1, the
-"soft hyphen" chararacter, also known as "discretionary hyphen",
+"soft hyphen" character, also known as "discretionary hyphen",
 i.e. C<EE<lt>173E<gt>> = C<EE<lt>0xADE<gt>> =
 C<EE<lt>shyE<gt>>).  This character expresses an optional hyphenation
 point.  That is, it normally renders as nothing, but may render as a
@@ -1225,9 +1225,9 @@ as in:
 
   <h1><a name="About_the_-M_Operator">About the <code>-M</code>
   Operator</h1>
-  
+
   ...
-  
+
   <a href="somedoc#About_the_-M_Operator">About the <code>-M</code>
   Operator" in somedoc</a>
 
@@ -1434,17 +1434,17 @@ Pod processors should tolerate "=item *" / "=item I<number>" commands
 with no accompanying paragraph.  The middle item is an example:
 
   =over
-  
+
   =item 1
-  
+
   Pick up dry cleaning.
-  
+
   =item 2
-  
+
   =item 3
-  
+
   Stop by the store.  Get Abba Zabas, Stoli, and cheap lawn chairs.
-  
+
   =back
 
 =item *
@@ -1458,7 +1458,7 @@ Note that an "=over" ... "=back" region should have some
 content.  That is, authors should not have an empty region like this:
 
   =over
-  
+
   =back
 
 Pod processors seeing such a contentless "=over" ... "=back" region,
@@ -1479,7 +1479,7 @@ Authors of Pod formatters should note that this construct:
   =item Porro
 
   =item Quisquam Est
-  
+
   Qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci 
   velit, sed quia non numquam eius modi tempora incidunt ut
   labore et dolore magnam aliquam quaerat voluptatem.
@@ -1494,9 +1494,9 @@ paragraph "Qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor..."; and then an item
 "Ut Enim".  In that case, you'd want to format it like so:
 
   Neque
-  
+
   Porro
-  
+
   Quisquam Est
     Qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci
     velit, sed quia non numquam eius modi tempora incidunt ut
@@ -1534,7 +1534,7 @@ authors to distinguish which grouping is meant by the above
 
   Ut Enim
 
-That is, there should be (at least roughtly) equal spacing between
+That is, there should be (at least roughly) equal spacing between
 items as between paragraphs (although that spacing may well be less
 than the full height of a line of text).  This leaves it to the reader
 to use (con)textual cues to figure out whether the "Qui dolorem
@@ -1554,9 +1554,9 @@ to be used (typically passed through) when rendering the document to
 a specific format:
 
   =begin rtf
-  
+
   \par{\pard\qr\sa4500{\i Printed\~\chdate\~\chtime}\par}
-  
+
   =end rtf
 
 The exact same effect could, incidentally, be achieved with a single
@@ -1570,11 +1570,11 @@ meaning as one, and Pod parsers may parse it as one.)
 Another example of a data paragraph:
 
   =begin html
-  
+
   I like <em>PIE</em>!
-  
+
   <hr>Especially pecan pie!
-  
+
   =end html
 
 If these were ordinary paragraphs, the Pod parser would try to
@@ -1620,26 +1620,26 @@ Note that a "=begin I<identifier>"..."=end I<identifier>" region where
 I<identifier> begins with a colon, I<can> contain commands.  For example:
 
   =begin :biblio
-  
+
   Wirth's classic is available in several editions, including:
-  
+
   =for comment
    hm, check abebooks.com for how much used copies cost.
-  
+
   =over
-  
+
   =item
-  
+
   Wirth, Niklaus.  1975.  I<Algorithmen und Datenstrukturen.>
   Teubner, Stuttgart.  [Yes, it's in German.]
-  
+
   =item
-  
+
   Wirth, Niklaus.  1976.  I<Algorithms + Data Structures =
   Programs.>  Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ.
-  
+
   =back
-  
+
   =end :biblio
 
 Note, however, a "=begin I<identifier>"..."=end I<identifier>"
@@ -1648,13 +1648,13 @@ directly contain "=head1" ... "=head4" commands, nor "=over", nor "=back",
 nor "=item".  For example, this may be considered invalid:
 
   =begin somedata
-  
+
   This is a data paragraph.
-  
+
   =head1 Don't do this!
-  
+
   This is a data paragraph too.
-  
+
   =end somedata
 
 A Pod processor may signal that the above (specifically the "=head1"
@@ -1662,48 +1662,48 @@ paragraph) is an error.  Note, however, that the following should
 I<not> be treated as an error:
 
   =begin somedata
-  
+
   This is a data paragraph.
-  
+
   =cut
-  
+
   # Yup, this isn't Pod anymore.
   sub excl { (rand() > .5) ? "hoo!" : "hah!" }
-  
+
   =pod
-  
+
   This is a data paragraph too.
-  
+
   =end somedata
 
 And this too is valid:
 
   =begin someformat
-  
+
   This is a data paragraph.
-  
+
     And this is a data paragraph.
-  
+
   =begin someotherformat
-  
+
   This is a data paragraph too.
-  
+
     And this is a data paragraph too.
-  
+
   =begin :yetanotherformat
 
   =head2 This is a command paragraph!
 
   This is an ordinary paragraph!
-  
+
     And this is a verbatim paragraph!
-  
+
   =end :yetanotherformat
-  
+
   =end someotherformat
-  
+
   Another data paragraph!
-  
+
   =end someformat
 
 The contents of the above "=begin :yetanotherformat" ...
@@ -1720,35 +1720,35 @@ other than "=end", "=pod", and "=cut".
 Also consider this valid structure:
 
   =begin :biblio
-  
+
   Wirth's classic is available in several editions, including:
-  
+
   =over
-  
+
   =item
-  
+
   Wirth, Niklaus.  1975.  I<Algorithmen und Datenstrukturen.>
   Teubner, Stuttgart.  [Yes, it's in German.]
-  
+
   =item
-  
+
   Wirth, Niklaus.  1976.  I<Algorithms + Data Structures =
   Programs.>  Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ.
 
   =back
-  
+
   Buy buy buy!
-  
+
   =begin html
-  
+
   <img src='wirth_spokesmodeling_book.png'>
-  
+
   <hr>
-  
+
   =end html
-  
+
   Now now now!
-  
+
   =end :biblio
 
 There, the "=begin html"..."=end html" region is nested inside
@@ -1774,22 +1774,22 @@ contentless "=for I<something>" and "=for :I<something>"
 paragraphs.  I.e., these should be tolerated:
 
   =for html
-  
+
   =begin html
-  
+
   =end html
-  
+
   =begin :biblio
-  
+
   =end :biblio
 
 Incidentally, note that there's no easy way to express a data
 paragraph starting with something that looks like a command.  Consider:
 
   =begin stuff
-  
+
   =shazbot
-  
+
   =end stuff
 
 There, "=shazbot" will be parsed as a Pod command "shazbot", not as a data
@@ -1804,40 +1804,40 @@ Note that =end commands must match the currently open =begin command.  That
 is, they must properly nest.  For example, this is valid:
 
   =begin outer
-  
+
   X
-  
+
   =begin inner
-  
+
   Y
-  
+
   =end inner
-  
+
   Z
-  
+
   =end outer
 
 while this is invalid:
 
   =begin outer
-  
+
   X
-  
+
   =begin inner
-  
+
   Y
-  
+
   =end outer
-  
+
   Z
-  
+
   =end inner
-  
+
 This latter is improper because when the "=end outer" command is seen, the
 currently open region has the formatname "inner", not "outer".  (It just
 happens that "outer" is the format name of a higher-up region.)  This is
 an error.  Processors must by default report this as an error, and may halt
-processing the document containing that error.  A corrolary of this is that
+processing the document containing that error.  A corollary of this is that
 regions cannot "overlap" -- i.e., the latter block above does not represent
 a region called "outer" which contains X and Y, overlapping a region called
 "inner" which contains Y and Z.  But because it is invalid (as all
@@ -1847,7 +1847,7 @@ anything at all.
 Similarly, this is invalid:
 
   =begin thing
-  
+
   =end hting
 
 This is an error because the region is opened by "thing", and the "=end"
@@ -1856,7 +1856,7 @@ tries to close "hting" [sic].
 This is also invalid:
 
   =begin thing
-  
+
   =end
 
 This is invalid because every "=end" command must have a formatname
index 1b483c0..a31adab 100644 (file)
@@ -238,7 +238,7 @@ C<cat> is able to match earlier in the string.
     "cats"          =~ /cats|cat|ca|c/; # matches "cats"
 
 At a given character position, the first alternative that allows the
-regex match to succeed wil be the one that matches. Here, all the
+regex match to succeed will be the one that matches. Here, all the
 alternatives match at the first string position, so th first matches.
 
 =head2 Grouping things and hierarchical matching
index 65dfb47..f4e9bb6 100644 (file)
@@ -550,7 +550,7 @@ to give them a chance to match.
 
 The last example points out that character classes are like
 alternations of characters.  At a given character position, the first
-alternative that allows the regexp match to succeed wil be the one
+alternative that allows the regexp match to succeed will be the one
 that matches.
 
 =head2 Grouping things and hierarchical matching
@@ -587,7 +587,7 @@ are
 
 Alternations behave the same way in groups as out of them: at a given
 string position, the leftmost alternative that allows the regexp to
-match is taken.  So in the last example at tth first string position,
+match is taken.  So in the last example at the first string position,
 C<"20"> matches the second alternative, but there is nothing left over
 to match the next two digits C<\d\d>.  So perl moves on to the next
 alternative, which is the null alternative and that works, since
index 44a7d10..f0b1b72 100644 (file)
@@ -173,7 +173,7 @@ C<[1234567890]> aren't the only numerals any more.
 
 =head2 POSIX Unicode character classes
 
-([=a=] for equivalance classes, [.ch.] for collation.)
+(C<[=a=]> for equivalance classes, C<[.ch.]> for collation.)
 These are dependent on Unicode normalization and collation.
 
 =head2 Factoring out common suffices/prefices in regexps (trie optimization)
@@ -213,7 +213,7 @@ fp_setmask(), fp_getmask(), fp_setround(), fp_getround()
 (no metaconfig units yet for these).  Don't forget finitel(), fp_classl(),
 fp_class_l(), (yes, both do, unfortunately, exist), and unorderedl().)
 
-As of Perl 5.6.1 is a Perl macro, Perl_isnan().
+As of Perl 5.6.1, there is a Perl macro, Perl_isnan().
 
 =head2 IV/UV preservation
 
@@ -279,7 +279,7 @@ mark-and-sweep GC implementation.
 
 Alan notes that: The basic idea was to extend the parser token stack
 (C<YYSTYPE>) to include a type field so we knew what sort of thing each
-element of the stack was.  The F<<perly.c> code would then have to be
+element of the stack was.  The F<perly.c> code would then have to be
 postprocessed to record the type of each entry on the stack as it was
 created, and the parser patched so that it could unroll the stack
 properly on error.
@@ -322,11 +322,11 @@ Damian Conway is planning to work on this, but it hasn't happened yet.
 
 =head2 Using POSIX calls internally
 
-When faced with a BSD vs. SySV -style interface to some library or
+When faced with a BSD vs. SysV -style interface to some library or
 system function, perl's roots show in that it typically prefers the BSD
 interface (but falls back to the SysV one).  One example is getpgrp().
 Other examples include C<memcpy> vs. C<bcopy>.  There are others, mostly in
-F<<pp_sys.c>.
+F<pp_sys.c>.
 
 Mostly, this item is a suggestion for which way to start a journey into
 an C<#ifdef> forest.  It is not primarily a suggestion to eliminate any of
@@ -444,7 +444,7 @@ Look at the "reification" code in C<av.c>
 
 Currently, indirect object syntax bypasses prototype checks.
 
-=head2 Install HMTL
+=head2 Install HTML
 
 HTML versions of the documentation need to be installed by default; a
 call to C<installhtml> from C<installperl> may be all that's necessary.
@@ -621,11 +621,11 @@ can be found on the CPAN.
 
 =head2 gettimeofday
 
-C<Time::Hires> has been integrated into the core.
+C<Time::HiRes> has been integrated into the core.
 
 =head2 setitimer and getimiter
 
-Adding C<Time::Hires> got us this too.
+Adding C<Time::HiRes> got us this too.
 
 =head2 Testing __DIE__ hook
 
index e56f3ff..e1dcf4b 100644 (file)
@@ -275,6 +275,8 @@ have their directionality defined:
     BidiWS      Whitespace
     BidiON      Other Neutrals
 
+=back
+
 =head2 Scripts
 
 The scripts available for C<\p{In...}> and C<\P{In...}>, for example
@@ -481,6 +483,8 @@ below list that have the C<Block> appended).
    Yi Radicals
    Yi Syllables
 
+=over 4
+
 =item *
 
 The special pattern C<\X> match matches any extended Unicode sequence
@@ -563,7 +567,7 @@ than one Unicode character
 
 =back
 
-What doesn't yet work are the followng cases:
+What doesn't yet work are the following cases:
 
 =over 8
 
index 2f31ea7..2f39d56 100644 (file)
@@ -261,7 +261,7 @@ with the rightmost closing parenthesis) of the last successful search
 pattern.  (Mnemonic: the (possibly) Nested parenthesis that most
 recently closed.)
 
-This is primarly used inside C<(?{...})> blocks for examining text
+This is primarily used inside C<(?{...})> blocks for examining text
 recently matched. For example, to effectively capture text to a variable
 (in addition to C<$1>, C<$2>, etc.), replace C<(...)> with
 
index 407a012..35f123f 100644 (file)
--- a/pp_ctl.c
+++ b/pp_ctl.c
@@ -4053,7 +4053,7 @@ dynprep(pTHX_ gptr *list1, gptr *list2, size_t nmemb, SVCOMPARE_t cmp)
 
 /* 
 =for apidoc sortsv
-   
+
 Sort an array. Here is an example:
 
     sortsv(AvARRAY(av), av_len(av)+1, Perl_sv_cmp_locale); 
index 755481e..e4b6e0f 100644 (file)
@@ -115,7 +115,7 @@ Perl_sharedsv_find(pTHX_ SV* sv)
 =for apidoc sharedsv_lock
 
 Recursive locks on a sharedsv.
-Locks are dynamicly scoped at the level of the first lock.
+Locks are dynamically scoped at the level of the first lock.
 =cut
 */
 void