More typo fixes in pod/perl*.pod files
authorKeith Thompson <kst@mib.org>
Sun, 31 Jul 2011 02:16:52 +0000 (19:16 -0700)
committerFather Chrysostomos <sprout@cpan.org>
Sun, 31 Jul 2011 20:29:47 +0000 (13:29 -0700)
13 files changed:
pod/perl5100delta.pod
pod/perl51311delta.pod
pod/perl5140delta.pod
pod/perl5150delta.pod
pod/perl5151delta.pod
pod/perl595delta.pod
pod/perldiag.pod
pod/perlhack.pod
pod/perlperf.pod
pod/perlpod.pod
pod/perlreapi.pod
pod/perlrecharclass.pod
pod/perlvms.pod

index e93c316..4e5c6d3 100644 (file)
@@ -844,7 +844,7 @@ of C<CPANPLUS>.
 =item *
 
 C<Archive::Extract> is a generic archive extraction mechanism
-for F<.tar> (plain, gziped or bzipped) or F<.zip> files.
+for F<.tar> (plain, gzipped or bzipped) or F<.zip> files.
 
 =item *
 
index 976eba3..812af75 100644 (file)
@@ -233,7 +233,7 @@ C<Test::Simple> has been upgraded from version 0.97_01 to 0.98
 
 C<Tie::Hash::NamedCapture> has been upgraded from version 0.07 to 0.08.
 
-Some of the Perl code has been converted to XS for efficency's sake.
+Some of the Perl code has been converted to XS for efficiency's sake.
 
 =item *
 
index 17faea8..51060ac 100644 (file)
@@ -2888,7 +2888,7 @@ When C<perlio> became the default and C<unix> became the default bottom layer,
 the most common path for creating files from Perl became C<PerlIOUnix_open>,
 which has always explicitly used C<0666> as the permission mask.  This prevents
 inheriting permissions from RMS defaults and ACLs, so to avoid that problem,
-we now pass C<0777> to open().  In theVMS CRTL, C<0777> has a special
+we now pass C<0777> to open().  In the VMS CRTL, C<0777> has a special
 meaning over and above intersecting with the current umask; specifically, it
 allows Unix syscalls to preserve native default permissions (5.12.3).
 
index c783b49..4966207 100644 (file)
@@ -1184,7 +1184,7 @@ L<YAML::Syck> has (undiagnosed) test failures.
 
 =head1 Acknowledgements
 
-Perl 5.15.0 represents approximatly five weeks of development since Perl
+Perl 5.15.0 represents approximately five weeks of development since Perl
 5.14.0 and contains approximately 54,000 lines of changes across 618
 files from 57 authors.
 
index 861f5cf..f9ae49f 100644 (file)
@@ -430,7 +430,7 @@ L<RT #87322|https://rt.perl.org/rt3/Public/Bug/Display.html?id=87322>.
 
 =item *
 
-The expermental C<fetch_cop_label> function has been renamed to
+The experimental C<fetch_cop_label> function has been renamed to
 C<cop_fetch_label>.
 
 =item *
index 246b2cc..097b6b4 100644 (file)
@@ -362,7 +362,7 @@ of C<CPANPLUS>.
 =item *
 
 C<Archive::Extract> is a generic archive extraction mechanism
-for F<.tar> (plain, gziped or bzipped) or F<.zip> files.
+for F<.tar> (plain, gzipped or bzipped) or F<.zip> files.
 
 =item *
 
index 2c675fd..f508db8 100644 (file)
@@ -104,7 +104,7 @@ really meant to multiply a glob by the result of calling a function.
 (W ambiguous) You wrote something like C<@{foo}>, which might be
 asking for the variable C<@foo>, or it might be calling a function
 named foo, and dereferencing it as an array reference.  If you wanted
-the varable, you can just write C<@foo>.  If you wanted to call the
+the variable, you can just write C<@foo>.  If you wanted to call the
 function, write C<@{foo()}> ... or you could just not have a variable
 and a function with the same name, and save yourself a lot of trouble.
 
index 3364d32..1bf2b88 100644 (file)
@@ -1080,7 +1080,7 @@ each file's purpose. Perl instead begins each with a literary allusion
 to that file's purpose.
 
 Like chapters in many books, all top-level Perl source files (along
-with a few others here and there) begin with an epigramic inscription
+with a few others here and there) begin with an epigrammatic inscription
 that alludes, indirectly and metaphorically, to the material you're
 about to read.
 
index 4751e35..007a02b 100644 (file)
@@ -597,7 +597,7 @@ the code.
 C<NYTProf> will generate a report database into the file F<nytprof.out> by
 default.  Human readable reports can be generated from here by using the
 supplied C<nytprofhtml> (HTML output) and C<nytprofcsv> (CSV output) programs.
-We've used the Unix sytem C<html2text> utility to convert the
+We've used the Unix system C<html2text> utility to convert the
 F<nytprof/index.html> file for convenience here.
 
     $> html2text nytprof/index.html
index 068afe4..0491dec 100644 (file)
@@ -238,7 +238,7 @@ region.
 That is, with "=for", you can have only one paragraph's worth
 of text (i.e., the text in "=foo targetname text..."), but with
 "=begin targetname" ... "=end targetname", you can have any amount
-of stuff inbetween.  (Note that there still must be a blank line
+of stuff in between.  (Note that there still must be a blank line
 after the "=begin" command and a blank line before the "=end"
 command.
 
index be75c84..e2a48e3 100644 (file)
@@ -586,7 +586,7 @@ Substring data about strings that must appear in the final match. This
 is currently only used internally by perl's engine for but might be
 used in the future for all engines for optimisations.
 
-=head2 C<nparens>, C<lasparen>, and C<lastcloseparen>
+=head2 C<nparens>, C<lastparen>, and C<lastcloseparen>
 
 These fields are used to keep track of how many paren groups could be matched
 in the pattern, which was the last open paren to be entered, and which was
index c79d1e6..0e583fd 100644 (file)
@@ -423,7 +423,7 @@ Examples:
  -------
 
 * There is an exception to a bracketed character class matching a
-single character only.  When the class is to match caselessely under C</i>
+single character only.  When the class is to match caselessly under C</i>
 matching rules, and a character inside the class matches a
 multiple-character sequence caselessly under Unicode rules, the class
 (when not L<inverted|/Negation>) will also match that sequence.  For
index 241a66c..d88e6b1 100644 (file)
@@ -409,7 +409,7 @@ internal Perl problems that would cause such a condition.
 This allows the programmer to look at the execution stack and variables to
 find out the cause of the exception.  As the debugger is being invoked as
 the Perl interpreter is about to do a fatal exit, continuing the execution
-in debug mode is usally not practical.
+in debug mode is usually not practical.
 
 Starting Perl in the VMS debugger may change the program execution
 profile in a way that such problems are not reproduced.