Docs: Minor modifications to discussion of constructor
authorMichael Witten <mfwitten@gmail.com>
Tue, 7 Apr 2009 19:59:29 +0000 (14:59 -0500)
committerDavid Mitchell <davem@iabyn.com>
Mon, 20 Apr 2009 00:24:19 +0000 (01:24 +0100)
Signed-off-by: Michael Witten <mfwitten@gmail.com>
(cherry picked from commit 64261f91d325cb53a52f189ce3dce7a4ef3c99ec)

pod/perlboot.pod

index 2426062..7d39843 100644 (file)
@@ -561,8 +561,8 @@ Of course, if we constructed all of our horses by hand, we'd most
 likely make mistakes from time to time.  We're also violating one of
 the properties of object-oriented programming, in that the "inside
 guts" of a Horse are visible.  That's good if you're a veterinarian,
-but not if you just like to own horses.  So, let's let the Horse class
-build a new horse:
+but not if you just like to own horses.  So, let's have the Horse
+class handle the details inside a class method:
 
   { package Horse;
     @ISA = qw(Animal);
@@ -578,14 +578,15 @@ build a new horse:
     }
   }
 
-Now with the new C<named> method, we can build a horse:
+Now with the new C<named> method, we can build a horse as follows:
 
   my $horse = Horse->named("Mr. Ed");
 
 Notice we're back to a class method, so the two arguments to
 C<Horse::named> are C<Horse> and C<Mr. Ed>.  The C<bless> operator
-not only blesses C<$name>, it also returns the reference to C<$name>,
-so that's fine as a return value.  And that's how to build a horse.
+not only blesses C<$name>, it also returns that reference.
+
+This C<Horse::named> method is called a "constructor".
 
 We've called the constructor C<named> here, so that it quickly denotes
 the constructor's argument as the name for this particular C<Horse>.