Upgrade Pod-Perldoc to CPAN version 3.15_15
authorRicardo Signes <rjbs@cpan.org>
Fri, 6 Jan 2012 12:58:33 +0000 (07:58 -0500)
committerRicardo Signes <rjbs@cpan.org>
Fri, 6 Jan 2012 20:58:39 +0000 (15:58 -0500)
26 files changed:
MANIFEST
Porting/Maintainers.pl
dist/Pod-Perldoc/corpus/no-head.pod [new file with mode: 0644]
dist/Pod-Perldoc/corpus/perlfunc.pod [new file with mode: 0644]
dist/Pod-Perldoc/corpus/utf8.pod [new file with mode: 0644]
dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc.pm
dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/BaseTo.pm
dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/GetOptsOO.pm
dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/ToANSI.pm [new file with mode: 0644]
dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/ToChecker.pm
dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/ToMan.pm
dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/ToNroff.pm
dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/ToPod.pm
dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/ToRtf.pm
dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/ToTerm.pm [new file with mode: 0644]
dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/ToText.pm
dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/ToTk.pm
dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/ToXml.pm
dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/perldoc.pod
dist/Pod-Perldoc/t/01_about_verbose.t [deleted file]
dist/Pod-Perldoc/t/checkerbasic.t [deleted file]
dist/Pod-Perldoc/t/load.t [new file with mode: 0644]
dist/Pod-Perldoc/t/man/_get_columns.t [new file with mode: 0644]
dist/Pod-Perldoc/t/perldocbasic.t [deleted file]
dist/Pod-Perldoc/t/pod.t [new file with mode: 0644]
dist/Pod-Perldoc/t/textbasic.t [deleted file]

index 2df1462..3d1a191 100644 (file)
--- a/MANIFEST
+++ b/MANIFEST
@@ -3364,22 +3364,26 @@ dist/Net-Ping/t/410_syn_host.t          Ping Net::Ping
 dist/Net-Ping/t/450_service.t          Ping Net::Ping
 dist/Net-Ping/t/500_ping_icmp.t                Ping Net::Ping
 dist/Net-Ping/t/510_ping_udp.t         Ping Net::Ping
-dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/perldoc.pod                       Look up Perl documentation in Pod format
+dist/Pod-Perldoc/corpus/no-head.pod            test file for Pod-Perldoc
+dist/Pod-Perldoc/corpus/perlfunc.pod           test file for Pod-Perldoc
+dist/Pod-Perldoc/corpus/utf8.pod               test file for Pod-Perldoc
+dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/perldoc.pod               Look up Perl documentation in Pod format
 dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/BaseTo.pm     utility module for perldoc
 dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/GetOptsOO.pm  options parsing for perldoc
 dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc.pm            guts of the 'perldoc' utility
+dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/ToANSI.pm     convert POD to ANSI text
 dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/ToChecker.pm  let perldoc check POD for errors
 dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/ToMan.pm      render POD as man pages
 dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/ToNroff.pm    convert POD to nroff
 dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/ToPod.pm      convert POD to POD
 dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/ToRtf.pm      convert POD to RTF
+dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/ToTerm.pm     convert POD to terminal output
 dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/ToText.pm     convert POD to plain text
 dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/ToTk.pm       convert POD via Tk::Pod
 dist/Pod-Perldoc/lib/Pod/Perldoc/ToXml.pm      convert POD to XML
-dist/Pod-Perldoc/t/01_about_verbose.t          test Pod::Perldoc
-dist/Pod-Perldoc/t/checkerbasic.t              test Pod::Perldoc::ToChecker
-dist/Pod-Perldoc/t/perldocbasic.t              test Pod::Perldoc basic operation
-dist/Pod-Perldoc/t/textbasic.t                 test Pod::Perldoc::ToText
+dist/Pod-Perldoc/t/load.t                      test file for Pod-Perldoc
+dist/Pod-Perldoc/t/man/_get_columns.t          test file for Pod-Perldoc
+dist/Pod-Perldoc/t/pod.t                       test file for Pod-Perldoc
 dist/Safe/Changes              Changes for Safe.pm
 dist/Safe/Makefile.PL          Makefile.PL for Safe.pm
 dist/Safe/MANIFEST             MANIFEST for Safe.pm
index 284c0f2..1ffdc22 100755 (executable)
@@ -1504,7 +1504,7 @@ use File::Glob qw(:case);
 
     'Pod::Perldoc' => {
         'MAINTAINER'   => 'ferreira',
-        'DISTRIBUTION' => 'FERREIRA/Pod-Perldoc-3.15_01.tar.gz',
+        'DISTRIBUTION' => 'BDFOY/Pod-Perldoc-3.15_14.tar.gz',
         'FILES'        => q[dist/Pod-Perldoc],
 
         # in blead, the perldoc executable is generated by perldoc.PL
diff --git a/dist/Pod-Perldoc/corpus/no-head.pod b/dist/Pod-Perldoc/corpus/no-head.pod
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..aa63819
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,5 @@
+=pod
+
+This is a line of text
+
+=cut
diff --git a/dist/Pod-Perldoc/corpus/perlfunc.pod b/dist/Pod-Perldoc/corpus/perlfunc.pod
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..604123d
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,8298 @@
+=head1 NAME
+X<function>
+
+perlfunc - Perl builtin functions
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+The functions in this section can serve as terms in an expression.
+They fall into two major categories: list operators and named unary
+operators.  These differ in their precedence relationship with a
+following comma.  (See the precedence table in L<perlop>.)  List
+operators take more than one argument, while unary operators can never
+take more than one argument.  Thus, a comma terminates the argument of
+a unary operator, but merely separates the arguments of a list
+operator.  A unary operator generally provides scalar context to its
+argument, while a list operator may provide either scalar or list
+contexts for its arguments.  If it does both, scalar arguments 
+come first and list argument follow, and there can only ever
+be one such list argument.  For instance, splice() has three scalar
+arguments followed by a list, whereas gethostbyname() has four scalar
+arguments.
+
+In the syntax descriptions that follow, list operators that expect a
+list (and provide list context for elements of the list) are shown
+with LIST as an argument.  Such a list may consist of any combination
+of scalar arguments or list values; the list values will be included
+in the list as if each individual element were interpolated at that
+point in the list, forming a longer single-dimensional list value.
+Commas should separate literal elements of the LIST.
+
+Any function in the list below may be used either with or without
+parentheses around its arguments.  (The syntax descriptions omit the
+parentheses.)  If you use parentheses, the simple but occasionally 
+surprising rule is this: It I<looks> like a function, therefore it I<is> a
+function, and precedence doesn't matter.  Otherwise it's a list
+operator or unary operator, and precedence does matter.  Whitespace
+between the function and left parenthesis doesn't count, so sometimes
+you need to be careful:
+
+    print 1+2+4;      # Prints 7.
+    print(1+2) + 4;   # Prints 3.
+    print (1+2)+4;    # Also prints 3!
+    print +(1+2)+4;   # Prints 7.
+    print ((1+2)+4);  # Prints 7.
+
+If you run Perl with the B<-w> switch it can warn you about this.  For
+example, the third line above produces:
+
+    print (...) interpreted as function at - line 1.
+    Useless use of integer addition in void context at - line 1.
+
+A few functions take no arguments at all, and therefore work as neither
+unary nor list operators.  These include such functions as C<time>
+and C<endpwent>.  For example, C<time+86_400> always means
+C<time() + 86_400>.
+
+For functions that can be used in either a scalar or list context,
+nonabortive failure is generally indicated in scalar context by
+returning the undefined value, and in list context by returning the
+empty list.
+
+Remember the following important rule: There is B<no rule> that relates
+the behavior of an expression in list context to its behavior in scalar
+context, or vice versa.  It might do two totally different things.
+Each operator and function decides which sort of value would be most
+appropriate to return in scalar context.  Some operators return the
+length of the list that would have been returned in list context.  Some
+operators return the first value in the list.  Some operators return the
+last value in the list.  Some operators return a count of successful
+operations.  In general, they do what you want, unless you want
+consistency.
+X<context>
+
+A named array in scalar context is quite different from what would at
+first glance appear to be a list in scalar context.  You can't get a list
+like C<(1,2,3)> into being in scalar context, because the compiler knows
+the context at compile time.  It would generate the scalar comma operator
+there, not the list construction version of the comma.  That means it
+was never a list to start with.
+
+In general, functions in Perl that serve as wrappers for system calls ("syscalls")
+of the same name (like chown(2), fork(2), closedir(2), etc.) return
+true when they succeed and C<undef> otherwise, as is usually mentioned
+in the descriptions below.  This is different from the C interfaces,
+which return C<-1> on failure.  Exceptions to this rule include C<wait>,
+C<waitpid>, and C<syscall>.  System calls also set the special C<$!>
+variable on failure.  Other functions do not, except accidentally.
+
+Extension modules can also hook into the Perl parser to define new
+kinds of keyword-headed expression.  These may look like functions, but
+may also look completely different.  The syntax following the keyword
+is defined entirely by the extension.  If you are an implementor, see
+L<perlapi/PL_keyword_plugin> for the mechanism.  If you are using such
+a module, see the module's documentation for details of the syntax that
+it defines.
+
+=head2 Perl Functions by Category
+X<function>
+
+Here are Perl's functions (including things that look like
+functions, like some keywords and named operators)
+arranged by category.  Some functions appear in more
+than one place.
+
+=over 4
+
+=item Functions for SCALARs or strings
+X<scalar> X<string> X<character>
+
+C<chomp>, C<chop>, C<chr>, C<crypt>, C<hex>, C<index>, C<lc>, C<lcfirst>,
+C<length>, C<oct>, C<ord>, C<pack>, C<q//>, C<qq//>, C<reverse>,
+C<rindex>, C<sprintf>, C<substr>, C<tr///>, C<uc>, C<ucfirst>, C<y///>
+
+=item Regular expressions and pattern matching
+X<regular expression> X<regex> X<regexp>
+
+C<m//>, C<pos>, C<quotemeta>, C<s///>, C<split>, C<study>, C<qr//>
+
+=item Numeric functions
+X<numeric> X<number> X<trigonometric> X<trigonometry>
+
+C<abs>, C<atan2>, C<cos>, C<exp>, C<hex>, C<int>, C<log>, C<oct>, C<rand>,
+C<sin>, C<sqrt>, C<srand>
+
+=item Functions for real @ARRAYs
+X<array>
+
+C<each>, C<keys>, C<pop>, C<push>, C<shift>, C<splice>, C<unshift>, C<values>
+
+=item Functions for list data
+X<list>
+
+C<grep>, C<join>, C<map>, C<qw//>, C<reverse>, C<sort>, C<unpack>
+
+=item Functions for real %HASHes
+X<hash>
+
+C<delete>, C<each>, C<exists>, C<keys>, C<values>
+
+=item Input and output functions
+X<I/O> X<input> X<output> X<dbm>
+
+C<binmode>, C<close>, C<closedir>, C<dbmclose>, C<dbmopen>, C<die>, C<eof>,
+C<fileno>, C<flock>, C<format>, C<getc>, C<print>, C<printf>, C<read>,
+C<readdir>, C<rewinddir>, C<say>, C<seek>, C<seekdir>, C<select>, C<syscall>,
+C<sysread>, C<sysseek>, C<syswrite>, C<tell>, C<telldir>, C<truncate>,
+C<warn>, C<write>
+
+=item Functions for fixed-length data or records
+
+C<pack>, C<read>, C<syscall>, C<sysread>, C<syswrite>, C<unpack>, C<vec>
+
+=item Functions for filehandles, files, or directories
+X<file> X<filehandle> X<directory> X<pipe> X<link> X<symlink>
+
+C<-I<X>>, C<chdir>, C<chmod>, C<chown>, C<chroot>, C<fcntl>, C<glob>,
+C<ioctl>, C<link>, C<lstat>, C<mkdir>, C<open>, C<opendir>,
+C<readlink>, C<rename>, C<rmdir>, C<stat>, C<symlink>, C<sysopen>,
+C<umask>, C<unlink>, C<utime>
+
+=item Keywords related to the control flow of your Perl program
+X<control flow>
+
+C<caller>, C<continue>, C<die>, C<do>,
+C<dump>, C<eval>, C<evalbytes> C<exit>,
+C<__FILE__>, C<goto>, C<last>, C<__LINE__>, C<next>, C<__PACKAGE__>,
+C<redo>, C<return>, C<sub>, C<__SUB__>, C<wantarray>
+
+C<__SUB__> is only available with a C<use v5.16> (or higher) declaration or
+with the C<"current_sub"> feature (see L<feature>).
+
+=item Keywords related to the switch feature
+
+C<break>, C<continue>, C<default>, C<given>, C<when>
+
+Except for C<continue>, these are available only if you enable the
+C<"switch"> feature or use the C<CORE::> prefix.
+See L<feature> and L<perlsyn/"Switch statements">.  
+Alternately, include a C<use v5.10> or later to the current scope.  In Perl
+5.14 and earlier, C<continue> required the C<"switch"> feature, like the
+other keywords.
+
+=item Keywords related to scoping
+
+C<caller>, C<import>, C<local>, C<my>, C<our>, C<package>, C<state>, C<use>
+
+C<state> is available only if the C<"state"> feature
+is enabled or if it is prefixed with C<CORE::>. See
+L<feature>.  Alternately, include a C<use v5.10> or later to the current scope.
+
+=item Miscellaneous functions
+
+C<defined>, C<dump>, C<eval>, C<evalbytes>,
+C<formline>, C<local>, C<my>, C<our>,
+C<reset>, C<scalar>, C<state>, C<undef>, C<wantarray>
+
+=item Functions for processes and process groups
+X<process> X<pid> X<process id>
+
+C<alarm>, C<exec>, C<fork>, C<getpgrp>, C<getppid>, C<getpriority>, C<kill>,
+C<pipe>, C<qx//>, C<readpipe>, C<setpgrp>,
+C<setpriority>, C<sleep>, C<system>,
+C<times>, C<wait>, C<waitpid>
+
+=item Keywords related to Perl modules
+X<module>
+
+C<do>, C<import>, C<no>, C<package>, C<require>, C<use>
+
+=item Keywords related to classes and object-orientation
+X<object> X<class> X<package>
+
+C<bless>, C<dbmclose>, C<dbmopen>, C<package>, C<ref>, C<tie>, C<tied>,
+C<untie>, C<use>
+
+=item Low-level socket functions
+X<socket> X<sock>
+
+C<accept>, C<bind>, C<connect>, C<getpeername>, C<getsockname>,
+C<getsockopt>, C<listen>, C<recv>, C<send>, C<setsockopt>, C<shutdown>,
+C<socket>, C<socketpair>
+
+=item System V interprocess communication functions
+X<IPC> X<System V> X<semaphore> X<shared memory> X<memory> X<message>
+
+C<msgctl>, C<msgget>, C<msgrcv>, C<msgsnd>, C<semctl>, C<semget>, C<semop>,
+C<shmctl>, C<shmget>, C<shmread>, C<shmwrite>
+
+=item Fetching user and group info
+X<user> X<group> X<password> X<uid> X<gid>  X<passwd> X</etc/passwd>
+
+C<endgrent>, C<endhostent>, C<endnetent>, C<endpwent>, C<getgrent>,
+C<getgrgid>, C<getgrnam>, C<getlogin>, C<getpwent>, C<getpwnam>,
+C<getpwuid>, C<setgrent>, C<setpwent>
+
+=item Fetching network info
+X<network> X<protocol> X<host> X<hostname> X<IP> X<address> X<service>
+
+C<endprotoent>, C<endservent>, C<gethostbyaddr>, C<gethostbyname>,
+C<gethostent>, C<getnetbyaddr>, C<getnetbyname>, C<getnetent>,
+C<getprotobyname>, C<getprotobynumber>, C<getprotoent>,
+C<getservbyname>, C<getservbyport>, C<getservent>, C<sethostent>,
+C<setnetent>, C<setprotoent>, C<setservent>
+
+=item Time-related functions
+X<time> X<date>
+
+C<gmtime>, C<localtime>, C<time>, C<times>
+
+=item Functions new in perl5
+X<perl5>
+
+C<abs>, C<bless>, C<break>, C<chomp>, C<chr>, C<continue>, C<default>, 
+C<exists>, C<formline>, C<given>, C<glob>, C<import>, C<lc>, C<lcfirst>,
+C<lock>, C<map>, C<my>, C<no>, C<our>, C<prototype>, C<qr//>, C<qw//>, C<qx//>,
+C<readline>, C<readpipe>, C<ref>, C<sub>*, C<sysopen>, C<tie>, C<tied>, C<uc>,
+C<ucfirst>, C<untie>, C<use>, C<when>
+
+* C<sub> was a keyword in Perl 4, but in Perl 5 it is an
+operator, which can be used in expressions.
+
+=item Functions obsoleted in perl5
+
+C<dbmclose>, C<dbmopen>
+
+=back
+
+=head2 Portability
+X<portability> X<Unix> X<portable>
+
+Perl was born in Unix and can therefore access all common Unix
+system calls.  In non-Unix environments, the functionality of some
+Unix system calls may not be available or details of the available
+functionality may differ slightly.  The Perl functions affected
+by this are:
+
+C<-X>, C<binmode>, C<chmod>, C<chown>, C<chroot>, C<crypt>,
+C<dbmclose>, C<dbmopen>, C<dump>, C<endgrent>, C<endhostent>,
+C<endnetent>, C<endprotoent>, C<endpwent>, C<endservent>, C<exec>,
+C<fcntl>, C<flock>, C<fork>, C<getgrent>, C<getgrgid>, C<gethostbyname>,
+C<gethostent>, C<getlogin>, C<getnetbyaddr>, C<getnetbyname>, C<getnetent>,
+C<getppid>, C<getpgrp>, C<getpriority>, C<getprotobynumber>,
+C<getprotoent>, C<getpwent>, C<getpwnam>, C<getpwuid>,
+C<getservbyport>, C<getservent>, C<getsockopt>, C<glob>, C<ioctl>,
+C<kill>, C<link>, C<lstat>, C<msgctl>, C<msgget>, C<msgrcv>,
+C<msgsnd>, C<open>, C<pipe>, C<readlink>, C<rename>, C<select>, C<semctl>,
+C<semget>, C<semop>, C<setgrent>, C<sethostent>, C<setnetent>,
+C<setpgrp>, C<setpriority>, C<setprotoent>, C<setpwent>,
+C<setservent>, C<setsockopt>, C<shmctl>, C<shmget>, C<shmread>,
+C<shmwrite>, C<socket>, C<socketpair>,
+C<stat>, C<symlink>, C<syscall>, C<sysopen>, C<system>,
+C<times>, C<truncate>, C<umask>, C<unlink>,
+C<utime>, C<wait>, C<waitpid>
+
+For more information about the portability of these functions, see
+L<perlport> and other available platform-specific documentation.
+
+=head2 Alphabetical Listing of Perl Functions
+
+=over 
+
+=item -X FILEHANDLE
+X<-r>X<-w>X<-x>X<-o>X<-R>X<-W>X<-X>X<-O>X<-e>X<-z>X<-s>X<-f>X<-d>X<-l>X<-p>
+X<-S>X<-b>X<-c>X<-t>X<-u>X<-g>X<-k>X<-T>X<-B>X<-M>X<-A>X<-C>
+
+=item -X EXPR
+
+=item -X DIRHANDLE
+
+=item -X
+
+A file test, where X is one of the letters listed below.  This unary
+operator takes one argument, either a filename, a filehandle, or a dirhandle, 
+and tests the associated file to see if something is true about it.  If the
+argument is omitted, tests C<$_>, except for C<-t>, which tests STDIN.
+Unless otherwise documented, it returns C<1> for true and C<''> for false, or
+the undefined value if the file doesn't exist.  Despite the funny
+names, precedence is the same as any other named unary operator.  The
+operator may be any of:
+
+    -r  File is readable by effective uid/gid.
+    -w  File is writable by effective uid/gid.
+    -x  File is executable by effective uid/gid.
+    -o  File is owned by effective uid.
+
+    -R  File is readable by real uid/gid.
+    -W  File is writable by real uid/gid.
+    -X  File is executable by real uid/gid.
+    -O  File is owned by real uid.
+
+    -e  File exists.
+    -z  File has zero size (is empty).
+    -s  File has nonzero size (returns size in bytes).
+
+    -f  File is a plain file.
+    -d  File is a directory.
+    -l  File is a symbolic link.
+    -p  File is a named pipe (FIFO), or Filehandle is a pipe.
+    -S  File is a socket.
+    -b  File is a block special file.
+    -c  File is a character special file.
+    -t  Filehandle is opened to a tty.
+
+    -u  File has setuid bit set.
+    -g  File has setgid bit set.
+    -k  File has sticky bit set.
+
+    -T  File is an ASCII text file (heuristic guess).
+    -B  File is a "binary" file (opposite of -T).
+
+    -M  Script start time minus file modification time, in days.
+    -A  Same for access time.
+    -C  Same for inode change time (Unix, may differ for other platforms)
+
+Example:
+
+    while (<>) {
+        chomp;
+        next unless -f $_;  # ignore specials
+        #...
+    }
+
+Note that C<-s/a/b/> does not do a negated substitution.  Saying
+C<-exp($foo)> still works as expected, however: only single letters
+following a minus are interpreted as file tests.
+
+These operators are exempt from the "looks like a function rule" described
+above.  That is, an opening parenthesis after the operator does not affect
+how much of the following code constitutes the argument.  Put the opening
+parentheses before the operator to separate it from code that follows (this
+applies only to operators with higher precedence than unary operators, of
+course):
+
+    -s($file) + 1024   # probably wrong; same as -s($file + 1024)
+    (-s $file) + 1024  # correct
+
+The interpretation of the file permission operators C<-r>, C<-R>,
+C<-w>, C<-W>, C<-x>, and C<-X> is by default based solely on the mode
+of the file and the uids and gids of the user.  There may be other
+reasons you can't actually read, write, or execute the file: for
+example network filesystem access controls, ACLs (access control lists),
+read-only filesystems, and unrecognized executable formats.  Note
+that the use of these six specific operators to verify if some operation
+is possible is usually a mistake, because it may be open to race
+conditions.
+
+Also note that, for the superuser on the local filesystems, the C<-r>,
+C<-R>, C<-w>, and C<-W> tests always return 1, and C<-x> and C<-X> return 1
+if any execute bit is set in the mode.  Scripts run by the superuser
+may thus need to do a stat() to determine the actual mode of the file,
+or temporarily set their effective uid to something else.
+
+If you are using ACLs, there is a pragma called C<filetest> that may
+produce more accurate results than the bare stat() mode bits.
+When under C<use filetest 'access'> the above-mentioned filetests
+test whether the permission can(not) be granted using the
+access(2) family of system calls.  Also note that the C<-x> and C<-X> may
+under this pragma return true even if there are no execute permission
+bits set (nor any extra execute permission ACLs).  This strangeness is
+due to the underlying system calls' definitions. Note also that, due to
+the implementation of C<use filetest 'access'>, the C<_> special
+filehandle won't cache the results of the file tests when this pragma is
+in effect.  Read the documentation for the C<filetest> pragma for more
+information.
+
+The C<-T> and C<-B> switches work as follows.  The first block or so of the
+file is examined for odd characters such as strange control codes or
+characters with the high bit set.  If too many strange characters (>30%)
+are found, it's a C<-B> file; otherwise it's a C<-T> file.  Also, any file
+containing a zero byte in the first block is considered a binary file.  If C<-T>
+or C<-B> is used on a filehandle, the current IO buffer is examined
+rather than the first block.  Both C<-T> and C<-B> return true on an empty
+file, or a file at EOF when testing a filehandle.  Because you have to
+read a file to do the C<-T> test, on most occasions you want to use a C<-f>
+against the file first, as in C<next unless -f $file && -T $file>.
+
+If any of the file tests (or either the C<stat> or C<lstat> operator) is given
+the special filehandle consisting of a solitary underline, then the stat
+structure of the previous file test (or stat operator) is used, saving
+a system call.  (This doesn't work with C<-t>, and you need to remember
+that lstat() and C<-l> leave values in the stat structure for the
+symbolic link, not the real file.)  (Also, if the stat buffer was filled by
+an C<lstat> call, C<-T> and C<-B> will reset it with the results of C<stat _>).
+Example:
+
+    print "Can do.\n" if -r $a || -w _ || -x _;
+
+    stat($filename);
+    print "Readable\n" if -r _;
+    print "Writable\n" if -w _;
+    print "Executable\n" if -x _;
+    print "Setuid\n" if -u _;
+    print "Setgid\n" if -g _;
+    print "Sticky\n" if -k _;
+    print "Text\n" if -T _;
+    print "Binary\n" if -B _;
+
+As of Perl 5.9.1, as a form of purely syntactic sugar, you can stack file
+test operators, in a way that C<-f -w -x $file> is equivalent to
+C<-x $file && -w _ && -f _>. (This is only fancy fancy: if you use
+the return value of C<-f $file> as an argument to another filetest
+operator, no special magic will happen.)
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/-X>.
+
+=item abs VALUE
+X<abs> X<absolute>
+
+=item abs
+
+Returns the absolute value of its argument.
+If VALUE is omitted, uses C<$_>.
+
+=item accept NEWSOCKET,GENERICSOCKET
+X<accept>
+
+Accepts an incoming socket connect, just as accept(2) 
+does.  Returns the packed address if it succeeded, false otherwise.
+See the example in L<perlipc/"Sockets: Client/Server Communication">.
+
+On systems that support a close-on-exec flag on files, the flag will
+be set for the newly opened file descriptor, as determined by the
+value of $^F.  See L<perlvar/$^F>.
+
+=item alarm SECONDS
+X<alarm>
+X<SIGALRM>
+X<timer>
+
+=item alarm
+
+Arranges to have a SIGALRM delivered to this process after the
+specified number of wallclock seconds has elapsed.  If SECONDS is not
+specified, the value stored in C<$_> is used. (On some machines,
+unfortunately, the elapsed time may be up to one second less or more
+than you specified because of how seconds are counted, and process
+scheduling may delay the delivery of the signal even further.)
+
+Only one timer may be counting at once.  Each call disables the
+previous timer, and an argument of C<0> may be supplied to cancel the
+previous timer without starting a new one.  The returned value is the
+amount of time remaining on the previous timer.
+
+For delays of finer granularity than one second, the Time::HiRes module
+(from CPAN, and starting from Perl 5.8 part of the standard
+distribution) provides ualarm().  You may also use Perl's four-argument
+version of select() leaving the first three arguments undefined, or you
+might be able to use the C<syscall> interface to access setitimer(2) if
+your system supports it. See L<perlfaq8> for details.
+
+It is usually a mistake to intermix C<alarm> and C<sleep> calls, because
+C<sleep> may be internally implemented on your system with C<alarm>.
+
+If you want to use C<alarm> to time out a system call you need to use an
+C<eval>/C<die> pair.  You can't rely on the alarm causing the system call to
+fail with C<$!> set to C<EINTR> because Perl sets up signal handlers to
+restart system calls on some systems.  Using C<eval>/C<die> always works,
+modulo the caveats given in L<perlipc/"Signals">.
+
+    eval {
+        local $SIG{ALRM} = sub { die "alarm\n" }; # NB: \n required
+        alarm $timeout;
+        $nread = sysread SOCKET, $buffer, $size;
+        alarm 0;
+    };
+    if ($@) {
+        die unless $@ eq "alarm\n";   # propagate unexpected errors
+        # timed out
+    }
+    else {
+        # didn't
+    }
+
+For more information see L<perlipc>.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/alarm>.
+
+=item atan2 Y,X
+X<atan2> X<arctangent> X<tan> X<tangent>
+
+Returns the arctangent of Y/X in the range -PI to PI.
+
+For the tangent operation, you may use the C<Math::Trig::tan>
+function, or use the familiar relation:
+
+    sub tan { sin($_[0]) / cos($_[0])  }
+
+The return value for C<atan2(0,0)> is implementation-defined; consult
+your atan2(3) manpage for more information.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/atan2>.
+
+=item bind SOCKET,NAME
+X<bind>
+
+Binds a network address to a socket, just as bind(2)
+does.  Returns true if it succeeded, false otherwise.  NAME should be a
+packed address of the appropriate type for the socket.  See the examples in
+L<perlipc/"Sockets: Client/Server Communication">.
+
+=item binmode FILEHANDLE, LAYER
+X<binmode> X<binary> X<text> X<DOS> X<Windows>
+
+=item binmode FILEHANDLE
+
+Arranges for FILEHANDLE to be read or written in "binary" or "text"
+mode on systems where the run-time libraries distinguish between
+binary and text files.  If FILEHANDLE is an expression, the value is
+taken as the name of the filehandle.  Returns true on success,
+otherwise it returns C<undef> and sets C<$!> (errno).
+
+On some systems (in general, DOS- and Windows-based systems) binmode()
+is necessary when you're not working with a text file.  For the sake
+of portability it is a good idea always to use it when appropriate,
+and never to use it when it isn't appropriate.  Also, people can
+set their I/O to be by default UTF8-encoded Unicode, not bytes.
+
+In other words: regardless of platform, use binmode() on binary data,
+like images, for example.
+
+If LAYER is present it is a single string, but may contain multiple
+directives. The directives alter the behaviour of the filehandle.
+When LAYER is present, using binmode on a text file makes sense.
+
+If LAYER is omitted or specified as C<:raw> the filehandle is made
+suitable for passing binary data. This includes turning off possible CRLF
+translation and marking it as bytes (as opposed to Unicode characters).
+Note that, despite what may be implied in I<"Programming Perl"> (the
+Camel, 3rd edition) or elsewhere, C<:raw> is I<not> simply the inverse of C<:crlf>.
+Other layers that would affect the binary nature of the stream are
+I<also> disabled. See L<PerlIO>, L<perlrun>, and the discussion about the
+PERLIO environment variable.
+
+The C<:bytes>, C<:crlf>, C<:utf8>, and any other directives of the
+form C<:...>, are called I/O I<layers>.  The C<open> pragma can be used to
+establish default I/O layers.  See L<open>.
+
+I<The LAYER parameter of the binmode() function is described as "DISCIPLINE"
+in "Programming Perl, 3rd Edition".  However, since the publishing of this
+book, by many known as "Camel III", the consensus of the naming of this
+functionality has moved from "discipline" to "layer".  All documentation
+of this version of Perl therefore refers to "layers" rather than to
+"disciplines".  Now back to the regularly scheduled documentation...>
+
+To mark FILEHANDLE as UTF-8, use C<:utf8> or C<:encoding(UTF-8)>.
+C<:utf8> just marks the data as UTF-8 without further checking,
+while C<:encoding(UTF-8)> checks the data for actually being valid
+UTF-8. More details can be found in L<PerlIO::encoding>.
+
+In general, binmode() should be called after open() but before any I/O
+is done on the filehandle.  Calling binmode() normally flushes any
+pending buffered output data (and perhaps pending input data) on the
+handle.  An exception to this is the C<:encoding> layer that
+changes the default character encoding of the handle; see L</open>.
+The C<:encoding> layer sometimes needs to be called in
+mid-stream, and it doesn't flush the stream.  The C<:encoding>
+also implicitly pushes on top of itself the C<:utf8> layer because
+internally Perl operates on UTF8-encoded Unicode characters.
+
+The operating system, device drivers, C libraries, and Perl run-time
+system all conspire to let the programmer treat a single
+character (C<\n>) as the line terminator, irrespective of external
+representation.  On many operating systems, the native text file
+representation matches the internal representation, but on some
+platforms the external representation of C<\n> is made up of more than
+one character.
+
+All variants of Unix, Mac OS (old and new), and Stream_LF files on VMS use
+a single character to end each line in the external representation of text
+(even though that single character is CARRIAGE RETURN on old, pre-Darwin
+flavors of Mac OS, and is LINE FEED on Unix and most VMS files). In other
+systems like OS/2, DOS, and the various flavors of MS-Windows, your program
+sees a C<\n> as a simple C<\cJ>, but what's stored in text files are the
+two characters C<\cM\cJ>.  That means that if you don't use binmode() on
+these systems, C<\cM\cJ> sequences on disk will be converted to C<\n> on
+input, and any C<\n> in your program will be converted back to C<\cM\cJ> on
+output.  This is what you want for text files, but it can be disastrous for
+binary files.
+
+Another consequence of using binmode() (on some systems) is that
+special end-of-file markers will be seen as part of the data stream.
+For systems from the Microsoft family this means that, if your binary
+data contain C<\cZ>, the I/O subsystem will regard it as the end of
+the file, unless you use binmode().
+
+binmode() is important not only for readline() and print() operations,
+but also when using read(), seek(), sysread(), syswrite() and tell()
+(see L<perlport> for more details).  See the C<$/> and C<$\> variables
+in L<perlvar> for how to manually set your input and output
+line-termination sequences.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/binmode>.
+
+=item bless REF,CLASSNAME
+X<bless>
+
+=item bless REF
+
+This function tells the thingy referenced by REF that it is now an object
+in the CLASSNAME package.  If CLASSNAME is omitted, the current package
+is used.  Because a C<bless> is often the last thing in a constructor,
+it returns the reference for convenience.  Always use the two-argument
+version if a derived class might inherit the function doing the blessing.
+SeeL<perlobj> for more about the blessing (and blessings) of objects.
+
+Consider always blessing objects in CLASSNAMEs that are mixed case.
+Namespaces with all lowercase names are considered reserved for
+Perl pragmata.  Builtin types have all uppercase names. To prevent
+confusion, you may wish to avoid such package names as well.  Make sure
+that CLASSNAME is a true value.
+
+See L<perlmod/"Perl Modules">.
+
+=item break
+
+Break out of a C<given()> block.
+
+This keyword is enabled by the C<"switch"> feature: see
+L<feature> for more information.  You can also access it by
+prefixing it with C<CORE::>.  Alternately, include a C<use
+v5.10> or later to the current scope.
+
+=item caller EXPR
+X<caller> X<call stack> X<stack> X<stack trace>
+
+=item caller
+
+Returns the context of the current subroutine call.  In scalar context,
+returns the caller's package name if there I<is> a caller (that is, if
+we're in a subroutine or C<eval> or C<require>) and the undefined value
+otherwise.  In list context, returns
+
+    # 0         1          2
+    ($package, $filename, $line) = caller;
+
+With EXPR, it returns some extra information that the debugger uses to
+print a stack trace.  The value of EXPR indicates how many call frames
+to go back before the current one.
+
+    #  0         1          2      3            4
+    ($package, $filename, $line, $subroutine, $hasargs,
+
+    #  5          6          7            8       9         10
+    $wantarray, $evaltext, $is_require, $hints, $bitmask, $hinthash)
+     = caller($i);
+
+Here $subroutine may be C<(eval)> if the frame is not a subroutine
+call, but an C<eval>.  In such a case additional elements $evaltext and
+C<$is_require> are set: C<$is_require> is true if the frame is created by a
+C<require> or C<use> statement, $evaltext contains the text of the
+C<eval EXPR> statement.  In particular, for an C<eval BLOCK> statement,
+$subroutine is C<(eval)>, but $evaltext is undefined.  (Note also that
+each C<use> statement creates a C<require> frame inside an C<eval EXPR>
+frame.)  $subroutine may also be C<(unknown)> if this particular
+subroutine happens to have been deleted from the symbol table.
+C<$hasargs> is true if a new instance of C<@_> was set up for the frame.
+C<$hints> and C<$bitmask> contain pragmatic hints that the caller was
+compiled with.  The C<$hints> and C<$bitmask> values are subject to change
+between versions of Perl, and are not meant for external use.
+
+C<$hinthash> is a reference to a hash containing the value of C<%^H> when the
+caller was compiled, or C<undef> if C<%^H> was empty. Do not modify the values
+of this hash, as they are the actual values stored in the optree.
+
+Furthermore, when called from within the DB package, caller returns more
+detailed information: it sets the list variable C<@DB::args> to be the
+arguments with which the subroutine was invoked.
+
+Be aware that the optimizer might have optimized call frames away before
+C<caller> had a chance to get the information.  That means that C<caller(N)>
+might not return information about the call frame you expect it to, for
+C<< N > 1 >>.  In particular, C<@DB::args> might have information from the
+previous time C<caller> was called.
+
+Be aware that setting C<@DB::args> is I<best effort>, intended for
+debugging or generating backtraces, and should not be relied upon. In
+particular, as C<@_> contains aliases to the caller's arguments, Perl does
+not take a copy of C<@_>, so C<@DB::args> will contain modifications the
+subroutine makes to C<@_> or its contents, not the original values at call
+time. C<@DB::args>, like C<@_>, does not hold explicit references to its
+elements, so under certain cases its elements may have become freed and
+reallocated for other variables or temporary values. Finally, a side effect
+of the current implementation is that the effects of C<shift @_> can
+I<normally> be undone (but not C<pop @_> or other splicing, I<and> not if a
+reference to C<@_> has been taken, I<and> subject to the caveat about reallocated
+elements), so C<@DB::args> is actually a hybrid of the current state and
+initial state of C<@_>. Buyer beware.
+
+=item chdir EXPR
+X<chdir>
+X<cd>
+X<directory, change>
+
+=item chdir FILEHANDLE
+
+=item chdir DIRHANDLE
+
+=item chdir
+
+Changes the working directory to EXPR, if possible. If EXPR is omitted,
+changes to the directory specified by C<$ENV{HOME}>, if set; if not,
+changes to the directory specified by C<$ENV{LOGDIR}>. (Under VMS, the
+variable C<$ENV{SYS$LOGIN}> is also checked, and used if it is set.) If
+neither is set, C<chdir> does nothing. It returns true on success,
+false otherwise. See the example under C<die>.
+
+On systems that support fchdir(2), you may pass a filehandle or
+directory handle as the argument.  On systems that don't support fchdir(2),
+passing handles raises an exception.
+
+=item chmod LIST
+X<chmod> X<permission> X<mode>
+
+Changes the permissions of a list of files.  The first element of the
+list must be the numeric mode, which should probably be an octal
+number, and which definitely should I<not> be a string of octal digits:
+C<0644> is okay, but C<"0644"> is not.  Returns the number of files
+successfully changed.  See also L</oct> if all you have is a string.
+
+    $cnt = chmod 0755, "foo", "bar";
+    chmod 0755, @executables;
+    $mode = "0644"; chmod $mode, "foo";      # !!! sets mode to
+                                             # --w----r-T
+    $mode = "0644"; chmod oct($mode), "foo"; # this is better
+    $mode = 0644;   chmod $mode, "foo";      # this is best
+
+On systems that support fchmod(2), you may pass filehandles among the
+files.  On systems that don't support fchmod(2), passing filehandles raises
+an exception.  Filehandles must be passed as globs or glob references to be
+recognized; barewords are considered filenames.
+
+    open(my $fh, "<", "foo");
+    my $perm = (stat $fh)[2] & 07777;
+    chmod($perm | 0600, $fh);
+
+You can also import the symbolic C<S_I*> constants from the C<Fcntl>
+module:
+
+    use Fcntl qw( :mode );
+    chmod S_IRWXU|S_IRGRP|S_IXGRP|S_IROTH|S_IXOTH, @executables;
+    # Identical to the chmod 0755 of the example above.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/chmod>.
+
+=item chomp VARIABLE
+X<chomp> X<INPUT_RECORD_SEPARATOR> X<$/> X<newline> X<eol>
+
+=item chomp( LIST )
+
+=item chomp
+
+This safer version of L</chop> removes any trailing string
+that corresponds to the current value of C<$/> (also known as
+$INPUT_RECORD_SEPARATOR in the C<English> module).  It returns the total
+number of characters removed from all its arguments.  It's often used to
+remove the newline from the end of an input record when you're worried
+that the final record may be missing its newline.  When in paragraph
+mode (C<$/ = "">), it removes all trailing newlines from the string.
+When in slurp mode (C<$/ = undef>) or fixed-length record mode (C<$/> is
+a reference to an integer or the like; see L<perlvar>) chomp() won't
+remove anything.
+If VARIABLE is omitted, it chomps C<$_>.  Example:
+
+    while (<>) {
+        chomp;  # avoid \n on last field
+        @array = split(/:/);
+        # ...
+    }
+
+If VARIABLE is a hash, it chomps the hash's values, but not its keys.
+
+You can actually chomp anything that's an lvalue, including an assignment:
+
+    chomp($cwd = `pwd`);
+    chomp($answer = <STDIN>);
+
+If you chomp a list, each element is chomped, and the total number of
+characters removed is returned.
+
+Note that parentheses are necessary when you're chomping anything
+that is not a simple variable.  This is because C<chomp $cwd = `pwd`;>
+is interpreted as C<(chomp $cwd) = `pwd`;>, rather than as
+C<chomp( $cwd = `pwd` )> which you might expect.  Similarly,
+C<chomp $a, $b> is interpreted as C<chomp($a), $b> rather than
+as C<chomp($a, $b)>.
+
+=item chop VARIABLE
+X<chop>
+
+=item chop( LIST )
+
+=item chop
+
+Chops off the last character of a string and returns the character
+chopped.  It is much more efficient than C<s/.$//s> because it neither
+scans nor copies the string.  If VARIABLE is omitted, chops C<$_>.
+If VARIABLE is a hash, it chops the hash's values, but not its keys.
+
+You can actually chop anything that's an lvalue, including an assignment.
+
+If you chop a list, each element is chopped.  Only the value of the
+last C<chop> is returned.
+
+Note that C<chop> returns the last character.  To return all but the last
+character, use C<substr($string, 0, -1)>.
+
+See also L</chomp>.
+
+=item chown LIST
+X<chown> X<owner> X<user> X<group>
+
+Changes the owner (and group) of a list of files.  The first two
+elements of the list must be the I<numeric> uid and gid, in that
+order.  A value of -1 in either position is interpreted by most
+systems to leave that value unchanged.  Returns the number of files
+successfully changed.
+
+    $cnt = chown $uid, $gid, 'foo', 'bar';
+    chown $uid, $gid, @filenames;
+
+On systems that support fchown(2), you may pass filehandles among the
+files.  On systems that don't support fchown(2), passing filehandles raises
+an exception.  Filehandles must be passed as globs or glob references to be
+recognized; barewords are considered filenames.
+
+Here's an example that looks up nonnumeric uids in the passwd file:
+
+    print "User: ";
+    chomp($user = <STDIN>);
+    print "Files: ";
+    chomp($pattern = <STDIN>);
+
+    ($login,$pass,$uid,$gid) = getpwnam($user)
+        or die "$user not in passwd file";
+
+    @ary = glob($pattern);  # expand filenames
+    chown $uid, $gid, @ary;
+
+On most systems, you are not allowed to change the ownership of the
+file unless you're the superuser, although you should be able to change
+the group to any of your secondary groups.  On insecure systems, these
+restrictions may be relaxed, but this is not a portable assumption.
+On POSIX systems, you can detect this condition this way:
+
+    use POSIX qw(sysconf _PC_CHOWN_RESTRICTED);
+    $can_chown_giveaway = not sysconf(_PC_CHOWN_RESTRICTED);
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/chmod>.
+
+=item chr NUMBER
+X<chr> X<character> X<ASCII> X<Unicode>
+
+=item chr
+
+Returns the character represented by that NUMBER in the character set.
+For example, C<chr(65)> is C<"A"> in either ASCII or Unicode, and
+chr(0x263a) is a Unicode smiley face.  
+
+Negative values give the Unicode replacement character (chr(0xfffd)),
+except under the L<bytes> pragma, where the low eight bits of the value
+(truncated to an integer) are used.
+
+If NUMBER is omitted, uses C<$_>.
+
+For the reverse, use L</ord>.
+
+Note that characters from 128 to 255 (inclusive) are by default
+internally not encoded as UTF-8 for backward compatibility reasons.
+
+See L<perlunicode> for more about Unicode.
+
+=item chroot FILENAME
+X<chroot> X<root>
+
+=item chroot
+
+This function works like the system call by the same name: it makes the
+named directory the new root directory for all further pathnames that
+begin with a C</> by your process and all its children.  (It doesn't
+change your current working directory, which is unaffected.)  For security
+reasons, this call is restricted to the superuser.  If FILENAME is
+omitted, does a C<chroot> to C<$_>.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/chroot>.
+
+=item close FILEHANDLE
+X<close>
+
+=item close
+
+Closes the file or pipe associated with the filehandle, flushes the IO
+buffers, and closes the system file descriptor.  Returns true if those
+operations succeed and if no error was reported by any PerlIO
+layer.  Closes the currently selected filehandle if the argument is
+omitted.
+
+You don't have to close FILEHANDLE if you are immediately going to do
+another C<open> on it, because C<open> closes it for you.  (See
+L<open|/open FILEHANDLE>.)  However, an explicit C<close> on an input file resets the line
+counter (C<$.>), while the implicit close done by C<open> does not.
+
+If the filehandle came from a piped open, C<close> returns false if one of
+the other syscalls involved fails or if its program exits with non-zero
+status.  If the only problem was that the program exited non-zero, C<$!>
+will be set to C<0>.  Closing a pipe also waits for the process executing
+on the pipe to exit--in case you wish to look at the output of the pipe
+afterwards--and implicitly puts the exit status value of that command into
+C<$?> and C<${^CHILD_ERROR_NATIVE}>.
+
+If there are multiple threads running, C<close> on a filehandle from a
+piped open returns true without waiting for the child process to terminate,
+if the filehandle is still open in another thread.
+
+Closing the read end of a pipe before the process writing to it at the
+other end is done writing results in the writer receiving a SIGPIPE.  If
+the other end can't handle that, be sure to read all the data before
+closing the pipe.
+
+Example:
+
+    open(OUTPUT, '|sort >foo')  # pipe to sort
+        or die "Can't start sort: $!";
+    #...                        # print stuff to output
+    close OUTPUT                # wait for sort to finish
+        or warn $! ? "Error closing sort pipe: $!"
+                   : "Exit status $? from sort";
+    open(INPUT, 'foo')          # get sort's results
+        or die "Can't open 'foo' for input: $!";
+
+FILEHANDLE may be an expression whose value can be used as an indirect
+filehandle, usually the real filehandle name or an autovivified handle.
+
+=item closedir DIRHANDLE
+X<closedir>
+
+Closes a directory opened by C<opendir> and returns the success of that
+system call.
+
+=item connect SOCKET,NAME
+X<connect>
+
+Attempts to connect to a remote socket, just like connect(2).
+Returns true if it succeeded, false otherwise.  NAME should be a
+packed address of the appropriate type for the socket.  See the examples in
+L<perlipc/"Sockets: Client/Server Communication">.
+
+=item continue BLOCK
+X<continue>
+
+=item continue
+
+When followed by a BLOCK, C<continue> is actually a
+flow control statement rather than a function.  If
+there is a C<continue> BLOCK attached to a BLOCK (typically in a C<while> or
+C<foreach>), it is always executed just before the conditional is about to
+be evaluated again, just like the third part of a C<for> loop in C.  Thus
+it can be used to increment a loop variable, even when the loop has been
+continued via the C<next> statement (which is similar to the C C<continue>
+statement).
+
+C<last>, C<next>, or C<redo> may appear within a C<continue>
+block; C<last> and C<redo> behave as if they had been executed within
+the main block.  So will C<next>, but since it will execute a C<continue>
+block, it may be more entertaining.
+
+    while (EXPR) {
+        ### redo always comes here
+        do_something;
+    } continue {
+        ### next always comes here
+        do_something_else;
+        # then back the top to re-check EXPR
+    }
+    ### last always comes here
+
+Omitting the C<continue> section is equivalent to using an
+empty one, logically enough, so C<next> goes directly back
+to check the condition at the top of the loop.
+
+When there is no BLOCK, C<continue> is a function that
+falls through the current C<when> or C<default> block instead of iterating
+a dynamically enclosing C<foreach> or exiting a lexically enclosing C<given>.
+In Perl 5.14 and earlier, this form of C<continue> was
+only available when the C<"switch"> feature was enabled.
+See L<feature> and L<perlsyn/"Switch statements"> for more
+information.
+
+=item cos EXPR
+X<cos> X<cosine> X<acos> X<arccosine>
+
+=item cos
+
+Returns the cosine of EXPR (expressed in radians).  If EXPR is omitted,
+takes the cosine of C<$_>.
+
+For the inverse cosine operation, you may use the C<Math::Trig::acos()>
+function, or use this relation:
+
+    sub acos { atan2( sqrt(1 - $_[0] * $_[0]), $_[0] ) }
+
+=item crypt PLAINTEXT,SALT
+X<crypt> X<digest> X<hash> X<salt> X<plaintext> X<password>
+X<decrypt> X<cryptography> X<passwd> X<encrypt>
+
+Creates a digest string exactly like the crypt(3) function in the C
+library (assuming that you actually have a version there that has not
+been extirpated as a potential munition).
+
+crypt() is a one-way hash function.  The PLAINTEXT and SALT are turned
+into a short string, called a digest, which is returned.  The same
+PLAINTEXT and SALT will always return the same string, but there is no
+(known) way to get the original PLAINTEXT from the hash.  Small
+changes in the PLAINTEXT or SALT will result in large changes in the
+digest.
+
+There is no decrypt function.  This function isn't all that useful for
+cryptography (for that, look for F<Crypt> modules on your nearby CPAN
+mirror) and the name "crypt" is a bit of a misnomer.  Instead it is
+primarily used to check if two pieces of text are the same without
+having to transmit or store the text itself.  An example is checking
+if a correct password is given.  The digest of the password is stored,
+not the password itself.  The user types in a password that is
+crypt()'d with the same salt as the stored digest.  If the two digests
+match, the password is correct.
+
+When verifying an existing digest string you should use the digest as
+the salt (like C<crypt($plain, $digest) eq $digest>).  The SALT used
+to create the digest is visible as part of the digest.  This ensures
+crypt() will hash the new string with the same salt as the digest.
+This allows your code to work with the standard L<crypt|/crypt> and
+with more exotic implementations.  In other words, assume
+nothing about the returned string itself nor about how many bytes 
+of SALT may matter.
+
+Traditionally the result is a string of 13 bytes: two first bytes of
+the salt, followed by 11 bytes from the set C<[./0-9A-Za-z]>, and only
+the first eight bytes of PLAINTEXT mattered. But alternative
+hashing schemes (like MD5), higher level security schemes (like C2),
+and implementations on non-Unix platforms may produce different
+strings.
+
+When choosing a new salt create a random two character string whose
+characters come from the set C<[./0-9A-Za-z]> (like C<join '', ('.',
+'/', 0..9, 'A'..'Z', 'a'..'z')[rand 64, rand 64]>).  This set of
+characters is just a recommendation; the characters allowed in
+the salt depend solely on your system's crypt library, and Perl can't
+restrict what salts C<crypt()> accepts.
+
+Here's an example that makes sure that whoever runs this program knows
+their password:
+
+    $pwd = (getpwuid($<))[1];
+
+    system "stty -echo";
+    print "Password: ";
+    chomp($word = <STDIN>);
+    print "\n";
+    system "stty echo";
+
+    if (crypt($word, $pwd) ne $pwd) {
+        die "Sorry...\n";
+    } else {
+        print "ok\n";
+    }
+
+Of course, typing in your own password to whoever asks you
+for it is unwise.
+
+The L<crypt|/crypt> function is unsuitable for hashing large quantities
+of data, not least of all because you can't get the information
+back.  Look at the L<Digest> module for more robust algorithms.
+
+If using crypt() on a Unicode string (which I<potentially> has
+characters with codepoints above 255), Perl tries to make sense
+of the situation by trying to downgrade (a copy of)
+the string back to an eight-bit byte string before calling crypt()
+(on that copy).  If that works, good.  If not, crypt() dies with
+C<Wide character in crypt>.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/crypt>.
+
+=item dbmclose HASH
+X<dbmclose>
+
+[This function has been largely superseded by the C<untie> function.]
+
+Breaks the binding between a DBM file and a hash.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/dbmclose>.
+
+=item dbmopen HASH,DBNAME,MASK
+X<dbmopen> X<dbm> X<ndbm> X<sdbm> X<gdbm>
+
+[This function has been largely superseded by the
+L<tie|/tie VARIABLE,CLASSNAME,LIST> function.]
+
+This binds a dbm(3), ndbm(3), sdbm(3), gdbm(3), or Berkeley DB file to a
+hash.  HASH is the name of the hash.  (Unlike normal C<open>, the first
+argument is I<not> a filehandle, even though it looks like one).  DBNAME
+is the name of the database (without the F<.dir> or F<.pag> extension if
+any).  If the database does not exist, it is created with protection
+specified by MASK (as modified by the C<umask>).  If your system supports
+only the older DBM functions, you may make only one C<dbmopen> call in your
+program.  In older versions of Perl, if your system had neither DBM nor
+ndbm, calling C<dbmopen> produced a fatal error; it now falls back to
+sdbm(3).
+
+If you don't have write access to the DBM file, you can only read hash
+variables, not set them.  If you want to test whether you can write,
+either use file tests or try setting a dummy hash entry inside an C<eval> 
+to trap the error.
+
+Note that functions such as C<keys> and C<values> may return huge lists
+when used on large DBM files.  You may prefer to use the C<each>
+function to iterate over large DBM files.  Example:
+
+    # print out history file offsets
+    dbmopen(%HIST,'/usr/lib/news/history',0666);
+    while (($key,$val) = each %HIST) {
+        print $key, ' = ', unpack('L',$val), "\n";
+    }
+    dbmclose(%HIST);
+
+See also L<AnyDBM_File> for a more general description of the pros and
+cons of the various dbm approaches, as well as L<DB_File> for a particularly
+rich implementation.
+
+You can control which DBM library you use by loading that library
+before you call dbmopen():
+
+    use DB_File;
+    dbmopen(%NS_Hist, "$ENV{HOME}/.netscape/history.db")
+        or die "Can't open netscape history file: $!";
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/dbmopen>.
+
+=item default BLOCK
+
+Within a C<foreach> or a C<given>, a C<default> BLOCK acts like a C<when>
+that's always true.  Only available after Perl 5.10, and only if the
+C<switch> feature has been requested or if the keyword is prefixed with
+C<CORE::>.  See L</when>.
+
+=item defined EXPR
+X<defined> X<undef> X<undefined>
+
+=item defined
+
+Returns a Boolean value telling whether EXPR has a value other than
+the undefined value C<undef>.  If EXPR is not present, C<$_> is
+checked.
+
+Many operations return C<undef> to indicate failure, end of file,
+system error, uninitialized variable, and other exceptional
+conditions.  This function allows you to distinguish C<undef> from
+other values.  (A simple Boolean test will not distinguish among
+C<undef>, zero, the empty string, and C<"0">, which are all equally
+false.)  Note that since C<undef> is a valid scalar, its presence
+doesn't I<necessarily> indicate an exceptional condition: C<pop>
+returns C<undef> when its argument is an empty array, I<or> when the
+element to return happens to be C<undef>.
+
+You may also use C<defined(&func)> to check whether subroutine C<&func>
+has ever been defined.  The return value is unaffected by any forward
+declarations of C<&func>.  A subroutine that is not defined
+may still be callable: its package may have an C<AUTOLOAD> method that
+makes it spring into existence the first time that it is called; see
+L<perlsub>.
+
+Use of C<defined> on aggregates (hashes and arrays) is deprecated.  It
+used to report whether memory for that aggregate had ever been
+allocated.  This behavior may disappear in future versions of Perl.
+You should instead use a simple test for size:
+
+    if (@an_array) { print "has array elements\n" }
+    if (%a_hash)   { print "has hash members\n"   }
+
+When used on a hash element, it tells you whether the value is defined,
+not whether the key exists in the hash.  Use L</exists> for the latter
+purpose.
+
+Examples:
+
+    print if defined $switch{D};
+    print "$val\n" while defined($val = pop(@ary));
+    die "Can't readlink $sym: $!"
+        unless defined($value = readlink $sym);
+    sub foo { defined &$bar ? &$bar(@_) : die "No bar"; }
+    $debugging = 0 unless defined $debugging;
+
+Note:  Many folks tend to overuse C<defined> and are then surprised to
+discover that the number C<0> and C<""> (the zero-length string) are, in fact,
+defined values.  For example, if you say
+
+    "ab" =~ /a(.*)b/;
+
+The pattern match succeeds and C<$1> is defined, although it
+matched "nothing".  It didn't really fail to match anything.  Rather, it
+matched something that happened to be zero characters long.  This is all
+very above-board and honest.  When a function returns an undefined value,
+it's an admission that it couldn't give you an honest answer.  So you
+should use C<defined> only when questioning the integrity of what
+you're trying to do.  At other times, a simple comparison to C<0> or C<""> is
+what you want.
+
+See also L</undef>, L</exists>, L</ref>.
+
+=item delete EXPR
+X<delete>
+
+Given an expression that specifies an element or slice of a hash, C<delete>
+deletes the specified elements from that hash so that exists() on that element
+no longer returns true.  Setting a hash element to the undefined value does
+not remove its key, but deleting it does; see L</exists>.
+
+In list context, returns the value or values deleted, or the last such
+element in scalar context.  The return list's length always matches that of
+the argument list: deleting non-existent elements returns the undefined value
+in their corresponding positions.
+
+delete() may also be used on arrays and array slices, but its behavior is less
+straightforward.  Although exists() will return false for deleted entries,
+deleting array elements never changes indices of existing values; use shift()
+or splice() for that.  However, if all deleted elements fall at the end of an
+array, the array's size shrinks to the position of the highest element that
+still tests true for exists(), or to 0 if none do.
+
+B<WARNING:> Calling delete on array values is deprecated and likely to
+be removed in a future version of Perl.
+
+Deleting from C<%ENV> modifies the environment.  Deleting from a hash tied to
+a DBM file deletes the entry from the DBM file.  Deleting from a C<tied> hash
+or array may not necessarily return anything; it depends on the implementation
+of the C<tied> package's DELETE method, which may do whatever it pleases.
+
+The C<delete local EXPR> construct localizes the deletion to the current
+block at run time.  Until the block exits, elements locally deleted
+temporarily no longer exist.  See L<perlsub/"Localized deletion of elements
+of composite types">.
+
+    %hash = (foo => 11, bar => 22, baz => 33);
+    $scalar = delete $hash{foo};             # $scalar is 11
+    $scalar = delete @hash{qw(foo bar)};     # $scalar is 22
+    @array  = delete @hash{qw(foo bar baz)}; # @array  is (undef,undef,33)
+
+The following (inefficiently) deletes all the values of %HASH and @ARRAY:
+
+    foreach $key (keys %HASH) {
+        delete $HASH{$key};
+    }
+
+    foreach $index (0 .. $#ARRAY) {
+        delete $ARRAY[$index];
+    }
+
+And so do these:
+
+    delete @HASH{keys %HASH};
+
+    delete @ARRAY[0 .. $#ARRAY];
+
+But both are slower than assigning the empty list
+or undefining %HASH or @ARRAY, which is the customary 
+way to empty out an aggregate:
+
+    %HASH = ();     # completely empty %HASH
+    undef %HASH;    # forget %HASH ever existed
+
+    @ARRAY = ();    # completely empty @ARRAY
+    undef @ARRAY;   # forget @ARRAY ever existed
+
+The EXPR can be arbitrarily complicated provided its
+final operation is an element or slice of an aggregate:
+
+    delete $ref->[$x][$y]{$key};
+    delete @{$ref->[$x][$y]}{$key1, $key2, @morekeys};
+
+    delete $ref->[$x][$y][$index];
+    delete @{$ref->[$x][$y]}[$index1, $index2, @moreindices];
+
+=item die LIST
+X<die> X<throw> X<exception> X<raise> X<$@> X<abort>
+
+C<die> raises an exception. Inside an C<eval> the error message is stuffed
+into C<$@> and the C<eval> is terminated with the undefined value.
+If the exception is outside of all enclosing C<eval>s, then the uncaught
+exception prints LIST to C<STDERR> and exits with a non-zero value. If you
+need to exit the process with a specific exit code, see L</exit>.
+
+Equivalent examples:
+
+    die "Can't cd to spool: $!\n" unless chdir '/usr/spool/news';
+    chdir '/usr/spool/news' or die "Can't cd to spool: $!\n"
+
+If the last element of LIST does not end in a newline, the current
+script line number and input line number (if any) are also printed,
+and a newline is supplied.  Note that the "input line number" (also
+known as "chunk") is subject to whatever notion of "line" happens to
+be currently in effect, and is also available as the special variable
+C<$.>.  See L<perlvar/"$/"> and L<perlvar/"$.">.
+
+Hint: sometimes appending C<", stopped"> to your message will cause it
+to make better sense when the string C<"at foo line 123"> is appended.
+Suppose you are running script "canasta".
+
+    die "/etc/games is no good";
+    die "/etc/games is no good, stopped";
+
+produce, respectively
+
+    /etc/games is no good at canasta line 123.
+    /etc/games is no good, stopped at canasta line 123.
+
+If the output is empty and C<$@> already contains a value (typically from a
+previous eval) that value is reused after appending C<"\t...propagated">.
+This is useful for propagating exceptions:
+
+    eval { ... };
+    die unless $@ =~ /Expected exception/;
+
+If the output is empty and C<$@> contains an object reference that has a
+C<PROPAGATE> method, that method will be called with additional file
+and line number parameters.  The return value replaces the value in
+C<$@>;  i.e., as if C<< $@ = eval { $@->PROPAGATE(__FILE__, __LINE__) }; >>
+were called.
+
+If C<$@> is empty then the string C<"Died"> is used.
+
+If an uncaught exception results in interpreter exit, the exit code is
+determined from the values of C<$!> and C<$?> with this pseudocode:
+
+    exit $! if $!;              # errno
+    exit $? >> 8 if $? >> 8;    # child exit status
+    exit 255;                   # last resort
+
+The intent is to squeeze as much possible information about the likely cause
+into the limited space of the system exit code. However, as C<$!> is the value
+of C's C<errno>, which can be set by any system call, this means that the value
+of the exit code used by C<die> can be non-predictable, so should not be relied
+upon, other than to be non-zero.
+
+You can also call C<die> with a reference argument, and if this is trapped
+within an C<eval>, C<$@> contains that reference.  This permits more
+elaborate exception handling using objects that maintain arbitrary state
+about the exception.  Such a scheme is sometimes preferable to matching
+particular string values of C<$@> with regular expressions.  Because C<$@> 
+is a global variable and C<eval> may be used within object implementations,
+be careful that analyzing the error object doesn't replace the reference in
+the global variable.  It's easiest to make a local copy of the reference
+before any manipulations.  Here's an example:
+
+    use Scalar::Util "blessed";
+
+    eval { ... ; die Some::Module::Exception->new( FOO => "bar" ) };
+    if (my $ev_err = $@) {
+        if (blessed($ev_err) && $ev_err->isa("Some::Module::Exception")) {
+            # handle Some::Module::Exception
+        }
+        else {
+            # handle all other possible exceptions
+        }
+    }
+
+Because Perl stringifies uncaught exception messages before display,
+you'll probably want to overload stringification operations on
+exception objects.  See L<overload> for details about that.
+
+You can arrange for a callback to be run just before the C<die>
+does its deed, by setting the C<$SIG{__DIE__}> hook.  The associated
+handler is called with the error text and can change the error
+message, if it sees fit, by calling C<die> again.  See
+L<perlvar/%SIG> for details on setting C<%SIG> entries, and
+L<"eval BLOCK"> for some examples.  Although this feature was 
+to be run only right before your program was to exit, this is not
+currently so: the C<$SIG{__DIE__}> hook is currently called
+even inside eval()ed blocks/strings!  If one wants the hook to do
+nothing in such situations, put
+
+    die @_ if $^S;
+
+as the first line of the handler (see L<perlvar/$^S>).  Because
+this promotes strange action at a distance, this counterintuitive
+behavior may be fixed in a future release.
+
+See also exit(), warn(), and the Carp module.
+
+=item do BLOCK
+X<do> X<block>
+
+Not really a function.  Returns the value of the last command in the
+sequence of commands indicated by BLOCK.  When modified by the C<while> or
+C<until> loop modifier, executes the BLOCK once before testing the loop
+condition. (On other statements the loop modifiers test the conditional
+first.)
+
+C<do BLOCK> does I<not> count as a loop, so the loop control statements
+C<next>, C<last>, or C<redo> cannot be used to leave or restart the block.
+See L<perlsyn> for alternative strategies.
+
+=item do SUBROUTINE(LIST)
+X<do>
+
+This form of subroutine call is deprecated.  SUBROUTINE can be a bareword,
+a scalar variable or a subroutine beginning with C<&>.
+
+=item do EXPR
+X<do>
+
+Uses the value of EXPR as a filename and executes the contents of the
+file as a Perl script.
+
+    do 'stat.pl';
+
+is just like
+
+    eval `cat stat.pl`;
+
+except that it's more efficient and concise, keeps track of the current
+filename for error messages, searches the C<@INC> directories, and updates
+C<%INC> if the file is found.  See L<perlvar/@INC> and L<perlvar/%INC> for
+these variables.  It also differs in that code evaluated with C<do FILENAME>
+cannot see lexicals in the enclosing scope; C<eval STRING> does.  It's the
+same, however, in that it does reparse the file every time you call it,
+so you probably don't want to do this inside a loop.
+
+If C<do> can read the file but cannot compile it, it returns C<undef> and sets
+an error message in C<$@>.  If C<do> cannot read the file, it returns undef
+and sets C<$!> to the error.  Always check C<$@> first, as compilation
+could fail in a way that also sets C<$!>.  If the file is successfully
+compiled, C<do> returns the value of the last expression evaluated.
+
+Inclusion of library modules is better done with the
+C<use> and C<require> operators, which also do automatic error checking
+and raise an exception if there's a problem.
+
+You might like to use C<do> to read in a program configuration
+file.  Manual error checking can be done this way:
+
+    # read in config files: system first, then user
+    for $file ("/share/prog/defaults.rc",
+               "$ENV{HOME}/.someprogrc")
+    {
+        unless ($return = do $file) {
+            warn "couldn't parse $file: $@" if $@;
+            warn "couldn't do $file: $!"    unless defined $return;
+            warn "couldn't run $file"       unless $return;
+        }
+    }
+
+=item dump LABEL
+X<dump> X<core> X<undump>
+
+=item dump
+
+This function causes an immediate core dump.  See also the B<-u>
+command-line switch in L<perlrun>, which does the same thing.
+Primarily this is so that you can use the B<undump> program (not
+supplied) to turn your core dump into an executable binary after
+having initialized all your variables at the beginning of the
+program.  When the new binary is executed it will begin by executing
+a C<goto LABEL> (with all the restrictions that C<goto> suffers).
+Think of it as a goto with an intervening core dump and reincarnation.
+If C<LABEL> is omitted, restarts the program from the top.
+
+B<WARNING>: Any files opened at the time of the dump will I<not>
+be open any more when the program is reincarnated, with possible
+resulting confusion by Perl.
+
+This function is now largely obsolete, mostly because it's very hard to
+convert a core file into an executable. That's why you should now invoke
+it as C<CORE::dump()>, if you don't want to be warned against a possible
+typo.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/dump>.
+
+=item each HASH
+X<each> X<hash, iterator>
+
+=item each ARRAY
+X<array, iterator>
+
+=item each EXPR
+
+When called in list context, returns a 2-element list consisting of the key
+and value for the next element of a hash, or the index and value for the
+next element of an array, so that you can iterate over it.  When called in
+scalar context, returns only the key (not the value) in a hash, or the index
+in an array.
+
+Hash entries are returned in an apparently random order.  The actual random
+order is subject to change in future versions of Perl, but it is
+guaranteed to be in the same order as either the C<keys> or C<values>
+function would produce on the same (unmodified) hash.  Since Perl
+5.8.2 the ordering can be different even between different runs of Perl
+for security reasons (see L<perlsec/"Algorithmic Complexity Attacks">).
+
+After C<each> has returned all entries from the hash or array, the next
+call to C<each> returns the empty list in list context and C<undef> in
+scalar context.  The next call following that one restarts iteration.  Each
+hash or array has its own internal iterator, accessed by C<each>, C<keys>,
+and C<values>.  The iterator is implicitly reset when C<each> has reached
+the end as just described; it can be explicitly reset by calling C<keys> or
+C<values> on the hash or array.  If you add or delete a hash's elements
+while iterating over it, entries may be skipped or duplicated--so don't do
+that.  Exception: It is always safe to delete the item most recently
+returned by C<each()>, so the following code works properly:
+
+        while (($key, $value) = each %hash) {
+          print $key, "\n";
+          delete $hash{$key};   # This is safe
+        }
+
+This prints out your environment like the printenv(1) program,
+but in a different order:
+
+    while (($key,$value) = each %ENV) {
+        print "$key=$value\n";
+    }
+
+Starting with Perl 5.14, C<each> can take a scalar EXPR, which must hold
+reference to an unblessed hash or array.  The argument will be dereferenced
+automatically.  This aspect of C<each> is considered highly experimental.
+The exact behaviour may change in a future version of Perl.
+
+    while (($key,$value) = each $hashref) { ... }
+
+See also C<keys>, C<values>, and C<sort>.
+
+=item eof FILEHANDLE
+X<eof>
+X<end of file>
+X<end-of-file>
+
+=item eof ()
+
+=item eof
+
+Returns 1 if the next read on FILEHANDLE will return end of file I<or> if
+FILEHANDLE is not open.  FILEHANDLE may be an expression whose value
+gives the real filehandle.  (Note that this function actually
+reads a character and then C<ungetc>s it, so isn't useful in an
+interactive context.)  Do not read from a terminal file (or call
+C<eof(FILEHANDLE)> on it) after end-of-file is reached.  File types such
+as terminals may lose the end-of-file condition if you do.
+
+An C<eof> without an argument uses the last file read.  Using C<eof()>
+with empty parentheses is different.  It refers to the pseudo file
+formed from the files listed on the command line and accessed via the
+C<< <> >> operator.  Since C<< <> >> isn't explicitly opened,
+as a normal filehandle is, an C<eof()> before C<< <> >> has been
+used will cause C<@ARGV> to be examined to determine if input is
+available.   Similarly, an C<eof()> after C<< <> >> has returned
+end-of-file will assume you are processing another C<@ARGV> list,
+and if you haven't set C<@ARGV>, will read input from C<STDIN>;
+see L<perlop/"I/O Operators">.
+
+In a C<< while (<>) >> loop, C<eof> or C<eof(ARGV)> can be used to
+detect the end of each file, whereas C<eof()> will detect the end 
+of the very last file only.  Examples:
+
+    # reset line numbering on each input file
+    while (<>) {
+        next if /^\s*#/;  # skip comments
+        print "$.\t$_";
+    } continue {
+        close ARGV if eof;  # Not eof()!
+    }
+
+    # insert dashes just before last line of last file
+    while (<>) {
+        if (eof()) {  # check for end of last file
+            print "--------------\n";
+        }
+        print;
+        last if eof();      # needed if we're reading from a terminal
+    }
+
+Practical hint: you almost never need to use C<eof> in Perl, because the
+input operators typically return C<undef> when they run out of data or 
+encounter an error.
+
+=item eval EXPR
+X<eval> X<try> X<catch> X<evaluate> X<parse> X<execute>
+X<error, handling> X<exception, handling>
+
+=item eval BLOCK
+
+=item eval
+
+In the first form, the return value of EXPR is parsed and executed as if it
+were a little Perl program.  The value of the expression (which is itself
+determined within scalar context) is first parsed, and if there were no
+errors, executed as a block within the lexical context of the current Perl
+program.  This means, that in particular, any outer lexical variables are
+visible to it, and any package variable settings or subroutine and format
+definitions remain afterwards.
+
+Note that the value is parsed every time the C<eval> executes.
+If EXPR is omitted, evaluates C<$_>.  This form is typically used to
+delay parsing and subsequent execution of the text of EXPR until run time.
+
+If the C<unicode_eval> feature is enabled (which is the default under a
+C<use 5.16> or higher declaration), EXPR or C<$_> is treated as a string of
+characters, so C<use utf8> declarations have no effect, and source filters
+are forbidden.  In the absence of the C<unicode_eval> feature, the string
+will sometimes be treated as characters and sometimes as bytes, depending
+on the internal encoding, and source filters activated within the C<eval>
+exhibit the erratic, but historical, behaviour of affecting some outer file
+scope that is still compiling.  See also the L</evalbytes> keyword, which
+always treats its input as a byte stream and works properly with source
+filters, and the L<feature> pragma.
+
+In the second form, the code within the BLOCK is parsed only once--at the
+same time the code surrounding the C<eval> itself was parsed--and executed
+within the context of the current Perl program.  This form is typically
+used to trap exceptions more efficiently than the first (see below), while
+also providing the benefit of checking the code within BLOCK at compile
+time.
+
+The final semicolon, if any, may be omitted from the value of EXPR or within
+the BLOCK.
+
+In both forms, the value returned is the value of the last expression
+evaluated inside the mini-program; a return statement may be also used, just
+as with subroutines.  The expression providing the return value is evaluated
+in void, scalar, or list context, depending on the context of the C<eval> 
+itself.  See L</wantarray> for more on how the evaluation context can be 
+determined.
+
+If there is a syntax error or runtime error, or a C<die> statement is
+executed, C<eval> returns C<undef> in scalar context
+or an empty list--or, for syntax errors, a list containing a single
+undefined value--in list context, and C<$@> is set to the error
+message.  The discrepancy in the return values in list context is
+considered a bug by some, and will probably be fixed in a future
+release.  If there was no error, C<$@> is set to the empty string.  A
+control flow operator like C<last> or C<goto> can bypass the setting of
+C<$@>.  Beware that using C<eval> neither silences Perl from printing
+warnings to STDERR, nor does it stuff the text of warning messages into C<$@>.
+To do either of those, you have to use the C<$SIG{__WARN__}> facility, or
+turn off warnings inside the BLOCK or EXPR using S<C<no warnings 'all'>>.
+See L</warn>, L<perlvar>, L<warnings> and L<perllexwarn>.
+
+Note that, because C<eval> traps otherwise-fatal errors, it is useful for
+determining whether a particular feature (such as C<socket> or C<symlink>)
+is implemented.  It is also Perl's exception-trapping mechanism, where
+the die operator is used to raise exceptions.
+
+If you want to trap errors when loading an XS module, some problems with
+the binary interface (such as Perl version skew) may be fatal even with
+C<eval> unless C<$ENV{PERL_DL_NONLAZY}> is set.  See L<perlrun>.
+
+If the code to be executed doesn't vary, you may use the eval-BLOCK
+form to trap run-time errors without incurring the penalty of
+recompiling each time.  The error, if any, is still returned in C<$@>.
+Examples:
+
+    # make divide-by-zero nonfatal
+    eval { $answer = $a / $b; }; warn $@ if $@;
+
+    # same thing, but less efficient
+    eval '$answer = $a / $b'; warn $@ if $@;
+
+    # a compile-time error
+    eval { $answer = }; # WRONG
+
+    # a run-time error
+    eval '$answer =';   # sets $@
+
+Using the C<eval{}> form as an exception trap in libraries does have some
+issues.  Due to the current arguably broken state of C<__DIE__> hooks, you
+may wish not to trigger any C<__DIE__> hooks that user code may have installed.
+You can use the C<local $SIG{__DIE__}> construct for this purpose,
+as this example shows:
+
+    # a private exception trap for divide-by-zero
+    eval { local $SIG{'__DIE__'}; $answer = $a / $b; };
+    warn $@ if $@;
+
+This is especially significant, given that C<__DIE__> hooks can call
+C<die> again, which has the effect of changing their error messages:
+
+    # __DIE__ hooks may modify error messages
+    {
+       local $SIG{'__DIE__'} =
+              sub { (my $x = $_[0]) =~ s/foo/bar/g; die $x };
+       eval { die "foo lives here" };
+       print $@ if $@;                # prints "bar lives here"
+    }
+
+Because this promotes action at a distance, this counterintuitive behavior
+may be fixed in a future release.
+
+With an C<eval>, you should be especially careful to remember what's
+being looked at when:
+
+    eval $x;        # CASE 1
+    eval "$x";      # CASE 2
+
+    eval '$x';      # CASE 3
+    eval { $x };    # CASE 4
+
+    eval "\$$x++";  # CASE 5
+    $$x++;          # CASE 6
+
+Cases 1 and 2 above behave identically: they run the code contained in
+the variable $x.  (Although case 2 has misleading double quotes making
+the reader wonder what else might be happening (nothing is).)  Cases 3
+and 4 likewise behave in the same way: they run the code C<'$x'>, which
+does nothing but return the value of $x.  (Case 4 is preferred for
+purely visual reasons, but it also has the advantage of compiling at
+compile-time instead of at run-time.)  Case 5 is a place where
+normally you I<would> like to use double quotes, except that in this
+particular situation, you can just use symbolic references instead, as
+in case 6.
+
+Before Perl 5.14, the assignment to C<$@> occurred before restoration 
+of localised variables, which means that for your code to run on older
+versions, a temporary is required if you want to mask some but not all
+errors:
+
+    # alter $@ on nefarious repugnancy only
+    {
+       my $e;
+       {
+          local $@; # protect existing $@
+          eval { test_repugnancy() };
+          # $@ =~ /nefarious/ and die $@; # Perl 5.14 and higher only
+          $@ =~ /nefarious/ and $e = $@;
+       }
+       die $e if defined $e
+    }
+
+C<eval BLOCK> does I<not> count as a loop, so the loop control statements
+C<next>, C<last>, or C<redo> cannot be used to leave or restart the block.
+
+An C<eval ''> executed within the C<DB> package doesn't see the usual
+surrounding lexical scope, but rather the scope of the first non-DB piece
+of code that called it.  You don't normally need to worry about this unless
+you are writing a Perl debugger.
+
+=item evalbytes EXPR
+X<evalbytes>
+
+=item evalbytes
+
+This function is like L</eval> with a string argument, except it always
+parses its argument, or C<$_> if EXPR is omitted, as a string of bytes.  A
+string containing characters whose ordinal value exceeds 255 results in an
+error.  Source filters activated within the evaluated code apply to the
+code itself.
+
+This function is only available under the C<evalbytes> feature, a
+C<use v5.16> (or higher) declaration, or with a C<CORE::> prefix.  See
+L<feature> for more information.
+
+=item exec LIST
+X<exec> X<execute>
+
+=item exec PROGRAM LIST
+
+The C<exec> function executes a system command I<and never returns>;
+use C<system> instead of C<exec> if you want it to return.  It fails and
+returns false only if the command does not exist I<and> it is executed
+directly instead of via your system's command shell (see below).
+
+Since it's a common mistake to use C<exec> instead of C<system>, Perl
+warns you if there is a following statement that isn't C<die>, C<warn>,
+or C<exit> (if C<-w> is set--but you always do that, right?).   If you
+I<really> want to follow an C<exec> with some other statement, you
+can use one of these styles to avoid the warning:
+
+    exec ('foo')   or print STDERR "couldn't exec foo: $!";
+    { exec ('foo') }; print STDERR "couldn't exec foo: $!";
+
+If there is more than one argument in LIST, or if LIST is an array
+with more than one value, calls execvp(3) with the arguments in LIST.
+If there is only one scalar argument or an array with one element in it,
+the argument is checked for shell metacharacters, and if there are any,
+the entire argument is passed to the system's command shell for parsing
+(this is C</bin/sh -c> on Unix platforms, but varies on other platforms).
+If there are no shell metacharacters in the argument, it is split into
+words and passed directly to C<execvp>, which is more efficient.
+Examples:
+
+    exec '/bin/echo', 'Your arguments are: ', @ARGV;
+    exec "sort $outfile | uniq";
+
+If you don't really want to execute the first argument, but want to lie
+to the program you are executing about its own name, you can specify
+the program you actually want to run as an "indirect object" (without a
+comma) in front of the LIST.  (This always forces interpretation of the
+LIST as a multivalued list, even if there is only a single scalar in
+the list.)  Example:
+
+    $shell = '/bin/csh';
+    exec $shell '-sh';    # pretend it's a login shell
+
+or, more directly,
+
+    exec {'/bin/csh'} '-sh';  # pretend it's a login shell
+
+When the arguments get executed via the system shell, results are
+subject to its quirks and capabilities.  See L<perlop/"`STRING`">
+for details.
+
+Using an indirect object with C<exec> or C<system> is also more
+secure.  This usage (which also works fine with system()) forces
+interpretation of the arguments as a multivalued list, even if the
+list had just one argument.  That way you're safe from the shell
+expanding wildcards or splitting up words with whitespace in them.
+
+    @args = ( "echo surprise" );
+
+    exec @args;               # subject to shell escapes
+                                # if @args == 1
+    exec { $args[0] } @args;  # safe even with one-arg list
+
+The first version, the one without the indirect object, ran the I<echo>
+program, passing it C<"surprise"> an argument.  The second version didn't;
+it tried to run a program named I<"echo surprise">, didn't find it, and set
+C<$?> to a non-zero value indicating failure.
+
+Beginning with v5.6.0, Perl attempts to flush all files opened for
+output before the exec, but this may not be supported on some platforms
+(see L<perlport>).  To be safe, you may need to set C<$|> ($AUTOFLUSH
+in English) or call the C<autoflush()> method of C<IO::Handle> on any
+open handles to avoid lost output.
+
+Note that C<exec> will not call your C<END> blocks, nor will it invoke
+C<DESTROY> methods on your objects.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/exec>.
+
+=item exists EXPR
+X<exists> X<autovivification>
+
+Given an expression that specifies an element of a hash, returns true if the
+specified element in the hash has ever been initialized, even if the
+corresponding value is undefined.
+
+    print "Exists\n"    if exists $hash{$key};
+    print "Defined\n"   if defined $hash{$key};
+    print "True\n"      if $hash{$key};
+
+exists may also be called on array elements, but its behavior is much less
+obvious and is strongly tied to the use of L</delete> on arrays.  B<Be aware>
+that calling exists on array values is deprecated and likely to be removed in
+a future version of Perl.
+
+    print "Exists\n"    if exists $array[$index];
+    print "Defined\n"   if defined $array[$index];
+    print "True\n"      if $array[$index];
+
+A hash or array element can be true only if it's defined and defined only if
+it exists, but the reverse doesn't necessarily hold true.
+
+Given an expression that specifies the name of a subroutine,
+returns true if the specified subroutine has ever been declared, even
+if it is undefined.  Mentioning a subroutine name for exists or defined
+does not count as declaring it.  Note that a subroutine that does not
+exist may still be callable: its package may have an C<AUTOLOAD>
+method that makes it spring into existence the first time that it is
+called; see L<perlsub>.
+
+    print "Exists\n"  if exists &subroutine;
+    print "Defined\n" if defined &subroutine;
+
+Note that the EXPR can be arbitrarily complicated as long as the final
+operation is a hash or array key lookup or subroutine name:
+
+    if (exists $ref->{A}->{B}->{$key})  { }
+    if (exists $hash{A}{B}{$key})       { }
+
+    if (exists $ref->{A}->{B}->[$ix])   { }
+    if (exists $hash{A}{B}[$ix])        { }
+
+    if (exists &{$ref->{A}{B}{$key}})   { }
+
+Although the mostly deeply nested array or hash will not spring into
+existence just because its existence was tested, any intervening ones will.
+Thus C<< $ref->{"A"} >> and C<< $ref->{"A"}->{"B"} >> will spring
+into existence due to the existence test for the $key element above.
+This happens anywhere the arrow operator is used, including even here:
+
+    undef $ref;
+    if (exists $ref->{"Some key"})    { }
+    print $ref;  # prints HASH(0x80d3d5c)
+
+This surprising autovivification in what does not at first--or even
+second--glance appear to be an lvalue context may be fixed in a future
+release.
+
+Use of a subroutine call, rather than a subroutine name, as an argument
+to exists() is an error.
+
+    exists &sub;    # OK
+    exists &sub();  # Error
+
+=item exit EXPR
+X<exit> X<terminate> X<abort>
+
+=item exit
+
+Evaluates EXPR and exits immediately with that value.    Example:
+
+    $ans = <STDIN>;
+    exit 0 if $ans =~ /^[Xx]/;
+
+See also C<die>.  If EXPR is omitted, exits with C<0> status.  The only
+universally recognized values for EXPR are C<0> for success and C<1>
+for error; other values are subject to interpretation depending on the
+environment in which the Perl program is running.  For example, exiting
+69 (EX_UNAVAILABLE) from a I<sendmail> incoming-mail filter will cause
+the mailer to return the item undelivered, but that's not true everywhere.
+
+Don't use C<exit> to abort a subroutine if there's any chance that
+someone might want to trap whatever error happened.  Use C<die> instead,
+which can be trapped by an C<eval>.
+
+The exit() function does not always exit immediately.  It calls any
+defined C<END> routines first, but these C<END> routines may not
+themselves abort the exit.  Likewise any object destructors that need to
+be called are called before the real exit.  C<END> routines and destructors
+can change the exit status by modifying C<$?>. If this is a problem, you
+can call C<POSIX:_exit($status)> to avoid END and destructor processing.
+See L<perlmod> for details.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/exit>.
+
+=item exp EXPR
+X<exp> X<exponential> X<antilog> X<antilogarithm> X<e>
+
+=item exp
+
+Returns I<e> (the natural logarithm base) to the power of EXPR.
+If EXPR is omitted, gives C<exp($_)>.
+
+=item fcntl FILEHANDLE,FUNCTION,SCALAR
+X<fcntl>
+
+Implements the fcntl(2) function.  You'll probably have to say
+
+    use Fcntl;
+
+first to get the correct constant definitions.  Argument processing and
+value returned work just like C<ioctl> below.
+For example:
+
+    use Fcntl;
+    fcntl($filehandle, F_GETFL, $packed_return_buffer)
+        or die "can't fcntl F_GETFL: $!";
+
+You don't have to check for C<defined> on the return from C<fcntl>.
+Like C<ioctl>, it maps a C<0> return from the system call into
+C<"0 but true"> in Perl.  This string is true in boolean context and C<0>
+in numeric context.  It is also exempt from the normal B<-w> warnings
+on improper numeric conversions.
+
+Note that C<fcntl> raises an exception if used on a machine that
+doesn't implement fcntl(2).  See the Fcntl module or your fcntl(2)
+manpage to learn what functions are available on your system.
+
+Here's an example of setting a filehandle named C<REMOTE> to be
+non-blocking at the system level.  You'll have to negotiate C<$|>
+on your own, though.
+
+    use Fcntl qw(F_GETFL F_SETFL O_NONBLOCK);
+
+    $flags = fcntl(REMOTE, F_GETFL, 0)
+                or die "Can't get flags for the socket: $!\n";
+
+    $flags = fcntl(REMOTE, F_SETFL, $flags | O_NONBLOCK)
+                or die "Can't set flags for the socket: $!\n";
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/fcntl>.
+
+=item __FILE__
+X<__FILE__>
+
+A special token that returns the name of the file in which it occurs.
+
+=item fileno FILEHANDLE
+X<fileno>
+
+Returns the file descriptor for a filehandle, or undefined if the
+filehandle is not open.  If there is no real file descriptor at the OS
+level, as can happen with filehandles connected to memory objects via
+C<open> with a reference for the third argument, -1 is returned.
+
+This is mainly useful for constructing
+bitmaps for C<select> and low-level POSIX tty-handling operations.
+If FILEHANDLE is an expression, the value is taken as an indirect
+filehandle, generally its name.
+
+You can use this to find out whether two handles refer to the
+same underlying descriptor:
+
+    if (fileno(THIS) == fileno(THAT)) {
+        print "THIS and THAT are dups\n";
+    }
+
+=item flock FILEHANDLE,OPERATION
+X<flock> X<lock> X<locking>
+
+Calls flock(2), or an emulation of it, on FILEHANDLE.  Returns true
+for success, false on failure.  Produces a fatal error if used on a
+machine that doesn't implement flock(2), fcntl(2) locking, or lockf(3).
+C<flock> is Perl's portable file-locking interface, although it locks
+entire files only, not records.
+
+Two potentially non-obvious but traditional C<flock> semantics are
+that it waits indefinitely until the lock is granted, and that its locks
+are B<merely advisory>.  Such discretionary locks are more flexible, but
+offer fewer guarantees.  This means that programs that do not also use
+C<flock> may modify files locked with C<flock>.  See L<perlport>, 
+your port's specific documentation, and your system-specific local manpages
+for details.  It's best to assume traditional behavior if you're writing
+portable programs.  (But if you're not, you should as always feel perfectly
+free to write for your own system's idiosyncrasies (sometimes called
+"features").  Slavish adherence to portability concerns shouldn't get
+in the way of your getting your job done.)
+
+OPERATION is one of LOCK_SH, LOCK_EX, or LOCK_UN, possibly combined with
+LOCK_NB.  These constants are traditionally valued 1, 2, 8 and 4, but
+you can use the symbolic names if you import them from the L<Fcntl> module,
+either individually, or as a group using the C<:flock> tag.  LOCK_SH
+requests a shared lock, LOCK_EX requests an exclusive lock, and LOCK_UN
+releases a previously requested lock.  If LOCK_NB is bitwise-or'ed with
+LOCK_SH or LOCK_EX, then C<flock> returns immediately rather than blocking
+waiting for the lock; check the return status to see if you got it.
+
+To avoid the possibility of miscoordination, Perl now flushes FILEHANDLE
+before locking or unlocking it.
+
+Note that the emulation built with lockf(3) doesn't provide shared
+locks, and it requires that FILEHANDLE be open with write intent.  These
+are the semantics that lockf(3) implements.  Most if not all systems
+implement lockf(3) in terms of fcntl(2) locking, though, so the
+differing semantics shouldn't bite too many people.
+
+Note that the fcntl(2) emulation of flock(3) requires that FILEHANDLE
+be open with read intent to use LOCK_SH and requires that it be open
+with write intent to use LOCK_EX.
+
+Note also that some versions of C<flock> cannot lock things over the
+network; you would need to use the more system-specific C<fcntl> for
+that.  If you like you can force Perl to ignore your system's flock(2)
+function, and so provide its own fcntl(2)-based emulation, by passing
+the switch C<-Ud_flock> to the F<Configure> program when you configure
+and build a new Perl.
+
+Here's a mailbox appender for BSD systems.
+
+    use Fcntl qw(:flock SEEK_END); # import LOCK_* and SEEK_END constants
+
+    sub lock {
+        my ($fh) = @_;
+        flock($fh, LOCK_EX) or die "Cannot lock mailbox - $!\n";
+
+        # and, in case someone appended while we were waiting...
+        seek($fh, 0, SEEK_END) or die "Cannot seek - $!\n";
+    }
+
+    sub unlock {
+        my ($fh) = @_;
+        flock($fh, LOCK_UN) or die "Cannot unlock mailbox - $!\n";
+    }
+
+    open(my $mbox, ">>", "/usr/spool/mail/$ENV{'USER'}")
+        or die "Can't open mailbox: $!";
+
+    lock($mbox);
+    print $mbox $msg,"\n\n";
+    unlock($mbox);
+
+On systems that support a real flock(2), locks are inherited across fork()
+calls, whereas those that must resort to the more capricious fcntl(2)
+function lose their locks, making it seriously harder to write servers.
+
+See also L<DB_File> for other flock() examples.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/flock>.
+
+=item fork
+X<fork> X<child> X<parent>
+
+Does a fork(2) system call to create a new process running the
+same program at the same point.  It returns the child pid to the
+parent process, C<0> to the child process, or C<undef> if the fork is
+unsuccessful.  File descriptors (and sometimes locks on those descriptors)
+are shared, while everything else is copied.  On most systems supporting
+fork(), great care has gone into making it extremely efficient (for
+example, using copy-on-write technology on data pages), making it the
+dominant paradigm for multitasking over the last few decades.
+
+Beginning with v5.6.0, Perl attempts to flush all files opened for
+output before forking the child process, but this may not be supported
+on some platforms (see L<perlport>).  To be safe, you may need to set
+C<$|> ($AUTOFLUSH in English) or call the C<autoflush()> method of
+C<IO::Handle> on any open handles to avoid duplicate output.
+
+If you C<fork> without ever waiting on your children, you will
+accumulate zombies.  On some systems, you can avoid this by setting
+C<$SIG{CHLD}> to C<"IGNORE">.  See also L<perlipc> for more examples of
+forking and reaping moribund children.
+
+Note that if your forked child inherits system file descriptors like
+STDIN and STDOUT that are actually connected by a pipe or socket, even
+if you exit, then the remote server (such as, say, a CGI script or a
+backgrounded job launched from a remote shell) won't think you're done.
+You should reopen those to F</dev/null> if it's any issue.
+
+On some platforms such as Windows, where the fork() system call is not available,
+Perl can be built to emulate fork() in the Perl interpreter. The emulation is designed to,
+at the level of the Perl program, be as compatible as possible with the "Unix" fork().
+However it has limitations that have to be considered in code intended to be portable.
+See L<perlfork> for more details.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/fork>.
+
+=item format
+X<format>
+
+Declare a picture format for use by the C<write> function.  For
+example:
+
+    format Something =
+        Test: @<<<<<<<< @||||| @>>>>>
+              $str,     $%,    '$' . int($num)
+    .
+
+    $str = "widget";
+    $num = $cost/$quantity;
+    $~ = 'Something';
+    write;
+
+See L<perlform> for many details and examples.
+
+=item formline PICTURE,LIST
+X<formline>
+
+This is an internal function used by C<format>s, though you may call it,
+too.  It formats (see L<perlform>) a list of values according to the
+contents of PICTURE, placing the output into the format output
+accumulator, C<$^A> (or C<$ACCUMULATOR> in English).
+Eventually, when a C<write> is done, the contents of
+C<$^A> are written to some filehandle.  You could also read C<$^A>
+and then set C<$^A> back to C<"">.  Note that a format typically
+does one C<formline> per line of form, but the C<formline> function itself
+doesn't care how many newlines are embedded in the PICTURE.  This means
+that the C<~> and C<~~> tokens treat the entire PICTURE as a single line.
+You may therefore need to use multiple formlines to implement a single
+record format, just like the C<format> compiler.
+
+Be careful if you put double quotes around the picture, because an C<@>
+character may be taken to mean the beginning of an array name.
+C<formline> always returns true.  See L<perlform> for other examples.
+
+If you are trying to use this instead of C<write> to capture the output,
+you may find it easier to open a filehandle to a scalar
+(C<< open $fh, ">", \$output >>) and write to that instead.
+
+=item getc FILEHANDLE
+X<getc> X<getchar> X<character> X<file, read>
+
+=item getc
+
+Returns the next character from the input file attached to FILEHANDLE,
+or the undefined value at end of file or if there was an error (in
+the latter case C<$!> is set).  If FILEHANDLE is omitted, reads from
+STDIN.  This is not particularly efficient.  However, it cannot be
+used by itself to fetch single characters without waiting for the user
+to hit enter.  For that, try something more like:
+
+    if ($BSD_STYLE) {
+        system "stty cbreak </dev/tty >/dev/tty 2>&1";
+    }
+    else {
+        system "stty", '-icanon', 'eol', "\001";
+    }
+
+    $key = getc(STDIN);
+
+    if ($BSD_STYLE) {
+        system "stty -cbreak </dev/tty >/dev/tty 2>&1";
+    }
+    else {
+        system 'stty', 'icanon', 'eol', '^@'; # ASCII NUL
+    }
+    print "\n";
+
+Determination of whether $BSD_STYLE should be set
+is left as an exercise to the reader.
+
+The C<POSIX::getattr> function can do this more portably on
+systems purporting POSIX compliance.  See also the C<Term::ReadKey>
+module from your nearest CPAN site; details on CPAN can be found under
+L<perlmodlib/CPAN>.
+
+=item getlogin
+X<getlogin> X<login>
+
+This implements the C library function of the same name, which on most
+systems returns the current login from F</etc/utmp>, if any.  If it
+returns the empty string, use C<getpwuid>.
+
+    $login = getlogin || getpwuid($<) || "Kilroy";
+
+Do not consider C<getlogin> for authentication: it is not as
+secure as C<getpwuid>.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/getlogin>.
+
+=item getpeername SOCKET
+X<getpeername> X<peer>
+
+Returns the packed sockaddr address of the other end of the SOCKET
+connection.
+
+    use Socket;
+    $hersockaddr    = getpeername(SOCK);
+    ($port, $iaddr) = sockaddr_in($hersockaddr);
+    $herhostname    = gethostbyaddr($iaddr, AF_INET);
+    $herstraddr     = inet_ntoa($iaddr);
+
+=item getpgrp PID
+X<getpgrp> X<group>
+
+Returns the current process group for the specified PID.  Use
+a PID of C<0> to get the current process group for the
+current process.  Will raise an exception if used on a machine that
+doesn't implement getpgrp(2).  If PID is omitted, returns the process
+group of the current process.  Note that the POSIX version of C<getpgrp>
+does not accept a PID argument, so only C<PID==0> is truly portable.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/getpgrp>.
+
+=item getppid
+X<getppid> X<parent> X<pid>
+
+Returns the process id of the parent process.
+
+Note for Linux users: on Linux, the C functions C<getpid()> and
+C<getppid()> return different values from different threads. In order to
+be portable, this behavior is not reflected by the Perl-level function
+C<getppid()>, that returns a consistent value across threads. If you want
+to call the underlying C<getppid()>, you may use the CPAN module
+C<Linux::Pid>.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/getppid>.
+
+=item getpriority WHICH,WHO
+X<getpriority> X<priority> X<nice>
+
+Returns the current priority for a process, a process group, or a user.
+(See L<getpriority(2)>.)  Will raise a fatal exception if used on a
+machine that doesn't implement getpriority(2).
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/getpriority>.
+
+=item getpwnam NAME
+X<getpwnam> X<getgrnam> X<gethostbyname> X<getnetbyname> X<getprotobyname>
+X<getpwuid> X<getgrgid> X<getservbyname> X<gethostbyaddr> X<getnetbyaddr>
+X<getprotobynumber> X<getservbyport> X<getpwent> X<getgrent> X<gethostent>
+X<getnetent> X<getprotoent> X<getservent> X<setpwent> X<setgrent> X<sethostent>
+X<setnetent> X<setprotoent> X<setservent> X<endpwent> X<endgrent> X<endhostent>
+X<endnetent> X<endprotoent> X<endservent> 
+
+=item getgrnam NAME
+
+=item gethostbyname NAME
+
+=item getnetbyname NAME
+
+=item getprotobyname NAME
+
+=item getpwuid UID
+
+=item getgrgid GID
+
+=item getservbyname NAME,PROTO
+
+=item gethostbyaddr ADDR,ADDRTYPE
+
+=item getnetbyaddr ADDR,ADDRTYPE
+
+=item getprotobynumber NUMBER
+
+=item getservbyport PORT,PROTO
+
+=item getpwent
+
+=item getgrent
+
+=item gethostent
+
+=item getnetent
+
+=item getprotoent
+
+=item getservent
+
+=item setpwent
+
+=item setgrent
+
+=item sethostent STAYOPEN
+
+=item setnetent STAYOPEN
+
+=item setprotoent STAYOPEN
+
+=item setservent STAYOPEN
+
+=item endpwent
+
+=item endgrent
+
+=item endhostent
+
+=item endnetent
+
+=item endprotoent
+
+=item endservent
+
+These routines are the same as their counterparts in the
+system C library.  In list context, the return values from the
+various get routines are as follows:
+
+    ($name,$passwd,$uid,$gid,
+       $quota,$comment,$gcos,$dir,$shell,$expire) = getpw*
+    ($name,$passwd,$gid,$members) = getgr*
+    ($name,$aliases,$addrtype,$length,@addrs) = gethost*
+    ($name,$aliases,$addrtype,$net) = getnet*
+    ($name,$aliases,$proto) = getproto*
+    ($name,$aliases,$port,$proto) = getserv*
+
+(If the entry doesn't exist you get an empty list.)
+
+The exact meaning of the $gcos field varies but it usually contains
+the real name of the user (as opposed to the login name) and other
+information pertaining to the user.  Beware, however, that in many
+system users are able to change this information and therefore it
+cannot be trusted and therefore the $gcos is tainted (see
+L<perlsec>).  The $passwd and $shell, user's encrypted password and
+login shell, are also tainted, for the same reason.
+
+In scalar context, you get the name, unless the function was a
+lookup by name, in which case you get the other thing, whatever it is.
+(If the entry doesn't exist you get the undefined value.)  For example:
+
+    $uid   = getpwnam($name);
+    $name  = getpwuid($num);
+    $name  = getpwent();
+    $gid   = getgrnam($name);
+    $name  = getgrgid($num);
+    $name  = getgrent();
+    #etc.
+
+In I<getpw*()> the fields $quota, $comment, and $expire are special
+in that they are unsupported on many systems.  If the
+$quota is unsupported, it is an empty scalar.  If it is supported, it
+usually encodes the disk quota.  If the $comment field is unsupported,
+it is an empty scalar.  If it is supported it usually encodes some
+administrative comment about the user.  In some systems the $quota
+field may be $change or $age, fields that have to do with password
+aging.  In some systems the $comment field may be $class.  The $expire
+field, if present, encodes the expiration period of the account or the
+password.  For the availability and the exact meaning of these fields
+in your system, please consult getpwnam(3) and your system's 
+F<pwd.h> file.  You can also find out from within Perl what your
+$quota and $comment fields mean and whether you have the $expire field
+by using the C<Config> module and the values C<d_pwquota>, C<d_pwage>,
+C<d_pwchange>, C<d_pwcomment>, and C<d_pwexpire>.  Shadow password
+files are supported only if your vendor has implemented them in the
+intuitive fashion that calling the regular C library routines gets the
+shadow versions if you're running under privilege or if there exists
+the shadow(3) functions as found in System V (this includes Solaris
+and Linux).  Those systems that implement a proprietary shadow password
+facility are unlikely to be supported.
+
+The $members value returned by I<getgr*()> is a space-separated list of
+the login names of the members of the group.
+
+For the I<gethost*()> functions, if the C<h_errno> variable is supported in
+C, it will be returned to you via C<$?> if the function call fails.  The
+C<@addrs> value returned by a successful call is a list of raw
+addresses returned by the corresponding library call.  In the
+Internet domain, each address is four bytes long; you can unpack it
+by saying something like:
+
+    ($a,$b,$c,$d) = unpack('W4',$addr[0]);
+
+The Socket library makes this slightly easier:
+
+    use Socket;
+    $iaddr = inet_aton("127.1"); # or whatever address
+    $name  = gethostbyaddr($iaddr, AF_INET);
+
+    # or going the other way
+    $straddr = inet_ntoa($iaddr);
+
+In the opposite way, to resolve a hostname to the IP address
+you can write this:
+
+    use Socket;
+    $packed_ip = gethostbyname("www.perl.org");
+    if (defined $packed_ip) {
+        $ip_address = inet_ntoa($packed_ip);
+    }
+
+Make sure C<gethostbyname()> is called in SCALAR context and that
+its return value is checked for definedness.
+
+The C<getprotobynumber> function, even though it only takes one argument,
+has the precedence of a list operator, so beware:
+
+    getprotobynumber $number eq 'icmp'   # WRONG
+    getprotobynumber($number eq 'icmp')  # actually means this
+    getprotobynumber($number) eq 'icmp'  # better this way
+
+If you get tired of remembering which element of the return list
+contains which return value, by-name interfaces are provided
+in standard modules: C<File::stat>, C<Net::hostent>, C<Net::netent>,
+C<Net::protoent>, C<Net::servent>, C<Time::gmtime>, C<Time::localtime>,
+and C<User::grent>.  These override the normal built-ins, supplying
+versions that return objects with the appropriate names
+for each field.  For example:
+
+   use File::stat;
+   use User::pwent;
+   $is_his = (stat($filename)->uid == pwent($whoever)->uid);
+
+Even though it looks as though they're the same method calls (uid),
+they aren't, because a C<File::stat> object is different from
+a C<User::pwent> object.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/getpwnam> to L<perlport/endservent>.
+
+=item getsockname SOCKET
+X<getsockname>
+
+Returns the packed sockaddr address of this end of the SOCKET connection,
+in case you don't know the address because you have several different
+IPs that the connection might have come in on.
+
+    use Socket;
+    $mysockaddr = getsockname(SOCK);
+    ($port, $myaddr) = sockaddr_in($mysockaddr);
+    printf "Connect to %s [%s]\n",
+       scalar gethostbyaddr($myaddr, AF_INET),
+       inet_ntoa($myaddr);
+
+=item getsockopt SOCKET,LEVEL,OPTNAME
+X<getsockopt>
+
+Queries the option named OPTNAME associated with SOCKET at a given LEVEL.
+Options may exist at multiple protocol levels depending on the socket
+type, but at least the uppermost socket level SOL_SOCKET (defined in the
+C<Socket> module) will exist. To query options at another level the
+protocol number of the appropriate protocol controlling the option
+should be supplied. For example, to indicate that an option is to be
+interpreted by the TCP protocol, LEVEL should be set to the protocol
+number of TCP, which you can get using C<getprotobyname>.
+
+The function returns a packed string representing the requested socket
+option, or C<undef> on error, with the reason for the error placed in
+C<$!>. Just what is in the packed string depends on LEVEL and OPTNAME;
+consult getsockopt(2) for details.  A common case is that the option is an
+integer, in which case the result is a packed integer, which you can decode
+using C<unpack> with the C<i> (or C<I>) format.
+
+Here's an example to test whether Nagle's algorithm is enabled on a socket:
+
+    use Socket qw(:all);
+
+    defined(my $tcp = getprotobyname("tcp"))
+        or die "Could not determine the protocol number for tcp";
+    # my $tcp = IPPROTO_TCP; # Alternative
+    my $packed = getsockopt($socket, $tcp, TCP_NODELAY)
+        or die "getsockopt TCP_NODELAY: $!";
+    my $nodelay = unpack("I", $packed);
+    print "Nagle's algorithm is turned ", $nodelay ? "off\n" : "on\n";
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/getsockopt>.
+
+=item given EXPR BLOCK
+X<given>
+
+=item given BLOCK
+
+C<given> is analogous to the C<switch> keyword in other languages. C<given>
+and C<when> are used in Perl to implement C<switch>/C<case> like statements.
+Only available after Perl 5.10.  For example:
+
+    use v5.10;
+    given ($fruit) {
+        when (/apples?/) {
+            print "I like apples."
+        }
+        when (/oranges?/) {
+            print "I don't like oranges."
+        }
+        default {
+            print "I don't like anything"
+        }
+    }
+
+See L<perlsyn/"Switch statements"> for detailed information.
+
+=item glob EXPR
+X<glob> X<wildcard> X<filename, expansion> X<expand>
+
+=item glob
+
+In list context, returns a (possibly empty) list of filename expansions on
+the value of EXPR such as the standard Unix shell F</bin/csh> would do. In
+scalar context, glob iterates through such filename expansions, returning
+undef when the list is exhausted. This is the internal function
+implementing the C<< <*.c> >> operator, but you can use it directly. If
+EXPR is omitted, C<$_> is used.  The C<< <*.c> >> operator is discussed in
+more detail in L<perlop/"I/O Operators">.
+
+Note that C<glob> splits its arguments on whitespace and treats
+each segment as separate pattern.  As such, C<glob("*.c *.h")> 
+matches all files with a F<.c> or F<.h> extension.  The expression
+C<glob(".* *")> matches all files in the current working directory.
+If you want to glob filenames that might contain whitespace, you'll
+have to use extra quotes around the spacey filename to protect it.
+For example, to glob filenames that have an C<e> followed by a space
+followed by an C<f>, use either of:
+
+    @spacies = <"*e f*">;
+    @spacies = glob '"*e f*"';
+    @spacies = glob q("*e f*");
+
+If you had to get a variable through, you could do this:
+
+    @spacies = glob "'*${var}e f*'";
+    @spacies = glob qq("*${var}e f*");
+
+If non-empty braces are the only wildcard characters used in the
+C<glob>, no filenames are matched, but potentially many strings
+are returned.  For example, this produces nine strings, one for
+each pairing of fruits and colors:
+
+    @many =  glob "{apple,tomato,cherry}={green,yellow,red}";
+
+Beginning with v5.6.0, this operator is implemented using the standard
+C<File::Glob> extension.  See L<File::Glob> for details, including
+C<bsd_glob> which does not treat whitespace as a pattern separator.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/glob>.
+
+=item gmtime EXPR
+X<gmtime> X<UTC> X<Greenwich>
+
+=item gmtime
+
+Works just like L</localtime> but the returned values are
+localized for the standard Greenwich time zone.
+
+Note: When called in list context, $isdst, the last value
+returned by gmtime, is always C<0>.  There is no
+Daylight Saving Time in GMT.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/gmtime>.
+
+=item goto LABEL
+X<goto> X<jump> X<jmp>
+
+=item goto EXPR
+
+=item goto &NAME
+
+The C<goto-LABEL> form finds the statement labeled with LABEL and
+resumes execution there. It can't be used to get out of a block or
+subroutine given to C<sort>.  It can be used to go almost anywhere
+else within the dynamic scope, including out of subroutines, but it's
+usually better to use some other construct such as C<last> or C<die>.
+The author of Perl has never felt the need to use this form of C<goto>
+(in Perl, that is; C is another matter).  (The difference is that C
+does not offer named loops combined with loop control.  Perl does, and
+this replaces most structured uses of C<goto> in other languages.)
+
+The C<goto-EXPR> form expects a label name, whose scope will be resolved
+dynamically.  This allows for computed C<goto>s per FORTRAN, but isn't
+necessarily recommended if you're optimizing for maintainability:
+
+    goto ("FOO", "BAR", "GLARCH")[$i];
+
+As shown in this example, C<goto-EXPR> is exempt from the "looks like a
+function" rule. A pair of parentheses following it does not (necessarily)
+delimit its argument. C<goto("NE")."XT"> is equivalent to C<goto NEXT>.
+
+Use of C<goto-LABEL> or C<goto-EXPR> to jump into a construct is
+deprecated and will issue a warning.  Even then, it may not be used to
+go into any construct that requires initialization, such as a
+subroutine or a C<foreach> loop.  It also can't be used to go into a
+construct that is optimized away.
+
+The C<goto-&NAME> form is quite different from the other forms of
+C<goto>.  In fact, it isn't a goto in the normal sense at all, and
+doesn't have the stigma associated with other gotos.  Instead, it
+exits the current subroutine (losing any changes set by local()) and
+immediately calls in its place the named subroutine using the current
+value of @_.  This is used by C<AUTOLOAD> subroutines that wish to
+load another subroutine and then pretend that the other subroutine had
+been called in the first place (except that any modifications to C<@_>
+in the current subroutine are propagated to the other subroutine.)
+After the C<goto>, not even C<caller> will be able to tell that this
+routine was called first.
+
+NAME needn't be the name of a subroutine; it can be a scalar variable
+containing a code reference or a block that evaluates to a code
+reference.
+
+=item grep BLOCK LIST
+X<grep>
+
+=item grep EXPR,LIST
+
+This is similar in spirit to, but not the same as, grep(1) and its
+relatives.  In particular, it is not limited to using regular expressions.
+
+Evaluates the BLOCK or EXPR for each element of LIST (locally setting
+C<$_> to each element) and returns the list value consisting of those
+elements for which the expression evaluated to true.  In scalar
+context, returns the number of times the expression was true.
+
+    @foo = grep(!/^#/, @bar);    # weed out comments
+
+or equivalently,
+
+    @foo = grep {!/^#/} @bar;    # weed out comments
+
+Note that C<$_> is an alias to the list value, so it can be used to
+modify the elements of the LIST.  While this is useful and supported,
+it can cause bizarre results if the elements of LIST are not variables.
+Similarly, grep returns aliases into the original list, much as a for
+loop's index variable aliases the list elements.  That is, modifying an
+element of a list returned by grep (for example, in a C<foreach>, C<map>
+or another C<grep>) actually modifies the element in the original list.
+This is usually something to be avoided when writing clear code.
+
+If C<$_> is lexical in the scope where the C<grep> appears (because it has
+been declared with C<my $_>) then, in addition to being locally aliased to
+the list elements, C<$_> keeps being lexical inside the block; i.e., it
+can't be seen from the outside, avoiding any potential side-effects.
+
+See also L</map> for a list composed of the results of the BLOCK or EXPR.
+
+=item hex EXPR
+X<hex> X<hexadecimal>
+
+=item hex
+
+Interprets EXPR as a hex string and returns the corresponding value.
+(To convert strings that might start with either C<0>, C<0x>, or C<0b>, see
+L</oct>.)  If EXPR is omitted, uses C<$_>.
+
+    print hex '0xAf'; # prints '175'
+    print hex 'aF';   # same
+
+Hex strings may only represent integers.  Strings that would cause
+integer overflow trigger a warning.  Leading whitespace is not stripped,
+unlike oct(). To present something as hex, look into L</printf>,
+L</sprintf>, and L</unpack>.
+
+=item import LIST
+X<import>
+
+There is no builtin C<import> function.  It is just an ordinary
+method (subroutine) defined (or inherited) by modules that wish to export
+names to another module.  The C<use> function calls the C<import> method
+for the package used.  See also L</use>, L<perlmod>, and L<Exporter>.
+
+=item index STR,SUBSTR,POSITION
+X<index> X<indexOf> X<InStr>
+
+=item index STR,SUBSTR
+
+The index function searches for one string within another, but without
+the wildcard-like behavior of a full regular-expression pattern match.
+It returns the position of the first occurrence of SUBSTR in STR at
+or after POSITION.  If POSITION is omitted, starts searching from the
+beginning of the string.  POSITION before the beginning of the string
+or after its end is treated as if it were the beginning or the end,
+respectively.  POSITION and the return value are based at zero.
+If the substring is not found, C<index> returns -1.
+
+=item int EXPR
+X<int> X<integer> X<truncate> X<trunc> X<floor>
+
+=item int
+
+Returns the integer portion of EXPR.  If EXPR is omitted, uses C<$_>.
+You should not use this function for rounding: one because it truncates
+towards C<0>, and two because machine representations of floating-point
+numbers can sometimes produce counterintuitive results.  For example,
+C<int(-6.725/0.025)> produces -268 rather than the correct -269; that's
+because it's really more like -268.99999999999994315658 instead.  Usually,
+the C<sprintf>, C<printf>, or the C<POSIX::floor> and C<POSIX::ceil>
+functions will serve you better than will int().
+
+=item ioctl FILEHANDLE,FUNCTION,SCALAR
+X<ioctl>
+
+Implements the ioctl(2) function.  You'll probably first have to say
+
+    require "sys/ioctl.ph";  # probably in $Config{archlib}/sys/ioctl.ph
+
+to get the correct function definitions.  If F<sys/ioctl.ph> doesn't
+exist or doesn't have the correct definitions you'll have to roll your
+own, based on your C header files such as F<< <sys/ioctl.h> >>.
+(There is a Perl script called B<h2ph> that comes with the Perl kit that
+may help you in this, but it's nontrivial.)  SCALAR will be read and/or
+written depending on the FUNCTION; a C pointer to the string value of SCALAR
+will be passed as the third argument of the actual C<ioctl> call.  (If SCALAR
+has no string value but does have a numeric value, that value will be
+passed rather than a pointer to the string value.  To guarantee this to be
+true, add a C<0> to the scalar before using it.)  The C<pack> and C<unpack>
+functions may be needed to manipulate the values of structures used by
+C<ioctl>.
+
+The return value of C<ioctl> (and C<fcntl>) is as follows:
+
+    if OS returns:      then Perl returns:
+        -1               undefined value
+         0              string "0 but true"
+    anything else           that number
+
+Thus Perl returns true on success and false on failure, yet you can
+still easily determine the actual value returned by the operating
+system:
+
+    $retval = ioctl(...) || -1;
+    printf "System returned %d\n", $retval;
+
+The special string C<"0 but true"> is exempt from B<-w> complaints
+about improper numeric conversions.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/ioctl>.
+
+=item join EXPR,LIST
+X<join>
+
+Joins the separate strings of LIST into a single string with fields
+separated by the value of EXPR, and returns that new string.  Example:
+
+    $rec = join(':', $login,$passwd,$uid,$gid,$gcos,$home,$shell);
+
+Beware that unlike C<split>, C<join> doesn't take a pattern as its
+first argument.  Compare L</split>.
+
+=item keys HASH
+X<keys> X<key>
+
+=item keys ARRAY
+
+=item keys EXPR
+
+Returns a list consisting of all the keys of the named hash, or the indices
+of an array. (In scalar context, returns the number of keys or indices.)
+
+The keys of a hash are returned in an apparently random order.  The actual
+random order is subject to change in future versions of Perl, but it
+is guaranteed to be the same order as either the C<values> or C<each>
+function produces (given that the hash has not been modified).  Since
+Perl 5.8.1 the ordering can be different even between different runs of
+Perl for security reasons (see L<perlsec/"Algorithmic Complexity
+Attacks">).
+
+As a side effect, calling keys() resets the internal interator of the HASH or ARRAY
+(see L</each>).  In particular, calling keys() in void context resets
+the iterator with no other overhead.
+
+Here is yet another way to print your environment:
+
+    @keys = keys %ENV;
+    @values = values %ENV;
+    while (@keys) {
+        print pop(@keys), '=', pop(@values), "\n";
+    }
+
+or how about sorted by key:
+
+    foreach $key (sort(keys %ENV)) {
+        print $key, '=', $ENV{$key}, "\n";
+    }
+
+The returned values are copies of the original keys in the hash, so
+modifying them will not affect the original hash.  Compare L</values>.
+
+To sort a hash by value, you'll need to use a C<sort> function.
+Here's a descending numeric sort of a hash by its values:
+
+    foreach $key (sort { $hash{$b} <=> $hash{$a} } keys %hash) {
+        printf "%4d %s\n", $hash{$key}, $key;
+    }
+
+Used as an lvalue, C<keys> allows you to increase the number of hash buckets
+allocated for the given hash.  This can gain you a measure of efficiency if
+you know the hash is going to get big.  (This is similar to pre-extending
+an array by assigning a larger number to $#array.)  If you say
+
+    keys %hash = 200;
+
+then C<%hash> will have at least 200 buckets allocated for it--256 of them,
+in fact, since it rounds up to the next power of two.  These
+buckets will be retained even if you do C<%hash = ()>, use C<undef
+%hash> if you want to free the storage while C<%hash> is still in scope.
+You can't shrink the number of buckets allocated for the hash using
+C<keys> in this way (but you needn't worry about doing this by accident,
+as trying has no effect). C<keys @array> in an lvalue context is a syntax
+error.
+
+Starting with Perl 5.14, C<keys> can take a scalar EXPR, which must contain
+a reference to an unblessed hash or array.  The argument will be
+dereferenced automatically.  This aspect of C<keys> is considered highly
+experimental.  The exact behaviour may change in a future version of Perl.
+
+    for (keys $hashref) { ... }
+    for (keys $obj->get_arrayref) { ... }
+
+See also C<each>, C<values>, and C<sort>.
+
+=item kill SIGNAL, LIST
+X<kill> X<signal>
+
+Sends a signal to a list of processes.  Returns the number of
+processes successfully signaled (which is not necessarily the
+same as the number actually killed).
+
+    $cnt = kill 1, $child1, $child2;
+    kill 9, @goners;
+
+If SIGNAL is zero, no signal is sent to the process, but C<kill>
+checks whether it's I<possible> to send a signal to it (that
+means, to be brief, that the process is owned by the same user, or we are
+the super-user).  This is useful to check that a child process is still
+alive (even if only as a zombie) and hasn't changed its UID.  See
+L<perlport> for notes on the portability of this construct.
+
+Unlike in the shell, if SIGNAL is negative, it kills process groups instead
+of processes. That means you usually want to use positive not negative signals.
+You may also use a signal name in quotes.
+
+The behavior of kill when a I<PROCESS> number is zero or negative depends on
+the operating system.  For example, on POSIX-conforming systems, zero will
+signal the current process group and -1 will signal all processes.
+
+See L<perlipc/"Signals"> for more details.
+
+On some platforms such as Windows where the fork() system call is not available.
+Perl can be built to emulate fork() at the interpreter level.
+This emulation has limitations related to kill that have to be considered,
+for code running on Windows and in code intended to be portable.
+
+See L<perlfork> for more details.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/kill>.
+
+=item last LABEL
+X<last> X<break>
+
+=item last
+
+The C<last> command is like the C<break> statement in C (as used in
+loops); it immediately exits the loop in question.  If the LABEL is
+omitted, the command refers to the innermost enclosing loop.  The
+C<continue> block, if any, is not executed:
+
+    LINE: while (<STDIN>) {
+        last LINE if /^$/;  # exit when done with header
+        #...
+    }
+
+C<last> cannot be used to exit a block that returns a value such as
+C<eval {}>, C<sub {}>, or C<do {}>, and should not be used to exit
+a grep() or map() operation.
+
+Note that a block by itself is semantically identical to a loop
+that executes once.  Thus C<last> can be used to effect an early
+exit out of such a block.
+
+See also L</continue> for an illustration of how C<last>, C<next>, and
+C<redo> work.
+
+=item lc EXPR
+X<lc> X<lowercase>
+
+=item lc
+
+Returns a lowercased version of EXPR.  This is the internal function
+implementing the C<\L> escape in double-quoted strings.
+
+If EXPR is omitted, uses C<$_>.
+
+What gets returned depends on several factors:
+
+=over
+
+=item If C<use bytes> is in effect:
+
+=over
+
+=item On EBCDIC platforms
+
+The results are what the C language system call C<tolower()> returns.
+
+=item On ASCII platforms
+
+The results follow ASCII semantics.  Only characters C<A-Z> change, to C<a-z>
+respectively.
+
+=back
+
+=item Otherwise, If EXPR has the UTF8 flag set
+
+Unicode semantics are used for the case change.
+
+=item Otherwise, if C<use locale> is in effect
+
+Respects current LC_CTYPE locale.  See L<perllocale>.
+
+=item Otherwise, if C<use feature 'unicode_strings'> is in effect:
+
+Unicode semantics are used for the case change.
+
+=item Otherwise:
+
+=over
+
+=item On EBCDIC platforms
+
+The results are what the C language system call C<tolower()> returns.
+
+=item On ASCII platforms
+
+ASCII semantics are used for the case change.  The lowercase of any character
+outside the ASCII range is the character itself.
+
+=back
+
+=back
+
+=item lcfirst EXPR
+X<lcfirst> X<lowercase>
+
+=item lcfirst
+
+Returns the value of EXPR with the first character lowercased.  This
+is the internal function implementing the C<\l> escape in
+double-quoted strings.
+
+If EXPR is omitted, uses C<$_>.
+
+This function behaves the same way under various pragmata, such as in a locale,
+as L</lc> does.
+
+=item length EXPR
+X<length> X<size>
+
+=item length
+
+Returns the length in I<characters> of the value of EXPR.  If EXPR is
+omitted, returns the length of C<$_>.  If EXPR is undefined, returns
+C<undef>.
+
+This function cannot be used on an entire array or hash to find out how
+many elements these have.  For that, use C<scalar @array> and C<scalar keys
+%hash>, respectively.
+
+Like all Perl character operations, length() normally deals in logical
+characters, not physical bytes.  For how many bytes a string encoded as
+UTF-8 would take up, use C<length(Encode::encode_utf8(EXPR))> (you'll have
+to C<use Encode> first).  See L<Encode> and L<perlunicode>.
+
+=item __LINE__
+X<__LINE__>
+
+A special token that compiles to the current line number.
+
+=item link OLDFILE,NEWFILE
+X<link>
+
+Creates a new filename linked to the old filename.  Returns true for
+success, false otherwise.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/link>.
+
+=item listen SOCKET,QUEUESIZE
+X<listen>
+
+Does the same thing that the listen(2) system call does.  Returns true if
+it succeeded, false otherwise.  See the example in
+L<perlipc/"Sockets: Client/Server Communication">.
+
+=item local EXPR
+X<local>
+
+You really probably want to be using C<my> instead, because C<local> isn't
+what most people think of as "local".  See
+L<perlsub/"Private Variables via my()"> for details.
+
+A local modifies the listed variables to be local to the enclosing
+block, file, or eval.  If more than one value is listed, the list must
+be placed in parentheses.  See L<perlsub/"Temporary Values via local()">
+for details, including issues with tied arrays and hashes.
+
+The C<delete local EXPR> construct can also be used to localize the deletion
+of array/hash elements to the current block.
+See L<perlsub/"Localized deletion of elements of composite types">.
+
+=item localtime EXPR
+X<localtime> X<ctime>
+
+=item localtime
+
+Converts a time as returned by the time function to a 9-element list
+with the time analyzed for the local time zone.  Typically used as
+follows:
+
+    #  0    1    2     3     4    5     6     7     8
+    ($sec,$min,$hour,$mday,$mon,$year,$wday,$yday,$isdst) =
+                                                localtime(time);
+
+All list elements are numeric and come straight out of the C `struct
+tm'.  C<$sec>, C<$min>, and C<$hour> are the seconds, minutes, and hours
+of the specified time.
+
+C<$mday> is the day of the month and C<$mon> the month in
+the range C<0..11>, with 0 indicating January and 11 indicating December.
+This makes it easy to get a month name from a list:
+
+    my @abbr = qw( Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec );
+    print "$abbr[$mon] $mday";
+    # $mon=9, $mday=18 gives "Oct 18"
+
+C<$year> is the number of years since 1900, B<not> just the last two digits
+of the year.  That is, C<$year> is C<123> in year 2023.  The proper way
+to get a 4-digit year is simply:
+
+    $year += 1900;
+
+Otherwise you create non-Y2K-compliant programs--and you wouldn't want
+to do that, would you?
+
+To get the last two digits of the year (e.g., "01" in 2001) do:
+
+    $year = sprintf("%02d", $year % 100);
+
+C<$wday> is the day of the week, with 0 indicating Sunday and 3 indicating
+Wednesday.  C<$yday> is the day of the year, in the range C<0..364>
+(or C<0..365> in leap years.)
+
+C<$isdst> is true if the specified time occurs during Daylight Saving
+Time, false otherwise.
+
+If EXPR is omitted, C<localtime()> uses the current time (as returned
+by time(3)).
+
+In scalar context, C<localtime()> returns the ctime(3) value:
+
+    $now_string = localtime;  # e.g., "Thu Oct 13 04:54:34 1994"
+
+This scalar value is B<not> locale-dependent but is a Perl builtin. For GMT
+instead of local time use the L</gmtime> builtin. See also the
+C<Time::Local> module (for converting seconds, minutes, hours, and such back to
+the integer value returned by time()), and the L<POSIX> module's strftime(3)
+and mktime(3) functions.
+
+To get somewhat similar but locale-dependent date strings, set up your
+locale environment variables appropriately (please see L<perllocale>) and
+try for example:
+
+    use POSIX qw(strftime);
+    $now_string = strftime "%a %b %e %H:%M:%S %Y", localtime;
+    # or for GMT formatted appropriately for your locale:
+    $now_string = strftime "%a %b %e %H:%M:%S %Y", gmtime;
+
+Note that the C<%a> and C<%b>, the short forms of the day of the week
+and the month of the year, may not necessarily be three characters wide.
+
+The L<Time::gmtime> and L<Time::localtime> modules provide a convenient,
+by-name access mechanism to the gmtime() and localtime() functions,
+respectively.
+
+For a comprehensive date and time representation look at the
+L<DateTime> module on CPAN.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/localtime>.
+
+=item lock THING
+X<lock>
+
+This function places an advisory lock on a shared variable or referenced
+object contained in I<THING> until the lock goes out of scope.
+
+The value returned is the scalar itself, if the argument is a scalar, or a
+reference, if the argument is a hash, array or subroutine.
+
+lock() is a "weak keyword" : this means that if you've defined a function
+by this name (before any calls to it), that function will be called
+instead.  If you are not under C<use threads::shared> this does nothing.
+See L<threads::shared>.
+
+=item log EXPR
+X<log> X<logarithm> X<e> X<ln> X<base>
+
+=item log
+
+Returns the natural logarithm (base I<e>) of EXPR.  If EXPR is omitted,
+returns the log of C<$_>.  To get the
+log of another base, use basic algebra:
+The base-N log of a number is equal to the natural log of that number
+divided by the natural log of N.  For example:
+
+    sub log10 {
+        my $n = shift;
+        return log($n)/log(10);
+    }
+
+See also L</exp> for the inverse operation.
+
+=item lstat FILEHANDLE
+X<lstat>
+
+=item lstat EXPR
+
+=item lstat DIRHANDLE
+
+=item lstat
+
+Does the same thing as the C<stat> function (including setting the
+special C<_> filehandle) but stats a symbolic link instead of the file
+the symbolic link points to.  If symbolic links are unimplemented on
+your system, a normal C<stat> is done.  For much more detailed
+information, please see the documentation for C<stat>.
+
+If EXPR is omitted, stats C<$_>.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/lstat>.
+
+=item m//
+
+The match operator.  See L<perlop/"Regexp Quote-Like Operators">.
+
+=item map BLOCK LIST
+X<map>
+
+=item map EXPR,LIST
+
+Evaluates the BLOCK or EXPR for each element of LIST (locally setting
+C<$_> to each element) and returns the list value composed of the
+results of each such evaluation.  In scalar context, returns the
+total number of elements so generated.  Evaluates BLOCK or EXPR in
+list context, so each element of LIST may produce zero, one, or
+more elements in the returned value.
+
+    @chars = map(chr, @numbers);
+
+translates a list of numbers to the corresponding characters.
+
+    my @squares = map { $_ * $_ } @numbers;
+
+translates a list of numbers to their squared values.
+
+    my @squares = map { $_ > 5 ? ($_ * $_) : () } @numbers;
+
+shows that number of returned elements can differ from the number of
+input elements. To omit an element, return an empty list ().
+This could also be achieved by writing
+
+    my @squares = map { $_ * $_ } grep { $_ > 5 } @numbers;
+
+which makes the intention more clear.
+
+Map always returns a list, which can be
+assigned to a hash such that the elements
+become key/value pairs. See L<perldata> for more details.
+
+    %hash = map { get_a_key_for($_) => $_ } @array;
+
+is just a funny way to write
+
+    %hash = ();
+    foreach (@array) {
+        $hash{get_a_key_for($_)} = $_;
+    }
+
+Note that C<$_> is an alias to the list value, so it can be used to
+modify the elements of the LIST.  While this is useful and supported,
+it can cause bizarre results if the elements of LIST are not variables.
+Using a regular C<foreach> loop for this purpose would be clearer in
+most cases.  See also L</grep> for an array composed of those items of
+the original list for which the BLOCK or EXPR evaluates to true.
+
+If C<$_> is lexical in the scope where the C<map> appears (because it has
+been declared with C<my $_>), then, in addition to being locally aliased to
+the list elements, C<$_> keeps being lexical inside the block; that is, it
+can't be seen from the outside, avoiding any potential side-effects.
+
+C<{> starts both hash references and blocks, so C<map { ...> could be either
+the start of map BLOCK LIST or map EXPR, LIST. Because Perl doesn't look
+ahead for the closing C<}> it has to take a guess at which it's dealing with
+based on what it finds just after the C<{>. Usually it gets it right, but if it
+doesn't it won't realize something is wrong until it gets to the C<}> and
+encounters the missing (or unexpected) comma. The syntax error will be
+reported close to the C<}>, but you'll need to change something near the C<{>
+such as using a unary C<+> to give Perl some help:
+
+    %hash = map {  "\L$_" => 1  } @array  # perl guesses EXPR.  wrong
+    %hash = map { +"\L$_" => 1  } @array  # perl guesses BLOCK. right
+    %hash = map { ("\L$_" => 1) } @array  # this also works
+    %hash = map {  lc($_) => 1  } @array  # as does this.
+    %hash = map +( lc($_) => 1 ), @array  # this is EXPR and works!
+
+    %hash = map  ( lc($_), 1 ),   @array  # evaluates to (1, @array)
+
+or to force an anon hash constructor use C<+{>:
+
+   @hashes = map +{ lc($_) => 1 }, @array # EXPR, so needs comma at end
+
+to get a list of anonymous hashes each with only one entry apiece.
+
+=item mkdir FILENAME,MASK
+X<mkdir> X<md> X<directory, create>
+
+=item mkdir FILENAME
+
+=item mkdir
+
+Creates the directory specified by FILENAME, with permissions
+specified by MASK (as modified by C<umask>).  If it succeeds it
+returns true; otherwise it returns false and sets C<$!> (errno).
+MASK defaults to 0777 if omitted, and FILENAME defaults
+to C<$_> if omitted.
+
+In general, it is better to create directories with a permissive MASK
+and let the user modify that with their C<umask> than it is to supply
+a restrictive MASK and give the user no way to be more permissive.
+The exceptions to this rule are when the file or directory should be
+kept private (mail files, for instance).  The perlfunc(1) entry on
+C<umask> discusses the choice of MASK in more detail.
+
+Note that according to the POSIX 1003.1-1996 the FILENAME may have any
+number of trailing slashes.  Some operating and filesystems do not get
+this right, so Perl automatically removes all trailing slashes to keep
+everyone happy.
+
+To recursively create a directory structure, look at
+the C<mkpath> function of the L<File::Path> module.
+
+=item msgctl ID,CMD,ARG
+X<msgctl>
+
+Calls the System V IPC function msgctl(2).  You'll probably have to say
+
+    use IPC::SysV;
+
+first to get the correct constant definitions.  If CMD is C<IPC_STAT>,
+then ARG must be a variable that will hold the returned C<msqid_ds>
+structure.  Returns like C<ioctl>: the undefined value for error,
+C<"0 but true"> for zero, or the actual return value otherwise.  See also
+L<perlipc/"SysV IPC"> and the documentation for C<IPC::SysV> and
+C<IPC::Semaphore>.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/msgctl>.
+
+=item msgget KEY,FLAGS
+X<msgget>
+
+Calls the System V IPC function msgget(2).  Returns the message queue
+id, or C<undef> on error.  See also
+L<perlipc/"SysV IPC"> and the documentation for C<IPC::SysV> and
+C<IPC::Msg>.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/msgget>.
+
+=item msgrcv ID,VAR,SIZE,TYPE,FLAGS
+X<msgrcv>
+
+Calls the System V IPC function msgrcv to receive a message from
+message queue ID into variable VAR with a maximum message size of
+SIZE.  Note that when a message is received, the message type as a
+native long integer will be the first thing in VAR, followed by the
+actual message.  This packing may be opened with C<unpack("l! a*")>.
+Taints the variable.  Returns true if successful, false 
+on error.  See also L<perlipc/"SysV IPC"> and the documentation for
+C<IPC::SysV> and C<IPC::SysV::Msg>.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/msgrcv>.
+
+=item msgsnd ID,MSG,FLAGS
+X<msgsnd>
+
+Calls the System V IPC function msgsnd to send the message MSG to the
+message queue ID.  MSG must begin with the native long integer message
+type, be followed by the length of the actual message, and then finally
+the message itself.  This kind of packing can be achieved with
+C<pack("l! a*", $type, $message)>.  Returns true if successful,
+false on error.  See also the C<IPC::SysV>
+and C<IPC::SysV::Msg> documentation.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/msgsnd>.
+
+=item my EXPR
+X<my>
+
+=item my TYPE EXPR
+
+=item my EXPR : ATTRS
+
+=item my TYPE EXPR : ATTRS
+
+A C<my> declares the listed variables to be local (lexically) to the
+enclosing block, file, or C<eval>.  If more than one value is listed,
+the list must be placed in parentheses.
+
+The exact semantics and interface of TYPE and ATTRS are still
+evolving.  TYPE is currently bound to the use of the C<fields> pragma,
+and attributes are handled using the C<attributes> pragma, or starting
+from Perl 5.8.0 also via the C<Attribute::Handlers> module.  See
+L<perlsub/"Private Variables via my()"> for details, and L<fields>,
+L<attributes>, and L<Attribute::Handlers>.
+
+=item next LABEL
+X<next> X<continue>
+
+=item next
+
+The C<next> command is like the C<continue> statement in C; it starts
+the next iteration of the loop:
+
+    LINE: while (<STDIN>) {
+        next LINE if /^#/;  # discard comments
+        #...
+    }
+
+Note that if there were a C<continue> block on the above, it would get
+executed even on discarded lines.  If LABEL is omitted, the command
+refers to the innermost enclosing loop.
+
+C<next> cannot be used to exit a block which returns a value such as
+C<eval {}>, C<sub {}>, or C<do {}>, and should not be used to exit
+a grep() or map() operation.
+
+Note that a block by itself is semantically identical to a loop
+that executes once.  Thus C<next> will exit such a block early.
+
+See also L</continue> for an illustration of how C<last>, C<next>, and
+C<redo> work.
+
+=item no MODULE VERSION LIST
+X<no declarations>
+X<unimporting>
+
+=item no MODULE VERSION
+
+=item no MODULE LIST
+
+=item no MODULE
+
+=item no VERSION
+
+See the C<use> function, of which C<no> is the opposite.
+
+=item oct EXPR
+X<oct> X<octal> X<hex> X<hexadecimal> X<binary> X<bin>
+
+=item oct
+
+Interprets EXPR as an octal string and returns the corresponding
+value.  (If EXPR happens to start off with C<0x>, interprets it as a
+hex string.  If EXPR starts off with C<0b>, it is interpreted as a
+binary string.  Leading whitespace is ignored in all three cases.)
+The following will handle decimal, binary, octal, and hex in standard
+Perl notation:
+
+    $val = oct($val) if $val =~ /^0/;
+
+If EXPR is omitted, uses C<$_>.   To go the other way (produce a number
+in octal), use sprintf() or printf():
+
+    $dec_perms = (stat("filename"))[2] & 07777;
+    $oct_perm_str = sprintf "%o", $perms;
+
+The oct() function is commonly used when a string such as C<644> needs
+to be converted into a file mode, for example.  Although Perl 
+automatically converts strings into numbers as needed, this automatic
+conversion assumes base 10.
+
+Leading white space is ignored without warning, as too are any trailing 
+non-digits, such as a decimal point (C<oct> only handles non-negative
+integers, not negative integers or floating point).
+
+=item open FILEHANDLE,EXPR
+X<open> X<pipe> X<file, open> X<fopen>
+
+=item open FILEHANDLE,MODE,EXPR
+
+=item open FILEHANDLE,MODE,EXPR,LIST
+
+=item open FILEHANDLE,MODE,REFERENCE
+
+=item open FILEHANDLE
+
+Opens the file whose filename is given by EXPR, and associates it with
+FILEHANDLE.
+
+Simple examples to open a file for reading:
+
+    open(my $fh, "<", "input.txt") 
+       or die "cannot open < input.txt: $!";
+
+and for writing:
+
+    open(my $fh, ">", "output.txt") 
+       or die "cannot open > output.txt: $!";
+
+(The following is a comprehensive reference to open(): for a gentler
+introduction you may consider L<perlopentut>.)
+
+If FILEHANDLE is an undefined scalar variable (or array or hash element), a
+new filehandle is autovivified, meaning that the variable is assigned a
+reference to a newly allocated anonymous filehandle.  Otherwise if
+FILEHANDLE is an expression, its value is the real filehandle.  (This is
+considered a symbolic reference, so C<use strict "refs"> should I<not> be
+in effect.)
+
+If EXPR is omitted, the global (package) scalar variable of the same
+name as the FILEHANDLE contains the filename.  (Note that lexical 
+variables--those declared with C<my> or C<state>--will not work for this
+purpose; so if you're using C<my> or C<state>, specify EXPR in your
+call to open.)
+
+If three (or more) arguments are specified, the open mode (including
+optional encoding) in the second argument are distinct from the filename in
+the third.  If MODE is C<< < >> or nothing, the file is opened for input.
+If MODE is C<< > >>, the file is opened for output, with existing files
+first being truncated ("clobbered") and nonexisting files newly created.
+If MODE is C<<< >> >>>, the file is opened for appending, again being
+created if necessary.
+
+You can put a C<+> in front of the C<< > >> or C<< < >> to
+indicate that you want both read and write access to the file; thus
+C<< +< >> is almost always preferred for read/write updates--the 
+C<< +> >> mode would clobber the file first.  You cant usually use
+either read-write mode for updating textfiles, since they have
+variable-length records.  See the B<-i> switch in L<perlrun> for a
+better approach.  The file is created with permissions of C<0666>
+modified by the process's C<umask> value.
+
+These various prefixes correspond to the fopen(3) modes of C<r>,
+C<r+>, C<w>, C<w+>, C<a>, and C<a+>.
+
+In the one- and two-argument forms of the call, the mode and filename
+should be concatenated (in that order), preferably separated by white
+space.  You can--but shouldn't--omit the mode in these forms when that mode
+is C<< < >>.  It is always safe to use the two-argument form of C<open> if
+the filename argument is a known literal.
+
+For three or more arguments if MODE is C<|->, the filename is
+interpreted as a command to which output is to be piped, and if MODE
+is C<-|>, the filename is interpreted as a command that pipes
+output to us.  In the two-argument (and one-argument) form, one should
+replace dash (C<->) with the command.
+See L<perlipc/"Using open() for IPC"> for more examples of this.
+(You are not allowed to C<open> to a command that pipes both in I<and>
+out, but see L<IPC::Open2>, L<IPC::Open3>, and
+L<perlipc/"Bidirectional Communication with Another Process"> for
+alternatives.)
+
+In the form of pipe opens taking three or more arguments, if LIST is specified
+(extra arguments after the command name) then LIST becomes arguments
+to the command invoked if the platform supports it.  The meaning of
+C<open> with more than three arguments for non-pipe modes is not yet
+defined, but experimental "layers" may give extra LIST arguments
+meaning.
+
+In the two-argument (and one-argument) form, opening C<< <- >> 
+or C<-> opens STDIN and opening C<< >- >> opens STDOUT.
+
+You may (and usually should) use the three-argument form of open to specify
+I/O layers (sometimes referred to as "disciplines") to apply to the handle
+that affect how the input and output are processed (see L<open> and
+L<PerlIO> for more details). For example:
+
+  open(my $fh, "<:encoding(UTF-8)", "filename")
+    || die "can't open UTF-8 encoded filename: $!";
+
+opens the UTF8-encoded file containing Unicode characters;
+see L<perluniintro>. Note that if layers are specified in the
+three-argument form, then default layers stored in ${^OPEN} (see L<perlvar>;
+usually set by the B<open> pragma or the switch B<-CioD>) are ignored.
+Those layers will also be ignored if you specifying a colon with no name
+following it.  In that case the default layer for the operating system
+(:raw on Unix, :crlf on Windows) is used.
+
+Open returns nonzero on success, the undefined value otherwise.  If
+the C<open> involved a pipe, the return value happens to be the pid of
+the subprocess.
+
+If you're running Perl on a system that distinguishes between text
+files and binary files, then you should check out L</binmode> for tips
+for dealing with this.  The key distinction between systems that need
+C<binmode> and those that don't is their text file formats.  Systems
+like Unix, Mac OS, and Plan 9, that end lines with a single
+character and encode that character in C as C<"\n"> do not
+need C<binmode>.  The rest need it.
+
+When opening a file, it's seldom a good idea to continue 
+if the request failed, so C<open> is frequently used with
+C<die>.  Even if C<die> won't do what you want (say, in a CGI script,
+where you want to format a suitable error message (but there are
+modules that can help with that problem)) always check
+the return value from opening a file.  
+
+As a special case the three-argument form with a read/write mode and the third
+argument being C<undef>:
+
+    open(my $tmp, "+>", undef) or die ...
+
+opens a filehandle to an anonymous temporary file.  Also using C<< +< >>
+works for symmetry, but you really should consider writing something
+to the temporary file first.  You will need to seek() to do the
+reading.
+
+Since v5.8.0, Perl has built using PerlIO by default.  Unless you've
+changed this (such as building Perl with C<Configure -Uuseperlio>), you can
+open filehandles directly to Perl scalars via:
+
+    open($fh, ">", \$variable) || ..
+
+To (re)open C<STDOUT> or C<STDERR> as an in-memory file, close it first:
+
+    close STDOUT;
+    open(STDOUT, ">", \$variable)
+       or die "Can't open STDOUT: $!";
+
+General examples:
+
+    $ARTICLE = 100;
+    open(ARTICLE) or die "Can't find article $ARTICLE: $!\n";
+    while (<ARTICLE>) {...
+
+    open(LOG, ">>/usr/spool/news/twitlog");  # (log is reserved)
+    # if the open fails, output is discarded
+
+    open(my $dbase, "+<", "dbase.mine")      # open for update
+        or die "Can't open 'dbase.mine' for update: $!";
+
+    open(my $dbase, "+<dbase.mine")          # ditto
+        or die "Can't open 'dbase.mine' for update: $!";
+
+    open(ARTICLE, "-|", "caesar <$article")  # decrypt article
+        or die "Can't start caesar: $!";
+
+    open(ARTICLE, "caesar <$article |")      # ditto
+        or die "Can't start caesar: $!";
+
+    open(EXTRACT, "|sort >Tmp$$")            # $$ is our process id
+        or die "Can't start sort: $!";
+
+    # in-memory files
+    open(MEMORY, ">", \$var)
+        or die "Can't open memory file: $!";
+    print MEMORY "foo!\n";                   # output will appear in $var
+
+    # process argument list of files along with any includes
+
+    foreach $file (@ARGV) {
+        process($file, "fh00");
+    }
+
+    sub process {
+        my($filename, $input) = @_;
+        $input++;    # this is a string increment
+        unless (open($input, "<", $filename)) {
+            print STDERR "Can't open $filename: $!\n";
+            return;
+        }
+
+        local $_;
+        while (<$input>) {    # note use of indirection
+            if (/^#include "(.*)"/) {
+                process($1, $input);
+                next;
+            }
+            #...          # whatever
+        }
+    }
+
+See L<perliol> for detailed info on PerlIO.
+
+You may also, in the Bourne shell tradition, specify an EXPR beginning
+with C<< >& >>, in which case the rest of the string is interpreted
+as the name of a filehandle (or file descriptor, if numeric) to be
+duped (as C<dup(2)>) and opened.  You may use C<&> after C<< > >>,
+C<<< >> >>>, C<< < >>, C<< +> >>, C<<< +>> >>>, and C<< +< >>.
+The mode you specify should match the mode of the original filehandle.
+(Duping a filehandle does not take into account any existing contents
+of IO buffers.) If you use the three-argument form, then you can pass either a
+number, the name of a filehandle, or the normal "reference to a glob".
+
+Here is a script that saves, redirects, and restores C<STDOUT> and
+C<STDERR> using various methods:
+
+    #!/usr/bin/perl
+    open(my $oldout, ">&STDOUT")     or die "Can't dup STDOUT: $!";
+    open(OLDERR,     ">&", \*STDERR) or die "Can't dup STDERR: $!";
+
+    open(STDOUT, '>', "foo.out") or die "Can't redirect STDOUT: $!";
+    open(STDERR, ">&STDOUT")     or die "Can't dup STDOUT: $!";
+
+    select STDERR; $| = 1;  # make unbuffered
+    select STDOUT; $| = 1;  # make unbuffered
+
+    print STDOUT "stdout 1\n";  # this works for
+    print STDERR "stderr 1\n";  # subprocesses too
+
+    open(STDOUT, ">&", $oldout) or die "Can't dup \$oldout: $!";
+    open(STDERR, ">&OLDERR")    or die "Can't dup OLDERR: $!";
+
+    print STDOUT "stdout 2\n";
+    print STDERR "stderr 2\n";
+
+If you specify C<< '<&=X' >>, where C<X> is a file descriptor number
+or a filehandle, then Perl will do an equivalent of C's C<fdopen> of
+that file descriptor (and not call C<dup(2)>); this is more
+parsimonious of file descriptors.  For example:
+
+    # open for input, reusing the fileno of $fd
+    open(FILEHANDLE, "<&=$fd")
+
+or
+
+    open(FILEHANDLE, "<&=", $fd)
+
+or
+
+    # open for append, using the fileno of OLDFH
+    open(FH, ">>&=", OLDFH)
+
+or
+
+    open(FH, ">>&=OLDFH")
+
+Being parsimonious on filehandles is also useful (besides being
+parsimonious) for example when something is dependent on file
+descriptors, like for example locking using flock().  If you do just
+C<< open(A, ">>&B") >>, the filehandle A will not have the same file
+descriptor as B, and therefore flock(A) will not flock(B) nor vice
+versa.  But with C<< open(A, ">>&=B") >>, the filehandles will share
+the same underlying system file descriptor.
+
+Note that under Perls older than 5.8.0, Perl uses the standard C library's'
+fdopen() to implement the C<=> functionality.  On many Unix systems,
+fdopen() fails when file descriptors exceed a certain value, typically 255.
+For Perls 5.8.0 and later, PerlIO is (most often) the default.
+
+You can see whether your Perl was built with PerlIO by running C<perl -V>
+and looking for the C<useperlio=> line.  If C<useperlio> is C<define>, you
+have PerlIO; otherwise you don't.
+
+If you open a pipe on the command C<-> (that is, specify either C<|-> or C<-|>
+with the one- or two-argument forms of C<open>), 
+an implicit C<fork> is done, so C<open> returns twice: in the parent
+process it returns the pid
+of the child process, and in the child process it returns (a defined) C<0>.
+Use C<defined($pid)> or C<//> to determine whether the open was successful.
+
+For example, use either
+
+    $child_pid = open(FROM_KID, "-|")  // die "can't fork: $!";
+
+or
+    $child_pid = open(TO_KID,   "|-")  // die "can't fork: $!";
+
+followed by 
+
+    if ($child_pid) {
+       # am the parent:
+       # either write TO_KID or else read FROM_KID
+       ...
+       wait $child_pid;
+    } else {
+       # am the child; use STDIN/STDOUT normally
+       ...
+       exit;
+    } 
+
+The filehandle behaves normally for the parent, but I/O to that
+filehandle is piped from/to the STDOUT/STDIN of the child process.
+In the child process, the filehandle isn't opened--I/O happens from/to
+the new STDOUT/STDIN.  Typically this is used like the normal
+piped open when you want to exercise more control over just how the
+pipe command gets executed, such as when running setuid and
+you don't want to have to scan shell commands for metacharacters.
+
+The following blocks are more or less equivalent:
+
+    open(FOO, "|tr '[a-z]' '[A-Z]'");
+    open(FOO, "|-", "tr '[a-z]' '[A-Z]'");
+    open(FOO, "|-") || exec 'tr', '[a-z]', '[A-Z]';
+    open(FOO, "|-", "tr", '[a-z]', '[A-Z]');
+
+    open(FOO, "cat -n '$file'|");
+    open(FOO, "-|", "cat -n '$file'");
+    open(FOO, "-|") || exec "cat", "-n", $file;
+    open(FOO, "-|", "cat", "-n", $file);
+
+The last two examples in each block show the pipe as "list form", which is
+not yet supported on all platforms.  A good rule of thumb is that if
+your platform has a real C<fork()> (in other words, if your platform is
+Unix, including Linux and MacOS X), you can use the list form.  You would 
+want to use the list form of the pipe so you can pass literal arguments
+to the command without risk of the shell interpreting any shell metacharacters
+in them.  However, this also bars you from opening pipes to commands
+that intentionally contain shell metacharacters, such as:
+
+    open(FOO, "|cat -n | expand -4 | lpr")
+       // die "Can't open pipeline to lpr: $!";
+
+See L<perlipc/"Safe Pipe Opens"> for more examples of this.
+
+Beginning with v5.6.0, Perl will attempt to flush all files opened for
+output before any operation that may do a fork, but this may not be
+supported on some platforms (see L<perlport>).  To be safe, you may need
+to set C<$|> ($AUTOFLUSH in English) or call the C<autoflush()> method
+of C<IO::Handle> on any open handles.
+
+On systems that support a close-on-exec flag on files, the flag will
+be set for the newly opened file descriptor as determined by the value
+of C<$^F>.  See L<perlvar/$^F>.
+
+Closing any piped filehandle causes the parent process to wait for the
+child to finish, then returns the status value in C<$?> and
+C<${^CHILD_ERROR_NATIVE}>.
+
+The filename passed to the one- and two-argument forms of open() will
+have leading and trailing whitespace deleted and normal
+redirection characters honored.  This property, known as "magic open",
+can often be used to good effect.  A user could specify a filename of
+F<"rsh cat file |">, or you could change certain filenames as needed:
+
+    $filename =~ s/(.*\.gz)\s*$/gzip -dc < $1|/;
+    open(FH, $filename) or die "Can't open $filename: $!";
+
+Use the three-argument form to open a file with arbitrary weird characters in it,
+
+    open(FOO, "<", $file)
+       || die "can't open < $file: $!";
+
+otherwise it's necessary to protect any leading and trailing whitespace:
+
+    $file =~ s#^(\s)#./$1#;
+    open(FOO, "< $file\0")
+       || die "open failed: $!";
+
+(this may not work on some bizarre filesystems).  One should
+conscientiously choose between the I<magic> and I<three-argument> form
+of open():
+
+    open(IN, $ARGV[0]) || die "can't open $ARGV[0]: $!";
+
+will allow the user to specify an argument of the form C<"rsh cat file |">,
+but will not work on a filename that happens to have a trailing space, while
+
+    open(IN, "<", $ARGV[0])
+       || die "can't open < $ARGV[0]: $!";
+
+will have exactly the opposite restrictions.
+
+If you want a "real" C C<open> (see L<open(2)> on your system), then you
+should use the C<sysopen> function, which involves no such magic (but may
+use subtly different filemodes than Perl open(), which is mapped to C
+fopen()).  This is another way to protect your filenames from
+interpretation.  For example:
+
+    use IO::Handle;
+    sysopen(HANDLE, $path, O_RDWR|O_CREAT|O_EXCL)
+        or die "sysopen $path: $!";
+    $oldfh = select(HANDLE); $| = 1; select($oldfh);
+    print HANDLE "stuff $$\n";
+    seek(HANDLE, 0, 0);
+    print "File contains: ", <HANDLE>;
+
+Using the constructor from the C<IO::Handle> package (or one of its
+subclasses, such as C<IO::File> or C<IO::Socket>), you can generate anonymous
+filehandles that have the scope of the variables used to hold them, then
+automatically (but silently) close once their reference counts become
+zero, typically at scope exit:
+
+    use IO::File;
+    #...
+    sub read_myfile_munged {
+        my $ALL = shift;
+       # or just leave it undef to autoviv
+        my $handle = IO::File->new;
+        open($handle, "<", "myfile") or die "myfile: $!";
+        $first = <$handle>
+            or return ();     # Automatically closed here.
+        mung($first) or die "mung failed";  # Or here.
+        return (first, <$handle>) if $ALL;  # Or here.
+        return $first;                      # Or here.
+    }
+
+B<WARNING:> The previous example has a bug because the automatic
+close that happens when the refcount on C<handle> does not
+properly detect and report failures.  I<Always> close the handle
+yourself and inspect the return value.
+
+    close($handle) 
+       || warn "close failed: $!";
+
+See L</seek> for some details about mixing reading and writing.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/open>.
+
+=item opendir DIRHANDLE,EXPR
+X<opendir>
+
+Opens a directory named EXPR for processing by C<readdir>, C<telldir>,
+C<seekdir>, C<rewinddir>, and C<closedir>.  Returns true if successful.
+DIRHANDLE may be an expression whose value can be used as an indirect
+dirhandle, usually the real dirhandle name.  If DIRHANDLE is an undefined
+scalar variable (or array or hash element), the variable is assigned a
+reference to a new anonymous dirhandle; that is, it's autovivified.
+DIRHANDLEs have their own namespace separate from FILEHANDLEs.
+
+See the example at C<readdir>.
+
+=item ord EXPR
+X<ord> X<encoding>
+
+=item ord
+
+Returns the numeric value of the first character of EXPR.
+If EXPR is an empty string, returns 0.  If EXPR is omitted, uses C<$_>.
+(Note I<character>, not byte.)
+
+For the reverse, see L</chr>.
+See L<perlunicode> for more about Unicode.
+
+=item our EXPR
+X<our> X<global>
+
+=item our TYPE EXPR
+
+=item our EXPR : ATTRS
+
+=item our TYPE EXPR : ATTRS
+
+C<our> associates a simple name with a package variable in the current
+package for use within the current scope.  When C<use strict 'vars'> is in
+effect, C<our> lets you use declared global variables without qualifying
+them with package names, within the lexical scope of the C<our> declaration.
+In this way C<our> differs from C<use vars>, which is package-scoped.
+
+Unlike C<my> or C<state>, which allocates storage for a variable and
+associates a simple name with that storage for use within the current
+scope, C<our> associates a simple name with a package (read: global)
+variable in the current package, for use within the current lexical scope.
+In other words, C<our> has the same scoping rules as C<my> or C<state>, but
+does not necessarily create a variable.
+
+If more than one value is listed, the list must be placed
+in parentheses.
+
+    our $foo;
+    our($bar, $baz);
+
+An C<our> declaration declares a global variable that will be visible
+across its entire lexical scope, even across package boundaries.  The
+package in which the variable is entered is determined at the point
+of the declaration, not at the point of use.  This means the following
+behavior holds:
+
+    package Foo;
+    our $bar;      # declares $Foo::bar for rest of lexical scope
+    $bar = 20;
+
+    package Bar;
+    print $bar;    # prints 20, as it refers to $Foo::bar
+
+Multiple C<our> declarations with the same name in the same lexical
+scope are allowed if they are in different packages.  If they happen
+to be in the same package, Perl will emit warnings if you have asked
+for them, just like multiple C<my> declarations.  Unlike a second
+C<my> declaration, which will bind the name to a fresh variable, a
+second C<our> declaration in the same package, in the same scope, is
+merely redundant.
+
+    use warnings;
+    package Foo;
+    our $bar;      # declares $Foo::bar for rest of lexical scope
+    $bar = 20;
+
+    package Bar;
+    our $bar = 30; # declares $Bar::bar for rest of lexical scope
+    print $bar;    # prints 30
+
+    our $bar;      # emits warning but has no other effect
+    print $bar;    # still prints 30
+
+An C<our> declaration may also have a list of attributes associated
+with it.
+
+The exact semantics and interface of TYPE and ATTRS are still
+evolving.  TYPE is currently bound to the use of C<fields> pragma,
+and attributes are handled using the C<attributes> pragma, or starting
+from Perl 5.8.0 also via the C<Attribute::Handlers> module.  See
+L<perlsub/"Private Variables via my()"> for details, and L<fields>,
+L<attributes>, and L<Attribute::Handlers>.
+
+=item pack TEMPLATE,LIST
+X<pack>
+
+Takes a LIST of values and converts it into a string using the rules
+given by the TEMPLATE.  The resulting string is the concatenation of
+the converted values.  Typically, each converted value looks
+like its machine-level representation.  For example, on 32-bit machines
+an integer may be represented by a sequence of 4 bytes, which  will in
+Perl be presented as a string that's 4 characters long. 
+
+See L<perlpacktut> for an introduction to this function.
+
+The TEMPLATE is a sequence of characters that give the order and type
+of values, as follows:
+
+    a  A string with arbitrary binary data, will be null padded.
+    A  A text (ASCII) string, will be space padded.
+    Z  A null-terminated (ASCIZ) string, will be null padded.
+
+    b  A bit string (ascending bit order inside each byte,
+       like vec()).
+    B  A bit string (descending bit order inside each byte).
+    h  A hex string (low nybble first).
+    H  A hex string (high nybble first).
+
+    c  A signed char (8-bit) value.
+    C  An unsigned char (octet) value.
+    W  An unsigned char value (can be greater than 255).
+
+    s  A signed short (16-bit) value.
+    S  An unsigned short value.
+
+    l  A signed long (32-bit) value.
+    L  An unsigned long value.
+
+    q  A signed quad (64-bit) value.
+    Q  An unsigned quad value.
+         (Quads are available only if your system supports 64-bit
+          integer values _and_ if Perl has been compiled to support
+          those.  Raises an exception otherwise.)
+
+    i  A signed integer value.
+    I  A unsigned integer value.
+         (This 'integer' is _at_least_ 32 bits wide.  Its exact
+          size depends on what a local C compiler calls 'int'.)
+
+    n  An unsigned short (16-bit) in "network" (big-endian) order.
+    N  An unsigned long (32-bit) in "network" (big-endian) order.
+    v  An unsigned short (16-bit) in "VAX" (little-endian) order.
+    V  An unsigned long (32-bit) in "VAX" (little-endian) order.
+
+    j  A Perl internal signed integer value (IV).
+    J  A Perl internal unsigned integer value (UV).
+
+    f  A single-precision float in native format.
+    d  A double-precision float in native format.
+
+    F  A Perl internal floating-point value (NV) in native format
+    D  A float of long-double precision in native format.
+         (Long doubles are available only if your system supports
+          long double values _and_ if Perl has been compiled to
+          support those.  Raises an exception otherwise.)
+
+    p  A pointer to a null-terminated string.
+    P  A pointer to a structure (fixed-length string).
+
+    u  A uuencoded string.
+    U  A Unicode character number.  Encodes to a character in char-
+       acter mode and UTF-8 (or UTF-EBCDIC in EBCDIC platforms) in
+       byte mode.
+
+    w  A BER compressed integer (not an ASN.1 BER, see perlpacktut
+       for details).  Its bytes represent an unsigned integer in
+       base 128, most significant digit first, with as few digits
+       as possible.  Bit eight (the high bit) is set on each byte
+       except the last.
+
+    x  A null byte (a.k.a ASCII NUL, "\000", chr(0))
+    X  Back up a byte.
+    @  Null-fill or truncate to absolute position, counted from the
+       start of the innermost ()-group.
+    .  Null-fill or truncate to absolute position specified by
+       the value.
+    (  Start of a ()-group.
+
+One or more modifiers below may optionally follow certain letters in the
+TEMPLATE (the second column lists letters for which the modifier is valid):
+
+    !   sSlLiI     Forces native (short, long, int) sizes instead
+                   of fixed (16-/32-bit) sizes.
+
+        xX         Make x and X act as alignment commands.
+
+        nNvV       Treat integers as signed instead of unsigned.
+
+        @.         Specify position as byte offset in the internal
+                   representation of the packed string. Efficient but
+                   dangerous.
+
+    >   sSiIlLqQ   Force big-endian byte-order on the type.
+        jJfFdDpP   (The "big end" touches the construct.)
+
+    <   sSiIlLqQ   Force little-endian byte-order on the type.
+        jJfFdDpP   (The "little end" touches the construct.)
+
+The C<< > >> and C<< < >> modifiers can also be used on C<()> groups 
+to force a particular byte-order on all components in that group, 
+including all its subgroups.
+
+The following rules apply:
+
+=over 
+
+=item *
+
+Each letter may optionally be followed by a number indicating the repeat
+count.  A numeric repeat count may optionally be enclosed in brackets, as
+in C<pack("C[80]", @arr)>.  The repeat count gobbles that many values from
+the LIST when used with all format types other than C<a>, C<A>, C<Z>, C<b>,
+C<B>, C<h>, C<H>, C<@>, C<.>, C<x>, C<X>, and C<P>, where it means
+something else, described below.  Supplying a C<*> for the repeat count
+instead of a number means to use however many items are left, except for:
+
+=over 
+
+=item * 
+
+C<@>, C<x>, and C<X>, where it is equivalent to C<0>.
+
+=item * 
+
+<.>, where it means relative to the start of the string.
+
+=item * 
+
+C<u>, where it is equivalent to 1 (or 45, which here is equivalent).
+
+=back 
+
+One can replace a numeric repeat count with a template letter enclosed in
+brackets to use the packed byte length of the bracketed template for the
+repeat count.
+
+For example, the template C<x[L]> skips as many bytes as in a packed long,
+and the template C<"$t X[$t] $t"> unpacks twice whatever $t (when
+variable-expanded) unpacks.  If the template in brackets contains alignment
+commands (such as C<x![d]>), its packed length is calculated as if the
+start of the template had the maximal possible alignment.
+
+When used with C<Z>, a C<*> as the repeat count is guaranteed to add a
+trailing null byte, so the resulting string is always one byte longer than
+the byte length of the item itself.
+
+When used with C<@>, the repeat count represents an offset from the start
+of the innermost C<()> group.
+
+When used with C<.>, the repeat count determines the starting position to
+calculate the value offset as follows:
+
+=over 
+
+=item *
+
+If the repeat count is C<0>, it's relative to the current position.
+
+=item *
+
+If the repeat count is C<*>, the offset is relative to the start of the
+packed string.
+
+=item *
+
+And if it's an integer I<n>, the offset is relative to the start of the
+I<n>th innermost C<( )> group, or to the start of the string if I<n> is
+bigger then the group level.
+
+=back
+
+The repeat count for C<u> is interpreted as the maximal number of bytes
+to encode per line of output, with 0, 1 and 2 replaced by 45. The repeat 
+count should not be more than 65.
+
+=item *
+
+The C<a>, C<A>, and C<Z> types gobble just one value, but pack it as a
+string of length count, padding with nulls or spaces as needed.  When
+unpacking, C<A> strips trailing whitespace and nulls, C<Z> strips everything
+after the first null, and C<a> returns data with no stripping at all.
+
+If the value to pack is too long, the result is truncated.  If it's too
+long and an explicit count is provided, C<Z> packs only C<$count-1> bytes,
+followed by a null byte.  Thus C<Z> always packs a trailing null, except
+when the count is 0.
+
+=item *
+
+Likewise, the C<b> and C<B> formats pack a string that's that many bits long.
+Each such format generates 1 bit of the result.  These are typically followed
+by a repeat count like C<B8> or C<B64>.
+
+Each result bit is based on the least-significant bit of the corresponding
+input character, i.e., on C<ord($char)%2>.  In particular, characters C<"0">
+and C<"1"> generate bits 0 and 1, as do characters C<"\000"> and C<"\001">.
+
+Starting from the beginning of the input string, each 8-tuple
+of characters is converted to 1 character of output.  With format C<b>,
+the first character of the 8-tuple determines the least-significant bit of a
+character; with format C<B>, it determines the most-significant bit of
+a character.
+
+If the length of the input string is not evenly divisible by 8, the
+remainder is packed as if the input string were padded by null characters
+at the end.  Similarly during unpacking, "extra" bits are ignored.
+
+If the input string is longer than needed, remaining characters are ignored.
+
+A C<*> for the repeat count uses all characters of the input field.  
+On unpacking, bits are converted to a string of C<0>s and C<1>s.
+
+=item *
+
+The C<h> and C<H> formats pack a string that many nybbles (4-bit groups,
+representable as hexadecimal digits, C<"0".."9"> C<"a".."f">) long.
+
+For each such format, pack() generates 4 bits of result.
+With non-alphabetical characters, the result is based on the 4 least-significant
+bits of the input character, i.e., on C<ord($char)%16>.  In particular,
+characters C<"0"> and C<"1"> generate nybbles 0 and 1, as do bytes
+C<"\000"> and C<"\001">.  For characters C<"a".."f"> and C<"A".."F">, the result
+is compatible with the usual hexadecimal digits, so that C<"a"> and
+C<"A"> both generate the nybble C<0xA==10>.  Use only these specific hex 
+characters with this format.
+
+Starting from the beginning of the template to pack(), each pair
+of characters is converted to 1 character of output.  With format C<h>, the
+first character of the pair determines the least-significant nybble of the
+output character; with format C<H>, it determines the most-significant
+nybble.
+
+If the length of the input string is not even, it behaves as if padded by
+a null character at the end.  Similarly, "extra" nybbles are ignored during
+unpacking.
+
+If the input string is longer than needed, extra characters are ignored.
+
+A C<*> for the repeat count uses all characters of the input field.  For
+unpack(), nybbles are converted to a string of hexadecimal digits.
+
+=item *
+
+The C<p> format packs a pointer to a null-terminated string.  You are
+responsible for ensuring that the string is not a temporary value, as that
+could potentially get deallocated before you got around to using the packed
+result.  The C<P> format packs a pointer to a structure of the size indicated
+by the length.  A null pointer is created if the corresponding value for
+C<p> or C<P> is C<undef>; similarly with unpack(), where a null pointer
+unpacks into C<undef>.
+
+If your system has a strange pointer size--meaning a pointer is neither as
+big as an int nor as big as a long--it may not be possible to pack or
+unpack pointers in big- or little-endian byte order.  Attempting to do
+so raises an exception.
+
+=item *
+
+The C</> template character allows packing and unpacking of a sequence of
+items where the packed structure contains a packed item count followed by
+the packed items themselves.  This is useful when the structure you're
+unpacking has encoded the sizes or repeat counts for some of its fields
+within the structure itself as separate fields.
+
+For C<pack>, you write I<length-item>C</>I<sequence-item>, and the
+I<length-item> describes how the length value is packed. Formats likely
+to be of most use are integer-packing ones like C<n> for Java strings,
+C<w> for ASN.1 or SNMP, and C<N> for Sun XDR.
+
+For C<pack>, I<sequence-item> may have a repeat count, in which case
+the minimum of that and the number of available items is used as the argument
+for I<length-item>. If it has no repeat count or uses a '*', the number
+of available items is used.
+
+For C<unpack>, an internal stack of integer arguments unpacked so far is
+used. You write C</>I<sequence-item> and the repeat count is obtained by
+popping off the last element from the stack. The I<sequence-item> must not
+have a repeat count.
+
+If I<sequence-item> refers to a string type (C<"A">, C<"a">, or C<"Z">),
+the I<length-item> is the string length, not the number of strings.  With
+an explicit repeat count for pack, the packed string is adjusted to that
+length.  For example:
+
+ This code:                              gives this result:
+  unpack("W/a", "\004Gurusamy")          ("Guru")
+  unpack("a3/A A*", "007 Bond  J ")      (" Bond", "J")
+  unpack("a3 x2 /A A*", "007: Bond, J.") ("Bond, J", ".")
+
+  pack("n/a* w/a","hello,","world")     "\000\006hello,\005world"
+  pack("a/W2", ord("a") .. ord("z"))    "2ab"
+
+The I<length-item> is not returned explicitly from C<unpack>.
+
+Supplying a count to the I<length-item> format letter is only useful with
+C<A>, C<a>, or C<Z>.  Packing with a I<length-item> of C<a> or C<Z> may
+introduce C<"\000"> characters, which Perl does not regard as legal in
+numeric strings.
+
+=item *
+
+The integer types C<s>, C<S>, C<l>, and C<L> may be
+followed by a C<!> modifier to specify native shorts or
+longs.  As shown in the example above, a bare C<l> means
+exactly 32 bits, although the native C<long> as seen by the local C compiler
+may be larger.  This is mainly an issue on 64-bit platforms.  You can
+see whether using C<!> makes any difference this way:
+
+    printf "format s is %d, s! is %d\n", 
+       length pack("s"), length pack("s!");
+
+    printf "format l is %d, l! is %d\n", 
+       length pack("l"), length pack("l!");
+
+
+C<i!> and C<I!> are also allowed, but only for completeness' sake:
+they are identical to C<i> and C<I>.
+
+The actual sizes (in bytes) of native shorts, ints, longs, and long
+longs on the platform where Perl was built are also available from
+the command line:
+
+    $ perl -V:{short,int,long{,long}}size
+    shortsize='2';
+    intsize='4';
+    longsize='4';
+    longlongsize='8';
+
+or programmatically via the C<Config> module:
+
+       use Config;
+       print $Config{shortsize},    "\n";
+       print $Config{intsize},      "\n";
+       print $Config{longsize},     "\n";
+       print $Config{longlongsize}, "\n";
+
+C<$Config{longlongsize}> is undefined on systems without 
+long long support.
+
+=item *
+
+The integer formats C<s>, C<S>, C<i>, C<I>, C<l>, C<L>, C<j>, and C<J> are
+inherently non-portable between processors and operating systems because
+they obey native byteorder and endianness.  For example, a 4-byte integer
+0x12345678 (305419896 decimal) would be ordered natively (arranged in and
+handled by the CPU registers) into bytes as
+
+    0x12 0x34 0x56 0x78  # big-endian
+    0x78 0x56 0x34 0x12  # little-endian
+
+Basically, Intel and VAX CPUs are little-endian, while everybody else,
+including Motorola m68k/88k, PPC, Sparc, HP PA, Power, and Cray, are
+big-endian.  Alpha and MIPS can be either: Digital/Compaq uses (well, used) 
+them in little-endian mode, but SGI/Cray uses them in big-endian mode.
+
+The names I<big-endian> and I<little-endian> are comic references to the
+egg-eating habits of the little-endian Lilliputians and the big-endian
+Blefuscudians from the classic Jonathan Swift satire, I<Gulliver's Travels>.
+This entered computer lingo via the paper "On Holy Wars and a Plea for
+Peace" by Danny Cohen, USC/ISI IEN 137, April 1, 1980.
+
+Some systems may have even weirder byte orders such as
+
+   0x56 0x78 0x12 0x34
+   0x34 0x12 0x78 0x56
+
+You can determine your system endianness with this incantation:
+
+   printf("%#02x ", $_) for unpack("W*", pack L=>0x12345678); 
+
+The byteorder on the platform where Perl was built is also available
+via L<Config>:
+
+    use Config;
+    print "$Config{byteorder}\n";
+
+or from the command line:
+
+    $ perl -V:byteorder
+
+Byteorders C<"1234"> and C<"12345678"> are little-endian; C<"4321">
+and C<"87654321"> are big-endian.
+
+For portably packed integers, either use the formats C<n>, C<N>, C<v>, 
+and C<V> or else use the C<< > >> and C<< < >> modifiers described
+immediately below.  See also L<perlport>.
+
+=item *
+
+Starting with Perl 5.9.2, integer and floating-point formats, along with
+the C<p> and C<P> formats and C<()> groups, may all be followed by the 
+C<< > >> or C<< < >> endianness modifiers to respectively enforce big-
+or little-endian byte-order.  These modifiers are especially useful 
+given how C<n>, C<N>, C<v>, and C<V> don't cover signed integers, 
+64-bit integers, or floating-point values.
+
+Here are some concerns to keep in mind when using an endianness modifier:
+
+=over
+
+=item * 
+
+Exchanging signed integers between different platforms works only 
+when all platforms store them in the same format.  Most platforms store
+signed integers in two's-complement notation, so usually this is not an issue.
+
+=item * 
+
+The C<< > >> or C<< < >> modifiers can only be used on floating-point
+formats on big- or little-endian machines.  Otherwise, attempting to
+use them raises an exception.
+
+=item * 
+
+Forcing big- or little-endian byte-order on floating-point values for
+data exchange can work only if all platforms use the same
+binary representation such as IEEE floating-point.  Even if all
+platforms are using IEEE, there may still be subtle differences.  Being able
+to use C<< > >> or C<< < >> on floating-point values can be useful,
+but also dangerous if you don't know exactly what you're doing.
+It is not a general way to portably store floating-point values.
+
+=item * 
+
+When using C<< > >> or C<< < >> on a C<()> group, this affects
+all types inside the group that accept byte-order modifiers,
+including all subgroups.  It is silently ignored for all other
+types.  You are not allowed to override the byte-order within a group
+that already has a byte-order modifier suffix.
+
+=back
+
+=item *
+
+Real numbers (floats and doubles) are in native machine format only.
+Due to the multiplicity of floating-point formats and the lack of a
+standard "network" representation for them, no facility for interchange has been
+made.  This means that packed floating-point data written on one machine
+may not be readable on another, even if both use IEEE floating-point
+arithmetic (because the endianness of the memory representation is not part
+of the IEEE spec).  See also L<perlport>.
+
+If you know I<exactly> what you're doing, you can use the C<< > >> or C<< < >>
+modifiers to force big- or little-endian byte-order on floating-point values.
+
+Because Perl uses doubles (or long doubles, if configured) internally for
+all numeric calculation, converting from double into float and thence 
+to double again loses precision, so C<unpack("f", pack("f", $foo)>)
+will not in general equal $foo.
+
+=item *
+
+Pack and unpack can operate in two modes: character mode (C<C0> mode) where
+the packed string is processed per character, and UTF-8 mode (C<U0> mode)
+where the packed string is processed in its UTF-8-encoded Unicode form on
+a byte-by-byte basis. Character mode is the default unless the format string 
+starts with C<U>. You can always switch mode mid-format with an explicit 
+C<C0> or C<U0> in the format.  This mode remains in effect until the next 
+mode change, or until the end of the C<()> group it (directly) applies to.
+
+Using C<C0> to get Unicode characters while using C<U0> to get I<non>-Unicode 
+bytes is not necessarily obvious.   Probably only the first of these
+is what you want:
+
+    $ perl -CS -E 'say "\x{3B1}\x{3C9}"' | 
+      perl -CS -ne 'printf "%v04X\n", $_ for unpack("C0A*", $_)'
+    03B1.03C9
+    $ perl -CS -E 'say "\x{3B1}\x{3C9}"' | 
+      perl -CS -ne 'printf "%v02X\n", $_ for unpack("U0A*", $_)'
+    CE.B1.CF.89
+    $ perl -CS -E 'say "\x{3B1}\x{3C9}"' | 
+      perl -C0 -ne 'printf "%v02X\n", $_ for unpack("C0A*", $_)'
+    CE.B1.CF.89
+    $ perl -CS -E 'say "\x{3B1}\x{3C9}"' | 
+      perl -C0 -ne 'printf "%v02X\n", $_ for unpack("U0A*", $_)'
+    C3.8E.C2.B1.C3.8F.C2.89
+
+Those examples also illustrate that you should not try to use
+C<pack>/C<unpack> as a substitute for the L<Encode> module.
+
+=item *
+
+You must yourself do any alignment or padding by inserting, for example,
+enough C<"x">es while packing.  There is no way for pack() and unpack()
+to know where characters are going to or coming from, so they 
+handle their output and input as flat sequences of characters.
+
+=item *
+
+A C<()> group is a sub-TEMPLATE enclosed in parentheses.  A group may
+take a repeat count either as postfix, or for unpack(), also via the C</>
+template character.  Within each repetition of a group, positioning with
+C<@> starts over at 0. Therefore, the result of
+
+    pack("@1A((@2A)@3A)", qw[X Y Z])
+
+is the string C<"\0X\0\0YZ">.
+
+=item *
+
+C<x> and C<X> accept the C<!> modifier to act as alignment commands: they
+jump forward or back to the closest position aligned at a multiple of C<count>
+characters. For example, to pack() or unpack() a C structure like
+
+    struct {
+       char   c;    /* one signed, 8-bit character */
+       double d; 
+       char   cc[2];
+    }
+
+one may need to use the template C<c x![d] d c[2]>.  This assumes that
+doubles must be aligned to the size of double.
+
+For alignment commands, a C<count> of 0 is equivalent to a C<count> of 1;
+both are no-ops.
+
+=item *
+
+C<n>, C<N>, C<v> and C<V> accept the C<!> modifier to
+represent signed 16-/32-bit integers in big-/little-endian order.
+This is portable only when all platforms sharing packed data use the
+same binary representation for signed integers; for example, when all
+platforms use two's-complement representation.
+
+=item *
+
+Comments can be embedded in a TEMPLATE using C<#> through the end of line.
+White space can separate pack codes from each other, but modifiers and
+repeat counts must follow immediately.  Breaking complex templates into
+individual line-by-line components, suitably annotated, can do as much to
+improve legibility and maintainability of pack/unpack formats as C</x> can
+for complicated pattern matches.
+
+=item *
+
+If TEMPLATE requires more arguments than pack() is given, pack()
+assumes additional C<""> arguments.  If TEMPLATE requires fewer arguments
+than given, extra arguments are ignored.
+
+=back
+
+Examples:
+
+    $foo = pack("WWWW",65,66,67,68);
+    # foo eq "ABCD"
+    $foo = pack("W4",65,66,67,68);
+    # same thing
+    $foo = pack("W4",0x24b6,0x24b7,0x24b8,0x24b9);
+    # same thing with Unicode circled letters.
+    $foo = pack("U4",0x24b6,0x24b7,0x24b8,0x24b9);
+    # same thing with Unicode circled letters. You don't get the
+    # UTF-8 bytes because the U at the start of the format caused
+    # a switch to U0-mode, so the UTF-8 bytes get joined into
+    # characters
+    $foo = pack("C0U4",0x24b6,0x24b7,0x24b8,0x24b9);
+    # foo eq "\xe2\x92\xb6\xe2\x92\xb7\xe2\x92\xb8\xe2\x92\xb9"
+    # This is the UTF-8 encoding of the string in the
+    # previous example
+
+    $foo = pack("ccxxcc",65,66,67,68);
+    # foo eq "AB\0\0CD"
+
+    # NOTE: The examples above featuring "W" and "c" are true
+    # only on ASCII and ASCII-derived systems such as ISO Latin 1
+    # and UTF-8.  On EBCDIC systems, the first example would be
+    #      $foo = pack("WWWW",193,194,195,196);
+
+    $foo = pack("s2",1,2);
+    # "\001\000\002\000" on little-endian
+    # "\000\001\000\002" on big-endian
+
+    $foo = pack("a4","abcd","x","y","z");
+    # "abcd"
+
+    $foo = pack("aaaa","abcd","x","y","z");
+    # "axyz"
+
+    $foo = pack("a14","abcdefg");
+    # "abcdefg\0\0\0\0\0\0\0"
+
+    $foo = pack("i9pl", gmtime);
+    # a real struct tm (on my system anyway)
+
+    $utmp_template = "Z8 Z8 Z16 L";
+    $utmp = pack($utmp_template, @utmp1);
+    # a struct utmp (BSDish)
+
+    @utmp2 = unpack($utmp_template, $utmp);
+    # "@utmp1" eq "@utmp2"
+
+    sub bintodec {
+        unpack("N", pack("B32", substr("0" x 32 . shift, -32)));
+    }
+
+    $foo = pack('sx2l', 12, 34);
+    # short 12, two zero bytes padding, long 34
+    $bar = pack('s@4l', 12, 34);
+    # short 12, zero fill to position 4, long 34
+    # $foo eq $bar
+    $baz = pack('s.l', 12, 4, 34);
+    # short 12, zero fill to position 4, long 34
+
+    $foo = pack('nN', 42, 4711);
+    # pack big-endian 16- and 32-bit unsigned integers
+    $foo = pack('S>L>', 42, 4711);
+    # exactly the same
+    $foo = pack('s<l<', -42, 4711);
+    # pack little-endian 16- and 32-bit signed integers
+    $foo = pack('(sl)<', -42, 4711);
+    # exactly the same
+
+The same template may generally also be used in unpack().
+
+=item package NAMESPACE
+
+=item package NAMESPACE VERSION
+X<package> X<module> X<namespace> X<version>
+
+=item package NAMESPACE BLOCK
+
+=item package NAMESPACE VERSION BLOCK
+X<package> X<module> X<namespace> X<version>
+
+Declares the BLOCK or the rest of the compilation unit as being in the
+given namespace.  The scope of the package declaration is either the
+supplied code BLOCK or, in the absence of a BLOCK, from the declaration
+itself through the end of current scope (the enclosing block, file, or
+C<eval>).  That is, the forms without a BLOCK are operative through the end
+of the current scope, just like the C<my>, C<state>, and C<our> operators.
+All unqualified dynamic identifiers in this scope will be in the given
+namespace, except where overridden by another C<package> declaration or
+when they're one of the special identifiers that qualify into C<main::>,
+like C<STDOUT>, C<ARGV>, C<ENV>, and the punctuation variables.
+
+A package statement affects dynamic variables only, including those
+you've used C<local> on, but I<not> lexical variables, which are created
+with C<my>, C<state>, or C<our>.  Typically it would be the first 
+declaration in a file included by C<require> or C<use>.  You can switch into a
+package in more than one place, since this only determines which default 
+symbol table the compiler uses for the rest of that block.  You can refer to
+identifiers in other packages than the current one by prefixing the identifier
+with the package name and a double colon, as in C<$SomePack::var>
+or C<ThatPack::INPUT_HANDLE>.  If package name is omitted, the C<main>
+package as assumed.  That is, C<$::sail> is equivalent to
+C<$main::sail> (as well as to C<$main'sail>, still seen in ancient
+code, mostly from Perl 4).
+
+If VERSION is provided, C<package> sets the C<$VERSION> variable in the given
+namespace to a L<version> object with the VERSION provided.  VERSION must be a
+"strict" style version number as defined by the L<version> module: a positive
+decimal number (integer or decimal-fraction) without exponentiation or else a
+dotted-decimal v-string with a leading 'v' character and at least three
+components.  You should set C<$VERSION> only once per package.
+
+See L<perlmod/"Packages"> for more information about packages, modules,
+and classes.  See L<perlsub> for other scoping issues.
+
+=item pipe READHANDLE,WRITEHANDLE
+X<pipe>
+
+Opens a pair of connected pipes like the corresponding system call.
+Note that if you set up a loop of piped processes, deadlock can occur
+unless you are very careful.  In addition, note that Perl's pipes use
+IO buffering, so you may need to set C<$|> to flush your WRITEHANDLE
+after each command, depending on the application.
+
+See L<IPC::Open2>, L<IPC::Open3>, and
+L<perlipc/"Bidirectional Communication with Another Process">
+for examples of such things.
+
+On systems that support a close-on-exec flag on files, that flag is set
+on all newly opened file descriptors whose C<fileno>s are I<higher> than 
+the current value of $^F (by default 2 for C<STDERR>).  See L<perlvar/$^F>.
+
+=item __PACKAGE__
+X<__PACKAGE__>
+
+A special token that returns the name of the package in which it occurs.
+
+=item pop ARRAY
+X<pop> X<stack>
+
+=item pop EXPR
+
+=item pop
+
+Pops and returns the last value of the array, shortening the array by
+one element.
+
+Returns the undefined value if the array is empty, although this may also
+happen at other times.  If ARRAY is omitted, pops the C<@ARGV> array in the
+main program, but the C<@_> array in subroutines, just like C<shift>.
+
+Starting with Perl 5.14, C<pop> can take a scalar EXPR, which must hold a
+reference to an unblessed array.  The argument will be dereferenced
+automatically.  This aspect of C<pop> is considered highly experimental.
+The exact behaviour may change in a future version of Perl.
+
+=item pos SCALAR
+X<pos> X<match, position>
+
+=item pos
+
+Returns the offset of where the last C<m//g> search left off for the
+variable in question (C<$_> is used when the variable is not
+specified). Note that 0 is a valid match offset. C<undef> indicates
+that the search position is reset (usually due to match failure, but
+can also be because no match has yet been run on the scalar).
+
+C<pos> directly accesses the location used by the regexp engine to
+store the offset, so assigning to C<pos> will change that offset, and
+so will also influence the C<\G> zero-width assertion in regular
+expressions. Both of these effects take place for the next match, so
+you can't affect the position with C<pos> during the current match,
+such as in C<(?{pos() = 5})> or C<s//pos() = 5/e>.
+
+Setting C<pos> also resets the I<matched with zero-length> flag, described
+under L<perlre/"Repeated Patterns Matching a Zero-length Substring">.
+
+Because a failed C<m//gc> match doesn't reset the offset, the return
+from C<pos> won't change either in this case.  See L<perlre> and
+L<perlop>.
+
+=item print FILEHANDLE LIST
+X<print>
+
+=item print FILEHANDLE
+
+=item print LIST
+
+=item print
+
+Prints a string or a list of strings.  Returns true if successful.
+FILEHANDLE may be a scalar variable containing the name of or a reference
+to the filehandle, thus introducing one level of indirection.  (NOTE: If
+FILEHANDLE is a variable and the next token is a term, it may be
+misinterpreted as an operator unless you interpose a C<+> or put
+parentheses around the arguments.) If FILEHANDLE is omitted, prints to the
+last selected (see L</select>) output handle.  If LIST is omitted, prints
+C<$_> to the currently selected output handle.  To use FILEHANDLE alone to
+print the content of C<$_> to it, you must use a real filehandle like
+C<FH>, not an indirect one like C<$fh>.  To set the default output handle
+to something other than STDOUT, use the select operation.
+
+The current value of C<$,> (if any) is printed between each LIST item.  The
+current value of C<$\> (if any) is printed after the entire LIST has been
+printed.  Because print takes a LIST, anything in the LIST is evaluated in
+list context, including any subroutines whose return lists you pass to
+C<print>.  Be careful not to follow the print keyword with a left
+parenthesis unless you want the corresponding right parenthesis to
+terminate the arguments to the print; put parentheses around all arguments
+(or interpose a C<+>, but that doesn't look as good).
+
+If you're storing handles in an array or hash, or in general whenever
+you're using any expression more complex than a bareword handle or a plain,
+unsubscripted scalar variable to retrieve it, you will have to use a block
+returning the filehandle value instead, in which case the LIST may not be
+omitted:
+
+    print { $files[$i] } "stuff\n";
+    print { $OK ? STDOUT : STDERR } "stuff\n";
+
+Printing to a closed pipe or socket will generate a SIGPIPE signal.  See
+L<perlipc> for more on signal handling.
+
+=item printf FILEHANDLE FORMAT, LIST
+X<printf>
+
+=item printf FILEHANDLE
+
+=item printf FORMAT, LIST
+
+=item printf
+
+Equivalent to C<print FILEHANDLE sprintf(FORMAT, LIST)>, except that C<$\>
+(the output record separator) is not appended.  The first argument of the
+list will be interpreted as the C<printf> format. See
+L<sprintf|/sprintf FORMAT, LIST> for an
+explanation of the format argument.    If you omit the LIST, C<$_> is used;
+to use FILEHANDLE without a LIST, you must use a real filehandle like
+C<FH>, not an indirect one like C<$fh>.  If C<use locale> is in effect and
+POSIX::setlocale() has been called, the character used for the decimal
+separator in formatted floating-point numbers is affected by the LC_NUMERIC
+locale setting.  See L<perllocale> and L<POSIX>.
+
+Don't fall into the trap of using a C<printf> when a simple
+C<print> would do.  The C<print> is more efficient and less
+error prone.
+
+=item prototype FUNCTION
+X<prototype>
+
+Returns the prototype of a function as a string (or C<undef> if the
+function has no prototype).  FUNCTION is a reference to, or the name of,
+the function whose prototype you want to retrieve.
+
+If FUNCTION is a string starting with C<CORE::>, the rest is taken as a
+name for a Perl builtin.  If the builtin is not I<overridable> (such as
+C<qw//>) or if its arguments cannot be adequately expressed by a prototype
+(such as C<system>), prototype() returns C<undef>, because the builtin
+does not really behave like a Perl function.  Otherwise, the string
+describing the equivalent prototype is returned.
+
+=item push ARRAY,LIST
+X<push> X<stack>
+
+=item push EXPR,LIST
+
+Treats ARRAY as a stack by appending the values of LIST to the end of
+ARRAY.  The length of ARRAY increases by the length of LIST.  Has the same
+effect as
+
+    for $value (LIST) {
+        $ARRAY[++$#ARRAY] = $value;
+    }
+
+but is more efficient.  Returns the number of elements in the array following
+the completed C<push>.
+
+Starting with Perl 5.14, C<push> can take a scalar EXPR, which must hold a
+reference to an unblessed array.  The argument will be dereferenced
+automatically.  This aspect of C<push> is considered highly experimental.
+The exact behaviour may change in a future version of Perl.
+
+=item q/STRING/
+
+=item qq/STRING/
+
+=item qx/STRING/
+
+=item qw/STRING/
+
+Generalized quotes.  See L<perlop/"Quote-Like Operators">.
+
+=item qr/STRING/
+
+Regexp-like quote.  See L<perlop/"Regexp Quote-Like Operators">.
+
+=item quotemeta EXPR
+X<quotemeta> X<metacharacter>
+
+=item quotemeta
+
+Returns the value of EXPR with all non-"word"
+characters backslashed.  (That is, all characters not matching
+C</[A-Za-z_0-9]/> will be preceded by a backslash in the
+returned string, regardless of any locale settings.)
+This is the internal function implementing
+the C<\Q> escape in double-quoted strings.
+
+If EXPR is omitted, uses C<$_>.
+
+quotemeta (and C<\Q> ... C<\E>) are useful when interpolating strings into
+regular expressions, because by default an interpolated variable will be
+considered a mini-regular expression. For example:
+
+    my $sentence = 'The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog';
+    my $substring = 'quick.*?fox';
+    $sentence =~ s{$substring}{big bad wolf};
+
+Will cause C<$sentence> to become C<'The big bad wolf jumped over...'>.
+
+On the other hand:
+
+    my $sentence = 'The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog';
+    my $substring = 'quick.*?fox';
+    $sentence =~ s{\Q$substring\E}{big bad wolf};
+
+Or:
+
+    my $sentence = 'The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog';
+    my $substring = 'quick.*?fox';
+    my $quoted_substring = quotemeta($substring);
+    $sentence =~ s{$quoted_substring}{big bad wolf};
+
+Will both leave the sentence as is. Normally, when accepting literal string
+input from the user, quotemeta() or C<\Q> must be used.
+
+In Perl 5.14, all characters whose code points are above 127 are not
+quoted in UTF8-encoded strings, but all are quoted in UTF-8 strings.
+It is planned to change this behavior in 5.16, but the exact rules
+haven't been determined yet.
+
+=item rand EXPR
+X<rand> X<random>
+
+=item rand
+
+Returns a random fractional number greater than or equal to C<0> and less
+than the value of EXPR.  (EXPR should be positive.)  If EXPR is
+omitted, the value C<1> is used.  Currently EXPR with the value C<0> is
+also special-cased as C<1> (this was undocumented before Perl 5.8.0
+and is subject to change in future versions of Perl).  Automatically calls
+C<srand> unless C<srand> has already been called.  See also C<srand>.
+
+Apply C<int()> to the value returned by C<rand()> if you want random
+integers instead of random fractional numbers.  For example,
+
+    int(rand(10))
+
+returns a random integer between C<0> and C<9>, inclusive.
+
+(Note: If your rand function consistently returns numbers that are too
+large or too small, then your version of Perl was probably compiled
+with the wrong number of RANDBITS.)
+
+B<C<rand()> is not cryptographically secure.  You should not rely
+on it in security-sensitive situations.>  As of this writing, a
+number of third-party CPAN modules offer random number generators
+intended by their authors to be cryptographically secure,
+including: L<Data::Entropy>, L<Crypt::Random>, L<Math::Random::Secure>,
+and L<Math::TrulyRandom>.
+
+=item read FILEHANDLE,SCALAR,LENGTH,OFFSET
+X<read> X<file, read>
+
+=item read FILEHANDLE,SCALAR,LENGTH
+
+Attempts to read LENGTH I<characters> of data into variable SCALAR
+from the specified FILEHANDLE.  Returns the number of characters
+actually read, C<0> at end of file, or undef if there was an error (in
+the latter case C<$!> is also set).  SCALAR will be grown or shrunk 
+so that the last character actually read is the last character of the
+scalar after the read.
+
+An OFFSET may be specified to place the read data at some place in the
+string other than the beginning.  A negative OFFSET specifies
+placement at that many characters counting backwards from the end of
+the string.  A positive OFFSET greater than the length of SCALAR
+results in the string being padded to the required size with C<"\0">
+bytes before the result of the read is appended.
+
+The call is implemented in terms of either Perl's or your system's native
+fread(3) library function.  To get a true read(2) system call, see
+L<sysread|/sysread FILEHANDLE,SCALAR,LENGTH,OFFSET>.
+
+Note the I<characters>: depending on the status of the filehandle,
+either (8-bit) bytes or characters are read.  By default, all
+filehandles operate on bytes, but for example if the filehandle has
+been opened with the C<:utf8> I/O layer (see L</open>, and the C<open>
+pragma, L<open>), the I/O will operate on UTF8-encoded Unicode
+characters, not bytes.  Similarly for the C<:encoding> pragma:
+in that case pretty much any characters can be read.
+
+=item readdir DIRHANDLE
+X<readdir>
+
+Returns the next directory entry for a directory opened by C<opendir>.
+If used in list context, returns all the rest of the entries in the
+directory.  If there are no more entries, returns the undefined value in
+scalar context and the empty list in list context.
+
+If you're planning to filetest the return values out of a C<readdir>, you'd
+better prepend the directory in question.  Otherwise, because we didn't
+C<chdir> there, it would have been testing the wrong file.
+
+    opendir(my $dh, $some_dir) || die "can't opendir $some_dir: $!";
+    @dots = grep { /^\./ && -f "$some_dir/$_" } readdir($dh);
+    closedir $dh;
+
+As of Perl 5.11.2 you can use a bare C<readdir> in a C<while> loop,
+which will set C<$_> on every iteration.
+
+    opendir(my $dh, $some_dir) || die;
+    while(readdir $dh) {
+        print "$some_dir/$_\n";
+    }
+    closedir $dh;
+
+=item readline EXPR
+
+=item readline
+X<readline> X<gets> X<fgets>
+
+Reads from the filehandle whose typeglob is contained in EXPR (or from
+C<*ARGV> if EXPR is not provided).  In scalar context, each call reads and
+returns the next line until end-of-file is reached, whereupon the
+subsequent call returns C<undef>.  In list context, reads until end-of-file
+is reached and returns a list of lines.  Note that the notion of "line"
+used here is whatever you may have defined with C<$/> or
+C<$INPUT_RECORD_SEPARATOR>).  See L<perlvar/"$/">.
+
+When C<$/> is set to C<undef>, when C<readline> is in scalar
+context (i.e., file slurp mode), and when an empty file is read, it
+returns C<''> the first time, followed by C<undef> subsequently.
+
+This is the internal function implementing the C<< <EXPR> >>
+operator, but you can use it directly.  The C<< <EXPR> >>
+operator is discussed in more detail in L<perlop/"I/O Operators">.
+
+    $line = <STDIN>;
+    $line = readline(*STDIN);    # same thing
+
+If C<readline> encounters an operating system error, C<$!> will be set
+with the corresponding error message.  It can be helpful to check
+C<$!> when you are reading from filehandles you don't trust, such as a
+tty or a socket.  The following example uses the operator form of
+C<readline> and dies if the result is not defined.
+
+    while ( ! eof($fh) ) {
+        defined( $_ = <$fh> ) or die "readline failed: $!";
+        ...
+    }
+
+Note that you have can't handle C<readline> errors that way with the
+C<ARGV> filehandle. In that case, you have to open each element of
+C<@ARGV> yourself since C<eof> handles C<ARGV> differently.
+
+    foreach my $arg (@ARGV) {
+        open(my $fh, $arg) or warn "Can't open $arg: $!";
+
+        while ( ! eof($fh) ) {
+            defined( $_ = <$fh> )
+                or die "readline failed for $arg: $!";
+            ...
+        }
+    }
+
+=item readlink EXPR
+X<readlink>
+
+=item readlink
+
+Returns the value of a symbolic link, if symbolic links are
+implemented.  If not, raises an exception.  If there is a system
+error, returns the undefined value and sets C<$!> (errno).  If EXPR is
+omitted, uses C<$_>.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/readlink>.
+
+=item readpipe EXPR
+
+=item readpipe
+X<readpipe>
+
+EXPR is executed as a system command.
+The collected standard output of the command is returned.
+In scalar context, it comes back as a single (potentially
+multi-line) string.  In list context, returns a list of lines
+(however you've defined lines with C<$/> or C<$INPUT_RECORD_SEPARATOR>).
+This is the internal function implementing the C<qx/EXPR/>
+operator, but you can use it directly.  The C<qx/EXPR/>
+operator is discussed in more detail in L<perlop/"I/O Operators">.
+If EXPR is omitted, uses C<$_>.
+
+=item recv SOCKET,SCALAR,LENGTH,FLAGS
+X<recv>
+
+Receives a message on a socket.  Attempts to receive LENGTH characters
+of data into variable SCALAR from the specified SOCKET filehandle.
+SCALAR will be grown or shrunk to the length actually read.  Takes the
+same flags as the system call of the same name.  Returns the address
+of the sender if SOCKET's protocol supports this; returns an empty
+string otherwise.  If there's an error, returns the undefined value.
+This call is actually implemented in terms of recvfrom(2) system call.
+See L<perlipc/"UDP: Message Passing"> for examples.
+
+Note the I<characters>: depending on the status of the socket, either
+(8-bit) bytes or characters are received.  By default all sockets
+operate on bytes, but for example if the socket has been changed using
+binmode() to operate with the C<:encoding(utf8)> I/O layer (see the
+C<open> pragma, L<open>), the I/O will operate on UTF8-encoded Unicode
+characters, not bytes.  Similarly for the C<:encoding> pragma: in that
+case pretty much any characters can be read.
+
+=item redo LABEL
+X<redo>
+
+=item redo
+
+The C<redo> command restarts the loop block without evaluating the
+conditional again.  The C<continue> block, if any, is not executed.  If
+the LABEL is omitted, the command refers to the innermost enclosing
+loop.  Programs that want to lie to themselves about what was just input 
+normally use this command:
+
+    # a simpleminded Pascal comment stripper
+    # (warning: assumes no { or } in strings)
+    LINE: while (<STDIN>) {
+        while (s|({.*}.*){.*}|$1 |) {}
+        s|{.*}| |;
+        if (s|{.*| |) {
+            $front = $_;
+            while (<STDIN>) {
+                if (/}/) {  # end of comment?
+                    s|^|$front\{|;
+                    redo LINE;
+                }
+            }
+        }
+        print;
+    }
+
+C<redo> cannot be used to retry a block that returns a value such as
+C<eval {}>, C<sub {}>, or C<do {}>, and should not be used to exit
+a grep() or map() operation.
+
+Note that a block by itself is semantically identical to a loop
+that executes once.  Thus C<redo> inside such a block will effectively
+turn it into a looping construct.
+
+See also L</continue> for an illustration of how C<last>, C<next>, and
+C<redo> work.
+
+=item ref EXPR
+X<ref> X<reference>
+
+=item ref
+
+Returns a non-empty string if EXPR is a reference, the empty
+string otherwise. If EXPR
+is not specified, C<$_> will be used.  The value returned depends on the
+type of thing the reference is a reference to.
+Builtin types include:
+
+    SCALAR
+    ARRAY
+    HASH
+    CODE
+    REF
+    GLOB
+    LVALUE
+    FORMAT
+    IO
+    VSTRING
+    Regexp
+
+If the referenced object has been blessed into a package, then that package
+name is returned instead.  You can think of C<ref> as a C<typeof> operator.
+
+    if (ref($r) eq "HASH") {
+        print "r is a reference to a hash.\n";
+    }
+    unless (ref($r)) {
+        print "r is not a reference at all.\n";
+    }
+
+The return value C<LVALUE> indicates a reference to an lvalue that is not
+a variable. You get this from taking the reference of function calls like
+C<pos()> or C<substr()>. C<VSTRING> is returned if the reference points
+to a L<version string|perldata/"Version Strings">.
+
+The result C<Regexp> indicates that the argument is a regular expression
+resulting from C<qr//>.
+
+See also L<perlref>.
+
+=item rename OLDNAME,NEWNAME
+X<rename> X<move> X<mv> X<ren>
+
+Changes the name of a file; an existing file NEWNAME will be
+clobbered.  Returns true for success, false otherwise.
+
+Behavior of this function varies wildly depending on your system
+implementation.  For example, it will usually not work across file system
+boundaries, even though the system I<mv> command sometimes compensates
+for this.  Other restrictions include whether it works on directories,
+open files, or pre-existing files.  Check L<perlport> and either the
+rename(2) manpage or equivalent system documentation for details.
+
+For a platform independent C<move> function look at the L<File::Copy>
+module.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/rename>.
+
+=item require VERSION
+X<require>
+
+=item require EXPR
+
+=item require
+
+Demands a version of Perl specified by VERSION, or demands some semantics
+specified by EXPR or by C<$_> if EXPR is not supplied.
+
+VERSION may be either a numeric argument such as 5.006, which will be
+compared to C<$]>, or a literal of the form v5.6.1, which will be compared
+to C<$^V> (aka $PERL_VERSION).  An exception is raised if
+VERSION is greater than the version of the current Perl interpreter.
+Compare with L</use>, which can do a similar check at compile time.
+
+Specifying VERSION as a literal of the form v5.6.1 should generally be
+avoided, because it leads to misleading error messages under earlier
+versions of Perl that do not support this syntax.  The equivalent numeric
+version should be used instead.
+
+    require v5.6.1;     # run time version check
+    require 5.6.1;      # ditto
+    require 5.006_001;  # ditto; preferred for backwards compatibility
+
+Otherwise, C<require> demands that a library file be included if it
+hasn't already been included.  The file is included via the do-FILE
+mechanism, which is essentially just a variety of C<eval> with the
+caveat that lexical variables in the invoking script will be invisible
+to the included code.  Has semantics similar to the following subroutine:
+
+    sub require {
+       my ($filename) = @_;
+       if (exists $INC{$filename}) {
+           return 1 if $INC{$filename};
+           die "Compilation failed in require";
+       }
+       my ($realfilename,$result);
+       ITER: {
+           foreach $prefix (@INC) {
+               $realfilename = "$prefix/$filename";
+               if (-f $realfilename) {
+                   $INC{$filename} = $realfilename;
+                   $result = do $realfilename;
+                   last ITER;
+               }
+           }
+           die "Can't find $filename in \@INC";
+       }
+       if ($@) {
+           $INC{$filename} = undef;
+           die $@;
+       } elsif (!$result) {
+           delete $INC{$filename};
+           die "$filename did not return true value";
+       } else {
+           return $result;
+       }
+    }
+
+Note that the file will not be included twice under the same specified
+name.
+
+The file must return true as the last statement to indicate
+successful execution of any initialization code, so it's customary to
+end such a file with C<1;> unless you're sure it'll return true
+otherwise.  But it's better just to put the C<1;>, in case you add more
+statements.
+
+If EXPR is a bareword, the require assumes a "F<.pm>" extension and
+replaces "F<::>" with "F</>" in the filename for you,
+to make it easy to load standard modules.  This form of loading of
+modules does not risk altering your namespace.
+
+In other words, if you try this:
+
+        require Foo::Bar;     # a splendid bareword
+
+The require function will actually look for the "F<Foo/Bar.pm>" file in the
+directories specified in the C<@INC> array.
+
+But if you try this:
+
+        $class = 'Foo::Bar';
+        require $class;       # $class is not a bareword
+    #or
+        require "Foo::Bar";   # not a bareword because of the ""
+
+The require function will look for the "F<Foo::Bar>" file in the @INC array and
+will complain about not finding "F<Foo::Bar>" there.  In this case you can do:
+
+        eval "require $class";
+
+Now that you understand how C<require> looks for files with a
+bareword argument, there is a little extra functionality going on behind
+the scenes.  Before C<require> looks for a "F<.pm>" extension, it will
+first look for a similar filename with a "F<.pmc>" extension. If this file
+is found, it will be loaded in place of any file ending in a "F<.pm>"
+extension.
+
+You can also insert hooks into the import facility by putting Perl code
+directly into the @INC array.  There are three forms of hooks: subroutine
+references, array references, and blessed objects.
+
+Subroutine references are the simplest case.  When the inclusion system
+walks through @INC and encounters a subroutine, this subroutine gets
+called with two parameters, the first a reference to itself, and the
+second the name of the file to be included (e.g., "F<Foo/Bar.pm>").  The
+subroutine should return either nothing or else a list of up to three 
+values in the following order:
+
+=over
+
+=item 1
+
+A filehandle, from which the file will be read.  
+
+=item 2
+
+A reference to a subroutine. If there is no filehandle (previous item),
+then this subroutine is expected to generate one line of source code per
+call, writing the line into C<$_> and returning 1, then finally at end of
+file returning 0.  If there is a filehandle, then the subroutine will be
+called to act as a simple source filter, with the line as read in C<$_>.
+Again, return 1 for each valid line, and 0 after all lines have been
+returned.
+
+=item 3
+
+Optional state for the subroutine. The state is passed in as C<$_[1]>. A
+reference to the subroutine itself is passed in as C<$_[0]>.
+
+=back
+
+If an empty list, C<undef>, or nothing that matches the first 3 values above
+is returned, then C<require> looks at the remaining elements of @INC.
+Note that this filehandle must be a real filehandle (strictly a typeglob
+or reference to a typeglob, whether blessed or unblessed); tied filehandles 
+will be ignored and processing will stop there.
+
+If the hook is an array reference, its first element must be a subroutine
+reference.  This subroutine is called as above, but the first parameter is
+the array reference.  This lets you indirectly pass arguments to
+the subroutine.
+
+In other words, you can write:
+
+    push @INC, \&my_sub;
+    sub my_sub {
+        my ($coderef, $filename) = @_;  # $coderef is \&my_sub
+        ...
+    }
+
+or:
+
+    push @INC, [ \&my_sub, $x, $y, ... ];
+    sub my_sub {
+        my ($arrayref, $filename) = @_;
+        # Retrieve $x, $y, ...
+        my @parameters = @$arrayref[1..$#$arrayref];
+        ...
+    }
+
+If the hook is an object, it must provide an INC method that will be
+called as above, the first parameter being the object itself.  (Note that
+you must fully qualify the sub's name, as unqualified C<INC> is always forced
+into package C<main>.)  Here is a typical code layout:
+
+    # In Foo.pm
+    package Foo;
+    sub new { ... }
+    sub Foo::INC {
+        my ($self, $filename) = @_;
+        ...
+    }
+
+    # In the main program
+    push @INC, Foo->new(...);
+
+These hooks are also permitted to set the %INC entry
+corresponding to the files they have loaded. See L<perlvar/%INC>.
+
+For a yet-more-powerful import facility, see L</use> and L<perlmod>.
+
+=item reset EXPR
+X<reset>
+
+=item reset
+
+Generally used in a C<continue> block at the end of a loop to clear
+variables and reset C<??> searches so that they work again.  The
+expression is interpreted as a list of single characters (hyphens
+allowed for ranges).  All variables and arrays beginning with one of
+those letters are reset to their pristine state.  If the expression is
+omitted, one-match searches (C<?pattern?>) are reset to match again.  
+Only resets variables or searches in the current package.  Always returns
+1.  Examples:
+
+    reset 'X';      # reset all X variables
+    reset 'a-z';    # reset lower case variables
+    reset;          # just reset ?one-time? searches
+
+Resetting C<"A-Z"> is not recommended because you'll wipe out your
+C<@ARGV> and C<@INC> arrays and your C<%ENV> hash.  Resets only package
+variables; lexical variables are unaffected, but they clean themselves
+up on scope exit anyway, so you'll probably want to use them instead.
+See L</my>.
+
+=item return EXPR
+X<return>
+
+=item return
+
+Returns from a subroutine, C<eval>, or C<do FILE> with the value
+given in EXPR.  Evaluation of EXPR may be in list, scalar, or void
+context, depending on how the return value will be used, and the context
+may vary from one execution to the next (see L</wantarray>).  If no EXPR
+is given, returns an empty list in list context, the undefined value in
+scalar context, and (of course) nothing at all in void context.
+
+(In the absence of an explicit C<return>, a subroutine, eval,
+or do FILE automatically returns the value of the last expression
+evaluated.)
+
+=item reverse LIST
+X<reverse> X<rev> X<invert>
+
+In list context, returns a list value consisting of the elements
+of LIST in the opposite order.  In scalar context, concatenates the
+elements of LIST and returns a string value with all characters
+in the opposite order.
+
+    print join(", ", reverse "world", "Hello"); # Hello, world
+
+    print scalar reverse "dlrow ,", "olleH";    # Hello, world
+
+Used without arguments in scalar context, reverse() reverses C<$_>.
+
+    $_ = "dlrow ,olleH";
+    print reverse;                              # No output, list context
+    print scalar reverse;                       # Hello, world
+
+Note that reversing an array to itself (as in C<@a = reverse @a>) will
+preserve non-existent elements whenever possible, i.e., for non magical
+arrays or tied arrays with C<EXISTS> and C<DELETE> methods.
+
+This operator is also handy for inverting a hash, although there are some
+caveats.  If a value is duplicated in the original hash, only one of those
+can be represented as a key in the inverted hash.  Also, this has to
+unwind one hash and build a whole new one, which may take some time
+on a large hash, such as from a DBM file.
+
+    %by_name = reverse %by_address;  # Invert the hash
+
+=item rewinddir DIRHANDLE
+X<rewinddir>
+
+Sets the current position to the beginning of the directory for the
+C<readdir> routine on DIRHANDLE.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/rewinddir>.
+
+=item rindex STR,SUBSTR,POSITION
+X<rindex>
+
+=item rindex STR,SUBSTR
+
+Works just like index() except that it returns the position of the I<last>
+occurrence of SUBSTR in STR.  If POSITION is specified, returns the
+last occurrence beginning at or before that position.
+
+=item rmdir FILENAME
+X<rmdir> X<rd> X<directory, remove>
+
+=item rmdir
+
+Deletes the directory specified by FILENAME if that directory is
+empty.  If it succeeds it returns true; otherwise it returns false and
+sets C<$!> (errno).  If FILENAME is omitted, uses C<$_>.
+
+To remove a directory tree recursively (C<rm -rf> on Unix) look at
+the C<rmtree> function of the L<File::Path> module.
+
+=item s///
+
+The substitution operator.  See L<perlop/"Regexp Quote-Like Operators">.
+
+=item say FILEHANDLE LIST
+X<say>
+
+=item say FILEHANDLE
+
+=item say LIST
+
+=item say
+
+Just like C<print>, but implicitly appends a newline.  C<say LIST> is
+simply an abbreviation for C<{ local $\ = "\n"; print LIST }>.  To use
+FILEHANDLE without a LIST to print the contents of C<$_> to it, you must
+use a real filehandle like C<FH>, not an indirect one like C<$fh>.
+
+This keyword is available only when the C<"say"> feature
+is enabled, or when prefixed with C<CORE::>; see
+L<feature>.  Alternately, include a C<use v5.10> or later to the current
+scope.
+
+=item scalar EXPR
+X<scalar> X<context>
+
+Forces EXPR to be interpreted in scalar context and returns the value
+of EXPR.
+
+    @counts = ( scalar @a, scalar @b, scalar @c );
+
+There is no equivalent operator to force an expression to
+be interpolated in list context because in practice, this is never
+needed.  If you really wanted to do so, however, you could use
+the construction C<@{[ (some expression) ]}>, but usually a simple
+C<(some expression)> suffices.
+
+Because C<scalar> is a unary operator, if you accidentally use a
+parenthesized list for the EXPR, this behaves as a scalar comma expression,
+evaluating all but the last element in void context and returning the final
+element evaluated in scalar context.  This is seldom what you want.
+
+The following single statement:
+
+    print uc(scalar(&foo,$bar)),$baz;
+
+is the moral equivalent of these two:
+
+    &foo;
+    print(uc($bar),$baz);
+
+See L<perlop> for more details on unary operators and the comma operator.
+
+=item seek FILEHANDLE,POSITION,WHENCE
+X<seek> X<fseek> X<filehandle, position>
+
+Sets FILEHANDLE's position, just like the C<fseek> call of C<stdio>.
+FILEHANDLE may be an expression whose value gives the name of the
+filehandle.  The values for WHENCE are C<0> to set the new position
+I<in bytes> to POSITION; C<1> to set it to the current position plus
+POSITION; and C<2> to set it to EOF plus POSITION, typically
+negative.  For WHENCE you may use the constants C<SEEK_SET>,
+C<SEEK_CUR>, and C<SEEK_END> (start of the file, current position, end
+of the file) from the L<Fcntl> module.  Returns C<1> on success, false
+otherwise.
+
+Note the I<in bytes>: even if the filehandle has been set to
+operate on characters (for example by using the C<:encoding(utf8)> open
+layer), tell() will return byte offsets, not character offsets
+(because implementing that would render seek() and tell() rather slow).
+
+If you want to position the file for C<sysread> or C<syswrite>, don't use
+C<seek>, because buffering makes its effect on the file's read-write position
+unpredictable and non-portable.  Use C<sysseek> instead.
+
+Due to the rules and rigors of ANSI C, on some systems you have to do a
+seek whenever you switch between reading and writing.  Amongst other
+things, this may have the effect of calling stdio's clearerr(3).
+A WHENCE of C<1> (C<SEEK_CUR>) is useful for not moving the file position:
+
+    seek(TEST,0,1);
+
+This is also useful for applications emulating C<tail -f>.  Once you hit
+EOF on your read and then sleep for a while, you (probably) have to stick in a
+dummy seek() to reset things.  The C<seek> doesn't change the position,
+but it I<does> clear the end-of-file condition on the handle, so that the
+next C<< <FILE> >> makes Perl try again to read something.  (We hope.)
+
+If that doesn't work (some I/O implementations are particularly
+cantankerous), you might need something like this:
+
+    for (;;) {
+        for ($curpos = tell(FILE); $_ = <FILE>;
+             $curpos = tell(FILE)) {
+            # search for some stuff and put it into files
+        }
+        sleep($for_a_while);
+        seek(FILE, $curpos, 0);
+    }
+
+=item seekdir DIRHANDLE,POS
+X<seekdir>
+
+Sets the current position for the C<readdir> routine on DIRHANDLE.  POS
+must be a value returned by C<telldir>.  C<seekdir> also has the same caveats
+about possible directory compaction as the corresponding system library
+routine.
+
+=item select FILEHANDLE
+X<select> X<filehandle, default>
+
+=item select
+
+Returns the currently selected filehandle.  If FILEHANDLE is supplied,
+sets the new current default filehandle for output.  This has two
+effects: first, a C<write> or a C<print> without a filehandle 
+default to this FILEHANDLE.  Second, references to variables related to
+output will refer to this output channel.  
+
+For example, to set the top-of-form format for more than one
+output channel, you might do the following:
+
+    select(REPORT1);
+    $^ = 'report1_top';
+    select(REPORT2);
+    $^ = 'report2_top';
+
+FILEHANDLE may be an expression whose value gives the name of the
+actual filehandle.  Thus:
+
+    $oldfh = select(STDERR); $| = 1; select($oldfh);
+
+Some programmers may prefer to think of filehandles as objects with
+methods, preferring to write the last example as:
+
+    use IO::Handle;
+    STDERR->autoflush(1);
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/select>.
+
+=item select RBITS,WBITS,EBITS,TIMEOUT
+X<select>
+
+This calls the select(2) syscall with the bit masks specified, which
+can be constructed using C<fileno> and C<vec>, along these lines:
+
+    $rin = $win = $ein = '';
+    vec($rin, fileno(STDIN),  1) = 1;
+    vec($win, fileno(STDOUT), 1) = 1;
+    $ein = $rin | $win;
+
+If you want to select on many filehandles, you may wish to write a
+subroutine like this:
+
+    sub fhbits {
+        my @fhlist = @_;
+        my $bits = "";
+        for my $fh (@fhlist) {
+            vec($bits, fileno($fh), 1) = 1;
+        }
+        return $bits;
+    }
+    $rin = fhbits(*STDIN, *TTY, *MYSOCK);
+
+The usual idiom is:
+
+    ($nfound,$timeleft) =
+      select($rout=$rin, $wout=$win, $eout=$ein, $timeout);
+
+or to block until something becomes ready just do this
+
+    $nfound = select($rout=$rin, $wout=$win, $eout=$ein, undef);
+
+Most systems do not bother to return anything useful in $timeleft, so
+calling select() in scalar context just returns $nfound.
+
+Any of the bit masks can also be undef.  The timeout, if specified, is
+in seconds, which may be fractional.  Note: not all implementations are
+capable of returning the $timeleft.  If not, they always return
+$timeleft equal to the supplied $timeout.
+
+You can effect a sleep of 250 milliseconds this way:
+
+    select(undef, undef, undef, 0.25);
+
+Note that whether C<select> gets restarted after signals (say, SIGALRM)
+is implementation-dependent.  See also L<perlport> for notes on the
+portability of C<select>.
+
+On error, C<select> behaves just like select(2): it returns
+-1 and sets C<$!>.
+
+On some Unixes, select(2) may report a socket file descriptor as "ready for
+reading" even when no data is available, and thus any subsequent C<read>
+would block. This can be avoided if you always use O_NONBLOCK on the
+socket. See select(2) and fcntl(2) for further details.
+
+The standard C<IO::Select> module provides a user-friendlier interface
+to C<select>, mostly because it does all the bit-mask work for you.
+
+B<WARNING>: One should not attempt to mix buffered I/O (like C<read>
+or <FH>) with C<select>, except as permitted by POSIX, and even
+then only on POSIX systems.  You have to use C<sysread> instead.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/select>.
+
+=item semctl ID,SEMNUM,CMD,ARG
+X<semctl>
+
+Calls the System V IPC function semctl(2).  You'll probably have to say
+
+    use IPC::SysV;
+
+first to get the correct constant definitions.  If CMD is IPC_STAT or
+GETALL, then ARG must be a variable that will hold the returned
+semid_ds structure or semaphore value array.  Returns like C<ioctl>:
+the undefined value for error, "C<0 but true>" for zero, or the actual
+return value otherwise.  The ARG must consist of a vector of native
+short integers, which may be created with C<pack("s!",(0)x$nsem)>.
+See also L<perlipc/"SysV IPC">, C<IPC::SysV>, C<IPC::Semaphore>
+documentation.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/semctl>.
+
+=item semget KEY,NSEMS,FLAGS
+X<semget>
+
+Calls the System V IPC function semget(2).  Returns the semaphore id, or
+the undefined value on error.  See also
+L<perlipc/"SysV IPC">, C<IPC::SysV>, C<IPC::SysV::Semaphore>
+documentation.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/semget>.
+
+=item semop KEY,OPSTRING
+X<semop>
+
+Calls the System V IPC function semop(2) for semaphore operations
+such as signalling and waiting.  OPSTRING must be a packed array of
+semop structures.  Each semop structure can be generated with
+C<pack("s!3", $semnum, $semop, $semflag)>.  The length of OPSTRING 
+implies the number of semaphore operations.  Returns true if
+successful, false on error.  As an example, the
+following code waits on semaphore $semnum of semaphore id $semid:
+
+    $semop = pack("s!3", $semnum, -1, 0);
+    die "Semaphore trouble: $!\n" unless semop($semid, $semop);
+
+To signal the semaphore, replace C<-1> with C<1>.  See also
+L<perlipc/"SysV IPC">, C<IPC::SysV>, and C<IPC::SysV::Semaphore>
+documentation.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/semop>.
+
+=item send SOCKET,MSG,FLAGS,TO
+X<send>
+
+=item send SOCKET,MSG,FLAGS
+
+Sends a message on a socket.  Attempts to send the scalar MSG to the SOCKET
+filehandle.  Takes the same flags as the system call of the same name.  On
+unconnected sockets, you must specify a destination to I<send to>, in which
+case it does a sendto(2) syscall.  Returns the number of characters sent,
+or the undefined value on error.  The sendmsg(2) syscall is currently
+unimplemented.  See L<perlipc/"UDP: Message Passing"> for examples.
+
+Note the I<characters>: depending on the status of the socket, either
+(8-bit) bytes or characters are sent.  By default all sockets operate
+on bytes, but for example if the socket has been changed using
+binmode() to operate with the C<:encoding(utf8)> I/O layer (see
+L</open>, or the C<open> pragma, L<open>), the I/O will operate on UTF-8
+encoded Unicode characters, not bytes.  Similarly for the C<:encoding>
+pragma: in that case pretty much any characters can be sent.
+
+=item setpgrp PID,PGRP
+X<setpgrp> X<group>
+
+Sets the current process group for the specified PID, C<0> for the current
+process.  Raises an exception when used on a machine that doesn't
+implement POSIX setpgid(2) or BSD setpgrp(2).  If the arguments are omitted,
+it defaults to C<0,0>.  Note that the BSD 4.2 version of C<setpgrp> does not
+accept any arguments, so only C<setpgrp(0,0)> is portable.  See also
+C<POSIX::setsid()>.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/setpgrp>.
+
+=item setpriority WHICH,WHO,PRIORITY
+X<setpriority> X<priority> X<nice> X<renice>
+
+Sets the current priority for a process, a process group, or a user.
+(See setpriority(2).)  Raises an exception when used on a machine
+that doesn't implement setpriority(2).
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/setpriority>.
+
+=item setsockopt SOCKET,LEVEL,OPTNAME,OPTVAL
+X<setsockopt>
+
+Sets the socket option requested.  Returns C<undef> on error.
+Use integer constants provided by the C<Socket> module for
+LEVEL and OPNAME.  Values for LEVEL can also be obtained from
+getprotobyname.  OPTVAL might either be a packed string or an integer.
+An integer OPTVAL is shorthand for pack("i", OPTVAL).
+
+An example disabling Nagle's algorithm on a socket:
+
+    use Socket qw(IPPROTO_TCP TCP_NODELAY);
+    setsockopt($socket, IPPROTO_TCP, TCP_NODELAY, 1);
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/setsockopt>.
+
+=item shift ARRAY
+X<shift>
+
+=item shift EXPR
+
+=item shift
+
+Shifts the first value of the array off and returns it, shortening the
+array by 1 and moving everything down.  If there are no elements in the
+array, returns the undefined value.  If ARRAY is omitted, shifts the
+C<@_> array within the lexical scope of subroutines and formats, and the
+C<@ARGV> array outside a subroutine and also within the lexical scopes
+established by the C<eval STRING>, C<BEGIN {}>, C<INIT {}>, C<CHECK {}>,
+C<UNITCHECK {}>, and C<END {}> constructs.
+
+Starting with Perl 5.14, C<shift> can take a scalar EXPR, which must hold a
+reference to an unblessed array.  The argument will be dereferenced
+automatically.  This aspect of C<shift> is considered highly experimental.
+The exact behaviour may change in a future version of Perl.
+
+See also C<unshift>, C<push>, and C<pop>.  C<shift> and C<unshift> do the
+same thing to the left end of an array that C<pop> and C<push> do to the
+right end.
+
+=item shmctl ID,CMD,ARG
+X<shmctl>
+
+Calls the System V IPC function shmctl.  You'll probably have to say
+
+    use IPC::SysV;
+
+first to get the correct constant definitions.  If CMD is C<IPC_STAT>,
+then ARG must be a variable that will hold the returned C<shmid_ds>
+structure.  Returns like ioctl: C<undef> for error; "C<0> but
+true" for zero; and the actual return value otherwise.
+See also L<perlipc/"SysV IPC"> and C<IPC::SysV> documentation.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/shmctl>.
+
+=item shmget KEY,SIZE,FLAGS
+X<shmget>
+
+Calls the System V IPC function shmget.  Returns the shared memory
+segment id, or C<undef> on error.
+See also L<perlipc/"SysV IPC"> and C<IPC::SysV> documentation.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/shmget>.
+
+=item shmread ID,VAR,POS,SIZE
+X<shmread>
+X<shmwrite>
+
+=item shmwrite ID,STRING,POS,SIZE
+
+Reads or writes the System V shared memory segment ID starting at
+position POS for size SIZE by attaching to it, copying in/out, and
+detaching from it.  When reading, VAR must be a variable that will
+hold the data read.  When writing, if STRING is too long, only SIZE
+bytes are used; if STRING is too short, nulls are written to fill out
+SIZE bytes.  Return true if successful, false on error.
+shmread() taints the variable. See also L<perlipc/"SysV IPC">,
+C<IPC::SysV>, and the C<IPC::Shareable> module from CPAN.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/shmread> and L<perlport/shmwrite>.
+
+=item shutdown SOCKET,HOW
+X<shutdown>
+
+Shuts down a socket connection in the manner indicated by HOW, which
+has the same interpretation as in the syscall of the same name.
+
+    shutdown(SOCKET, 0);    # I/we have stopped reading data
+    shutdown(SOCKET, 1);    # I/we have stopped writing data
+    shutdown(SOCKET, 2);    # I/we have stopped using this socket
+
+This is useful with sockets when you want to tell the other
+side you're done writing but not done reading, or vice versa.
+It's also a more insistent form of close because it also
+disables the file descriptor in any forked copies in other
+processes.
+
+Returns C<1> for success; on error, returns C<undef> if
+the first argument is not a valid filehandle, or returns C<0> and sets
+C<$!> for any other failure.
+
+=item sin EXPR
+X<sin> X<sine> X<asin> X<arcsine>
+
+=item sin
+
+Returns the sine of EXPR (expressed in radians).  If EXPR is omitted,
+returns sine of C<$_>.
+
+For the inverse sine operation, you may use the C<Math::Trig::asin>
+function, or use this relation:
+
+    sub asin { atan2($_[0], sqrt(1 - $_[0] * $_[0])) }
+
+=item sleep EXPR
+X<sleep> X<pause>
+
+=item sleep
+
+Causes the script to sleep for (integer) EXPR seconds, or forever if no 
+argument is given.  Returns the integer number of seconds actually slept.  
+
+May be interrupted if the process receives a signal such as C<SIGALRM>.
+
+    eval {
+        local $SIG{ALARM} = sub { die "Alarm!\n" };
+        sleep;
+    };
+    die $@ unless $@ eq "Alarm!\n";
+
+You probably cannot mix C<alarm> and C<sleep> calls, because C<sleep>
+is often implemented using C<alarm>.
+
+On some older systems, it may sleep up to a full second less than what
+you requested, depending on how it counts seconds.  Most modern systems
+always sleep the full amount.  They may appear to sleep longer than that,
+however, because your process might not be scheduled right away in a
+busy multitasking system.
+
+For delays of finer granularity than one second, the Time::HiRes module
+(from CPAN, and starting from Perl 5.8 part of the standard
+distribution) provides usleep().  You may also use Perl's four-argument
+version of select() leaving the first three arguments undefined, or you
+might be able to use the C<syscall> interface to access setitimer(2) if
+your system supports it. See L<perlfaq8> for details.
+
+See also the POSIX module's C<pause> function.
+
+=item socket SOCKET,DOMAIN,TYPE,PROTOCOL
+X<socket>
+
+Opens a socket of the specified kind and attaches it to filehandle
+SOCKET.  DOMAIN, TYPE, and PROTOCOL are specified the same as for
+the syscall of the same name.  You should C<use Socket> first
+to get the proper definitions imported.  See the examples in
+L<perlipc/"Sockets: Client/Server Communication">.
+
+On systems that support a close-on-exec flag on files, the flag will
+be set for the newly opened file descriptor, as determined by the
+value of $^F.  See L<perlvar/$^F>.
+
+=item socketpair SOCKET1,SOCKET2,DOMAIN,TYPE,PROTOCOL
+X<socketpair>
+
+Creates an unnamed pair of sockets in the specified domain, of the
+specified type.  DOMAIN, TYPE, and PROTOCOL are specified the same as
+for the syscall of the same name.  If unimplemented, raises an exception.
+Returns true if successful.
+
+On systems that support a close-on-exec flag on files, the flag will
+be set for the newly opened file descriptors, as determined by the value
+of $^F.  See L<perlvar/$^F>.
+
+Some systems defined C<pipe> in terms of C<socketpair>, in which a call
+to C<pipe(Rdr, Wtr)> is essentially:
+
+    use Socket;
+    socketpair(Rdr, Wtr, AF_UNIX, SOCK_STREAM, PF_UNSPEC);
+    shutdown(Rdr, 1);        # no more writing for reader
+    shutdown(Wtr, 0);        # no more reading for writer
+
+See L<perlipc> for an example of socketpair use.  Perl 5.8 and later will
+emulate socketpair using IP sockets to localhost if your system implements
+sockets but not socketpair.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/socketpair>.
+
+=item sort SUBNAME LIST
+X<sort> X<qsort> X<quicksort> X<mergesort>
+
+=item sort BLOCK LIST
+
+=item sort LIST
+
+In list context, this sorts the LIST and returns the sorted list value.
+In scalar context, the behaviour of C<sort()> is undefined.
+
+If SUBNAME or BLOCK is omitted, C<sort>s in standard string comparison
+order.  If SUBNAME is specified, it gives the name of a subroutine
+that returns an integer less than, equal to, or greater than C<0>,
+depending on how the elements of the list are to be ordered.  (The 
+C<< <=> >> and C<cmp> operators are extremely useful in such routines.)
+SUBNAME may be a scalar variable name (unsubscripted), in which case
+the value provides the name of (or a reference to) the actual
+subroutine to use.  In place of a SUBNAME, you can provide a BLOCK as
+an anonymous, in-line sort subroutine.
+
+If the subroutine's prototype is C<($$)>, the elements to be compared are
+passed by reference in C<@_>, as for a normal subroutine.  This is slower
+than unprototyped subroutines, where the elements to be compared are passed
+into the subroutine as the package global variables $a and $b (see example
+below).  Note that in the latter case, it is usually highly counter-productive
+to declare $a and $b as lexicals.
+
+If the subroutine is an XSUB, the elements to be compared are pushed on to
+the stack, the way arguments are usually passed to XSUBs.  $a and $b are
+not set.
+
+The values to be compared are always passed by reference and should not
+be modified.
+
+You also cannot exit out of the sort block or subroutine using any of the
+loop control operators described in L<perlsyn> or with C<goto>.
+
+When C<use locale> is in effect, C<sort LIST> sorts LIST according to the
+current collation locale.  See L<perllocale>.
+
+sort() returns aliases into the original list, much as a for loop's index
+variable aliases the list elements.  That is, modifying an element of a
+list returned by sort() (for example, in a C<foreach>, C<map> or C<grep>)
+actually modifies the element in the original list.  This is usually
+something to be avoided when writing clear code.
+
+Perl 5.6 and earlier used a quicksort algorithm to implement sort.
+That algorithm was not stable, so I<could> go quadratic.  (A I<stable> sort
+preserves the input order of elements that compare equal.  Although
+quicksort's run time is O(NlogN) when averaged over all arrays of
+length N, the time can be O(N**2), I<quadratic> behavior, for some
+inputs.)  In 5.7, the quicksort implementation was replaced with
+a stable mergesort algorithm whose worst-case behavior is O(NlogN).
+But benchmarks indicated that for some inputs, on some platforms,
+the original quicksort was faster.  5.8 has a sort pragma for
+limited control of the sort.  Its rather blunt control of the
+underlying algorithm may not persist into future Perls, but the
+ability to characterize the input or output in implementation
+independent ways quite probably will.  See L<the sort pragma|sort>.
+
+Examples:
+
+    # sort lexically
+    @articles = sort @files;
+    
+    # same thing, but with explicit sort routine
+    @articles = sort {$a cmp $b} @files;
+    
+    # now case-insensitively
+    @articles = sort {uc($a) cmp uc($b)} @files;
+    
+    # same thing in reversed order
+    @articles = sort {$b cmp $a} @files;
+    
+    # sort numerically ascending
+    @articles = sort {$a <=> $b} @files;
+    
+    # sort numerically descending
+    @articles = sort {$b <=> $a} @files;
+    
+    # this sorts the %age hash by value instead of key
+    # using an in-line function
+    @eldest = sort { $age{$b} <=> $age{$a} } keys %age;
+    
+    # sort using explicit subroutine name
+    sub byage {
+        $age{$a} <=> $age{$b};  # presuming numeric
+    }
+    @sortedclass = sort byage @class;
+    
+    sub backwards { $b cmp $a }
+    @harry  = qw(dog cat x Cain Abel);
+    @george = qw(gone chased yz Punished Axed);
+    print sort @harry;
+        # prints AbelCaincatdogx
+    print sort backwards @harry;
+        # prints xdogcatCainAbel
+    print sort @george, 'to', @harry;
+        # prints AbelAxedCainPunishedcatchaseddoggonetoxyz
+
+    # inefficiently sort by descending numeric compare using
+    # the first integer after the first = sign, or the
+    # whole record case-insensitively otherwise
+
+    my @new = sort {
+        ($b =~ /=(\d+)/)[0] <=> ($a =~ /=(\d+)/)[0]
+                            ||
+                    uc($a)  cmp  uc($b)
+    } @old;
+
+    # same thing, but much more efficiently;
+    # we'll build auxiliary indices instead
+    # for speed
+    my @nums = @caps = ();
+    for (@old) {
+        push @nums, ( /=(\d+)/ ? $1 : undef );
+        push @caps, uc($_);
+    }
+
+    my @new = @old[ sort {
+                           $nums[$b] <=> $nums[$a]
+                                    ||
+                           $caps[$a] cmp $caps[$b]
+                         } 0..$#old
+                  ];
+
+    # same thing, but without any temps
+    @new = map { $_->[0] }
+           sort { $b->[1] <=> $a->[1]
+                           ||
+                  $a->[2] cmp $b->[2]
+           } map { [$_, /=(\d+)/, uc($_)] } @old;
+
+    # using a prototype allows you to use any comparison subroutine
+    # as a sort subroutine (including other package's subroutines)
+    package other;
+    sub backwards ($$) { $_[1] cmp $_[0]; }  # $a and $b are not set here
+    
+    package main;
+    @new = sort other::backwards @old;
+    
+    # guarantee stability, regardless of algorithm
+    use sort 'stable';
+    @new = sort { substr($a, 3, 5) cmp substr($b, 3, 5) } @old;
+    
+    # force use of mergesort (not portable outside Perl 5.8)
+    use sort '_mergesort';  # note discouraging _
+    @new = sort { substr($a, 3, 5) cmp substr($b, 3, 5) } @old;
+
+Warning: syntactical care is required when sorting the list returned from
+a function. If you want to sort the list returned by the function call
+C<find_records(@key)>, you can use:
+
+    @contact = sort { $a cmp $b } find_records @key;
+    @contact = sort +find_records(@key);
+    @contact = sort &find_records(@key);
+    @contact = sort(find_records(@key));
+
+If instead you want to sort the array @key with the comparison routine
+C<find_records()> then you can use:
+
+    @contact = sort { find_records() } @key;
+    @contact = sort find_records(@key);
+    @contact = sort(find_records @key);
+    @contact = sort(find_records (@key));
+
+If you're using strict, you I<must not> declare $a
+and $b as lexicals.  They are package globals.  That means
+that if you're in the C<main> package and type
+
+    @articles = sort {$b <=> $a} @files;
+
+then C<$a> and C<$b> are C<$main::a> and C<$main::b> (or C<$::a> and C<$::b>),
+but if you're in the C<FooPack> package, it's the same as typing
+
+    @articles = sort {$FooPack::b <=> $FooPack::a} @files;
+
+The comparison function is required to behave.  If it returns
+inconsistent results (sometimes saying C<$x[1]> is less than C<$x[2]> and
+sometimes saying the opposite, for example) the results are not
+well-defined.
+
+Because C<< <=> >> returns C<undef> when either operand is C<NaN>
+(not-a-number), be careful when sorting with a
+comparison function like C<< $a <=> $b >> any lists that might contain a
+C<NaN>.  The following example takes advantage that C<NaN != NaN> to
+eliminate any C<NaN>s from the input list.
+
+    @result = sort { $a <=> $b } grep { $_ == $_ } @input;
+
+=item splice ARRAY or EXPR,OFFSET,LENGTH,LIST
+X<splice>
+
+=item splice ARRAY or EXPR,OFFSET,LENGTH
+
+=item splice ARRAY or EXPR,OFFSET
+
+=item splice ARRAY or EXPR
+
+Removes the elements designated by OFFSET and LENGTH from an array, and
+replaces them with the elements of LIST, if any.  In list context,
+returns the elements removed from the array.  In scalar context,
+returns the last element removed, or C<undef> if no elements are
+removed.  The array grows or shrinks as necessary.
+If OFFSET is negative then it starts that far from the end of the array.
+If LENGTH is omitted, removes everything from OFFSET onward.
+If LENGTH is negative, removes the elements from OFFSET onward
+except for -LENGTH elements at the end of the array.
+If both OFFSET and LENGTH are omitted, removes everything. If OFFSET is
+past the end of the array, Perl issues a warning, and splices at the
+end of the array.
+
+The following equivalences hold (assuming C<< $#a >= $i >> )
+
+    push(@a,$x,$y)      splice(@a,@a,0,$x,$y)
+    pop(@a)             splice(@a,-1)
+    shift(@a)           splice(@a,0,1)
+    unshift(@a,$x,$y)   splice(@a,0,0,$x,$y)
+    $a[$i] = $y         splice(@a,$i,1,$y)
+
+Example, assuming array lengths are passed before arrays:
+
+    sub aeq {  # compare two list values
+        my(@a) = splice(@_,0,shift);
+        my(@b) = splice(@_,0,shift);
+        return 0 unless @a == @b;  # same len?
+        while (@a) {
+            return 0 if pop(@a) ne pop(@b);
+        }
+        return 1;
+    }
+    if (&aeq($len,@foo[1..$len],0+@bar,@bar)) { ... }
+
+Starting with Perl 5.14, C<splice> can take scalar EXPR, which must hold a
+reference to an unblessed array.  The argument will be dereferenced
+automatically.  This aspect of C<splice> is considered highly experimental.
+The exact behaviour may change in a future version of Perl.
+
+=item split /PATTERN/,EXPR,LIMIT
+X<split>
+
+=item split /PATTERN/,EXPR
+
+=item split /PATTERN/
+
+=item split
+
+Splits the string EXPR into a list of strings and returns that list.  By
+default, empty leading fields are preserved, and empty trailing ones are
+deleted.  (If all fields are empty, they are considered to be trailing.)
+
+In scalar context, returns the number of fields found.
+
+If EXPR is omitted, splits the C<$_> string.  If PATTERN is also omitted,
+splits on whitespace (after skipping any leading whitespace).  Anything
+matching PATTERN is taken to be a delimiter separating the fields.  (Note
+that the delimiter may be longer than one character.)
+
+If LIMIT is specified and positive, it represents the maximum number
+of fields the EXPR will be split into, though the actual number of
+fields returned depends on the number of times PATTERN matches within
+EXPR.  If LIMIT is unspecified or zero, trailing null fields are
+stripped (which potential users of C<pop> would do well to remember).
+If LIMIT is negative, it is treated as if an arbitrarily large LIMIT
+had been specified.  Note that splitting an EXPR that evaluates to the
+empty string always returns the empty list, regardless of the LIMIT
+specified.
+
+A pattern matching the empty string (not to be confused with
+an empty pattern C<//>, which is just one member of the set of patterns
+matching the empty string), splits EXPR into individual
+characters.  For example:
+
+    print join(':', split(/ */, 'hi there')), "\n";
+
+produces the output 'h:i:t:h:e:r:e'.
+
+As a special case for C<split>, the empty pattern C<//> specifically
+matches the empty string; this is not be confused with the normal use
+of an empty pattern to mean the last successful match.  So to split
+a string into individual characters, the following:
+
+    print join(':', split(//, 'hi there')), "\n";
+
+produces the output 'h:i: :t:h:e:r:e'.
+
+Empty leading fields are produced when there are positive-width matches at
+the beginning of the string; a zero-width match at the beginning of
+the string does not produce an empty field. For example:
+
+   print join(':', split(/(?=\w)/, 'hi there!'));
+
+produces the output 'h:i :t:h:e:r:e!'. Empty trailing fields, on the other
+hand, are produced when there is a match at the end of the string (and
+when LIMIT is given and is not 0), regardless of the length of the match.
+For example:
+
+   print join(':', split(//,   'hi there!', -1)), "\n";
+   print join(':', split(/\W/, 'hi there!', -1)), "\n";
+
+produce the output 'h:i: :t:h:e:r:e:!:' and 'hi:there:', respectively,
+both with an empty trailing field.
+
+The LIMIT parameter can be used to split a line partially
+
+    ($login, $passwd, $remainder) = split(/:/, $_, 3);
+
+When assigning to a list, if LIMIT is omitted, or zero, Perl supplies
+a LIMIT one larger than the number of variables in the list, to avoid
+unnecessary work.  For the list above LIMIT would have been 4 by
+default.  In time critical applications it behooves you not to split
+into more fields than you really need.
+
+If the PATTERN contains parentheses, additional list elements are
+created from each matching substring in the delimiter.
+
+    split(/([,-])/, "1-10,20", 3);
+
+produces the list value
+
+    (1, '-', 10, ',', 20)
+
+If you had the entire header of a normal Unix email message in $header,
+you could split it up into fields and their values this way:
+
+    $header =~ s/\n(?=\s)//g;  # fix continuation lines
+    %hdrs   =  (UNIX_FROM => split /^(\S*?):\s*/m, $header);
+
+The pattern C</PATTERN/> may be replaced with an expression to specify
+patterns that vary at runtime.  (To do runtime compilation only once,
+use C</$variable/o>.)
+
+As a special case, specifying a PATTERN of space (S<C<' '>>) will split on
+white space just as C<split> with no arguments does.  Thus, S<C<split(' ')>> can
+be used to emulate B<awk>'s default behavior, whereas S<C<split(/ /)>>
+will give you as many initial null fields (empty string) as there are leading spaces.
+A C<split> on C</\s+/> is like a S<C<split(' ')>> except that any leading
+whitespace produces a null first field.  A C<split> with no arguments
+really does a S<C<split(' ', $_)>> internally.
+
+A PATTERN of C</^/> is treated as if it were C</^/m>, since it isn't
+much use otherwise.
+
+Example:
+
+    open(PASSWD, '/etc/passwd');
+    while (<PASSWD>) {
+        chomp;
+        ($login, $passwd, $uid, $gid,
+         $gcos, $home, $shell) = split(/:/);
+        #...
+    }
+
+As with regular pattern matching, any capturing parentheses that are not
+matched in a C<split()> will be set to C<undef> when returned:
+
+    @fields = split /(A)|B/, "1A2B3";
+    # @fields is (1, 'A', 2, undef, 3)
+
+=item sprintf FORMAT, LIST
+X<sprintf>
+
+Returns a string formatted by the usual C<printf> conventions of the C
+library function C<sprintf>.  See below for more details
+and see L<sprintf(3)> or L<printf(3)> on your system for an explanation of
+the general principles.
+
+For example:
+
+        # Format number with up to 8 leading zeroes
+        $result = sprintf("%08d", $number);
+
+        # Round number to 3 digits after decimal point
+        $rounded = sprintf("%.3f", $number);
+
+Perl does its own C<sprintf> formatting: it emulates the C
+function sprintf(3), but doesn't use it except for floating-point
+numbers, and even then only standard modifiers are allowed.  
+Non-standard extensions in your local sprintf(3) are 
+therefore unavailable from Perl.
+
+Unlike C<printf>, C<sprintf> does not do what you probably mean when you
+pass it an array as your first argument. The array is given scalar context,
+and instead of using the 0th element of the array as the format, Perl will
+use the count of elements in the array as the format, which is almost never
+useful.
+
+Perl's C<sprintf> permits the following universally-known conversions:
+
+   %%    a percent sign
+   %c    a character with the given number
+   %s    a string
+   %d    a signed integer, in decimal
+   %u    an unsigned integer, in decimal
+   %o    an unsigned integer, in octal
+   %x    an unsigned integer, in hexadecimal
+   %e    a floating-point number, in scientific notation
+   %f    a floating-point number, in fixed decimal notation
+   %g    a floating-point number, in %e or %f notation
+
+In addition, Perl permits the following widely-supported conversions:
+
+   %X    like %x, but using upper-case letters
+   %E    like %e, but using an upper-case "E"
+   %G    like %g, but with an upper-case "E" (if applicable)
+   %b    an unsigned integer, in binary
+   %B    like %b, but using an upper-case "B" with the # flag
+   %p    a pointer (outputs the Perl value's address in hexadecimal)
+   %n    special: *stores* the number of characters output so far
+         into the next variable in the parameter list
+
+Finally, for backward (and we do mean "backward") compatibility, Perl
+permits these unnecessary but widely-supported conversions:
+
+   %i    a synonym for %d
+   %D    a synonym for %ld
+   %U    a synonym for %lu
+   %O    a synonym for %lo
+   %F    a synonym for %f
+
+Note that the number of exponent digits in the scientific notation produced
+by C<%e>, C<%E>, C<%g> and C<%G> for numbers with the modulus of the
+exponent less than 100 is system-dependent: it may be three or less
+(zero-padded as necessary).  In other words, 1.23 times ten to the
+99th may be either "1.23e99" or "1.23e099".
+
+Between the C<%> and the format letter, you may specify several
+additional attributes controlling the interpretation of the format.
+In order, these are:
+
+=over 4
+
+=item format parameter index
+
+An explicit format parameter index, such as C<2$>. By default sprintf
+will format the next unused argument in the list, but this allows you
+to take the arguments out of order:
+
+  printf '%2$d %1$d', 12, 34;      # prints "34 12"
+  printf '%3$d %d %1$d', 1, 2, 3;  # prints "3 1 1"
+
+=item flags
+
+one or more of:
+
+   space   prefix non-negative number with a space
+   +       prefix non-negative number with a plus sign
+   -       left-justify within the field
+   0       use zeros, not spaces, to right-justify
+   #       ensure the leading "0" for any octal,
+           prefix non-zero hexadecimal with "0x" or "0X",
+           prefix non-zero binary with "0b" or "0B"
+
+For example:
+
+  printf '<% d>',  12;   # prints "< 12>"
+  printf '<%+d>',  12;   # prints "<+12>"
+  printf '<%6s>',  12;   # prints "<    12>"
+  printf '<%-6s>', 12;   # prints "<12    >"
+  printf '<%06s>', 12;   # prints "<000012>"
+  printf '<%#o>',  12;   # prints "<014>"
+  printf '<%#x>',  12;   # prints "<0xc>"
+  printf '<%#X>',  12;   # prints "<0XC>"
+  printf '<%#b>',  12;   # prints "<0b1100>"
+  printf '<%#B>',  12;   # prints "<0B1100>"
+
+When a space and a plus sign are given as the flags at once,
+a plus sign is used to prefix a positive number.
+
+  printf '<%+ d>', 12;   # prints "<+12>"
+  printf '<% +d>', 12;   # prints "<+12>"
+
+When the # flag and a precision are given in the %o conversion,
+the precision is incremented if it's necessary for the leading "0".
+
+  printf '<%#.5o>', 012;      # prints "<00012>"
+  printf '<%#.5o>', 012345;   # prints "<012345>"
+  printf '<%#.0o>', 0;        # prints "<0>"
+
+=item vector flag
+
+This flag tells Perl to interpret the supplied string as a vector of
+integers, one for each character in the string. Perl applies the format to
+each integer in turn, then joins the resulting strings with a separator (a
+dot C<.> by default). This can be useful for displaying ordinal values of
+characters in arbitrary strings:
+
+  printf "%vd", "AB\x{100}";           # prints "65.66.256"
+  printf "version is v%vd\n", $^V;     # Perl's version
+
+Put an asterisk C<*> before the C<v> to override the string to
+use to separate the numbers:
+
+  printf "address is %*vX\n", ":", $addr;   # IPv6 address
+  printf "bits are %0*v8b\n", " ", $bits;   # random bitstring
+
+You can also explicitly specify the argument number to use for
+the join string using something like C<*2$v>; for example:
+
+  printf '%*4$vX %*4$vX %*4$vX', @addr[1..3], ":";   # 3 IPv6 addresses
+
+=item (minimum) width
+
+Arguments are usually formatted to be only as wide as required to
+display the given value. You can override the width by putting
+a number here, or get the width from the next argument (with C<*>)
+or from a specified argument (e.g., with C<*2$>):
+
+  printf "<%s>", "a";       # prints "<a>"
+  printf "<%6s>", "a";      # prints "<     a>"
+  printf "<%*s>", 6, "a";   # prints "<     a>"
+  printf "<%*2$s>", "a", 6; # prints "<     a>"
+  printf "<%2s>", "long";   # prints "<long>" (does not truncate)
+
+If a field width obtained through C<*> is negative, it has the same
+effect as the C<-> flag: left-justification.
+
+=item precision, or maximum width
+X<precision>
+
+You can specify a precision (for numeric conversions) or a maximum
+width (for string conversions) by specifying a C<.> followed by a number.
+For floating-point formats except C<g> and C<G>, this specifies
+how many places right of the decimal point to show (the default being 6).
+For example:
+
+  # these examples are subject to system-specific variation
+  printf '<%f>', 1;    # prints "<1.000000>"
+  printf '<%.1f>', 1;  # prints "<1.0>"
+  printf '<%.0f>', 1;  # prints "<1>"
+  printf '<%e>', 10;   # prints "<1.000000e+01>"
+  printf '<%.1e>', 10; # prints "<1.0e+01>"
+
+For "g" and "G", this specifies the maximum number of digits to show,
+including those prior to the decimal point and those after it; for 
+example:
+
+  # These examples are subject to system-specific variation.
+  printf '<%g>', 1;        # prints "<1>"
+  printf '<%.10g>', 1;     # prints "<1>"
+  printf '<%g>', 100;      # prints "<100>"
+  printf '<%.1g>', 100;    # prints "<1e+02>"
+  printf '<%.2g>', 100.01; # prints "<1e+02>"
+  printf '<%.5g>', 100.01; # prints "<100.01>"
+  printf '<%.4g>', 100.01; # prints "<100>"
+
+For integer conversions, specifying a precision implies that the
+output of the number itself should be zero-padded to this width,
+where the 0 flag is ignored:
+
+  printf '<%.6d>', 1;      # prints "<000001>"
+  printf '<%+.6d>', 1;     # prints "<+000001>"
+  printf '<%-10.6d>', 1;   # prints "<000001    >"
+  printf '<%10.6d>', 1;    # prints "<    000001>"
+  printf '<%010.6d>', 1;   # prints "<    000001>"
+  printf '<%+10.6d>', 1;   # prints "<   +000001>"
+
+  printf '<%.6x>', 1;      # prints "<000001>"
+  printf '<%#.6x>', 1;     # prints "<0x000001>"
+  printf '<%-10.6x>', 1;   # prints "<000001    >"
+  printf '<%10.6x>', 1;    # prints "<    000001>"
+  printf '<%010.6x>', 1;   # prints "<    000001>"
+  printf '<%#10.6x>', 1;   # prints "<  0x000001>"
+
+For string conversions, specifying a precision truncates the string
+to fit the specified width:
+
+  printf '<%.5s>', "truncated";   # prints "<trunc>"
+  printf '<%10.5s>', "truncated"; # prints "<     trunc>"
+
+You can also get the precision from the next argument using C<.*>:
+
+  printf '<%.6x>', 1;       # prints "<000001>"
+  printf '<%.*x>', 6, 1;    # prints "<000001>"
+
+If a precision obtained through C<*> is negative, it counts
+as having no precision at all.
+
+  printf '<%.*s>',  7, "string";   # prints "<string>"
+  printf '<%.*s>',  3, "string";   # prints "<str>"
+  printf '<%.*s>',  0, "string";   # prints "<>"
+  printf '<%.*s>', -1, "string";   # prints "<string>"
+
+  printf '<%.*d>',  1, 0;   # prints "<0>"
+  printf '<%.*d>',  0, 0;   # prints "<>"
+  printf '<%.*d>', -1, 0;   # prints "<0>"
+
+You cannot currently get the precision from a specified number,
+but it is intended that this will be possible in the future, for
+example using C<.*2$>:
+
+  printf "<%.*2$x>", 1, 6;   # INVALID, but in future will print "<000001>"
+
+=item size
+
+For numeric conversions, you can specify the size to interpret the
+number as using C<l>, C<h>, C<V>, C<q>, C<L>, or C<ll>. For integer
+conversions (C<d u o x X b i D U O>), numbers are usually assumed to be
+whatever the default integer size is on your platform (usually 32 or 64
+bits), but you can override this to use instead one of the standard C types,
+as supported by the compiler used to build Perl:
+
+   hh          interpret integer as C type "char" or "unsigned char"
+              on Perl 5.14 or later
+   h           interpret integer as C type "short" or "unsigned short"
+   j          interpret integer as C type "intmax_t" on Perl 5.14 
+              or later, and only with a C99 compiler (unportable)
+   l           interpret integer as C type "long" or "unsigned long"
+   q, L, or ll interpret integer as C type "long long", "unsigned long long",
+               or "quad" (typically 64-bit integers)
+   t          interpret integer as C type "ptrdiff_t" on Perl 5.14 or later
+   z          interpret integer as C type "size_t" on Perl 5.14 or later
+
+As of 5.14, none of these raises an exception if they are not supported on
+your platform.  However, if warnings are enabled, a warning of the
+C<printf> warning class is issued on an unsupported conversion flag.  
+Should you instead prefer an exception, do this:
+
+    use warnings FATAL => "printf";
+
+If you would like to know about a version dependency before you
+start running the program, put something like this at its top:
+
+    use 5.014;  # for hh/j/t/z/ printf modifiers
+
+You can find out whether your Perl supports quads via L<Config>:
+
+    use Config;
+    if ($Config{use64bitint} eq "define" || $Config{longsize} >= 8) {
+        print "Nice quads!\n";
+    }
+
+For floating-point conversions (C<e f g E F G>), numbers are usually assumed
+to be the default floating-point size on your platform (double or long double),
+but you can force "long double" with C<q>, C<L>, or C<ll> if your
+platform supports them. You can find out whether your Perl supports long
+doubles via L<Config>:
+
+    use Config;
+    print "long doubles\n" if $Config{d_longdbl} eq "define";
+
+You can find out whether Perl considers "long double" to be the default
+floating-point size to use on your platform via L<Config>:
+
+    use Config;
+    if ($Config{uselongdouble} eq "define") {
+       print "long doubles by default\n";
+    }
+
+It can also be that long doubles and doubles are the same thing:
+
+        use Config;
+        ($Config{doublesize} == $Config{longdblsize}) &&
+                print "doubles are long doubles\n";
+
+The size specifier C<V> has no effect for Perl code, but is supported for
+compatibility with XS code.  It means "use the standard size for a Perl
+integer or floating-point number", which is the default.
+
+=item order of arguments
+
+Normally, sprintf() takes the next unused argument as the value to
+format for each format specification. If the format specification
+uses C<*> to require additional arguments, these are consumed from
+the argument list in the order they appear in the format
+specification I<before> the value to format.  Where an argument is
+specified by an explicit index, this does not affect the normal
+order for the arguments, even when the explicitly specified index
+would have been the next argument.
+
+So:
+
+    printf "<%*.*s>", $a, $b, $c;
+
+uses C<$a> for the width, C<$b> for the precision, and C<$c>
+as the value to format; while:
+
+  printf "<%*1$.*s>", $a, $b;
+
+would use C<$a> for the width and precision, and C<$b> as the
+value to format.
+
+Here are some more examples; be aware that when using an explicit
+index, the C<$> may need escaping:
+
+  printf "%2\$d %d\n",    12, 34;        # will print "34 12\n"
+  printf "%2\$d %d %d\n", 12, 34;        # will print "34 12 34\n"
+  printf "%3\$d %d %d\n", 12, 34, 56;    # will print "56 12 34\n"
+  printf "%2\$*3\$d %d\n", 12, 34, 3;    # will print " 34 12\n"
+
+=back
+
+If C<use locale> is in effect and POSIX::setlocale() has been called,
+the character used for the decimal separator in formatted floating-point
+numbers is affected by the LC_NUMERIC locale.  See L<perllocale>
+and L<POSIX>.
+
+=item sqrt EXPR
+X<sqrt> X<root> X<square root>
+
+=item sqrt
+
+Return the positive square root of EXPR.  If EXPR is omitted, uses
+C<$_>.  Works only for non-negative operands unless you've
+loaded the C<Math::Complex> module.
+
+    use Math::Complex;
+    print sqrt(-4);    # prints 2i
+
+=item srand EXPR
+X<srand> X<seed> X<randseed>
+
+=item srand
+
+Sets and returns the random number seed for the C<rand> operator.
+
+The point of the function is to "seed" the C<rand> function so that
+C<rand> can produce a different sequence each time you run your
+program.  When called with a parameter, C<srand> uses that for the seed;
+otherwise it (semi-)randomly chooses a seed.  In either case, starting with
+Perl 5.14, it returns the seed.
+
+If C<srand()> is not called explicitly, it is called implicitly without a
+parameter at the first use of the C<rand> operator.  However, this was not true
+of versions of Perl before 5.004, so if your script will run under older
+Perl versions, it should call C<srand>; otherwise most programs won't call
+C<srand()> at all.
+
+But there are a few situations in recent Perls where programs are likely to
+want to call C<srand>.  One is for generating predictable results generally for
+testing or debugging.  There, you use C<srand($seed)>, with the same C<$seed>
+each time.  Another case is that you may want to call C<srand()>
+after a C<fork()> to avoid child processes sharing the same seed value as the
+parent (and consequently each other).
+
+Do B<not> call C<srand()> (i.e., without an argument) more than once per
+process.  The internal state of the random number generator should
+contain more entropy than can be provided by any seed, so calling
+C<srand()> again actually I<loses> randomness.
+
+Most implementations of C<srand> take an integer and will silently
+truncate decimal numbers.  This means C<srand(42)> will usually
+produce the same results as C<srand(42.1)>.  To be safe, always pass
+C<srand> an integer.
+
+In versions of Perl prior to 5.004 the default seed was just the
+current C<time>.  This isn't a particularly good seed, so many old
+programs supply their own seed value (often C<time ^ $$> or C<time ^
+($$ + ($$ << 15))>), but that isn't necessary any more.
+
+Frequently called programs (like CGI scripts) that simply use
+
+    time ^ $$
+
+for a seed can fall prey to the mathematical property that
+
+    a^b == (a+1)^(b+1)
+
+one-third of the time.  So don't do that.
+
+A typical use of the returned seed is for a test program which has too many
+combinations to test comprehensively in the time available to it each run.  It
+can test a random subset each time, and should there be a failure, log the seed
+used for that run so that it can later be used to reproduce the same results.
+
+B<C<rand()> is not cryptographically secure.  You should not rely
+on it in security-sensitive situations.>  As of this writing, a
+number of third-party CPAN modules offer random number generators
+intended by their authors to be cryptographically secure,
+including: L<Data::Entropy>, L<Crypt::Random>, L<Math::Random::Secure>,
+and L<Math::TrulyRandom>.
+
+=item stat FILEHANDLE
+X<stat> X<file, status> X<ctime>
+
+=item stat EXPR
+
+=item stat DIRHANDLE
+
+=item stat
+
+Returns a 13-element list giving the status info for a file, either
+the file opened via FILEHANDLE or DIRHANDLE, or named by EXPR.  If EXPR is 
+omitted, it stats C<$_> (not C<_>!).  Returns the empty list if C<stat> fails.  Typically
+used as follows:
+
+    ($dev,$ino,$mode,$nlink,$uid,$gid,$rdev,$size,
+       $atime,$mtime,$ctime,$blksize,$blocks)
+           = stat($filename);
+
+Not all fields are supported on all filesystem types.  Here are the
+meanings of the fields:
+
+  0 dev      device number of filesystem
+  1 ino      inode number
+  2 mode     file mode  (type and permissions)
+  3 nlink    number of (hard) links to the file
+  4 uid      numeric user ID of file's owner
+  5 gid      numeric group ID of file's owner
+  6 rdev     the device identifier (special files only)
+  7 size     total size of file, in bytes
+  8 atime    last access time in seconds since the epoch
+  9 mtime    last modify time in seconds since the epoch
+ 10 ctime    inode change time in seconds since the epoch (*)
+ 11 blksize  preferred block size for file system I/O
+ 12 blocks   actual number of blocks allocated
+
+(The epoch was at 00:00 January 1, 1970 GMT.)
+
+(*) Not all fields are supported on all filesystem types. Notably, the
+ctime field is non-portable.  In particular, you cannot expect it to be a
+"creation time"; see L<perlport/"Files and Filesystems"> for details.
+
+If C<stat> is passed the special filehandle consisting of an underline, no
+stat is done, but the current contents of the stat structure from the
+last C<stat>, C<lstat>, or filetest are returned.  Example:
+
+    if (-x $file && (($d) = stat(_)) && $d < 0) {
+        print "$file is executable NFS file\n";
+    }
+
+(This works on machines only for which the device number is negative
+under NFS.)
+
+Because the mode contains both the file type and its permissions, you
+should mask off the file type portion and (s)printf using a C<"%o">
+if you want to see the real permissions.
+
+    $mode = (stat($filename))[2];
+    printf "Permissions are %04o\n", $mode & 07777;
+
+In scalar context, C<stat> returns a boolean value indicating success
+or failure, and, if successful, sets the information associated with
+the special filehandle C<_>.
+
+The L<File::stat> module provides a convenient, by-name access mechanism:
+
+    use File::stat;
+    $sb = stat($filename);
+    printf "File is %s, size is %s, perm %04o, mtime %s\n",
+           $filename, $sb->size, $sb->mode & 07777,
+           scalar localtime $sb->mtime;
+
+You can import symbolic mode constants (C<S_IF*>) and functions
+(C<S_IS*>) from the Fcntl module:
+
+    use Fcntl ':mode';
+
+    $mode = (stat($filename))[2];
+
+    $user_rwx      = ($mode & S_IRWXU) >> 6;
+    $group_read    = ($mode & S_IRGRP) >> 3;
+    $other_execute =  $mode & S_IXOTH;
+
+    printf "Permissions are %04o\n", S_IMODE($mode), "\n";
+
+    $is_setuid     =  $mode & S_ISUID;
+    $is_directory  =  S_ISDIR($mode);
+
+You could write the last two using the C<-u> and C<-d> operators.
+Commonly available C<S_IF*> constants are:
+
+    # Permissions: read, write, execute, for user, group, others.
+
+    S_IRWXU S_IRUSR S_IWUSR S_IXUSR
+    S_IRWXG S_IRGRP S_IWGRP S_IXGRP
+    S_IRWXO S_IROTH S_IWOTH S_IXOTH
+
+    # Setuid/Setgid/Stickiness/SaveText.
+    # Note that the exact meaning of these is system-dependent.
+
+    S_ISUID S_ISGID S_ISVTX S_ISTXT
+
+    # File types.  Not all are necessarily available on
+    # your system.
+
+    S_IFREG S_IFDIR S_IFLNK S_IFBLK S_IFCHR
+    S_IFIFO S_IFSOCK S_IFWHT S_ENFMT
+
+    # The following are compatibility aliases for S_IRUSR,
+    # S_IWUSR, and S_IXUSR.
+
+    S_IREAD S_IWRITE S_IEXEC
+
+and the C<S_IF*> functions are
+
+    S_IMODE($mode)    the part of $mode containing the permission
+                      bits and the setuid/setgid/sticky bits
+
+    S_IFMT($mode)     the part of $mode containing the file type
+                      which can be bit-anded with (for example)
+                      S_IFREG or with the following functions
+
+    # The operators -f, -d, -l, -b, -c, -p, and -S.
+
+    S_ISREG($mode) S_ISDIR($mode) S_ISLNK($mode)
+    S_ISBLK($mode) S_ISCHR($mode) S_ISFIFO($mode) S_ISSOCK($mode)
+
+    # No direct -X operator counterpart, but for the first one
+    # the -g operator is often equivalent.  The ENFMT stands for
+    # record flocking enforcement, a platform-dependent feature.
+
+    S_ISENFMT($mode) S_ISWHT($mode)
+
+See your native chmod(2) and stat(2) documentation for more details
+about the C<S_*> constants.  To get status info for a symbolic link
+instead of the target file behind the link, use the C<lstat> function.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/stat>.
+
+=item state EXPR
+X<state>
+
+=item state TYPE EXPR
+
+=item state EXPR : ATTRS
+
+=item state TYPE EXPR : ATTRS
+
+C<state> declares a lexically scoped variable, just like C<my>.
+However, those variables will never be reinitialized, contrary to
+lexical variables that are reinitialized each time their enclosing block
+is entered.
+See L<perlsub/"Persistent Private Variables"> for details.
+
+C<state> variables are enabled only when the C<use feature "state"> pragma 
+is in effect, unless the keyword is written as C<CORE::state>.
+See also L<feature>.
+
+=item study SCALAR
+X<study>
+
+=item study
+
+Takes extra time to study SCALAR (C<$_> if unspecified) in anticipation of
+doing many pattern matches on the string before it is next modified.
+This may or may not save time, depending on the nature and number of
+patterns you are searching and the distribution of character
+frequencies in the string to be searched; you probably want to compare
+run times with and without it to see which is faster.  Those loops
+that scan for many short constant strings (including the constant
+parts of more complex patterns) will benefit most.
+(The way C<study> works is this: a linked list of every
+character in the string to be searched is made, so we know, for
+example, where all the C<'k'> characters are.  From each search string,
+the rarest character is selected, based on some static frequency tables
+constructed from some C programs and English text.  Only those places
+that contain this "rarest" character are examined.)
+
+For example, here is a loop that inserts index producing entries
+before any line containing a certain pattern:
+
+    while (<>) {
+        study;
+        print ".IX foo\n"    if /\bfoo\b/;
+        print ".IX bar\n"    if /\bbar\b/;
+        print ".IX blurfl\n" if /\bblurfl\b/;
+        # ...
+        print;
+    }
+
+In searching for C</\bfoo\b/>, only locations in C<$_> that contain C<f>
+will be looked at, because C<f> is rarer than C<o>.  In general, this is
+a big win except in pathological cases.  The only question is whether
+it saves you more time than it took to build the linked list in the
+first place.
+
+Note that if you have to look for strings that you don't know till
+runtime, you can build an entire loop as a string and C<eval> that to
+avoid recompiling all your patterns all the time.  Together with
+undefining C<$/> to input entire files as one record, this can be quite
+fast, often faster than specialized programs like fgrep(1).  The following
+scans a list of files (C<@files>) for a list of words (C<@words>), and prints
+out the names of those files that contain a match:
+
+    $search = 'while (<>) { study;';
+    foreach $word (@words) {
+        $search .= "++\$seen{\$ARGV} if /\\b$word\\b/;\n";
+    }
+    $search .= "}";
+    @ARGV = @files;
+    undef $/;
+    eval $search;        # this screams
+    $/ = "\n";        # put back to normal input delimiter
+    foreach $file (sort keys(%seen)) {
+        print $file, "\n";
+    }
+
+=item sub NAME BLOCK
+X<sub>
+
+=item sub NAME (PROTO) BLOCK
+
+=item sub NAME : ATTRS BLOCK
+
+=item sub NAME (PROTO) : ATTRS BLOCK
+
+This is subroutine definition, not a real function I<per se>.  Without a
+BLOCK it's just a forward declaration.  Without a NAME, it's an anonymous
+function declaration, so does return a value: the CODE ref of the closure
+just created.
+
+See L<perlsub> and L<perlref> for details about subroutines and
+references; see L<attributes> and L<Attribute::Handlers> for more
+information about attributes.
+
+=item __SUB__
+X<__SUB__>
+
+A special token that returns the a reference to the current subroutine, or
+C<undef> outside of a subroutine.
+
+This token is only available under C<use v5.16> or the "current_sub"
+feature.  See L<feature>.
+
+=item substr EXPR,OFFSET,LENGTH,REPLACEMENT
+X<substr> X<substring> X<mid> X<left> X<right>
+
+=item substr EXPR,OFFSET,LENGTH
+
+=item substr EXPR,OFFSET
+
+Extracts a substring out of EXPR and returns it.  First character is at
+offset zero.  If OFFSET is negative, starts
+that far back from the end of the string.  If LENGTH is omitted, returns
+everything through the end of the string.  If LENGTH is negative, leaves that
+many characters off the end of the string.
+
+    my $s = "The black cat climbed the green tree";
+    my $color  = substr $s, 4, 5;      # black
+    my $middle = substr $s, 4, -11;    # black cat climbed the
+    my $end    = substr $s, 14;        # climbed the green tree
+    my $tail   = substr $s, -4;        # tree
+    my $z      = substr $s, -4, 2;     # tr
+
+You can use the substr() function as an lvalue, in which case EXPR
+must itself be an lvalue.  If you assign something shorter than LENGTH,
+the string will shrink, and if you assign something longer than LENGTH,
+the string will grow to accommodate it.  To keep the string the same
+length, you may need to pad or chop your value using C<sprintf>.
+
+If OFFSET and LENGTH specify a substring that is partly outside the
+string, only the part within the string is returned.  If the substring
+is beyond either end of the string, substr() returns the undefined
+value and produces a warning.  When used as an lvalue, specifying a
+substring that is entirely outside the string raises an exception.
+Here's an example showing the behavior for boundary cases:
+
+    my $name = 'fred';
+    substr($name, 4) = 'dy';         # $name is now 'freddy'
+    my $null = substr $name, 6, 2;   # returns "" (no warning)
+    my $oops = substr $name, 7;      # returns undef, with warning
+    substr($name, 7) = 'gap';        # raises an exception
+
+An alternative to using substr() as an lvalue is to specify the
+replacement string as the 4th argument.  This allows you to replace
+parts of the EXPR and return what was there before in one operation,
+just as you can with splice().
+
+    my $s = "The black cat climbed the green tree";
+    my $z = substr $s, 14, 7, "jumped from";    # climbed
+    # $s is now "The black cat jumped from the green tree"
+
+Note that the lvalue returned by the three-argument version of substr() acts as
+a 'magic bullet'; each time it is assigned to, it remembers which part
+of the original string is being modified; for example:
+
+    $x = '1234';
+    for (substr($x,1,2)) {
+        $_ = 'a';   print $x,"\n";    # prints 1a4
+        $_ = 'xyz'; print $x,"\n";    # prints 1xyz4
+        $x = '56789';
+        $_ = 'pq';  print $x,"\n";    # prints 5pq9
+    }
+
+Prior to Perl version 5.9.1, the result of using an lvalue multiple times was
+unspecified.
+
+=item symlink OLDFILE,NEWFILE
+X<symlink> X<link> X<symbolic link> X<link, symbolic>
+
+Creates a new filename symbolically linked to the old filename.
+Returns C<1> for success, C<0> otherwise.  On systems that don't support
+symbolic links, raises an exception.  To check for that,
+use eval:
+
+    $symlink_exists = eval { symlink("",""); 1 };
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/symlink>.
+
+=item syscall NUMBER, LIST
+X<syscall> X<system call>
+
+Calls the system call specified as the first element of the list,
+passing the remaining elements as arguments to the system call.  If
+unimplemented, raises an exception.  The arguments are interpreted
+as follows: if a given argument is numeric, the argument is passed as
+an int.  If not, the pointer to the string value is passed.  You are
+responsible to make sure a string is pre-extended long enough to
+receive any result that might be written into a string.  You can't use a
+string literal (or other read-only string) as an argument to C<syscall>
+because Perl has to assume that any string pointer might be written
+through.  If your
+integer arguments are not literals and have never been interpreted in a
+numeric context, you may need to add C<0> to them to force them to look
+like numbers.  This emulates the C<syswrite> function (or vice versa):
+
+    require 'syscall.ph';        # may need to run h2ph
+    $s = "hi there\n";
+    syscall(&SYS_write, fileno(STDOUT), $s, length $s);
+
+Note that Perl supports passing of up to only 14 arguments to your syscall,
+which in practice should (usually) suffice.
+
+Syscall returns whatever value returned by the system call it calls.
+If the system call fails, C<syscall> returns C<-1> and sets C<$!> (errno).
+Note that some system calls I<can> legitimately return C<-1>.  The proper
+way to handle such calls is to assign C<$!=0> before the call, then
+check the value of C<$!> if C<syscall> returns C<-1>.
+
+There's a problem with C<syscall(&SYS_pipe)>: it returns the file
+number of the read end of the pipe it creates, but there is no way
+to retrieve the file number of the other end.  You can avoid this
+problem by using C<pipe> instead.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/syscall>.
+
+=item sysopen FILEHANDLE,FILENAME,MODE
+X<sysopen>
+
+=item sysopen FILEHANDLE,FILENAME,MODE,PERMS
+
+Opens the file whose filename is given by FILENAME, and associates it with
+FILEHANDLE.  If FILEHANDLE is an expression, its value is used as the real
+filehandle wanted; an undefined scalar will be suitably autovivified. This
+function calls the underlying operating system's I<open>(2) function with the
+parameters FILENAME, MODE, and PERMS.
+
+The possible values and flag bits of the MODE parameter are
+system-dependent; they are available via the standard module C<Fcntl>.  See
+the documentation of your operating system's I<open>(2) syscall to see
+which values and flag bits are available.  You may combine several flags
+using the C<|>-operator.
+
+Some of the most common values are C<O_RDONLY> for opening the file in
+read-only mode, C<O_WRONLY> for opening the file in write-only mode,
+and C<O_RDWR> for opening the file in read-write mode.
+X<O_RDONLY> X<O_RDWR> X<O_WRONLY>
+
+For historical reasons, some values work on almost every system
+supported by Perl: 0 means read-only, 1 means write-only, and 2
+means read/write.  We know that these values do I<not> work under
+OS/390 & VM/ESA Unix and on the Macintosh; you probably don't want to
+use them in new code.
+
+If the file named by FILENAME does not exist and the C<open> call creates
+it (typically because MODE includes the C<O_CREAT> flag), then the value of
+PERMS specifies the permissions of the newly created file.  If you omit
+the PERMS argument to C<sysopen>, Perl uses the octal value C<0666>.
+These permission values need to be in octal, and are modified by your
+process's current C<umask>.
+X<O_CREAT>
+
+In many systems the C<O_EXCL> flag is available for opening files in
+exclusive mode.  This is B<not> locking: exclusiveness means here that
+if the file already exists, sysopen() fails.  C<O_EXCL> may not work
+on network filesystems, and has no effect unless the C<O_CREAT> flag
+is set as well.  Setting C<O_CREAT|O_EXCL> prevents the file from
+being opened if it is a symbolic link.  It does not protect against
+symbolic links in the file's path.
+X<O_EXCL>
+
+Sometimes you may want to truncate an already-existing file.  This
+can be done using the C<O_TRUNC> flag.  The behavior of
+C<O_TRUNC> with C<O_RDONLY> is undefined.
+X<O_TRUNC>
+
+You should seldom if ever use C<0644> as argument to C<sysopen>, because
+that takes away the user's option to have a more permissive umask.
+Better to omit it.  See the perlfunc(1) entry on C<umask> for more
+on this.
+
+Note that C<sysopen> depends on the fdopen() C library function.
+On many Unix systems, fdopen() is known to fail when file descriptors
+exceed a certain value, typically 255. If you need more file
+descriptors than that, consider rebuilding Perl to use the C<sfio>
+library, or perhaps using the POSIX::open() function.
+
+See L<perlopentut> for a kinder, gentler explanation of opening files.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/sysopen>.
+
+=item sysread FILEHANDLE,SCALAR,LENGTH,OFFSET
+X<sysread>
+
+=item sysread FILEHANDLE,SCALAR,LENGTH
+
+Attempts to read LENGTH bytes of data into variable SCALAR from the
+specified FILEHANDLE, using the read(2).  It bypasses
+buffered IO, so mixing this with other kinds of reads, C<print>,
+C<write>, C<seek>, C<tell>, or C<eof> can cause confusion because the
+perlio or stdio layers usually buffers data.  Returns the number of
+bytes actually read, C<0> at end of file, or undef if there was an
+error (in the latter case C<$!> is also set).  SCALAR will be grown or
+shrunk so that the last byte actually read is the last byte of the
+scalar after the read.
+
+An OFFSET may be specified to place the read data at some place in the
+string other than the beginning.  A negative OFFSET specifies
+placement at that many characters counting backwards from the end of
+the string.  A positive OFFSET greater than the length of SCALAR
+results in the string being padded to the required size with C<"\0">
+bytes before the result of the read is appended.
+
+There is no syseof() function, which is ok, since eof() doesn't work
+well on device files (like ttys) anyway.  Use sysread() and check
+for a return value for 0 to decide whether you're done.
+
+Note that if the filehandle has been marked as C<:utf8> Unicode
+characters are read instead of bytes (the LENGTH, OFFSET, and the
+return value of sysread() are in Unicode characters).
+The C<:encoding(...)> layer implicitly introduces the C<:utf8> layer.
+See L</binmode>, L</open>, and the C<open> pragma, L<open>.
+
+=item sysseek FILEHANDLE,POSITION,WHENCE
+X<sysseek> X<lseek>
+
+Sets FILEHANDLE's system position in bytes using lseek(2).  FILEHANDLE may
+be an expression whose value gives the name of the filehandle.  The values
+for WHENCE are C<0> to set the new position to POSITION; C<1> to set the it
+to the current position plus POSITION; and C<2> to set it to EOF plus
+POSITION, typically negative.
+
+Note the I<in bytes>: even if the filehandle has been set to operate
+on characters (for example by using the C<:encoding(utf8)> I/O layer),
+tell() will return byte offsets, not character offsets (because
+implementing that would render sysseek() unacceptably slow).
+
+sysseek() bypasses normal buffered IO, so mixing it with reads other
+than C<sysread> (for example C<< <> >> or read()) C<print>, C<write>,
+C<seek>, C<tell>, or C<eof> may cause confusion.
+
+For WHENCE, you may also use the constants C<SEEK_SET>, C<SEEK_CUR>,
+and C<SEEK_END> (start of the file, current position, end of the file)
+from the Fcntl module.  Use of the constants is also more portable
+than relying on 0, 1, and 2.  For example to define a "systell" function:
+
+    use Fcntl 'SEEK_CUR';
+    sub systell { sysseek($_[0], 0, SEEK_CUR) }
+
+Returns the new position, or the undefined value on failure.  A position
+of zero is returned as the string C<"0 but true">; thus C<sysseek> returns
+true on success and false on failure, yet you can still easily determine
+the new position.
+
+=item system LIST
+X<system> X<shell>
+
+=item system PROGRAM LIST
+
+Does exactly the same thing as C<exec LIST>, except that a fork is
+done first and the parent process waits for the child process to
+exit.  Note that argument processing varies depending on the
+number of arguments.  If there is more than one argument in LIST,
+or if LIST is an array with more than one value, starts the program
+given by the first element of the list with arguments given by the
+rest of the list.  If there is only one scalar argument, the argument
+is checked for shell metacharacters, and if there are any, the
+entire argument is passed to the system's command shell for parsing
+(this is C</bin/sh -c> on Unix platforms, but varies on other
+platforms).  If there are no shell metacharacters in the argument,
+it is split into words and passed directly to C<execvp>, which is
+more efficient.
+
+Beginning with v5.6.0, Perl will attempt to flush all files opened for
+output before any operation that may do a fork, but this may not be
+supported on some platforms (see L<perlport>).  To be safe, you may need
+to set C<$|> ($AUTOFLUSH in English) or call the C<autoflush()> method
+of C<IO::Handle> on any open handles.
+
+The return value is the exit status of the program as returned by the
+C<wait> call.  To get the actual exit value, shift right by eight (see
+below). See also L</exec>.  This is I<not> what you want to use to capture
+the output from a command; for that you should use merely backticks or
+C<qx//>, as described in L<perlop/"`STRING`">.  Return value of -1
+indicates a failure to start the program or an error of the wait(2) system
+call (inspect $! for the reason).
+
+If you'd like to make C<system> (and many other bits of Perl) die on error,
+have a look at the L<autodie> pragma.
+
+Like C<exec>, C<system> allows you to lie to a program about its name if
+you use the C<system PROGRAM LIST> syntax.  Again, see L</exec>.
+
+Since C<SIGINT> and C<SIGQUIT> are ignored during the execution of
+C<system>, if you expect your program to terminate on receipt of these
+signals you will need to arrange to do so yourself based on the return
+value.
+
+    @args = ("command", "arg1", "arg2");
+    system(@args) == 0
+        or die "system @args failed: $?"
+
+If you'd like to manually inspect C<system>'s failure, you can check all
+possible failure modes by inspecting C<$?> like this:
+
+    if ($? == -1) {
+        print "failed to execute: $!\n";
+    }
+    elsif ($? & 127) {
+        printf "child died with signal %d, %s coredump\n",
+            ($? & 127),  ($? & 128) ? 'with' : 'without';
+    }
+    else {
+        printf "child exited with value %d\n", $? >> 8;
+    }
+
+Alternatively, you may inspect the value of C<${^CHILD_ERROR_NATIVE}>
+with the C<W*()> calls from the POSIX module.
+
+When C<system>'s arguments are executed indirectly by the shell, 
+results and return codes are subject to its quirks.
+See L<perlop/"`STRING`"> and L</exec> for details.
+
+Since C<system> does a C<fork> and C<wait> it may affect a C<SIGCHLD>
+handler. See L<perlipc> for details.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/system>.
+
+=item syswrite FILEHANDLE,SCALAR,LENGTH,OFFSET
+X<syswrite>
+
+=item syswrite FILEHANDLE,SCALAR,LENGTH
+
+=item syswrite FILEHANDLE,SCALAR
+
+Attempts to write LENGTH bytes of data from variable SCALAR to the
+specified FILEHANDLE, using write(2).  If LENGTH is
+not specified, writes whole SCALAR.  It bypasses buffered IO, so
+mixing this with reads (other than C<sysread())>, C<print>, C<write>,
+C<seek>, C<tell>, or C<eof> may cause confusion because the perlio and
+stdio layers usually buffer data.  Returns the number of bytes
+actually written, or C<undef> if there was an error (in this case the
+errno variable C<$!> is also set).  If the LENGTH is greater than the
+data available in the SCALAR after the OFFSET, only as much data as is
+available will be written.
+
+An OFFSET may be specified to write the data from some part of the
+string other than the beginning.  A negative OFFSET specifies writing
+that many characters counting backwards from the end of the string.
+If SCALAR is of length zero, you can only use an OFFSET of 0.
+
+B<WARNING>: If the filehandle is marked C<:utf8>, Unicode characters
+encoded in UTF-8 are written instead of bytes, and the LENGTH, OFFSET, and
+return value of syswrite() are in (UTF8-encoded Unicode) characters.
+The C<:encoding(...)> layer implicitly introduces the C<:utf8> layer.
+Alternately, if the handle is not marked with an encoding but you
+attempt to write characters with code points over 255, raises an exception.
+See L</binmode>, L</open>, and the C<open> pragma, L<open>.
+
+=item tell FILEHANDLE
+X<tell>
+
+=item tell
+
+Returns the current position I<in bytes> for FILEHANDLE, or -1 on
+error.  FILEHANDLE may be an expression whose value gives the name of
+the actual filehandle.  If FILEHANDLE is omitted, assumes the file
+last read.
+
+Note the I<in bytes>: even if the filehandle has been set to
+operate on characters (for example by using the C<:encoding(utf8)> open
+layer), tell() will return byte offsets, not character offsets (because
+that would render seek() and tell() rather slow).
+
+The return value of tell() for the standard streams like the STDIN
+depends on the operating system: it may return -1 or something else.
+tell() on pipes, fifos, and sockets usually returns -1.
+
+There is no C<systell> function.  Use C<sysseek(FH, 0, 1)> for that.
+
+Do not use tell() (or other buffered I/O operations) on a filehandle
+that has been manipulated by sysread(), syswrite(), or sysseek().
+Those functions ignore the buffering, while tell() does not.
+
+=item telldir DIRHANDLE
+X<telldir>
+
+Returns the current position of the C<readdir> routines on DIRHANDLE.
+Value may be given to C<seekdir> to access a particular location in a
+directory.  C<telldir> has the same caveats about possible directory
+compaction as the corresponding system library routine.
+
+=item tie VARIABLE,CLASSNAME,LIST
+X<tie>
+
+This function binds a variable to a package class that will provide the
+implementation for the variable.  VARIABLE is the name of the variable
+to be enchanted.  CLASSNAME is the name of a class implementing objects
+of correct type.  Any additional arguments are passed to the C<new>
+method of the class (meaning C<TIESCALAR>, C<TIEHANDLE>, C<TIEARRAY>,
+or C<TIEHASH>).  Typically these are arguments such as might be passed
+to the C<dbm_open()> function of C.  The object returned by the C<new>
+method is also returned by the C<tie> function, which would be useful
+if you want to access other methods in CLASSNAME.
+
+Note that functions such as C<keys> and C<values> may return huge lists
+when used on large objects, like DBM files.  You may prefer to use the
+C<each> function to iterate over such.  Example:
+
+    # print out history file offsets
+    use NDBM_File;
+    tie(%HIST, 'NDBM_File', '/usr/lib/news/history', 1, 0);
+    while (($key,$val) = each %HIST) {
+        print $key, ' = ', unpack('L',$val), "\n";
+    }
+    untie(%HIST);
+
+A class implementing a hash should have the following methods:
+
+    TIEHASH classname, LIST
+    FETCH this, key
+    STORE this, key, value
+    DELETE this, key
+    CLEAR this
+    EXISTS this, key
+    FIRSTKEY this
+    NEXTKEY this, lastkey
+    SCALAR this
+    DESTROY this
+    UNTIE this
+
+A class implementing an ordinary array should have the following methods:
+
+    TIEARRAY classname, LIST
+    FETCH this, key
+    STORE this, key, value
+    FETCHSIZE this
+    STORESIZE this, count
+    CLEAR this
+    PUSH this, LIST
+    POP this
+    SHIFT this
+    UNSHIFT this, LIST
+    SPLICE this, offset, length, LIST
+    EXTEND this, count
+    DESTROY this
+    UNTIE this
+
+A class implementing a filehandle should have the following methods:
+
+    TIEHANDLE classname, LIST
+    READ this, scalar, length, offset
+    READLINE this
+    GETC this
+    WRITE this, scalar, length, offset
+    PRINT this, LIST
+    PRINTF this, format, LIST
+    BINMODE this
+    EOF this
+    FILENO this
+    SEEK this, position, whence
+    TELL this
+    OPEN this, mode, LIST
+    CLOSE this
+    DESTROY this
+    UNTIE this
+
+A class implementing a scalar should have the following methods:
+
+    TIESCALAR classname, LIST
+    FETCH this,
+    STORE this, value
+    DESTROY this
+    UNTIE this
+
+Not all methods indicated above need be implemented.  See L<perltie>,
+L<Tie::Hash>, L<Tie::Array>, L<Tie::Scalar>, and L<Tie::Handle>.
+
+Unlike C<dbmopen>, the C<tie> function will not C<use> or C<require> a module
+for you; you need to do that explicitly yourself.  See L<DB_File>
+or the F<Config> module for interesting C<tie> implementations.
+
+For further details see L<perltie>, L<"tied VARIABLE">.
+
+=item tied VARIABLE
+X<tied>
+
+Returns a reference to the object underlying VARIABLE (the same value
+that was originally returned by the C<tie> call that bound the variable
+to a package.)  Returns the undefined value if VARIABLE isn't tied to a
+package.
+
+=item time
+X<time> X<epoch>
+
+Returns the number of non-leap seconds since whatever time the system
+considers to be the epoch, suitable for feeding to C<gmtime> and
+C<localtime>. On most systems the epoch is 00:00:00 UTC, January 1, 1970;
+a prominent exception being Mac OS Classic which uses 00:00:00, January 1,
+1904 in the current local time zone for its epoch.
+
+For measuring time in better granularity than one second, use the
+L<Time::HiRes> module from Perl 5.8 onwards (or from CPAN before then), or,
+if you have gettimeofday(2), you may be able to use the C<syscall>
+interface of Perl.  See L<perlfaq8> for details.
+
+For date and time processing look at the many related modules on CPAN.
+For a comprehensive date and time representation look at the
+L<DateTime> module.
+
+=item times
+X<times>
+
+Returns a four-element list giving the user and system times in
+seconds for this process and any exited children of this process.
+
+    ($user,$system,$cuser,$csystem) = times;
+
+In scalar context, C<times> returns C<$user>.
+
+Children's times are only included for terminated children.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/times>.
+
+=item tr///
+
+The transliteration operator.  Same as C<y///>.  See
+L<perlop/"Quote and Quote-like Operators">.
+
+=item truncate FILEHANDLE,LENGTH
+X<truncate>
+
+=item truncate EXPR,LENGTH
+
+Truncates the file opened on FILEHANDLE, or named by EXPR, to the
+specified length.  Raises an exception if truncate isn't implemented
+on your system.  Returns true if successful, C<undef> on error.
+
+The behavior is undefined if LENGTH is greater than the length of the
+file.
+
+The position in the file of FILEHANDLE is left unchanged.  You may want to
+call L<seek|/"seek FILEHANDLE,POSITION,WHENCE"> before writing to the file.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/truncate>.
+
+=item uc EXPR
+X<uc> X<uppercase> X<toupper>
+
+=item uc
+
+Returns an uppercased version of EXPR.  This is the internal function
+implementing the C<\U> escape in double-quoted strings.
+It does not attempt to do titlecase mapping on initial letters.  See
+L</ucfirst> for that.
+
+If EXPR is omitted, uses C<$_>.
+
+This function behaves the same way under various pragma, such as in a locale,
+as L</lc> does.
+
+=item ucfirst EXPR
+X<ucfirst> X<uppercase>
+
+=item ucfirst
+
+Returns the value of EXPR with the first character in uppercase
+(titlecase in Unicode).  This is the internal function implementing
+the C<\u> escape in double-quoted strings.
+
+If EXPR is omitted, uses C<$_>.
+
+This function behaves the same way under various pragma, such as in a locale,
+as L</lc> does.
+
+=item umask EXPR
+X<umask>
+
+=item umask
+
+Sets the umask for the process to EXPR and returns the previous value.
+If EXPR is omitted, merely returns the current umask.
+
+The Unix permission C<rwxr-x---> is represented as three sets of three
+bits, or three octal digits: C<0750> (the leading 0 indicates octal
+and isn't one of the digits).  The C<umask> value is such a number
+representing disabled permissions bits.  The permission (or "mode")
+values you pass C<mkdir> or C<sysopen> are modified by your umask, so
+even if you tell C<sysopen> to create a file with permissions C<0777>,
+if your umask is C<0022>, then the file will actually be created with
+permissions C<0755>.  If your C<umask> were C<0027> (group can't
+write; others can't read, write, or execute), then passing
+C<sysopen> C<0666> would create a file with mode C<0640> (because 
+C<0666 &~ 027> is C<0640>).
+
+Here's some advice: supply a creation mode of C<0666> for regular
+files (in C<sysopen>) and one of C<0777> for directories (in
+C<mkdir>) and executable files.  This gives users the freedom of
+choice: if they want protected files, they might choose process umasks
+of C<022>, C<027>, or even the particularly antisocial mask of C<077>.
+Programs should rarely if ever make policy decisions better left to
+the user.  The exception to this is when writing files that should be
+kept private: mail files, web browser cookies, I<.rhosts> files, and
+so on.
+
+If umask(2) is not implemented on your system and you are trying to
+restrict access for I<yourself> (i.e., C<< (EXPR & 0700) > 0 >>), 
+raises an exception.  If umask(2) is not implemented and you are
+not trying to restrict access for yourself, returns C<undef>.
+
+Remember that a umask is a number, usually given in octal; it is I<not> a
+string of octal digits.  See also L</oct>, if all you have is a string.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/umask>.
+
+=item undef EXPR
+X<undef> X<undefine>
+
+=item undef
+
+Undefines the value of EXPR, which must be an lvalue.  Use only on a
+scalar value, an array (using C<@>), a hash (using C<%>), a subroutine
+(using C<&>), or a typeglob (using C<*>).  Saying C<undef $hash{$key}>
+will probably not do what you expect on most predefined variables or
+DBM list values, so don't do that; see L</delete>.  Always returns the
+undefined value.  You can omit the EXPR, in which case nothing is
+undefined, but you still get an undefined value that you could, for
+instance, return from a subroutine, assign to a variable, or pass as a
+parameter.  Examples:
+
+    undef $foo;
+    undef $bar{'blurfl'};      # Compare to: delete $bar{'blurfl'};
+    undef @ary;
+    undef %hash;
+    undef &mysub;
+    undef *xyz;       # destroys $xyz, @xyz, %xyz, &xyz, etc.
+    return (wantarray ? (undef, $errmsg) : undef) if $they_blew_it;
+    select undef, undef, undef, 0.25;
+    ($a, $b, undef, $c) = &foo;       # Ignore third value returned
+
+Note that this is a unary operator, not a list operator.
+
+=item unlink LIST
+X<unlink> X<delete> X<remove> X<rm> X<del>
+
+=item unlink
+
+Deletes a list of files. On success, it returns the number of files
+it successfully deleted. On failure, it returns false and sets C<$!>
+(errno):
+
+    my $unlinked = unlink 'a', 'b', 'c';
+    unlink @goners;
+    unlink glob "*.bak";
+
+On error, C<unlink> will not tell you which files it could not remove.
+If you want to know which files you could not remove, try them one
+at a time:
+
+     foreach my $file ( @goners ) {
+         unlink $file or warn "Could not unlink $file: $!";
+     }
+
+Note: C<unlink> will not attempt to delete directories unless you are
+superuser and the B<-U> flag is supplied to Perl. Even if these
+conditions are met, be warned that unlinking a directory can inflict
+damage on your filesystem.  Finally, using C<unlink> on directories is
+not supported on many operating systems.  Use C<rmdir> instead.
+
+If LIST is omitted, C<unlink> uses C<$_>.
+
+=item unpack TEMPLATE,EXPR
+X<unpack>
+
+=item unpack TEMPLATE
+
+C<unpack> does the reverse of C<pack>: it takes a string
+and expands it out into a list of values.
+(In scalar context, it returns merely the first value produced.)
+
+If EXPR is omitted, unpacks the C<$_> string.
+See L<perlpacktut> for an introduction to this function.
+
+The string is broken into chunks described by the TEMPLATE.  Each chunk
+is converted separately to a value.  Typically, either the string is a result
+of C<pack>, or the characters of the string represent a C structure of some
+kind.
+
+The TEMPLATE has the same format as in the C<pack> function.
+Here's a subroutine that does substring:
+
+    sub substr {
+        my($what,$where,$howmuch) = @_;
+        unpack("x$where a$howmuch", $what);
+    }
+
+and then there's
+
+    sub ordinal { unpack("W",$_[0]); } # same as ord()
+
+In addition to fields allowed in pack(), you may prefix a field with
+a %<number> to indicate that
+you want a <number>-bit checksum of the items instead of the items
+themselves.  Default is a 16-bit checksum.  Checksum is calculated by
+summing numeric values of expanded values (for string fields the sum of
+C<ord($char)> is taken; for bit fields the sum of zeroes and ones).
+
+For example, the following
+computes the same number as the System V sum program:
+
+    $checksum = do {
+        local $/;  # slurp!
+        unpack("%32W*",<>) % 65535;
+    };
+
+The following efficiently counts the number of set bits in a bit vector:
+
+    $setbits = unpack("%32b*", $selectmask);
+
+The C<p> and C<P> formats should be used with care.  Since Perl
+has no way of checking whether the value passed to C<unpack()>
+corresponds to a valid memory location, passing a pointer value that's
+not known to be valid is likely to have disastrous consequences.
+
+If there are more pack codes or if the repeat count of a field or a group
+is larger than what the remainder of the input string allows, the result
+is not well defined: the repeat count may be decreased, or
+C<unpack()> may produce empty strings or zeros, or it may raise an exception.
+If the input string is longer than one described by the TEMPLATE,
+the remainder of that input string is ignored.
+
+See L</pack> for more examples and notes.
+
+=item untie VARIABLE
+X<untie>
+
+Breaks the binding between a variable and a package.
+(See L<tie|/tie VARIABLE,CLASSNAME,LIST>.)
+Has no effect if the variable is not tied.
+
+=item unshift ARRAY,LIST
+X<unshift>
+
+=item unshift EXPR,LIST
+
+Does the opposite of a C<shift>.  Or the opposite of a C<push>,
+depending on how you look at it.  Prepends list to the front of the
+array and returns the new number of elements in the array.
+
+    unshift(@ARGV, '-e') unless $ARGV[0] =~ /^-/;
+
+Note the LIST is prepended whole, not one element at a time, so the
+prepended elements stay in the same order.  Use C<reverse> to do the
+reverse.
+
+Starting with Perl 5.14, C<unshift> can take a scalar EXPR, which must hold
+a reference to an unblessed array.  The argument will be dereferenced
+automatically.  This aspect of C<unshift> is considered highly
+experimental.  The exact behaviour may change in a future version of Perl.
+
+=item use Module VERSION LIST
+X<use> X<module> X<import>
+
+=item use Module VERSION
+
+=item use Module LIST
+
+=item use Module
+
+=item use VERSION
+
+Imports some semantics into the current package from the named module,
+generally by aliasing certain subroutine or variable names into your
+package.  It is exactly equivalent to
+
+    BEGIN { require Module; Module->import( LIST ); }
+
+except that Module I<must> be a bareword.
+The importation can be made conditional; see L<if>.
+
+In the peculiar C<use VERSION> form, VERSION may be either a positive
+decimal fraction such as 5.006, which will be compared to C<$]>, or a v-string
+of the form v5.6.1, which will be compared to C<$^V> (aka $PERL_VERSION).  An
+exception is raised if VERSION is greater than the version of the
+current Perl interpreter; Perl will not attempt to parse the rest of the
+file.  Compare with L</require>, which can do a similar check at run time.
+Symmetrically, C<no VERSION> allows you to specify that you want a version
+of Perl older than the specified one.
+
+Specifying VERSION as a literal of the form v5.6.1 should generally be
+avoided, because it leads to misleading error messages under earlier
+versions of Perl (that is, prior to 5.6.0) that do not support this
+syntax.  The equivalent numeric version should be used instead.
+
+    use v5.6.1;     # compile time version check
+    use 5.6.1;      # ditto
+    use 5.006_001;  # ditto; preferred for backwards compatibility
+
+This is often useful if you need to check the current Perl version before
+C<use>ing library modules that won't work with older versions of Perl.
+(We try not to do this more than we have to.)
+
+Also, if the specified Perl version is greater than or equal to 5.9.5,
+C<use VERSION> will also load the C<feature> pragma and enable all
+features available in the requested version.  See L<feature>.
+Similarly, if the specified Perl version is greater than or equal to
+5.11.0, strictures are enabled lexically as with C<use strict> (except
+that the F<strict.pm> file is not actually loaded).
+
+The C<BEGIN> forces the C<require> and C<import> to happen at compile time.  The
+C<require> makes sure the module is loaded into memory if it hasn't been
+yet.  The C<import> is not a builtin; it's just an ordinary static method
+call into the C<Module> package to tell the module to import the list of
+features back into the current package.  The module can implement its
+C<import> method any way it likes, though most modules just choose to
+derive their C<import> method via inheritance from the C<Exporter> class that
+is defined in the C<Exporter> module.  See L<Exporter>.  If no C<import>
+method can be found then the call is skipped, even if there is an AUTOLOAD
+method.
+
+If you do not want to call the package's C<import> method (for instance,
+to stop your namespace from being altered), explicitly supply the empty list:
+
+    use Module ();
+
+That is exactly equivalent to
+
+    BEGIN { require Module }
+
+If the VERSION argument is present between Module and LIST, then the
+C<use> will call the VERSION method in class Module with the given
+version as an argument.  The default VERSION method, inherited from
+the UNIVERSAL class, croaks if the given version is larger than the
+value of the variable C<$Module::VERSION>.
+
+Again, there is a distinction between omitting LIST (C<import> called
+with no arguments) and an explicit empty LIST C<()> (C<import> not
+called).  Note that there is no comma after VERSION!
+
+Because this is a wide-open interface, pragmas (compiler directives)
+are also implemented this way.  Currently implemented pragmas are:
+
+    use constant;
+    use diagnostics;
+    use integer;
+    use sigtrap  qw(SEGV BUS);
+    use strict   qw(subs vars refs);
+    use subs     qw(afunc blurfl);
+    use warnings qw(all);
+    use sort     qw(stable _quicksort _mergesort);
+
+Some of these pseudo-modules import semantics into the current
+block scope (like C<strict> or C<integer>, unlike ordinary modules,
+which import symbols into the current package (which are effective
+through the end of the file).
+
+Because C<use> takes effect at compile time, it doesn't respect the
+ordinary flow control of the code being compiled.  In particular, putting
+a C<use> inside the false branch of a conditional doesn't prevent it
+from being processed.  If a module or pragma only needs to be loaded 
+conditionally, this can be done using the L<if> pragma:
+
+    use if $] < 5.008, "utf8";
+    use if WANT_WARNINGS, warnings => qw(all);
+
+There's a corresponding C<no> declaration that unimports meanings imported
+by C<use>, i.e., it calls C<unimport Module LIST> instead of C<import>.
+It behaves just as C<import> does with VERSION, an omitted or empty LIST, 
+or no unimport method being found.
+
+    no integer;
+    no strict 'refs';
+    no warnings;
+
+Care should be taken when using the C<no VERSION> form of C<no>.  It is
+I<only> meant to be used to assert that the running Perl is of a earlier
+version than its argument and I<not> to undo the feature-enabling side effects
+of C<use VERSION>.
+
+See L<perlmodlib> for a list of standard modules and pragmas.  See L<perlrun>
+for the C<-M> and C<-m> command-line options to Perl that give C<use>
+functionality from the command-line.
+
+=item utime LIST
+X<utime>
+
+Changes the access and modification times on each file of a list of
+files.  The first two elements of the list must be the NUMERIC access
+and modification times, in that order.  Returns the number of files
+successfully changed.  The inode change time of each file is set
+to the current time.  For example, this code has the same effect as the
+Unix touch(1) command when the files I<already exist> and belong to
+the user running the program:
+
+    #!/usr/bin/perl
+    $atime = $mtime = time;
+    utime $atime, $mtime, @ARGV;
+
+Since Perl 5.7.2, if the first two elements of the list are C<undef>, 
+the utime(2) syscall from your C library is called with a null second
+argument. On most systems, this will set the file's access and
+modification times to the current time (i.e., equivalent to the example
+above) and will work even on files you don't own provided you have write
+permission:
+
+    for $file (@ARGV) {
+       utime(undef, undef, $file) 
+           || warn "couldn't touch $file: $!";
+    } 
+
+Under NFS this will use the time of the NFS server, not the time of
+the local machine.  If there is a time synchronization problem, the
+NFS server and local machine will have different times.  The Unix
+touch(1) command will in fact normally use this form instead of the
+one shown in the first example.
+
+Passing only one of the first two elements as C<undef> is
+equivalent to passing a 0 and will not have the effect 
+described when both are C<undef>.  This also triggers an
+uninitialized warning.
+
+On systems that support futimes(2), you may pass filehandles among the
+files.  On systems that don't support futimes(2), passing filehandles raises
+an exception.  Filehandles must be passed as globs or glob references to be
+recognized; barewords are considered filenames.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/utime>.
+
+=item values HASH
+X<values>
+
+=item values ARRAY
+
+=item values EXPR
+
+Returns a list consisting of all the values of the named hash, or the values
+of an array. (In scalar context, returns the number of values.)
+
+The values are returned in an apparently random order.  The actual
+random order is subject to change in future versions of Perl, but it
+is guaranteed to be the same order as either the C<keys> or C<each>
+function would produce on the same (unmodified) hash.  Since Perl
+5.8.1 the ordering is different even between different runs of Perl
+for security reasons (see L<perlsec/"Algorithmic Complexity Attacks">).
+
+As a side effect, calling values() resets the HASH or ARRAY's internal
+iterator;
+see L</each>. (In particular, calling values() in void context resets
+the iterator with no other overhead. Apart from resetting the iterator,
+C<values @array> in list context is the same as plain C<@array>.
+We recommend that you use void context C<keys @array> for this, but reasoned
+that it taking C<values @array> out would require more documentation than
+leaving it in.)
+
+Note that the values are not copied, which means modifying them will
+modify the contents of the hash:
+
+    for (values %hash)      { s/foo/bar/g }   # modifies %hash values
+    for (@hash{keys %hash}) { s/foo/bar/g }   # same
+
+Starting with Perl 5.14, C<values> can take a scalar EXPR, which must hold
+a reference to an unblessed hash or array.  The argument will be
+dereferenced automatically.  This aspect of C<values> is considered highly
+experimental.  The exact behaviour may change in a future version of Perl.
+
+    for (values $hashref) { ... }
+    for (values $obj->get_arrayref) { ... }
+
+See also C<keys>, C<each>, and C<sort>.
+
+=item vec EXPR,OFFSET,BITS
+X<vec> X<bit> X<bit vector>
+
+Treats the string in EXPR as a bit vector made up of elements of
+width BITS and returns the value of the element specified by OFFSET
+as an unsigned integer.  BITS therefore specifies the number of bits
+that are reserved for each element in the bit vector.  This must
+be a power of two from 1 to 32 (or 64, if your platform supports
+that).
+
+If BITS is 8, "elements" coincide with bytes of the input string.
+
+If BITS is 16 or more, bytes of the input string are grouped into chunks
+of size BITS/8, and each group is converted to a number as with
+pack()/unpack() with big-endian formats C<n>/C<N> (and analogously
+for BITS==64).  See L<"pack"> for details.
+
+If bits is 4 or less, the string is broken into bytes, then the bits
+of each byte are broken into 8/BITS groups.  Bits of a byte are
+numbered in a little-endian-ish way, as in C<0x01>, C<0x02>,
+C<0x04>, C<0x08>, C<0x10>, C<0x20>, C<0x40>, C<0x80>.  For example,
+breaking the single input byte C<chr(0x36)> into two groups gives a list
+C<(0x6, 0x3)>; breaking it into 4 groups gives C<(0x2, 0x1, 0x3, 0x0)>.
+
+C<vec> may also be assigned to, in which case parentheses are needed
+to give the expression the correct precedence as in
+
+    vec($image, $max_x * $x + $y, 8) = 3;
+
+If the selected element is outside the string, the value 0 is returned.
+If an element off the end of the string is written to, Perl will first
+extend the string with sufficiently many zero bytes.   It is an error
+to try to write off the beginning of the string (i.e., negative OFFSET).
+
+If the string happens to be encoded as UTF-8 internally (and thus has
+the UTF8 flag set), this is ignored by C<vec>, and it operates on the
+internal byte string, not the conceptual character string, even if you
+only have characters with values less than 256. 
+
+Strings created with C<vec> can also be manipulated with the logical
+operators C<|>, C<&>, C<^>, and C<~>.  These operators will assume a bit
+vector operation is desired when both operands are strings.
+See L<perlop/"Bitwise String Operators">.
+
+The following code will build up an ASCII string saying C<'PerlPerlPerl'>.
+The comments show the string after each step.  Note that this code works
+in the same way on big-endian or little-endian machines.
+
+    my $foo = '';
+    vec($foo,  0, 32) = 0x5065726C; # 'Perl'
+
+    # $foo eq "Perl" eq "\x50\x65\x72\x6C", 32 bits
+    print vec($foo, 0, 8);  # prints 80 == 0x50 == ord('P')
+
+    vec($foo,  2, 16) = 0x5065; # 'PerlPe'
+    vec($foo,  3, 16) = 0x726C; # 'PerlPerl'
+    vec($foo,  8,  8) = 0x50;   # 'PerlPerlP'
+    vec($foo,  9,  8) = 0x65;   # 'PerlPerlPe'
+    vec($foo, 20,  4) = 2;      # 'PerlPerlPe'   . "\x02"
+    vec($foo, 21,  4) = 7;      # 'PerlPerlPer'
+                                   # 'r' is "\x72"
+    vec($foo, 45,  2) = 3;      # 'PerlPerlPer'  . "\x0c"
+    vec($foo, 93,  1) = 1;      # 'PerlPerlPer'  . "\x2c"
+    vec($foo, 94,  1) = 1;      # 'PerlPerlPerl'
+                                   # 'l' is "\x6c"
+
+To transform a bit vector into a string or list of 0's and 1's, use these:
+
+    $bits = unpack("b*", $vector);
+    @bits = split(//, unpack("b*", $vector));
+
+If you know the exact length in bits, it can be used in place of the C<*>.
+
+Here is an example to illustrate how the bits actually fall in place:
+
+    #!/usr/bin/perl -wl
+
+    print <<'EOT';
+                                      0         1         2         3
+                       unpack("V",$_) 01234567890123456789012345678901
+    ------------------------------------------------------------------
+    EOT
+
+    for $w (0..3) {
+        $width = 2**$w;
+        for ($shift=0; $shift < $width; ++$shift) {
+            for ($off=0; $off < 32/$width; ++$off) {
+                $str = pack("B*", "0"x32);
+                $bits = (1<<$shift);
+                vec($str, $off, $width) = $bits;
+                $res = unpack("b*",$str);
+                $val = unpack("V", $str);
+                write;
+            }
+        }
+    }
+
+    format STDOUT =
+    vec($_,@#,@#) = @<< == @######### @>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
+    $off, $width, $bits, $val, $res
+    .
+    __END__
+
+Regardless of the machine architecture on which it runs, the 
+example above should print the following table:
+
+                                      0         1         2         3
+                       unpack("V",$_) 01234567890123456789012345678901
+    ------------------------------------------------------------------
+    vec($_, 0, 1) = 1   ==          1 10000000000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 1, 1) = 1   ==          2 01000000000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 2, 1) = 1   ==          4 00100000000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 3, 1) = 1   ==          8 00010000000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 4, 1) = 1   ==         16 00001000000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 5, 1) = 1   ==         32 00000100000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 6, 1) = 1   ==         64 00000010000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 7, 1) = 1   ==        128 00000001000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 8, 1) = 1   ==        256 00000000100000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 9, 1) = 1   ==        512 00000000010000000000000000000000
+    vec($_,10, 1) = 1   ==       1024 00000000001000000000000000000000
+    vec($_,11, 1) = 1   ==       2048 00000000000100000000000000000000
+    vec($_,12, 1) = 1   ==       4096 00000000000010000000000000000000
+    vec($_,13, 1) = 1   ==       8192 00000000000001000000000000000000
+    vec($_,14, 1) = 1   ==      16384 00000000000000100000000000000000
+    vec($_,15, 1) = 1   ==      32768 00000000000000010000000000000000
+    vec($_,16, 1) = 1   ==      65536 00000000000000001000000000000000
+    vec($_,17, 1) = 1   ==     131072 00000000000000000100000000000000
+    vec($_,18, 1) = 1   ==     262144 00000000000000000010000000000000
+    vec($_,19, 1) = 1   ==     524288 00000000000000000001000000000000
+    vec($_,20, 1) = 1   ==    1048576 00000000000000000000100000000000
+    vec($_,21, 1) = 1   ==    2097152 00000000000000000000010000000000
+    vec($_,22, 1) = 1   ==    4194304 00000000000000000000001000000000
+    vec($_,23, 1) = 1   ==    8388608 00000000000000000000000100000000
+    vec($_,24, 1) = 1   ==   16777216 00000000000000000000000010000000
+    vec($_,25, 1) = 1   ==   33554432 00000000000000000000000001000000
+    vec($_,26, 1) = 1   ==   67108864 00000000000000000000000000100000
+    vec($_,27, 1) = 1   ==  134217728 00000000000000000000000000010000
+    vec($_,28, 1) = 1   ==  268435456 00000000000000000000000000001000
+    vec($_,29, 1) = 1   ==  536870912 00000000000000000000000000000100
+    vec($_,30, 1) = 1   == 1073741824 00000000000000000000000000000010
+    vec($_,31, 1) = 1   == 2147483648 00000000000000000000000000000001
+    vec($_, 0, 2) = 1   ==          1 10000000000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 1, 2) = 1   ==          4 00100000000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 2, 2) = 1   ==         16 00001000000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 3, 2) = 1   ==         64 00000010000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 4, 2) = 1   ==        256 00000000100000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 5, 2) = 1   ==       1024 00000000001000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 6, 2) = 1   ==       4096 00000000000010000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 7, 2) = 1   ==      16384 00000000000000100000000000000000
+    vec($_, 8, 2) = 1   ==      65536 00000000000000001000000000000000
+    vec($_, 9, 2) = 1   ==     262144 00000000000000000010000000000000
+    vec($_,10, 2) = 1   ==    1048576 00000000000000000000100000000000
+    vec($_,11, 2) = 1   ==    4194304 00000000000000000000001000000000
+    vec($_,12, 2) = 1   ==   16777216 00000000000000000000000010000000
+    vec($_,13, 2) = 1   ==   67108864 00000000000000000000000000100000
+    vec($_,14, 2) = 1   ==  268435456 00000000000000000000000000001000
+    vec($_,15, 2) = 1   == 1073741824 00000000000000000000000000000010
+    vec($_, 0, 2) = 2   ==          2 01000000000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 1, 2) = 2   ==          8 00010000000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 2, 2) = 2   ==         32 00000100000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 3, 2) = 2   ==        128 00000001000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 4, 2) = 2   ==        512 00000000010000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 5, 2) = 2   ==       2048 00000000000100000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 6, 2) = 2   ==       8192 00000000000001000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 7, 2) = 2   ==      32768 00000000000000010000000000000000
+    vec($_, 8, 2) = 2   ==     131072 00000000000000000100000000000000
+    vec($_, 9, 2) = 2   ==     524288 00000000000000000001000000000000
+    vec($_,10, 2) = 2   ==    2097152 00000000000000000000010000000000
+    vec($_,11, 2) = 2   ==    8388608 00000000000000000000000100000000
+    vec($_,12, 2) = 2   ==   33554432 00000000000000000000000001000000
+    vec($_,13, 2) = 2   ==  134217728 00000000000000000000000000010000
+    vec($_,14, 2) = 2   ==  536870912 00000000000000000000000000000100
+    vec($_,15, 2) = 2   == 2147483648 00000000000000000000000000000001
+    vec($_, 0, 4) = 1   ==          1 10000000000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 1, 4) = 1   ==         16 00001000000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 2, 4) = 1   ==        256 00000000100000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 3, 4) = 1   ==       4096 00000000000010000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 4, 4) = 1   ==      65536 00000000000000001000000000000000
+    vec($_, 5, 4) = 1   ==    1048576 00000000000000000000100000000000
+    vec($_, 6, 4) = 1   ==   16777216 00000000000000000000000010000000
+    vec($_, 7, 4) = 1   ==  268435456 00000000000000000000000000001000
+    vec($_, 0, 4) = 2   ==          2 01000000000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 1, 4) = 2   ==         32 00000100000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 2, 4) = 2   ==        512 00000000010000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 3, 4) = 2   ==       8192 00000000000001000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 4, 4) = 2   ==     131072 00000000000000000100000000000000
+    vec($_, 5, 4) = 2   ==    2097152 00000000000000000000010000000000
+    vec($_, 6, 4) = 2   ==   33554432 00000000000000000000000001000000
+    vec($_, 7, 4) = 2   ==  536870912 00000000000000000000000000000100
+    vec($_, 0, 4) = 4   ==          4 00100000000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 1, 4) = 4   ==         64 00000010000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 2, 4) = 4   ==       1024 00000000001000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 3, 4) = 4   ==      16384 00000000000000100000000000000000
+    vec($_, 4, 4) = 4   ==     262144 00000000000000000010000000000000
+    vec($_, 5, 4) = 4   ==    4194304 00000000000000000000001000000000
+    vec($_, 6, 4) = 4   ==   67108864 00000000000000000000000000100000
+    vec($_, 7, 4) = 4   == 1073741824 00000000000000000000000000000010
+    vec($_, 0, 4) = 8   ==          8 00010000000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 1, 4) = 8   ==        128 00000001000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 2, 4) = 8   ==       2048 00000000000100000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 3, 4) = 8   ==      32768 00000000000000010000000000000000
+    vec($_, 4, 4) = 8   ==     524288 00000000000000000001000000000000
+    vec($_, 5, 4) = 8   ==    8388608 00000000000000000000000100000000
+    vec($_, 6, 4) = 8   ==  134217728 00000000000000000000000000010000
+    vec($_, 7, 4) = 8   == 2147483648 00000000000000000000000000000001
+    vec($_, 0, 8) = 1   ==          1 10000000000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 1, 8) = 1   ==        256 00000000100000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 2, 8) = 1   ==      65536 00000000000000001000000000000000
+    vec($_, 3, 8) = 1   ==   16777216 00000000000000000000000010000000
+    vec($_, 0, 8) = 2   ==          2 01000000000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 1, 8) = 2   ==        512 00000000010000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 2, 8) = 2   ==     131072 00000000000000000100000000000000
+    vec($_, 3, 8) = 2   ==   33554432 00000000000000000000000001000000
+    vec($_, 0, 8) = 4   ==          4 00100000000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 1, 8) = 4   ==       1024 00000000001000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 2, 8) = 4   ==     262144 00000000000000000010000000000000
+    vec($_, 3, 8) = 4   ==   67108864 00000000000000000000000000100000
+    vec($_, 0, 8) = 8   ==          8 00010000000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 1, 8) = 8   ==       2048 00000000000100000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 2, 8) = 8   ==     524288 00000000000000000001000000000000
+    vec($_, 3, 8) = 8   ==  134217728 00000000000000000000000000010000
+    vec($_, 0, 8) = 16  ==         16 00001000000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 1, 8) = 16  ==       4096 00000000000010000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 2, 8) = 16  ==    1048576 00000000000000000000100000000000
+    vec($_, 3, 8) = 16  ==  268435456 00000000000000000000000000001000
+    vec($_, 0, 8) = 32  ==         32 00000100000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 1, 8) = 32  ==       8192 00000000000001000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 2, 8) = 32  ==    2097152 00000000000000000000010000000000
+    vec($_, 3, 8) = 32  ==  536870912 00000000000000000000000000000100
+    vec($_, 0, 8) = 64  ==         64 00000010000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 1, 8) = 64  ==      16384 00000000000000100000000000000000
+    vec($_, 2, 8) = 64  ==    4194304 00000000000000000000001000000000
+    vec($_, 3, 8) = 64  == 1073741824 00000000000000000000000000000010
+    vec($_, 0, 8) = 128 ==        128 00000001000000000000000000000000
+    vec($_, 1, 8) = 128 ==      32768 00000000000000010000000000000000
+    vec($_, 2, 8) = 128 ==    8388608 00000000000000000000000100000000
+    vec($_, 3, 8) = 128 == 2147483648 00000000000000000000000000000001
+
+=item wait
+X<wait>
+
+Behaves like wait(2) on your system: it waits for a child
+process to terminate and returns the pid of the deceased process, or
+C<-1> if there are no child processes.  The status is returned in C<$?>
+and C<${^CHILD_ERROR_NATIVE}>.
+Note that a return value of C<-1> could mean that child processes are
+being automatically reaped, as described in L<perlipc>.
+
+If you use wait in your handler for $SIG{CHLD} it may accidentally for the
+child created by qx() or system(). See L<perlipc> for details.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/wait>.
+
+=item waitpid PID,FLAGS
+X<waitpid>
+
+Waits for a particular child process to terminate and returns the pid of
+the deceased process, or C<-1> if there is no such child process.  On some
+systems, a value of 0 indicates that there are processes still running.
+The status is returned in C<$?> and C<${^CHILD_ERROR_NATIVE}>.  If you say
+
+    use POSIX ":sys_wait_h";
+    #...
+    do {
+        $kid = waitpid(-1, WNOHANG);
+    } while $kid > 0;
+
+then you can do a non-blocking wait for all pending zombie processes.
+Non-blocking wait is available on machines supporting either the
+waitpid(2) or wait4(2) syscalls.  However, waiting for a particular
+pid with FLAGS of C<0> is implemented everywhere.  (Perl emulates the
+system call by remembering the status values of processes that have
+exited but have not been harvested by the Perl script yet.)
+
+Note that on some systems, a return value of C<-1> could mean that child
+processes are being automatically reaped.  See L<perlipc> for details,
+and for other examples.
+
+Portability issues: L<perlport/waitpid>.
+
+=item wantarray
+X<wantarray> X<context>
+
+Returns true if the context of the currently executing subroutine or
+C<eval> is looking for a list value.  Returns false if the context is
+looking for a scalar.  Returns the undefined value if the context is
+looking for no value (void context).
+
+    return unless defined wantarray; # don't bother doing more
+    my @a = complex_calculation();
+    return wantarray ? @a : "@a";
+
+C<wantarray()>'s result is unspecified in the top level of a file,
+in a C<BEGIN>, C<UNITCHECK>, C<CHECK>, C<INIT> or C<END> block, or
+in a C<DESTROY> method.
+
+This function should have been named wantlist() instead.
+
+=item warn LIST
+X<warn> X<warning> X<STDERR>
+
+Prints the value of LIST to STDERR.  If the last element of LIST does
+not end in a newline, it appends the same file/line number text as C<die>
+does.
+
+If the output is empty and C<$@> already contains a value (typically from a
+previous eval) that value is used after appending C<"\t...caught">
+to C<$@>.  This is useful for staying almost, but not entirely similar to
+C<die>.
+
+If C<$@> is empty then the string C<"Warning: Something's wrong"> is used.
+
+No message is printed if there is a C<$SIG{__WARN__}> handler
+installed.  It is the handler's responsibility to deal with the message
+as it sees fit (like, for instance, converting it into a C<die>).  Most
+handlers must therefore arrange to actually display the
+warnings that they are not prepared to deal with, by calling C<warn>
+again in the handler.  Note that this is quite safe and will not
+produce an endless loop, since C<__WARN__> hooks are not called from
+inside one.
+
+You will find this behavior is slightly different from that of
+C<$SIG{__DIE__}> handlers (which don't suppress the error text, but can
+instead call C<die> again to change it).
+
+Using a C<__WARN__> handler provides a powerful way to silence all
+warnings (even the so-called mandatory ones).  An example:
+
+    # wipe out *all* compile-time warnings
+    BEGIN { $SIG{'__WARN__'} = sub { warn $_[0] if $DOWARN } }
+    my $foo = 10;
+    my $foo = 20;          # no warning about duplicate my $foo,
+                           # but hey, you asked for it!
+    # no compile-time or run-time warnings before here
+    $DOWARN = 1;
+
+    # run-time warnings enabled after here
+    warn "\$foo is alive and $foo!";     # does show up
+
+See L<perlvar> for details on setting C<%SIG> entries and for more
+examples.  See the Carp module for other kinds of warnings using its
+carp() and cluck() functions.
+
+=item when EXPR BLOCK
+X<when>
+
+=item when BLOCK
+
+C<when> is analogous to the C<case> keyword in other languages. Used with a
+C<foreach> loop or the experimental C<given> block, C<when> can be used in
+Perl to implement C<switch>/C<case> like statements.  Available as a
+statement after Perl 5.10 and as a statement modifier after 5.14.  
+Here are three examples:
+
+    use v5.10;
+    foreach (@fruits) {
+        when (/apples?/) {
+            say "I like apples."
+        }
+        when (/oranges?/) {
+            say "I don't like oranges."
+        }
+        default {
+            say "I don't like anything"
+        }
+    }
+
+    # require 5.14 for when as statement modifier
+    use v5.14;
+    foreach (@fruits) {
+       say "I like apples."        when /apples?/; 
+       say "I don't like oranges." when /oranges?;
+        default { say "I don't like anything" }
+    }
+
+    use v5.10;
+    given ($fruit) {
+        when (/apples?/) {
+            say "I like apples."
+        }
+        when (/oranges?/) {
+            say "I don't like oranges."
+        }
+        default {
+            say "I don't like anything"
+        }
+    }
+
+See L<perlsyn/"Switch statements"> for detailed information.
+
+=item write FILEHANDLE
+X<write>
+
+=item write EXPR
+
+=item write
+
+Writes a formatted record (possibly multi-line) to the specified FILEHANDLE,
+using the format associated with that file.  By default the format for
+a file is the one having the same name as the filehandle, but the
+format for the current output channel (see the C<select> function) may be set
+explicitly by assigning the name of the format to the C<$~> variable.
+
+Top of form processing is handled automatically:  if there is insufficient
+room on the current page for the formatted record, the page is advanced by
+writing a form feed, a special top-of-page format is used to format the new
+page header before the record is written.  By default, the top-of-page
+format is the name of the filehandle with "_TOP" appended. This would be a
+problem with autovivified filehandles, but it may be dynamically set to the
+format of your choice by assigning the name to the C<$^> variable while
+that filehandle is selected.  The number of lines remaining on the current
+page is in variable C<$->, which can be set to C<0> to force a new page.
+
+If FILEHANDLE is unspecified, output goes to the current default output
+channel, which starts out as STDOUT but may be changed by the
+C<select> operator.  If the FILEHANDLE is an EXPR, then the expression
+is evaluated and the resulting string is used to look up the name of
+the FILEHANDLE at run time.  For more on formats, see L<perlform>.
+
+Note that write is I<not> the opposite of C<read>.  Unfortunately.
+
+=item y///
+
+The transliteration operator.  Same as C<tr///>.  See
+L<perlop/"Quote and Quote-like Operators">.
+
+=back
+
+=cut
diff --git a/dist/Pod-Perldoc/corpus/utf8.pod b/dist/Pod-Perldoc/corpus/utf8.pod
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..0c12b7e
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,13 @@
+=encoding utf8
+
+=head1 NAME
+
+Büster is my cat
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+Ingy döt Net is a Perl programmer
+
+The Roman number for 5 is Ⅴ
+
+=cut
index 90aaff2..3de1cd6 100644 (file)
@@ -1,18 +1,19 @@
+use 5.006;  # we use some open(X, "<", $y) syntax
 
-require 5;
-use 5.006;  # we use some open(X, "<", $y) syntax 
 package Pod::Perldoc;
 use strict;
 use warnings;
 use Config '%Config';
 
 use Fcntl;    # for sysopen
+use File::Basename qw(basename);
 use File::Spec::Functions qw(catfile catdir splitdir);
 
 use vars qw($VERSION @Pagers $Bindir $Pod2man
   $Temp_Files_Created $Temp_File_Lifetime
 );
-$VERSION = '3.15_08';
+$VERSION = '3.15_15';
+
 #..........................................................................
 
 BEGIN {  # Make a DEBUG constant very first thing...
@@ -27,6 +28,20 @@ BEGIN {  # Make a DEBUG constant very first thing...
 }
 
 use Pod::Perldoc::GetOptsOO; # uses the DEBUG.
+use Carp qw(croak carp);
+
+# these are also in BaseTo, which I don't want to inherit
+sub warn {
+  my( $self, @messages ) = @_;
+
+  carp( join "\n", @messages, '' );
+  }
+
+sub die {
+  my( $self, @messages ) = @_;
+
+  croak( join "\n", @messages, '' );
+  }
 
 #..........................................................................
 
@@ -35,13 +50,13 @@ sub FALSE () {return}
 sub BE_LENIENT () {1}
 
 BEGIN {
- *IS_VMS     = $^O eq 'VMS'     ? \&TRUE : \&FALSE unless defined &IS_VMS;
- *IS_MSWin32 = $^O eq 'MSWin32' ? \&TRUE : \&FALSE unless defined &IS_MSWin32;
- *IS_Dos     = $^O eq 'dos'     ? \&TRUE : \&FALSE unless defined &IS_Dos;
- *IS_OS2     = $^O eq 'os2'     ? \&TRUE : \&FALSE unless defined &IS_OS2;
- *IS_Cygwin  = $^O eq 'cygwin'  ? \&TRUE : \&FALSE unless defined &IS_Cygwin;
- *IS_Linux   = $^O eq 'linux'   ? \&TRUE : \&FALSE unless defined &IS_Linux;
- *IS_HPUX    = $^O =~ m/hpux/   ? \&TRUE : \&FALSE unless defined &IS_HPUX;
+ *is_vms     = $^O eq 'VMS'     ? \&TRUE : \&FALSE unless defined &is_vms;
+ *is_mswin32 = $^O eq 'MSWin32' ? \&TRUE : \&FALSE unless defined &is_mswin32;
+ *is_dos     = $^O eq 'dos'     ? \&TRUE : \&FALSE unless defined &is_dos;
+ *is_os2     = $^O eq 'os2'     ? \&TRUE : \&FALSE unless defined &is_os2;
+ *is_cygwin  = $^O eq 'cygwin'  ? \&TRUE : \&FALSE unless defined &is_cygwin;
+ *is_linux   = $^O eq 'linux'   ? \&TRUE : \&FALSE unless defined &is_linux;
+ *is_hpux    = $^O =~ m/hpux/   ? \&TRUE : \&FALSE unless defined &is_hpux;
 }
 
 $Temp_File_Lifetime ||= 60 * 60 * 24 * 5;
@@ -52,7 +67,7 @@ $Temp_File_Lifetime ||= 60 * 60 * 24 * 5;
 
 #..........................................................................
 { my $pager = $Config{'pager'};
-  push @Pagers, $pager if -x (split /\s+/, $pager)[0] or IS_VMS;
+  push @Pagers, $pager if -x (split /\s+/, $pager)[0] or __PACKAGE__->is_vms;
 }
 $Bindir  = $Config{'scriptdirexp'};
 $Pod2man = "pod2man" . ( $Config{'versiononly'} ? $Config{'version'} : '' );
@@ -83,7 +98,7 @@ sub opt_w_with { # Specify an option for the formatter subclass
     $option =~ tr/\-/_/s;  # tolerate "foo-bar" for "foo_bar"
     $self->add_formatter_option( $option, $option_value );
   } else {
-    warn "\"$value\" isn't a good formatter option name.  I'm ignoring it!\n";
+    $self->warn( qq("$value" isn't a good formatter option name.  I'm ignoring it!\n ) );
   }
   return;
 }
@@ -99,17 +114,17 @@ sub opt_M_with { # specify formatter class name(s)
       # A mildly restrictive concept of what modulenames are valid.
       push @classes_to_add, $1; # untaint
     } else {
-      warn "\"$classname\" isn't a valid classname.  Ignoring.\n";
+      $self->warn(  qq("$classname" isn't a valid classname.  Ignoring.\n) );
     }
   }
-  
+
   unshift @{ $self->{'formatter_classes'} }, @classes_to_add;
-  
+
   DEBUG > 3 and print(
     "Adding @classes_to_add to the list of formatter classes, "
     . "making them @{ $self->{'formatter_classes'} }.\n"
   );
-  
+
   return;
 }
 
@@ -119,9 +134,9 @@ sub opt_V { # report version and exit
 
     (defined(&Win32::BuildNumber) and defined &Win32::BuildNumber())
      ? (" (win32 build ", &Win32::BuildNumber(), ")") : (),
-    
+
     (chr(65) eq 'A') ? () : " (non-ASCII)",
-    
+
     "\n",
   ;
   exit;
@@ -152,14 +167,14 @@ sub opt_o_with { # "o" for output format
   if($rest =~ m/^(\w+)$/s) {
     $rest = $1; #untaint
   } else {
-    warn "\"$rest\" isn't a valid output format.  Skipping.\n";
+    $self->warn( qq("$rest" isn't a valid output format.  Skipping.\n") );
     return;
   }
-  
+
   $self->aside("Noting \"$rest\" as desired output format...\n");
-  
+
   # Figure out what class(es) that could actually mean...
-  
+
   my @classes;
   foreach my $prefix ("Pod::Perldoc::To", "Pod::Simple::", "Pod::") {
     # Messy but smart:
@@ -168,10 +183,10 @@ sub opt_o_with { # "o" for output format
       "\L$rest", "\L\u$rest", "\U$rest" # And then try variations
 
     ) {
+      $self->aside("Considering $prefix$stem\n");
       push @classes, $prefix . $stem;
-      #print "Considering $prefix$stem\n";
     }
-    
+
     # Tidier, but misses too much:
     #push @classes, $prefix . ucfirst(lc($rest));
   }
@@ -233,12 +248,12 @@ sub aside {  # If we're in -D or DEBUG mode, say this.
 
 sub usage {
   my $self = shift;
-  warn "@_\n" if @_;
-  
+  $self->warn( "@_\n" ) if @_;
+
   # Erase evidence of previous errors (if any), so exit status is simple.
   $! = 0;
-  
-  die <<EOF;
+
+  $self->die( <<EOF );
 perldoc [options] PageName|ModuleName|ProgramName|URL...
 perldoc [options] -f BuiltinFunction
 perldoc [options] -q FAQRegex
@@ -249,11 +264,11 @@ Options:
     -V   Report version
     -r   Recursive search (slow)
     -i   Ignore case
-    -t   Display pod using pod2text instead of pod2man and nroff
+    -t   Display pod using pod2text instead of Pod::Man and groff
              (-t is the default on win32 unless -n is specified)
     -u   Display unformatted pod text
     -m   Display module's file in its entirety
-    -n   Specify replacement for nroff
+    -n   Specify replacement for groff
     -l   Display the module's file name
     -F   Arguments are file names, not modules
     -D   Verbosely describe what's going on
@@ -271,13 +286,13 @@ Options:
 PageName|ModuleName|ProgramName|URL...
          is the name of a piece of documentation that you want to look at. You
          may either give a descriptive name of the page (as in the case of
-         'perlfunc') the name of a module, either like 'Term::Info' or like
-         'Term/Info', or the name of a program, like 'perldoc', or a URL 
-         starting with http(s). 
+         `perlfunc') the name of a module, either like `Term::Info' or like
+         `Term/Info', or the name of a program, like `perldoc', or a URL
+         starting with http(s).
 
 BuiltinFunction
          is the name of a perl function.  Will extract documentation from
-         'perlfunc'.
+         `perlfunc' or `perlop'.
 
 FAQRegex
          is a regex. Will search perlfaq[1-9] for and extract any
@@ -294,26 +309,85 @@ EOF
 #..........................................................................
 
 sub program_name {
-  my $me = $0;         # Editing $0 is unportable
+  my( $self ) = @_;
+
+  if( my $link = readlink( $0 ) ) {
+    $self->debug( "The value in $0 is a symbolic link to $link\n" );
+    }
+
+  my $basename = basename( $0 );
 
-  $me =~ s,.*[/\\],,; # get basename
+  $self->debug( "\$0 is [$0]\nbasename is [$basename]\n" );
+  # possible name forms
+  #   perldoc
+  #   perldoc-v5.14
+  #   perldoc-5.14
+  #   perldoc-5.14.2
+  #   perlvar         # an alias mentioned in Camel 3
+  {
+  my( $untainted ) = $basename =~ m/(
+    \A
+    perl
+      (?:
+      doc | func | faq | help | op | toc | var # Camel 3
+      )
+    (?: -? v? \d+ \. \d+ (?:\. \d+)? ) # possible version
+    (?: \. (?: bat | exe | com ) )?    # possible extension
+    \z
+    )
+    /x;
+
+  return $untainted if $untainted;
+  }
+
+  $self->warn(<<"HERE");
+You called the perldoc command with a name that I didn't recognize.
+This might mean that someone is tricking you into running a
+program you don't intend to use, but it also might mean that you
+created your own link to perldoc. I think your program name is
+[$basename].
+
+I'll allow this if the filename looks only has [a-zA-Z0-9._-].
+HERE
+
+  {
+  my( $untainted ) = $basename =~ m/(
+    \A [a-zA-Z0-9._-]+ \z
+    )/x;
 
-  return $me;
+  return $untainted if $untainted;
+  }
+
+  $self->die(<<"HERE");
+I think that your name for perldoc is potentially unsafe, so I'm
+going to disallow it. I'd rather you be safe than sorry. If you
+intended to use the name I'm disallowing, please tell the maintainers
+about it. Write to:
+
+    Pod-Perldoc\@rt.cpan.org
+
+HERE
 }
 
 #..........................................................................
 
 sub usage_brief {
   my $self = shift;
-  my $me = $self->program_name;
+  my $program_name = $self->program_name;
 
-  die <<"EOUSAGE";
-Usage: $me [-h] [-V] [-r] [-i] [-D] [-t] [-u] [-m] [-n nroffer_program] [-l] [-T] [-d output_filename] [-o output_format] [-M FormatterModuleNameToUse] [-w formatter_option:option_value] [-L translation_code] [-F] [-X] PageName|ModuleName|ProgramName
-       $me -f PerlFunc
-       $me -q FAQKeywords
-       $me -v PerlVar
+  $self->die( <<"EOUSAGE" );
+Usage: $program_name [-hVriDtumFXlT] [-n nroffer_program]
+    [-d output_filename] [-o output_format] [-M FormatterModule]
+    [-w formatter_option:option_value] [-L translation_code]
+    PageName|ModuleName|ProgramName
 
-The -h option prints more help.  Also try "$me perldoc" to get
+Examples:
+
+    $program_name -f PerlFunc
+    $program_name -q FAQKeywords
+    $program_name -v PerlVar
+
+The -h option prints more help.  Also try "$program_name perldoc" to get
 acquainted with the system.                        [Perldoc v$VERSION]
 EOUSAGE
 
@@ -321,7 +395,7 @@ EOUSAGE
 
 #..........................................................................
 
-sub pagers { @{ shift->{'pagers'} } } 
+sub pagers { @{ shift->{'pagers'} } }
 
 #..........................................................................
 
@@ -345,8 +419,8 @@ sub init {
   $self->{'args'}              ||= \@ARGV;
   $self->{'found'}             ||= [];
   $self->{'temp_file_list'}    ||= [];
-  
-  
+
+
   $self->{'target'} = undef;
 
   $self->init_formatter_class_list;
@@ -383,7 +457,7 @@ sub init_formatter_class_list {
 
   $self->opt_M_with('Pod::Perldoc::ToPod');   # the always-there fallthru
   $self->opt_o_with('text');
-  $self->opt_o_with('man') unless IS_MSWin32 || IS_Dos
+  $self->opt_o_with('man') unless $self->is_mswin32 || $self->is_dos
        || !($ENV{TERM} && (
               ($ENV{TERM} || '') !~ /dumb|emacs|none|unknown/i
            ));
@@ -413,14 +487,14 @@ sub process {
 
     # TODO: make it deal with being invoked as various different things
     #  such as perlfaq".
-  
+
     return $self->usage_brief  unless  @{ $self->{'args'} };
     $self->pagers_guessing;
     $self->options_reading;
     $self->aside(sprintf "$0 => %s v%s\n", ref($self), $self->VERSION);
     $self->drop_privs_maybe;
     $self->options_processing;
-    
+
     # Hm, we have @pages and @found, but we only really act on one
     # file per call, with the exception of the opt_q hack, and with
     # -l things
@@ -429,7 +503,7 @@ sub process {
 
     my @pages;
     $self->{'pages'} = \@pages;
-    if(    $self->opt_f) { @pages = ("perlfunc")               }
+    if(    $self->opt_f) { @pages = qw(perlfunc perlop)        }
     elsif( $self->opt_q) { @pages = ("perlfaq1" .. "perlfaq9") }
     elsif( $self->opt_v) { @pages = ("perlvar")                }
     else                 { @pages = @{$self->{'args'}};
@@ -444,10 +518,10 @@ sub process {
 
     $self->maybe_diddle_INC();
       # for when we're apparently in a module or extension directory
-    
+
     my @found = $self->grand_search_init(\@pages);
-    exit (IS_VMS ? 98962 : 1) unless @found;
-    
+    exit ($self->is_vms ? 98962 : 1) unless @found;
+
     if ($self->opt_l) {
         DEBUG and print "We're in -l mode, so byebye after this:\n";
         print join("\n", @found), "\n";
@@ -469,8 +543,8 @@ my( %class_seen, %class_loaded );
 sub find_good_formatter_class {
   my $self = $_[0];
   my @class_list = @{ $self->{'formatter_classes'} || [] };
-  die "WHAT?  Nothing in the formatter class list!?" unless @class_list;
-  
+  $self->die( "WHAT?  Nothing in the formatter class list!?" ) unless @class_list;
+
   my $good_class_found;
   foreach my $c (@class_list) {
     DEBUG > 4 and print "Trying to load $c...\n";
@@ -479,21 +553,21 @@ sub find_good_formatter_class {
       $good_class_found = $c;
       last;
     }
-    
+
     if($class_seen{$c}) {
       DEBUG > 4 and print
        "I've tried $c before, and it's no good.  Skipping.\n";
       next;
     }
-    
+
     $class_seen{$c} = 1;
-    
+
     if( $c->can('parse_from_file') ) {
       DEBUG > 4 and print
        "Interesting, the formatter class $c is already loaded!\n";
-      
+
     } elsif(
-      (IS_VMS or IS_MSWin32 or IS_Dos or IS_OS2)
+      ( $self->is_os2 or $self->is_mswin32 or $self->is_dos or $self->is_os2)
        # the always case-insensitive filesystems
       and $class_seen{lc("~$c")}++
     ) {
@@ -518,7 +592,7 @@ sub find_good_formatter_class {
         next;
       }
     }
-    
+
     if( $c->can('parse_from_file') ) {
       DEBUG > 4 and print "Settling on $c\n";
       my $v = $c->VERSION;
@@ -530,13 +604,13 @@ sub find_good_formatter_class {
       DEBUG > 4 and print "Class $c isn't a formatter?!  Skipping.\n";
     }
   }
-  
-  die "Can't find any loadable formatter class in @class_list?!\nAborting"
+
+  $self->die( "Can't find any loadable formatter class in @class_list?!\nAborting" )
     unless $good_class_found;
-  
+
   $self->{'formatter_class'} = $good_class_found;
   $self->aside("Will format with the class $good_class_found\n");
-  
+
   return;
 }
 
@@ -546,8 +620,8 @@ sub find_good_formatter_class {
 sub formatter_sanity_check {
   my $self = shift;
   my $formatter_class = $self->{'formatter_class'}
-   || die "NO FORMATTER CLASS YET!?";
-  
+   || $self->die( "NO FORMATTER CLASS YET!?" );
+
   if(!$self->opt_T # so -T can FORCE sending to STDOUT
     and $formatter_class->can('is_pageable')
     and !$formatter_class->is_pageable
@@ -558,12 +632,12 @@ sub formatter_sanity_check {
        && $formatter_class->output_extension
      ) || '';
     $ext = ".$ext" if length $ext;
-    
+
     my $me = $self->program_name;
-    die
+    $self->die(
        "When using Perldoc to format with $formatter_class, you have to\n"
      . "specify -T or -dsomefile$ext\n"
-     . "See '$me perldoc' for more information on those switches.\n"
+     . "See `$me perldoc' for more information on those switches.\n" )
     ;
   }
 }
@@ -572,18 +646,18 @@ sub formatter_sanity_check {
 
 sub render_and_page {
     my($self, $found_list) = @_;
-    
+
     $self->maybe_generate_dynamic_pod($found_list);
 
     my($out, $formatter) = $self->render_findings($found_list);
-    
+
     if($self->opt_d) {
       printf "Perldoc (%s) output saved to %s\n",
         $self->{'formatter_class'} || ref($self),
         $out;
       print "But notice that it's 0 bytes long!\n" unless -s $out;
-      
-      
+
+
     } elsif(  # Allow the formatter to "page" itself, if it wants.
       $formatter->can('page_for_perldoc')
       and do {
@@ -598,25 +672,25 @@ sub render_and_page {
       }
     ) {
       # Do nothing, since the formatter has "paged" it for itself.
-    
+
     } else {
       # Page it normally (internally)
-      
+
       if( -s $out ) {  # Usual case:
         $self->page($out, $self->{'output_to_stdout'}, $self->pagers);
-        
+
       } else {
         # Odd case:
         $self->aside("Skipping $out (from $$found_list[0] "
          . "via $$self{'formatter_class'}) as it is 0-length.\n");
-         
+
         push @{ $self->{'temp_file_list'} }, $out;
         $self->unlink_if_temp_file($out);
       }
     }
-    
+
     $self->after_rendering();  # any extra cleanup or whatever
-    
+
     return;
 }
 
@@ -624,7 +698,7 @@ sub render_and_page {
 
 sub options_reading {
     my $self = shift;
-    
+
     if( defined $ENV{"PERLDOC"} and length $ENV{"PERLDOC"} ) {
       require Text::ParseWords;
       $self->aside("Noting env PERLDOC setting of $ENV{'PERLDOC'}\n");
@@ -647,7 +721,7 @@ sub options_reading {
      and print "  Args after switch processing: @{$self->{'args'}}\n";
 
     return $self->usage if $self->opt_h;
-  
+
     return;
 }
 
@@ -655,7 +729,7 @@ sub options_reading {
 
 sub options_processing {
     my $self = shift;
-    
+
     if ($self->opt_X) {
         my $podidx = "$Config{'archlib'}/pod.idx";
         $podidx = "" unless -f $podidx && -r _ && -M _ <= 7;
@@ -666,8 +740,11 @@ sub options_processing {
 
     $self->options_sanity;
 
-    $self->opt_n("nroff") unless $self->opt_n;
-    $self->add_formatter_option( '__nroffer' => $self->opt_n );
+    # This used to set a default, but that's now moved into any
+    # formatter that cares to have a default.
+    if( $self->opt_n ) {
+        $self->add_formatter_option( '__nroffer' => $self->opt_n );
+    }
 
     # Get language from PERLDOC_POD2 environment variable
     if ( ! $self->opt_L && $ENV{PERLDOC_POD2} ) {
@@ -700,19 +777,19 @@ sub options_sanity {
     #;
     #
     #$self->usage("only one of -t, -u, -m or -l") if $opts > 1;
-    
-    
+
+
     # Any sanity-checking need doing here?
-    
-    # But does not make sense to set either -f or -q in $ENV{"PERLDOC"} 
-    if( $self->opt_f or $self->opt_q ) { 
-       $self->usage("Only one of -f -or -q") if $self->opt_f and $self->opt_q;
-       warn 
-           "Perldoc is only really meant for reading one word at a time.\n",
-           "So these parameters are being ignored: ",
-           join(' ', @{$self->{'args'}}),
-           "\n"
-               if @{$self->{'args'}}
+
+    # But does not make sense to set either -f or -q in $ENV{"PERLDOC"}
+    if( $self->opt_f or $self->opt_q ) {
+    $self->usage("Only one of -f -or -q") if $self->opt_f and $self->opt_q;
+    $self->warn(
+        "Perldoc is only really meant for reading one word at a time.\n",
+        "So these parameters are being ignored: ",
+        join(' ', @{$self->{'args'}}),
+        "\n" )
+        if @{$self->{'args'}}
     }
     return;
 }
@@ -737,7 +814,7 @@ sub grand_search_init {
             }
             else {
                 print STDERR "No " .
-                    ($self->opt_m ? "module" : "documentation") . " found for \"$_\".\n";                
+                    ($self->opt_m ? "module" : "documentation") . " found for \"$_\".\n";
             }
             next;
         }
@@ -749,7 +826,7 @@ sub grand_search_init {
                 chomp;
                 push(@found, $_) if m,/$searchfor(?:\.(?:pod|pm))?\z,i;
             }
-            close(PODIDX)            or die "Can't close $$self{'podidx'}: $!";
+            close(PODIDX)            or $self->die( "Can't close $$self{'podidx'}: $!" );
             next;
         }
 
@@ -757,7 +834,7 @@ sub grand_search_init {
 
         if ($self->opt_F) {
             next unless -r;
-            push @found, $_ if $self->opt_m or $self->containspod($_);
+            push @found, $_ if $self->opt_l or $self->opt_m or $self->containspod($_);
             next;
         }
 
@@ -770,7 +847,7 @@ sub grand_search_init {
         # for executables, like h2xs or perldoc itself.
         push @searchdirs, ($self->{'bindir'}, @INC);
         unless ($self->opt_m) {
-            if (IS_VMS) {
+            if ($self->is_vms) {
                 my($i,$trn);
                 for ($i = 0; $trn = $ENV{'DCL$PATH;'.$i}; $i++) {
                     push(@searchdirs,$trn);
@@ -787,7 +864,7 @@ sub grand_search_init {
             $self->aside( "Found as @files\n" );
         }
         # add "perl" prefix, so "perldoc foo" may find perlfoo.pod
-       elsif (BE_LENIENT and !/\W/ and  @files = $self->searchfor(0, "perl$_", @searchdirs)) {
+    elsif (BE_LENIENT and !/\W/ and  @files = $self->searchfor(0, "perl$_", @searchdirs)) {
             $self->aside( "Loosely found as @files\n" );
         }
         else {
@@ -804,13 +881,13 @@ sub grand_search_init {
                     print STDERR "However, try\n";
                     my $me = $self->program_name;
                     for my $dir (@{ $self->{'found'} }) {
-                        opendir(DIR, $dir) or die "opendir $dir: $!";
+                        opendir(DIR, $dir) or $self->die( "opendir $dir: $!" );
                         while (my $file = readdir(DIR)) {
                             next if ($file =~ /^\./s);
                             $file =~ s/\.(pm|pod)\z//;  # XXX: badfs
                             print STDERR "\t$me $_\::$file\n";
                         }
-                        closedir(DIR)    or die "closedir $dir: $!";
+                        closedir(DIR)    or $self->die( "closedir $dir: $!" );
                     }
                 }
             }
@@ -825,11 +902,11 @@ sub grand_search_init {
 sub maybe_generate_dynamic_pod {
     my($self, $found_things) = @_;
     my @dynamic_pod;
-    
+
     $self->search_perlfunc($found_things, \@dynamic_pod)  if  $self->opt_f;
 
     $self->search_perlvar($found_things, \@dynamic_pod)   if  $self->opt_v;
-    
+
     $self->search_perlfaqs($found_things, \@dynamic_pod)  if  $self->opt_q;
 
     if( ! $self->opt_f and ! $self->opt_q and ! $self->opt_v ) {
@@ -837,22 +914,22 @@ sub maybe_generate_dynamic_pod {
     } elsif ( @dynamic_pod ) {
         $self->aside("Hm, I found some Pod from that search!\n");
         my ($buffd, $buffer) = $self->new_tempfile('pod', 'dyn');
-        
+
         push @{ $self->{'temp_file_list'} }, $buffer;
          # I.e., it MIGHT be deleted at the end.
-        
-       my $in_list = $self->opt_f || $self->opt_v;
+
+        my $in_list = !$self->not_dynamic && $self->opt_f || $self->opt_v;
 
         print $buffd "=over 8\n\n" if $in_list;
-        print $buffd @dynamic_pod  or die "Can't print $buffer: $!";
+        print $buffd @dynamic_pod  or $self->die( "Can't print $buffer: $!" );
         print $buffd "=back\n"     if $in_list;
 
-        close $buffd        or die "Can't close $buffer: $!";
-        
+        close $buffd        or $self->die( "Can't close $buffer: $!" );
+
         @$found_things = $buffer;
           # Yes, so found_things never has more than one thing in
           #  it, by time we leave here
-        
+
         $self->add_formatter_option('__filter_nroff' => 1);
 
     } else {
@@ -865,13 +942,21 @@ sub maybe_generate_dynamic_pod {
 
 #..........................................................................
 
+sub not_dynamic {
+  my ($self,$value) = @_;
+  $self->{__not_dynamic} = $value if @_ == 2;
+  return $self->{__not_dynamic};
+}
+
+#..........................................................................
+
 sub add_formatter_option { # $self->add_formatter_option('key' => 'value');
   my $self = shift;
   push @{ $self->{'formatter_switches'} }, [ @_ ] if @_;
 
   DEBUG > 3 and printf "Formatter switches now: [%s]\n",
    join ' ', map "[@$_]", @{ $self->{'formatter_switches'} };
-  
+
   return;
 }
 
@@ -884,12 +969,12 @@ sub new_translator { # $tr = $self->new_translator($lang);
     my $pack = 'POD2::' . uc($lang);
     eval "require $pack";
     if ( !$@ && $pack->can('new') ) {
-       return $pack->new();
+    return $pack->new();
     }
 
     eval { require POD2::Base };
     return if $@;
-    
+
     return POD2::Base->new({ lang => $lang });
 }
 
@@ -906,7 +991,7 @@ sub add_translator { # $self->add_translator($lang);
             $self->aside( "translator for '$lang' loaded\n" );
         } else {
             # non-installed or bad translator package
-            warn "Perldoc cannot load translator package for '$lang': ignored\n";
+            $self->warn( "Perldoc cannot load translator package for '$lang': ignored\n" );
         }
 
     }
@@ -921,14 +1006,14 @@ sub search_perlvar {
     my $opt = $self->opt_v;
 
     if ( $opt !~ /^ (?: [\@\%\$]\S+ | [A-Z]\w* ) $/x ) {
-        die "'$opt' does not look like a Perl variable\n";
+        $self->die( "'$opt' does not look like a Perl variable\n" );
     }
 
     DEBUG > 2 and print "Search: @$found_things\n";
-    
+
     my $perlvar = shift @$found_things;
     open(PVAR, "<", $perlvar)               # "Funk is its own reward"
-        or die("Can't open $perlvar: $!");
+        or $self->die("Can't open $perlvar: $!");
 
     if ( $opt ne '$0' && $opt =~ /^\$\d+$/ ) { # handle $1, $2, ...
       $opt = '$<I<digits>>';
@@ -937,7 +1022,7 @@ sub search_perlvar {
 
     DEBUG > 2 and
      print "Going to perlvar-scan for $search_re in $perlvar\n";
-    
+
     # Skip introduction
     local $_;
     while (<PVAR>) {
@@ -960,13 +1045,13 @@ sub search_perlvar {
         elsif (!/^\s+$/) { # not a blank line
             if ( $found ) {
                 $inheader = 0; # don't accept more =item (unless inlist)
-           }
+        }
             else {
                 @$pod = (); # reset
                 $inheader = 1; # start over
                 next;
             }
-       }
+    }
 
         if (/^=over/) {
             ++$inlist;
@@ -980,15 +1065,68 @@ sub search_perlvar {
     }
     @$pod = () unless $found;
     if (!@$pod) {
-        die "No documentation for perl variable '$opt' found\n";
+        $self->die( "No documentation for perl variable '$opt' found\n" );
     }
-    close PVAR                or die "Can't open $perlvar: $!";
+    close PVAR                or $self->die( "Can't open $perlvar: $!" );
 
     return;
 }
 
 #..........................................................................
 
+sub search_perlop {
+  my ($self,$found_things,$pod) = @_;
+
+  $self->not_dynamic( 1 );
+
+  my $perlop = shift @$found_things;
+  open( PERLOP, '<', $perlop ) or $self->die( "Can't open $perlop: $!" );
+
+  my $paragraph = "";
+  my $has_text_seen = 0;
+  my $thing = $self->opt_f;
+  my $list = 0;
+
+  while( my $line = <PERLOP> ){
+    if( $paragraph and $line =~ m!^=(?:head|item)! and $paragraph =~ m!X<+\s*\Q$thing\E\s*>+! ){
+      if( $list ){
+        $paragraph =~ s!=back.*?\z!!s;
+      }
+
+      if( $paragraph =~ m!^=item! ){
+        $paragraph = "=over 8\n\n" . $paragraph . "=back\n";
+      }
+
+      push @$pod, $paragraph;
+      $paragraph = "";
+      $has_text_seen = 0;
+      $list = 0;
+    }
+
+    if( $line =~ m!^=over! ){
+      $list++;
+    }
+    elsif( $line =~ m!^=back! ){
+      $list--;
+    }
+
+    if( $line =~ m!^=(?:head|item)! and $has_text_seen ){
+      $paragraph = "";
+    }
+    elsif( $line !~ m!^=(?:head|item)! and $line !~ m!^\s*$! and $line !~ m!^\s*X<! ){
+      $has_text_seen = 1;
+    }
+
+    $paragraph .= $line;
+    }
+
+  close PERLOP;
+
+  return;
+}
+
+#..........................................................................
+
 sub search_perlfunc {
     my($self, $found_things, $pod) = @_;
 
@@ -996,9 +1134,9 @@ sub search_perlfunc {
 
     my $perlfunc = shift @$found_things;
     open(PFUNC, "<", $perlfunc)               # "Funk is its own reward"
-        or die("Can't open $perlfunc: $!");
+        or $self->die("Can't open $perlfunc: $!");
 
-    # Functions like -r, -e, etc. are listed under '-X'.
+    # Functions like -r, -e, etc. are listed under `-X'.
     my $search_re = ($self->opt_f =~ /^-[rwxoRWXOeszfdlpSbctugkTBMAC]$/)
                         ? '(?:I<)?-X' : quotemeta($self->opt_f) ;
 
@@ -1022,13 +1160,31 @@ sub search_perlfunc {
     # Look for our function
     my $found = 0;
     my $inlist = 0;
+
+    my @perlops = qw(m q qq qr qx qw s tr y);
+
+    my @related;
+    my $related_re;
     while (<PFUNC>) {  # "The Mothership Connection is here!"
+        last if( grep{ $self->opt_f eq $_ }@perlops );
         if ( m/^=item\s+$search_re\b/ )  {
             $found = 1;
         }
+        elsif (@related > 1 and /^=item/) {
+            $related_re ||= join "|", @related;
+            if (m/^=item\s+(?:$related_re)\b/) {
+                $found = 1;
+            }
+            else {
+                last;
+            }
+        }
         elsif (/^=item/) {
             last if $found > 1 and not $inlist;
         }
+        elsif ($found and /^X<[^>]+>/) {
+            push @related, m/X<([^>]+)>/g;
+        }
         next unless $found;
         if (/^=over/) {
             ++$inlist;
@@ -1040,13 +1196,18 @@ sub search_perlfunc {
         push @$pod, $_;
         ++$found if /^\w/;        # found descriptive text
     }
+
+    if( !@$pod ){
+        $self->search_perlop( $found_things, $pod );
+    }
+
     if (!@$pod) {
-        die sprintf
-          "No documentation for perl function '%s' found\n",
-          $self->opt_f
+        $self->die( sprintf
+          "No documentation for perl function `%s' found\n",
+          $self->opt_f )
         ;
     }
-    close PFUNC                or die "Can't open $perlfunc: $!";
+    close PFUNC                or $self->die( "Can't open $perlfunc: $!" );
 
     return;
 }
@@ -1059,9 +1220,9 @@ sub search_perlfaqs {
     my $found = 0;
     my %found_in;
     my $search_key = $self->opt_q;
-    
+
     my $rx = eval { qr/$search_key/ }
-     or die <<EOD;
+     or $self->die( <<EOD );
 Invalid regular expression '$search_key' given as -q pattern:
 $@
 Did you mean \\Q$search_key ?
@@ -1070,9 +1231,9 @@ EOD
 
     local $_;
     foreach my $file (@$found_things) {
-        die "invalid file spec: $!" if $file =~ /[<>|]/;
+        $self->die( "invalid file spec: $!" ) if $file =~ /[<>|]/;
         open(INFAQ, "<", $file)  # XXX 5.6ism
-         or die "Can't read-open $file: $!\nAborting";
+         or $self->die( "Can't read-open $file: $!\nAborting" );
         while (<INFAQ>) {
             if ( m/^=head2\s+.*(?:$search_key)/i ) {
                 $found = 1;
@@ -1086,7 +1247,7 @@ EOD
         }
         close(INFAQ);
     }
-    die("No documentation for perl FAQ keyword '$search_key' found\n")
+    $self->die("No documentation for perl FAQ keyword `$search_key' found\n")
      unless @$pod;
 
     return;
@@ -1101,25 +1262,25 @@ sub render_findings {
   my($self, $found_things) = @_;
 
   my $formatter_class = $self->{'formatter_class'}
-   || die "No formatter class set!?";
+   || $self->die( "No formatter class set!?" );
   my $formatter = $formatter_class->can('new')
     ? $formatter_class->new
     : $formatter_class
   ;
 
   if(! @$found_things) {
-    die "Nothing found?!";
+    $self->die( "Nothing found?!" );
     # should have been caught before here
   } elsif(@$found_things > 1) {
-    warn 
+    $self->warn(
      "Perldoc is only really meant for reading one document at a time.\n",
      "So these parameters are being ignored: ",
      join(' ', @$found_things[1 .. $#$found_things] ),
-     "\n"
+     "\n" );
   }
 
   my $file = $found_things->[0];
-  
+
   DEBUG > 3 and printf "Formatter switches now: [%s]\n",
    join ' ', map "[@$_]", @{ $self->{'formatter_switches'} };
 
@@ -1129,18 +1290,18 @@ sub render_findings {
       my($switch, $value, $silent_fail) = @$f;
       if( $formatter->can($switch) ) {
         eval { $formatter->$switch( defined($value) ? $value : () ) };
-        warn "Got an error when setting $formatter_class\->$switch:\n$@\n"
+        $self->warn( "Got an error when setting $formatter_class\->$switch:\n$@\n" )
          if $@;
       } else {
         if( $silent_fail or $switch =~ m/^__/s ) {
           DEBUG > 2 and print "Formatter $formatter_class doesn't support $switch\n";
         } else {
-          warn "$formatter_class doesn't recognize the $switch switch.\n";
+          $self->warn( "$formatter_class doesn't recognize the $switch switch.\n" );
         }
       }
     }
   }
-  
+
   $self->{'output_is_binary'} =
     $formatter->can('write_with_binmode') && $formatter->write_with_binmode;
 
@@ -1165,19 +1326,19 @@ sub render_findings {
       # The average user just has no reason to be seeing
       #  $^W-suppressible warnings from the formatting!
     }
-          
+
     eval {  $formatter->parse_from_file( $file, $out_fh )  };
   }
-  
-  warn "Error while formatting with $formatter_class:\n $@\n" if $@;
+
+  $self->warn( "Error while formatting with $formatter_class:\n $@\n" ) if $@;
   DEBUG > 2 and print "Back from formatting with $formatter_class\n";
 
-  close $out_fh 
-   or warn "Can't close $out: $!\n(Did $formatter already close it?)";
+  close $out_fh
+   or $self->warn( "Can't close $out: $!\n(Did $formatter already close it?)" );
   sleep 0; sleep 0; sleep 0;
    # Give the system a few timeslices to meditate on the fact
    # that the output file does in fact exist and is closed.
-  
+
   $self->unlink_if_temp_file($file);
 
   unless( -s $out ) {
@@ -1187,7 +1348,7 @@ sub render_findings {
       # as a 0-length output file?
       $formatter->if_zero_length( $file, $out, $out_fh );
     } else {
-      warn "Got a 0-length file from $$found_things[0] via $formatter_class!?\n"
+      $self->warn( "Got a 0-length file from $$found_things[0] via $formatter_class!?\n" );
     }
   }
 
@@ -1206,11 +1367,11 @@ sub unlink_if_temp_file {
   #
   my($self, $file) = @_;
   return unless defined $file and length $file;
-  
+
   my $temp_file_list = $self->{'temp_file_list'} || return;
   if(grep $_ eq $file, @$temp_file_list) {
     $self->aside("Unlinking $file\n");
-    unlink($file) or warn "Odd, couldn't unlink $file: $!";
+    unlink($file) or $self->warn( "Odd, couldn't unlink $file: $!" );
   } else {
     DEBUG > 1 and print "$file isn't a temp file, so not unlinking.\n";
   }
@@ -1219,129 +1380,25 @@ sub unlink_if_temp_file {
 
 #..........................................................................
 
-sub MSWin_temp_cleanup {
-
-  # Nothing particularly MSWin-specific in here, but I don't know if any
-  # other OS needs its temp dir policed like MSWin does!
-  my $self = shift;
-
-  my $tempdir = $ENV{'TEMP'};
-  return unless defined $tempdir and length $tempdir
-   and -e $tempdir and -d _ and -w _;
-
-  $self->aside(
-   "Considering whether any old files of mine in $tempdir need unlinking.\n"
-  );
-
-  opendir(TMPDIR, $tempdir) || return;
-  my @to_unlink;
-  
-  my $limit = time() - $Temp_File_Lifetime;
-  
-  DEBUG > 5 and printf "Looking for things pre-dating %s (%x)\n",
-   ($limit) x 2;
-  
-  my $filespec;
-  
-  while(defined($filespec = readdir(TMPDIR))) {
-    if(
-     $filespec =~ m{^perldoc_[a-zA-Z0-9]+_T([a-fA-F0-9]{7,})_[a-fA-F0-9]{3,}}s
-    ) {
-      if( hex($1) < $limit ) {
-        push @to_unlink, "$tempdir/$filespec";
-        $self->aside( "Will unlink my old temp file $to_unlink[-1]\n" );
-      } else {
-        DEBUG > 5 and
-         printf "  $tempdir/$filespec is too recent (after %x)\n", $limit;
-      }
-    } else {
-      DEBUG > 5 and
-       print "  $tempdir/$filespec doesn't look like a perldoc temp file.\n";
-    }
-  }
-  closedir(TMPDIR);
-  $self->aside(sprintf "Unlinked %s items of mine in %s\n",
-    scalar(unlink(@to_unlink)),
-    $tempdir
-  );
-  return;
-}
-
-#  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
-
-sub MSWin_perldoc_tempfile {
-  my($self, $suffix, $infix) = @_;
-
-  my $tempdir = $ENV{'TEMP'};
-  return unless defined $tempdir and length $tempdir
-   and -e $tempdir and -d _ and -w _;
-
-  my $spec;
-  
-  do {
-    $spec = sprintf "%s\\perldoc_%s_T%x_%x%02x.%s", # used also in MSWin_temp_cleanup
-      # Yes, we embed the create-time in the filename!
-      $tempdir,
-      $infix || 'x',
-      time(),
-      $$,
-      defined( &Win32::GetTickCount )
-        ? (Win32::GetTickCount() & 0xff)
-        : int(rand 256)
-       # Under MSWin, $$ values get reused quickly!  So if we ran
-       # perldoc foo and then perldoc bar before there was time for
-       # time() to increment time."_$$" would likely be the same
-       # for each process!  So we tack on the tick count's lower
-       # bits (or, in a pinch, rand)
-      ,
-      $suffix || 'txt';
-    ;
-  } while( -e $spec );
-
-  my $counter = 0;
-  
-  while($counter < 50) {
-    my $fh;
-    # If we are running before perl5.6.0, we can't autovivify
-    if ($] < 5.006) {
-      require Symbol;
-      $fh = Symbol::gensym();
-    }
-    DEBUG > 3 and print "About to try making temp file $spec\n";
-    return($fh, $spec) if open($fh, ">", $spec);    # XXX 5.6ism
-    $self->aside("Can't create temp file $spec: $!\n");
-  }
-
-  $self->aside("Giving up on making a temp file!\n");
-  die "Can't make a tempfile!?";
-}
-
-#..........................................................................
-
 
 sub after_rendering {
   my $self = $_[0];
-  $self->after_rendering_VMS     if IS_VMS;
-  $self->after_rendering_MSWin32 if IS_MSWin32;
-  $self->after_rendering_Dos     if IS_Dos;
-  $self->after_rendering_OS2     if IS_OS2;
+  $self->after_rendering_VMS     if $self->is_vms;
+  $self->after_rendering_MSWin32 if $self->is_mswin32;
+  $self->after_rendering_Dos     if $self->is_dos;
+  $self->after_rendering_OS2     if $self->is_os2;
   return;
 }
 
 sub after_rendering_VMS      { return }
 sub after_rendering_Dos      { return }
 sub after_rendering_OS2      { return }
-
-sub after_rendering_MSWin32  {
-  shift->MSWin_temp_cleanup() if $Temp_Files_Created;
-}
+sub after_rendering_MSWin32  { return }
 
 #..........................................................................
-#      :       :       :       :       : &n