RE: Combining UTF-16 output with :crlf is awkward
[perl.git] / lib / UNIVERSAL.pm
1 package UNIVERSAL;
2
3 our $VERSION = '1.04';
4
5 # UNIVERSAL should not contain any extra subs/methods beyond those
6 # that it exists to define. The use of Exporter below is a historical
7 # accident that can't be fixed without breaking code.  Note that we
8 # *don't* set @ISA here, as we don't want all classes/objects inheriting from
9 # Exporter.  It's bad enough that all classes have a import() method
10 # whenever UNIVERSAL.pm is loaded.
11 require Exporter;
12 @EXPORT_OK = qw(isa can VERSION);
13
14 # Make sure that even though the import method is called, it doesn't do
15 # anything unless called on UNIVERSAL.
16 sub import {
17     return unless $_[0] eq __PACKAGE__;
18     goto &Exporter::import;
19 }
20
21 1;
22 __END__
23
24 =head1 NAME
25
26 UNIVERSAL - base class for ALL classes (blessed references)
27
28 =head1 SYNOPSIS
29
30     $is_io    = $fd->isa("IO::Handle");
31     $is_io    = Class->isa("IO::Handle");
32
33     $does_log = $obj->DOES("Logger");
34     $does_log = Class->DOES("Logger");
35
36     $sub      = $obj->can("print");
37     $sub      = Class->can("print");
38
39     $sub      = eval { $ref->can("fandango") };
40     $ver      = $obj->VERSION;
41
42     # but never do this!
43     $is_io    = UNIVERSAL::isa($fd, "IO::Handle");
44     $sub      = UNIVERSAL::can($obj, "print");
45
46 =head1 DESCRIPTION
47
48 C<UNIVERSAL> is the base class from which all blessed references inherit.
49 See L<perlobj>.
50
51 C<UNIVERSAL> provides the following methods:
52
53 =over 4
54
55 =item C<< $obj->isa( TYPE ) >>
56
57 =item C<< CLASS->isa( TYPE ) >>
58
59 =item C<< eval { VAL->isa( TYPE ) } >>
60
61 Where
62
63 =over 4
64
65 =item C<TYPE>
66
67 is a package name
68
69 =item C<$obj>
70
71 is a blessed reference or a string containing a package name
72
73 =item C<CLASS>
74
75 is a package name
76
77 =item C<VAL>
78
79 is any of the above or an unblessed reference
80
81 =back
82
83 When used as an instance or class method (C<< $obj->isa( TYPE ) >>),
84 C<isa> returns I<true> if $obj is blessed into package C<TYPE> or
85 inherits from package C<TYPE>.
86
87 When used as a class method (C<< CLASS->isa( TYPE ) >>, sometimes
88 referred to as a static method), C<isa> returns I<true> if C<CLASS>
89 inherits from (or is itself) the name of the package C<TYPE> or
90 inherits from package C<TYPE>.
91
92 If you're not sure what you have (the C<VAL> case), wrap the method call in an
93 C<eval> block to catch the exception if C<VAL> is undefined.
94
95 If you want to be sure that you're calling C<isa> as a method, not a class,
96 check the invocant with C<blessed> from L<Scalar::Util> first:
97
98   use Scalar::Util 'blessed';
99
100   if ( blessed( $obj ) && $obj->isa("Some::Class") {
101       ...
102   }
103
104 =item C<< $obj->DOES( ROLE ) >>
105
106 =item C<< CLASS->DOES( ROLE ) >>
107
108 C<DOES> checks if the object or class performs the role C<ROLE>.  A role is a
109 named group of specific behavior (often methods of particular names and
110 signatures), similar to a class, but not necessarily a complete class by
111 itself.  For example, logging or serialization may be roles.
112
113 C<DOES> and C<isa> are similar, in that if either is true, you know that the
114 object or class on which you call the method can perform specific behavior.
115 However, C<DOES> is different from C<isa> in that it does not care I<how> the
116 invocant performs the operations, merely that it does.  (C<isa> of course
117 mandates an inheritance relationship.  Other relationships include aggregation,
118 delegation, and mocking.)
119
120 By default, classes in Perl only perform the C<UNIVERSAL> role.  To mark that
121 your own classes perform other roles, override C<DOES> appropriately.
122
123 There is a relationship between roles and classes, as each class implies the
124 existence of a role of the same name.  There is also a relationship between
125 inheritance and roles, in that a subclass that inherits from an ancestor class
126 implicitly performs any roles its parent performs.  Thus you can use C<DOES> in
127 place of C<isa> safely, as it will return true in all places where C<isa> will
128 return true (provided that any overridden C<DOES> I<and> C<isa> methods behave
129 appropriately).
130
131 =item C<< $obj->can( METHOD ) >>
132
133 =item C<< CLASS->can( METHOD ) >>
134
135 =item C<< eval { VAL->can( METHOD ) } >>
136
137 C<can> checks if the object or class has a method called C<METHOD>. If it does,
138 then it returns a reference to the sub.  If it does not, then it returns
139 I<undef>.  This includes methods inherited or imported by C<$obj>, C<CLASS>, or
140 C<VAL>.
141
142 C<can> cannot know whether an object will be able to provide a method through
143 AUTOLOAD (unless the object's class has overriden C<can> appropriately), so a
144 return value of I<undef> does not necessarily mean the object will not be able
145 to handle the method call. To get around this some module authors use a forward
146 declaration (see L<perlsub>) for methods they will handle via AUTOLOAD. For
147 such 'dummy' subs, C<can> will still return a code reference, which, when
148 called, will fall through to the AUTOLOAD. If no suitable AUTOLOAD is provided,
149 calling the coderef will cause an error.
150
151 You may call C<can> as a class (static) method or an object method.
152
153 Again, the same rule about having a valid invocant applies -- use an C<eval>
154 block or C<blessed> if you need to be extra paranoid.
155
156 =item C<VERSION ( [ REQUIRE ] )>
157
158 C<VERSION> will return the value of the variable C<$VERSION> in the
159 package the object is blessed into. If C<REQUIRE> is given then
160 it will do a comparison and die if the package version is not
161 greater than or equal to C<REQUIRE>.
162
163 C<VERSION> can be called as either a class (static) method or an object
164 method.
165
166 =back
167
168 =head1 EXPORTS
169
170 None by default.
171
172 You may request the import of three functions (C<isa>, C<can>, and C<VERSION>),
173 however it is usually harmful to do so.  Please don't do this in new code.
174
175 For example, previous versions of this documentation suggested using C<isa> as
176 a function to determine the type of a reference:
177
178   use UNIVERSAL 'isa';
179
180   $yes = isa $h, "HASH";
181   $yes = isa "Foo", "Bar";
182
183 The problem is that this code will I<never> call an overridden C<isa> method in
184 any class.  Instead, use C<reftype> from L<Scalar::Util> for the first case:
185
186   use Scalar::Util 'reftype';
187
188   $yes = reftype( $h ) eq "HASH";
189
190 and the method form of C<isa> for the second:
191
192   $yes = Foo->isa("Bar");
193
194 =cut