Convert some SvREFCNT_dec's to SvREFCNT_dec_NN's for efficiency
[perl.git] / pod / perlpod.pod
1
2 =for comment
3 This document is in Pod format.  To read this, use a Pod formatter,
4 like "perldoc perlpod".
5
6 =head1 NAME
7 X<POD> X<plain old documentation>
8
9 perlpod - the Plain Old Documentation format
10
11 =head1 DESCRIPTION
12
13 Pod is a simple-to-use markup language used for writing documentation
14 for Perl, Perl programs, and Perl modules.
15
16 Translators are available for converting Pod to various formats
17 like plain text, HTML, man pages, and more.
18
19 Pod markup consists of three basic kinds of paragraphs:
20 L<ordinary|/"Ordinary Paragraph">,
21 L<verbatim|/"Verbatim Paragraph">, and 
22 L<command|/"Command Paragraph">.
23
24
25 =head2 Ordinary Paragraph
26 X<POD, ordinary paragraph>
27
28 Most paragraphs in your documentation will be ordinary blocks
29 of text, like this one.  You can simply type in your text without
30 any markup whatsoever, and with just a blank line before and
31 after.  When it gets formatted, it will undergo minimal formatting, 
32 like being rewrapped, probably put into a proportionally spaced
33 font, and maybe even justified.
34
35 You can use formatting codes in ordinary paragraphs, for B<bold>,
36 I<italic>, C<code-style>, L<hyperlinks|perlfaq>, and more.  Such
37 codes are explained in the "L<Formatting Codes|/"Formatting Codes">"
38 section, below.
39
40
41 =head2 Verbatim Paragraph
42 X<POD, verbatim paragraph> X<verbatim>
43
44 Verbatim paragraphs are usually used for presenting a codeblock or
45 other text which does not require any special parsing or formatting,
46 and which shouldn't be wrapped.
47
48 A verbatim paragraph is distinguished by having its first character
49 be a space or a tab.  (And commonly, all its lines begin with spaces
50 and/or tabs.)  It should be reproduced exactly, with tabs assumed to
51 be on 8-column boundaries.  There are no special formatting codes,
52 so you can't italicize or anything like that.  A \ means \, and
53 nothing else.
54
55
56 =head2 Command Paragraph
57 X<POD, command>
58
59 A command paragraph is used for special treatment of whole chunks
60 of text, usually as headings or parts of lists.
61
62 All command paragraphs (which are typically only one line long) start
63 with "=", followed by an identifier, followed by arbitrary text that
64 the command can use however it pleases.  Currently recognized commands
65 are
66
67     =pod
68     =head1 Heading Text
69     =head2 Heading Text
70     =head3 Heading Text
71     =head4 Heading Text
72     =over indentlevel
73     =item stuff
74     =back
75     =begin format
76     =end format
77     =for format text...
78     =encoding type
79     =cut
80
81 To explain them each in detail:
82
83 =over
84
85 =item C<=head1 I<Heading Text>>
86 X<=head1> X<=head2> X<=head3> X<=head4>
87 X<head1> X<head2> X<head3> X<head4>
88
89 =item C<=head2 I<Heading Text>>
90
91 =item C<=head3 I<Heading Text>>
92
93 =item C<=head4 I<Heading Text>>
94
95 Head1 through head4 produce headings, head1 being the highest
96 level.  The text in the rest of this paragraph is the content of the
97 heading.  For example:
98
99   =head2 Object Attributes
100
101 The text "Object Attributes" comprises the heading there.
102 The text in these heading commands can use formatting codes, as seen here:
103
104   =head2 Possible Values for C<$/>
105
106 Such commands are explained in the
107 "L<Formatting Codes|/"Formatting Codes">" section, below.
108
109 =item C<=over I<indentlevel>>
110 X<=over> X<=item> X<=back> X<over> X<item> X<back>
111
112 =item C<=item I<stuff...>>
113
114 =item C<=back>
115
116 Item, over, and back require a little more explanation:  "=over" starts
117 a region specifically for the generation of a list using "=item"
118 commands, or for indenting (groups of) normal paragraphs.  At the end
119 of your list, use "=back" to end it.  The I<indentlevel> option to
120 "=over" indicates how far over to indent, generally in ems (where
121 one em is the width of an "M" in the document's base font) or roughly
122 comparable units; if there is no I<indentlevel> option, it defaults
123 to four.  (And some formatters may just ignore whatever I<indentlevel>
124 you provide.)  In the I<stuff> in C<=item I<stuff...>>, you may
125 use formatting codes, as seen here:
126
127   =item Using C<$|> to Control Buffering
128
129 Such commands are explained in the
130 "L<Formatting Codes|/"Formatting Codes">" section, below.
131
132 Note also that there are some basic rules to using "=over" ...
133 "=back" regions:
134
135 =over
136
137 =item *
138
139 Don't use "=item"s outside of an "=over" ... "=back" region.
140
141 =item *
142
143 The first thing after the "=over" command should be an "=item", unless
144 there aren't going to be any items at all in this "=over" ... "=back"
145 region.
146
147 =item *
148
149 Don't put "=headI<n>" commands inside an "=over" ... "=back" region.
150
151 =item *
152
153 And perhaps most importantly, keep the items consistent: either use
154 "=item *" for all of them, to produce bullets; or use "=item 1.",
155 "=item 2.", etc., to produce numbered lists; or use "=item foo",
156 "=item bar", etc.--namely, things that look nothing like bullets or
157 numbers.
158
159 If you start with bullets or numbers, stick with them, as
160 formatters use the first "=item" type to decide how to format the
161 list.
162
163 =back
164
165 =item C<=cut>
166 X<=cut> X<cut>
167
168 To end a Pod block, use a blank line,
169 then a line beginning with "=cut", and a blank
170 line after it.  This lets Perl (and the Pod formatter) know that
171 this is where Perl code is resuming.  (The blank line before the "=cut"
172 is not technically necessary, but many older Pod processors require it.)
173
174 =item C<=pod>
175 X<=pod> X<pod>
176
177 The "=pod" command by itself doesn't do much of anything, but it
178 signals to Perl (and Pod formatters) that a Pod block starts here.  A
179 Pod block starts with I<any> command paragraph, so a "=pod" command is
180 usually used just when you want to start a Pod block with an ordinary
181 paragraph or a verbatim paragraph.  For example:
182
183   =item stuff()
184
185   This function does stuff.
186
187   =cut
188
189   sub stuff {
190     ...
191   }
192
193   =pod
194
195   Remember to check its return value, as in:
196
197     stuff() || die "Couldn't do stuff!";
198
199   =cut
200
201 =item C<=begin I<formatname>>
202 X<=begin> X<=end> X<=for> X<begin> X<end> X<for>
203
204 =item C<=end I<formatname>>
205
206 =item C<=for I<formatname> I<text...>>
207
208 For, begin, and end will let you have regions of text/code/data that
209 are not generally interpreted as normal Pod text, but are passed
210 directly to particular formatters, or are otherwise special.  A
211 formatter that can use that format will use the region, otherwise it
212 will be completely ignored.
213
214 A command "=begin I<formatname>", some paragraphs, and a
215 command "=end I<formatname>", mean that the text/data in between
216 is meant for formatters that understand the special format
217 called I<formatname>.  For example,
218
219   =begin html
220
221   <hr> <img src="thang.png">
222   <p> This is a raw HTML paragraph </p>
223
224   =end html
225
226 The command "=for I<formatname> I<text...>"
227 specifies that the remainder of just this paragraph (starting
228 right after I<formatname>) is in that special format.  
229
230   =for html <hr> <img src="thang.png">
231   <p> This is a raw HTML paragraph </p>
232
233 This means the same thing as the above "=begin html" ... "=end html"
234 region.
235
236 That is, with "=for", you can have only one paragraph's worth
237 of text (i.e., the text in "=foo targetname text..."), but with
238 "=begin targetname" ... "=end targetname", you can have any amount
239 of stuff in between.  (Note that there still must be a blank line
240 after the "=begin" command and a blank line before the "=end"
241 command.
242
243 Here are some examples of how to use these:
244
245   =begin html
246
247   <br>Figure 1.<br><IMG SRC="figure1.png"><br>
248
249   =end html
250
251   =begin text
252
253     ---------------
254     |  foo        |
255     |        bar  |
256     ---------------
257
258   ^^^^ Figure 1. ^^^^
259
260   =end text
261
262 Some format names that formatters currently are known to accept
263 include "roff", "man", "latex", "tex", "text", and "html".  (Some
264 formatters will treat some of these as synonyms.)
265
266 A format name of "comment" is common for just making notes (presumably
267 to yourself) that won't appear in any formatted version of the Pod
268 document:
269
270   =for comment
271   Make sure that all the available options are documented!
272
273 Some I<formatnames> will require a leading colon (as in
274 C<"=for :formatname">, or
275 C<"=begin :formatname" ... "=end :formatname">),
276 to signal that the text is not raw data, but instead I<is> Pod text
277 (i.e., possibly containing formatting codes) that's just not for
278 normal formatting (e.g., may not be a normal-use paragraph, but might
279 be for formatting as a footnote).
280
281 =item C<=encoding I<encodingname>>
282 X<=encoding> X<encoding>
283
284 This command is used for declaring the encoding of a document.  Most
285 users won't need this; but if your encoding isn't US-ASCII or Latin-1,
286 then put a C<=encoding I<encodingname>> command early in the document so
287 that pod formatters will know how to decode the document.  For
288 I<encodingname>, use a name recognized by the L<Encode::Supported>
289 module.  Examples:
290
291   =encoding utf8
292
293   =encoding koi8-r
294   
295   =encoding ShiftJIS
296   
297   =encoding big5
298
299 =back
300
301 C<=encoding> affects the whole document, and must occur only once.
302
303 And don't forget, when using any other command, that the command lasts up
304 until the end of its I<paragraph>, not its line.  So in the
305 examples below, you can see that every command needs the blank
306 line after it, to end its paragraph.
307
308 Some examples of lists include:
309
310   =over
311
312   =item *
313
314   First item
315
316   =item *
317
318   Second item
319
320   =back
321
322   =over
323
324   =item Foo()
325
326   Description of Foo function
327
328   =item Bar()
329
330   Description of Bar function
331
332   =back
333
334
335 =head2 Formatting Codes
336 X<POD, formatting code> X<formatting code>
337 X<POD, interior sequence> X<interior sequence>
338
339 In ordinary paragraphs and in some command paragraphs, various
340 formatting codes (a.k.a. "interior sequences") can be used:
341
342 =for comment
343  "interior sequences" is such an opaque term.
344  Prefer "formatting codes" instead.
345
346 =over
347
348 =item C<IE<lt>textE<gt>> -- italic text
349 X<I> X<< IZ<><> >> X<POD, formatting code, italic> X<italic>
350
351 Used for emphasis ("C<be IE<lt>careful!E<gt>>") and parameters
352 ("C<redo IE<lt>LABELE<gt>>")
353
354 =item C<BE<lt>textE<gt>> -- bold text
355 X<B> X<< BZ<><> >> X<POD, formatting code, bold> X<bold>
356
357 Used for switches ("C<perl's BE<lt>-nE<gt> switch>"), programs
358 ("C<some systems provide a BE<lt>chfnE<gt> for that>"),
359 emphasis ("C<be BE<lt>careful!E<gt>>"), and so on
360 ("C<and that feature is known as BE<lt>autovivificationE<gt>>").
361
362 =item C<CE<lt>codeE<gt>> -- code text
363 X<C> X<< CZ<><> >> X<POD, formatting code, code> X<code>
364
365 Renders code in a typewriter font, or gives some other indication that
366 this represents program text ("C<CE<lt>gmtime($^T)E<gt>>") or some other
367 form of computerese ("C<CE<lt>drwxr-xr-xE<gt>>").
368
369 =item C<LE<lt>nameE<gt>> -- a hyperlink
370 X<L> X<< LZ<><> >> X<POD, formatting code, hyperlink> X<hyperlink>
371
372 There are various syntaxes, listed below.  In the syntaxes given,
373 C<text>, C<name>, and C<section> cannot contain the characters
374 '/' and '|'; and any '<' or '>' should be matched.
375
376 =over
377
378 =item *
379
380 C<LE<lt>nameE<gt>>
381
382 Link to a Perl manual page (e.g., C<LE<lt>Net::PingE<gt>>).  Note
383 that C<name> should not contain spaces.  This syntax
384 is also occasionally used for references to Unix man pages, as in
385 C<LE<lt>crontab(5)E<gt>>.
386
387 =item *
388
389 C<LE<lt>name/"sec"E<gt>> or C<LE<lt>name/secE<gt>>
390
391 Link to a section in other manual page.  E.g.,
392 C<LE<lt>perlsyn/"For Loops"E<gt>>
393
394 =item *
395
396 C<LE<lt>/"sec"E<gt>> or C<LE<lt>/secE<gt>>
397
398 Link to a section in this manual page.  E.g.,
399 C<LE<lt>/"Object Methods"E<gt>>
400
401 =back
402
403 A section is started by the named heading or item.  For
404 example, C<LE<lt>perlvar/$.E<gt>> or C<LE<lt>perlvar/"$."E<gt>> both
405 link to the section started by "C<=item $.>" in perlvar.  And
406 C<LE<lt>perlsyn/For LoopsE<gt>> or C<LE<lt>perlsyn/"For Loops"E<gt>>
407 both link to the section started by "C<=head2 For Loops>"
408 in perlsyn.
409
410 To control what text is used for display, you
411 use "C<LE<lt>text|...E<gt>>", as in:
412
413 =over
414
415 =item *
416
417 C<LE<lt>text|nameE<gt>>
418
419 Link this text to that manual page.  E.g.,
420 C<LE<lt>Perl Error Messages|perldiagE<gt>>
421
422 =item *
423
424 C<LE<lt>text|name/"sec"E<gt>> or C<LE<lt>text|name/secE<gt>>
425
426 Link this text to that section in that manual page.  E.g.,
427 C<LE<lt>postfix "if"|perlsyn/"Statement Modifiers"E<gt>>
428
429 =item *
430
431 C<LE<lt>text|/"sec"E<gt>> or C<LE<lt>text|/secE<gt>>
432 or C<LE<lt>text|"sec"E<gt>>
433
434 Link this text to that section in this manual page.  E.g.,
435 C<LE<lt>the various attributes|/"Member Data"E<gt>>
436
437 =back
438
439 Or you can link to a web page:
440
441 =over
442
443 =item *
444
445 C<LE<lt>scheme:...E<gt>>
446
447 C<LE<lt>text|scheme:...E<gt>>
448
449 Links to an absolute URL.  For example, C<LE<lt>http://www.perl.org/E<gt>> or
450 C<LE<lt>The Perl Home Page|http://www.perl.org/E<gt>>.
451
452 =back
453
454 =item C<EE<lt>escapeE<gt>> -- a character escape
455 X<E> X<< EZ<><> >> X<POD, formatting code, escape> X<escape>
456
457 Very similar to HTML/XML C<&I<foo>;> "entity references":
458
459 =over
460
461 =item *
462
463 C<EE<lt>ltE<gt>> -- a literal E<lt> (less than)
464
465 =item *
466
467 C<EE<lt>gtE<gt>> -- a literal E<gt> (greater than)
468
469 =item *
470
471 C<EE<lt>verbarE<gt>> -- a literal | (I<ver>tical I<bar>)
472
473 =item *
474
475 C<EE<lt>solE<gt>> -- a literal / (I<sol>idus)
476
477 The above four are optional except in other formatting codes,
478 notably C<LE<lt>...E<gt>>, and when preceded by a
479 capital letter.
480
481 =item *
482
483 C<EE<lt>htmlnameE<gt>>
484
485 Some non-numeric HTML entity name, such as C<EE<lt>eacuteE<gt>>,
486 meaning the same thing as C<&eacute;> in HTML -- i.e., a lowercase
487 e with an acute (/-shaped) accent.
488
489 =item *
490
491 C<EE<lt>numberE<gt>>
492
493 The ASCII/Latin-1/Unicode character with that number.  A
494 leading "0x" means that I<number> is hex, as in
495 C<EE<lt>0x201EE<gt>>.  A leading "0" means that I<number> is octal,
496 as in C<EE<lt>075E<gt>>.  Otherwise I<number> is interpreted as being
497 in decimal, as in C<EE<lt>181E<gt>>.
498
499 Note that older Pod formatters might not recognize octal or
500 hex numeric escapes, and that many formatters cannot reliably
501 render characters above 255.  (Some formatters may even have
502 to use compromised renderings of Latin-1 characters, like
503 rendering C<EE<lt>eacuteE<gt>> as just a plain "e".)
504
505 =back
506
507 =item C<FE<lt>filenameE<gt>> -- used for filenames
508 X<F> X<< FZ<><> >> X<POD, formatting code, filename> X<filename>
509
510 Typically displayed in italics.  Example: "C<FE<lt>.cshrcE<gt>>"
511
512 =item C<SE<lt>textE<gt>> -- text contains non-breaking spaces
513 X<S> X<< SZ<><> >> X<POD, formatting code, non-breaking space> 
514 X<non-breaking space>
515
516 This means that the words in I<text> should not be broken
517 across lines.  Example: S<C<SE<lt>$x ? $y : $zE<gt>>>.
518
519 =item C<XE<lt>topic nameE<gt>> -- an index entry
520 X<X> X<< XZ<><> >> X<POD, formatting code, index entry> X<index entry>
521
522 This is ignored by most formatters, but some may use it for building
523 indexes.  It always renders as empty-string.
524 Example: C<XE<lt>absolutizing relative URLsE<gt>>
525
526 =item C<ZE<lt>E<gt>> -- a null (zero-effect) formatting code
527 X<Z> X<< ZZ<><> >> X<POD, formatting code, null> X<null>
528
529 This is rarely used.  It's one way to get around using an
530 EE<lt>...E<gt> code sometimes.  For example, instead of
531 "C<NEE<lt>ltE<gt>3>" (for "NE<lt>3") you could write
532 "C<NZE<lt>E<gt>E<lt>3>" (the "ZE<lt>E<gt>" breaks up the "N" and
533 the "E<lt>" so they can't be considered
534 the part of a (fictitious) "NE<lt>...E<gt>" code).
535
536 =for comment
537  This was formerly explained as a "zero-width character".  But it in
538  most parser models, it parses to nothing at all, as opposed to parsing
539  as if it were a E<zwnj> or E<zwj>, which are REAL zero-width characters.
540  So "width" and "character" are exactly the wrong words.
541
542 =back
543
544 Most of the time, you will need only a single set of angle brackets to
545 delimit the beginning and end of formatting codes.  However,
546 sometimes you will want to put a real right angle bracket (a
547 greater-than sign, '>') inside of a formatting code.  This is particularly
548 common when using a formatting code to provide a different font-type for a
549 snippet of code.  As with all things in Perl, there is more than
550 one way to do it.  One way is to simply escape the closing bracket
551 using an C<E> code:
552
553     C<$a E<lt>=E<gt> $b>
554
555 This will produce: "C<$a E<lt>=E<gt> $b>"
556
557 A more readable, and perhaps more "plain" way is to use an alternate
558 set of delimiters that doesn't require a single ">" to be escaped.
559 Doubled angle brackets ("<<" and ">>") may be used I<if and only if there is
560 whitespace right after the opening delimiter and whitespace right
561 before the closing delimiter!>  For example, the following will
562 do the trick:
563 X<POD, formatting code, escaping with multiple brackets>
564
565     C<< $a <=> $b >>
566
567 In fact, you can use as many repeated angle-brackets as you like so
568 long as you have the same number of them in the opening and closing
569 delimiters, and make sure that whitespace immediately follows the last
570 '<' of the opening delimiter, and immediately precedes the first '>'
571 of the closing delimiter.  (The whitespace is ignored.)  So the
572 following will also work:
573 X<POD, formatting code, escaping with multiple brackets>
574
575     C<<< $a <=> $b >>>
576     C<<<<  $a <=> $b     >>>>
577
578 And they all mean exactly the same as this:
579
580     C<$a E<lt>=E<gt> $b>
581
582 The multiple-bracket form does not affect the interpretation of the contents of
583 the formatting code, only how it must end.  That means that the examples above
584 are also exactly the same as this:
585
586     C<< $a E<lt>=E<gt> $b >>
587
588 As a further example, this means that if you wanted to put these bits of
589 code in C<C> (code) style:
590
591     open(X, ">>thing.dat") || die $!
592     $foo->bar();
593
594 you could do it like so:
595
596     C<<< open(X, ">>thing.dat") || die $! >>>
597     C<< $foo->bar(); >>
598
599 which is presumably easier to read than the old way:
600
601     C<open(X, "E<gt>E<gt>thing.dat") || die $!>
602     C<$foo-E<gt>bar();>
603
604 This is currently supported by pod2text (Pod::Text), pod2man (Pod::Man),
605 and any other pod2xxx or Pod::Xxxx translators that use
606 Pod::Parser 1.093 or later, or Pod::Tree 1.02 or later.
607
608 =head2 The Intent
609 X<POD, intent of>
610
611 The intent is simplicity of use, not power of expression.  Paragraphs
612 look like paragraphs (block format), so that they stand out
613 visually, and so that I could run them through C<fmt> easily to reformat
614 them (that's F7 in my version of B<vi>, or Esc Q in my version of
615 B<emacs>).  I wanted the translator to always leave the C<'> and C<`> and
616 C<"> quotes alone, in verbatim mode, so I could slurp in a
617 working program, shift it over four spaces, and have it print out, er,
618 verbatim.  And presumably in a monospace font.
619
620 The Pod format is not necessarily sufficient for writing a book.  Pod
621 is just meant to be an idiot-proof common source for nroff, HTML,
622 TeX, and other markup languages, as used for online
623 documentation.  Translators exist for B<pod2text>, B<pod2html>,
624 B<pod2man> (that's for nroff(1) and troff(1)), B<pod2latex>, and
625 B<pod2fm>.  Various others are available in CPAN.
626
627
628 =head2 Embedding Pods in Perl Modules
629 X<POD, embedding>
630
631 You can embed Pod documentation in your Perl modules and scripts.
632 Start your documentation with an empty line, a "=head1" command at the
633 beginning, and end it with a "=cut" command and an empty line.  Perl
634 will ignore the Pod text.  See any of the supplied library modules for
635 examples.  If you're going to put your Pod at the end of the file, and
636 you're using an __END__ or __DATA__ cut mark, make sure to put an
637 empty line there before the first Pod command.
638
639   __END__
640
641   =head1 NAME
642
643   Time::Local - efficiently compute time from local and GMT time
644
645 Without that empty line before the "=head1", many translators wouldn't
646 have recognized the "=head1" as starting a Pod block.
647
648 =head2 Hints for Writing Pod
649
650 =over
651
652 =item *
653 X<podchecker> X<POD, validating>
654
655 The B<podchecker> command is provided for checking Pod syntax for errors
656 and warnings.  For example, it checks for completely blank lines in
657 Pod blocks and for unknown commands and formatting codes.  You should
658 still also pass your document through one or more translators and proofread
659 the result, or print out the result and proofread that.  Some of the
660 problems found may be bugs in the translators, which you may or may not
661 wish to work around.
662
663 =item *
664
665 If you're more familiar with writing in HTML than with writing in Pod, you
666 can try your hand at writing documentation in simple HTML, and converting
667 it to Pod with the experimental L<Pod::HTML2Pod|Pod::HTML2Pod> module,
668 (available in CPAN), and looking at the resulting code.  The experimental
669 L<Pod::PXML|Pod::PXML> module in CPAN might also be useful.
670
671 =item *
672
673 Many older Pod translators require the lines before every Pod
674 command and after every Pod command (including "=cut"!) to be a blank
675 line.  Having something like this:
676
677  # - - - - - - - - - - - -
678  =item $firecracker->boom()
679
680  This noisily detonates the firecracker object.
681  =cut
682  sub boom {
683  ...
684
685 ...will make such Pod translators completely fail to see the Pod block
686 at all.
687
688 Instead, have it like this:
689
690  # - - - - - - - - - - - -
691
692  =item $firecracker->boom()
693
694  This noisily detonates the firecracker object.
695
696  =cut
697
698  sub boom {
699  ...
700
701 =item *
702
703 Some older Pod translators require paragraphs (including command
704 paragraphs like "=head2 Functions") to be separated by I<completely>
705 empty lines.  If you have an apparently empty line with some spaces
706 on it, this might not count as a separator for those translators, and
707 that could cause odd formatting.
708
709 =item *
710
711 Older translators might add wording around an LE<lt>E<gt> link, so that
712 C<LE<lt>Foo::BarE<gt>> may become "the Foo::Bar manpage", for example.
713 So you shouldn't write things like C<the LE<lt>fooE<gt>
714 documentation>, if you want the translated document to read sensibly.
715 Instead, write C<the LE<lt>Foo::Bar|Foo::BarE<gt> documentation> or
716 C<LE<lt>the Foo::Bar documentation|Foo::BarE<gt>>, to control how the
717 link comes out.
718
719 =item *
720
721 Going past the 70th column in a verbatim block might be ungracefully
722 wrapped by some formatters.
723
724 =back
725
726 =head1 SEE ALSO
727
728 L<perlpodspec>, L<perlsyn/"PODs: Embedded Documentation">,
729 L<perlnewmod>, L<perldoc>, L<pod2html>, L<pod2man>, L<podchecker>.
730
731 =head1 AUTHOR
732
733 Larry Wall, Sean M. Burke
734
735 =cut