Convert some SvREFCNT_dec's to SvREFCNT_dec_NN's for efficiency
[perl.git] / pod / perldsc.pod
1 =head1 NAME
2 X<data structure> X<complex data structure> X<struct>
3
4 perldsc - Perl Data Structures Cookbook
5
6 =head1 DESCRIPTION
7
8 Perl lets us have complex data structures.  You can write something like
9 this and all of a sudden, you'd have an array with three dimensions!
10
11     for $x (1 .. 10) {
12         for $y (1 .. 10) {
13             for $z (1 .. 10) {
14                 $AoA[$x][$y][$z] =
15                     $x ** $y + $z;
16             }
17         }
18     }
19
20 Alas, however simple this may appear, underneath it's a much more
21 elaborate construct than meets the eye!
22
23 How do you print it out?  Why can't you say just C<print @AoA>?  How do
24 you sort it?  How can you pass it to a function or get one of these back
25 from a function?  Is it an object?  Can you save it to disk to read
26 back later?  How do you access whole rows or columns of that matrix?  Do
27 all the values have to be numeric?
28
29 As you see, it's quite easy to become confused.  While some small portion
30 of the blame for this can be attributed to the reference-based
31 implementation, it's really more due to a lack of existing documentation with
32 examples designed for the beginner.
33
34 This document is meant to be a detailed but understandable treatment of the
35 many different sorts of data structures you might want to develop.  It
36 should also serve as a cookbook of examples.  That way, when you need to
37 create one of these complex data structures, you can just pinch, pilfer, or
38 purloin a drop-in example from here.
39
40 Let's look at each of these possible constructs in detail.  There are separate
41 sections on each of the following:
42
43 =over 5
44
45 =item * arrays of arrays
46
47 =item * hashes of arrays
48
49 =item * arrays of hashes
50
51 =item * hashes of hashes
52
53 =item * more elaborate constructs
54
55 =back
56
57 But for now, let's look at general issues common to all
58 these types of data structures.
59
60 =head1 REFERENCES
61 X<reference> X<dereference> X<dereferencing> X<pointer>
62
63 The most important thing to understand about all data structures in
64 Perl--including multidimensional arrays--is that even though they might
65 appear otherwise, Perl C<@ARRAY>s and C<%HASH>es are all internally
66 one-dimensional.  They can hold only scalar values (meaning a string,
67 number, or a reference).  They cannot directly contain other arrays or
68 hashes, but instead contain I<references> to other arrays or hashes.
69 X<multidimensional array> X<array, multidimensional>
70
71 You can't use a reference to an array or hash in quite the same way that you
72 would a real array or hash.  For C or C++ programmers unused to
73 distinguishing between arrays and pointers to the same, this can be
74 confusing.  If so, just think of it as the difference between a structure
75 and a pointer to a structure.
76
77 You can (and should) read more about references in L<perlref>.
78 Briefly, references are rather like pointers that know what they
79 point to.  (Objects are also a kind of reference, but we won't be needing
80 them right away--if ever.)  This means that when you have something which
81 looks to you like an access to a two-or-more-dimensional array and/or hash,
82 what's really going on is that the base type is
83 merely a one-dimensional entity that contains references to the next
84 level.  It's just that you can I<use> it as though it were a
85 two-dimensional one.  This is actually the way almost all C
86 multidimensional arrays work as well.
87
88     $array[7][12]                       # array of arrays
89     $array[7]{string}                   # array of hashes
90     $hash{string}[7]                    # hash of arrays
91     $hash{string}{'another string'}     # hash of hashes
92
93 Now, because the top level contains only references, if you try to print
94 out your array in with a simple print() function, you'll get something
95 that doesn't look very nice, like this:
96
97     @AoA = ( [2, 3], [4, 5, 7], [0] );
98     print $AoA[1][2];
99   7
100     print @AoA;
101   ARRAY(0x83c38)ARRAY(0x8b194)ARRAY(0x8b1d0)
102
103
104 That's because Perl doesn't (ever) implicitly dereference your variables.
105 If you want to get at the thing a reference is referring to, then you have
106 to do this yourself using either prefix typing indicators, like
107 C<${$blah}>, C<@{$blah}>, C<@{$blah[$i]}>, or else postfix pointer arrows,
108 like C<$a-E<gt>[3]>, C<$h-E<gt>{fred}>, or even C<$ob-E<gt>method()-E<gt>[3]>.
109
110 =head1 COMMON MISTAKES
111
112 The two most common mistakes made in constructing something like
113 an array of arrays is either accidentally counting the number of
114 elements or else taking a reference to the same memory location
115 repeatedly.  Here's the case where you just get the count instead
116 of a nested array:
117
118     for $i (1..10) {
119         @array = somefunc($i);
120         $AoA[$i] = @array;      # WRONG!
121     }
122
123 That's just the simple case of assigning an array to a scalar and getting
124 its element count.  If that's what you really and truly want, then you
125 might do well to consider being a tad more explicit about it, like this:
126
127     for $i (1..10) {
128         @array = somefunc($i);
129         $counts[$i] = scalar @array;
130     }
131
132 Here's the case of taking a reference to the same memory location
133 again and again:
134
135     for $i (1..10) {
136         @array = somefunc($i);
137         $AoA[$i] = \@array;     # WRONG!
138     }
139
140 So, what's the big problem with that?  It looks right, doesn't it?
141 After all, I just told you that you need an array of references, so by
142 golly, you've made me one!
143
144 Unfortunately, while this is true, it's still broken.  All the references
145 in @AoA refer to the I<very same place>, and they will therefore all hold
146 whatever was last in @array!  It's similar to the problem demonstrated in
147 the following C program:
148
149     #include <pwd.h>
150     main() {
151         struct passwd *getpwnam(), *rp, *dp;
152         rp = getpwnam("root");
153         dp = getpwnam("daemon");
154
155         printf("daemon name is %s\nroot name is %s\n",
156                 dp->pw_name, rp->pw_name);
157     }
158
159 Which will print
160
161     daemon name is daemon
162     root name is daemon
163
164 The problem is that both C<rp> and C<dp> are pointers to the same location
165 in memory!  In C, you'd have to remember to malloc() yourself some new
166 memory.  In Perl, you'll want to use the array constructor C<[]> or the
167 hash constructor C<{}> instead.   Here's the right way to do the preceding
168 broken code fragments:
169 X<[]> X<{}>
170
171     for $i (1..10) {
172         @array = somefunc($i);
173         $AoA[$i] = [ @array ];
174     }
175
176 The square brackets make a reference to a new array with a I<copy>
177 of what's in @array at the time of the assignment.  This is what
178 you want.
179
180 Note that this will produce something similar, but it's
181 much harder to read:
182
183     for $i (1..10) {
184         @array = 0 .. $i;
185         @{$AoA[$i]} = @array;
186     }
187
188 Is it the same?  Well, maybe so--and maybe not.  The subtle difference
189 is that when you assign something in square brackets, you know for sure
190 it's always a brand new reference with a new I<copy> of the data.
191 Something else could be going on in this new case with the C<@{$AoA[$i]}>
192 dereference on the left-hand-side of the assignment.  It all depends on
193 whether C<$AoA[$i]> had been undefined to start with, or whether it
194 already contained a reference.  If you had already populated @AoA with
195 references, as in
196
197     $AoA[3] = \@another_array;
198
199 Then the assignment with the indirection on the left-hand-side would
200 use the existing reference that was already there:
201
202     @{$AoA[3]} = @array;
203
204 Of course, this I<would> have the "interesting" effect of clobbering
205 @another_array.  (Have you ever noticed how when a programmer says
206 something is "interesting", that rather than meaning "intriguing",
207 they're disturbingly more apt to mean that it's "annoying",
208 "difficult", or both?  :-)
209
210 So just remember always to use the array or hash constructors with C<[]>
211 or C<{}>, and you'll be fine, although it's not always optimally
212 efficient.
213
214 Surprisingly, the following dangerous-looking construct will
215 actually work out fine:
216
217     for $i (1..10) {
218         my @array = somefunc($i);
219         $AoA[$i] = \@array;
220     }
221
222 That's because my() is more of a run-time statement than it is a
223 compile-time declaration I<per se>.  This means that the my() variable is
224 remade afresh each time through the loop.  So even though it I<looks> as
225 though you stored the same variable reference each time, you actually did
226 not!  This is a subtle distinction that can produce more efficient code at
227 the risk of misleading all but the most experienced of programmers.  So I
228 usually advise against teaching it to beginners.  In fact, except for
229 passing arguments to functions, I seldom like to see the gimme-a-reference
230 operator (backslash) used much at all in code.  Instead, I advise
231 beginners that they (and most of the rest of us) should try to use the
232 much more easily understood constructors C<[]> and C<{}> instead of
233 relying upon lexical (or dynamic) scoping and hidden reference-counting to
234 do the right thing behind the scenes.
235
236 In summary:
237
238     $AoA[$i] = [ @array ];      # usually best
239     $AoA[$i] = \@array;         # perilous; just how my() was that array?
240     @{ $AoA[$i] } = @array;     # way too tricky for most programmers
241
242
243 =head1 CAVEAT ON PRECEDENCE
244 X<dereference, precedence> X<dereferencing, precedence>
245
246 Speaking of things like C<@{$AoA[$i]}>, the following are actually the
247 same thing:
248 X<< -> >>
249
250     $aref->[2][2]       # clear
251     $$aref[2][2]        # confusing
252
253 That's because Perl's precedence rules on its five prefix dereferencers
254 (which look like someone swearing: C<$ @ * % &>) make them bind more
255 tightly than the postfix subscripting brackets or braces!  This will no
256 doubt come as a great shock to the C or C++ programmer, who is quite
257 accustomed to using C<*a[i]> to mean what's pointed to by the I<i'th>
258 element of C<a>.  That is, they first take the subscript, and only then
259 dereference the thing at that subscript.  That's fine in C, but this isn't C.
260
261 The seemingly equivalent construct in Perl, C<$$aref[$i]> first does
262 the deref of $aref, making it take $aref as a reference to an
263 array, and then dereference that, and finally tell you the I<i'th> value
264 of the array pointed to by $AoA. If you wanted the C notion, you'd have to
265 write C<${$AoA[$i]}> to force the C<$AoA[$i]> to get evaluated first
266 before the leading C<$> dereferencer.
267
268 =head1 WHY YOU SHOULD ALWAYS C<use strict>
269
270 If this is starting to sound scarier than it's worth, relax.  Perl has
271 some features to help you avoid its most common pitfalls.  The best
272 way to avoid getting confused is to start every program like this:
273
274     #!/usr/bin/perl -w
275     use strict;
276
277 This way, you'll be forced to declare all your variables with my() and
278 also disallow accidental "symbolic dereferencing".  Therefore if you'd done
279 this:
280
281     my $aref = [
282         [ "fred", "barney", "pebbles", "bambam", "dino", ],
283         [ "homer", "bart", "marge", "maggie", ],
284         [ "george", "jane", "elroy", "judy", ],
285     ];
286
287     print $aref[2][2];
288
289 The compiler would immediately flag that as an error I<at compile time>,
290 because you were accidentally accessing C<@aref>, an undeclared
291 variable, and it would thereby remind you to write instead:
292
293     print $aref->[2][2]
294
295 =head1 DEBUGGING
296 X<data structure, debugging> X<complex data structure, debugging>
297 X<AoA, debugging> X<HoA, debugging> X<AoH, debugging> X<HoH, debugging>
298 X<array of arrays, debugging> X<hash of arrays, debugging>
299 X<array of hashes, debugging> X<hash of hashes, debugging>
300
301 You can use the debugger's C<x> command to dump out complex data structures.
302 For example, given the assignment to $AoA above, here's the debugger output:
303
304     DB<1> x $AoA
305     $AoA = ARRAY(0x13b5a0)
306        0  ARRAY(0x1f0a24)
307           0  'fred'
308           1  'barney'
309           2  'pebbles'
310           3  'bambam'
311           4  'dino'
312        1  ARRAY(0x13b558)
313           0  'homer'
314           1  'bart'
315           2  'marge'
316           3  'maggie'
317        2  ARRAY(0x13b540)
318           0  'george'
319           1  'jane'
320           2  'elroy'
321           3  'judy'
322
323 =head1 CODE EXAMPLES
324
325 Presented with little comment (these will get their own manpages someday)
326 here are short code examples illustrating access of various
327 types of data structures.
328
329 =head1 ARRAYS OF ARRAYS
330 X<array of arrays> X<AoA>
331
332 =head2 Declaration of an ARRAY OF ARRAYS
333
334  @AoA = (
335         [ "fred", "barney" ],
336         [ "george", "jane", "elroy" ],
337         [ "homer", "marge", "bart" ],
338       );
339
340 =head2 Generation of an ARRAY OF ARRAYS
341
342  # reading from file
343  while ( <> ) {
344      push @AoA, [ split ];
345  }
346
347  # calling a function
348  for $i ( 1 .. 10 ) {
349      $AoA[$i] = [ somefunc($i) ];
350  }
351
352  # using temp vars
353  for $i ( 1 .. 10 ) {
354      @tmp = somefunc($i);
355      $AoA[$i] = [ @tmp ];
356  }
357
358  # add to an existing row
359  push @{ $AoA[0] }, "wilma", "betty";
360
361 =head2 Access and Printing of an ARRAY OF ARRAYS
362
363  # one element
364  $AoA[0][0] = "Fred";
365
366  # another element
367  $AoA[1][1] =~ s/(\w)/\u$1/;
368
369  # print the whole thing with refs
370  for $aref ( @AoA ) {
371      print "\t [ @$aref ],\n";
372  }
373
374  # print the whole thing with indices
375  for $i ( 0 .. $#AoA ) {
376      print "\t [ @{$AoA[$i]} ],\n";
377  }
378
379  # print the whole thing one at a time
380  for $i ( 0 .. $#AoA ) {
381      for $j ( 0 .. $#{ $AoA[$i] } ) {
382          print "elt $i $j is $AoA[$i][$j]\n";
383      }
384  }
385
386 =head1 HASHES OF ARRAYS
387 X<hash of arrays> X<HoA>
388
389 =head2 Declaration of a HASH OF ARRAYS
390
391  %HoA = (
392         flintstones        => [ "fred", "barney" ],
393         jetsons            => [ "george", "jane", "elroy" ],
394         simpsons           => [ "homer", "marge", "bart" ],
395       );
396
397 =head2 Generation of a HASH OF ARRAYS
398
399  # reading from file
400  # flintstones: fred barney wilma dino
401  while ( <> ) {
402      next unless s/^(.*?):\s*//;
403      $HoA{$1} = [ split ];
404  }
405
406  # reading from file; more temps
407  # flintstones: fred barney wilma dino
408  while ( $line = <> ) {
409      ($who, $rest) = split /:\s*/, $line, 2;
410      @fields = split ' ', $rest;
411      $HoA{$who} = [ @fields ];
412  }
413
414  # calling a function that returns a list
415  for $group ( "simpsons", "jetsons", "flintstones" ) {
416      $HoA{$group} = [ get_family($group) ];
417  }
418
419  # likewise, but using temps
420  for $group ( "simpsons", "jetsons", "flintstones" ) {
421      @members = get_family($group);
422      $HoA{$group} = [ @members ];
423  }
424
425  # append new members to an existing family
426  push @{ $HoA{"flintstones"} }, "wilma", "betty";
427
428 =head2 Access and Printing of a HASH OF ARRAYS
429
430  # one element
431  $HoA{flintstones}[0] = "Fred";
432
433  # another element
434  $HoA{simpsons}[1] =~ s/(\w)/\u$1/;
435
436  # print the whole thing
437  foreach $family ( keys %HoA ) {
438      print "$family: @{ $HoA{$family} }\n"
439  }
440
441  # print the whole thing with indices
442  foreach $family ( keys %HoA ) {
443      print "family: ";
444      foreach $i ( 0 .. $#{ $HoA{$family} } ) {
445          print " $i = $HoA{$family}[$i]";
446      }
447      print "\n";
448  }
449
450  # print the whole thing sorted by number of members
451  foreach $family ( sort { @{$HoA{$b}} <=> @{$HoA{$a}} } keys %HoA ) {
452      print "$family: @{ $HoA{$family} }\n"
453  }
454
455  # print the whole thing sorted by number of members and name
456  foreach $family ( sort {
457                             @{$HoA{$b}} <=> @{$HoA{$a}}
458                                         ||
459                                     $a cmp $b
460             } keys %HoA )
461  {
462      print "$family: ", join(", ", sort @{ $HoA{$family} }), "\n";
463  }
464
465 =head1 ARRAYS OF HASHES
466 X<array of hashes> X<AoH>
467
468 =head2 Declaration of an ARRAY OF HASHES
469
470  @AoH = (
471         {
472             Lead     => "fred",
473             Friend   => "barney",
474         },
475         {
476             Lead     => "george",
477             Wife     => "jane",
478             Son      => "elroy",
479         },
480         {
481             Lead     => "homer",
482             Wife     => "marge",
483             Son      => "bart",
484         }
485   );
486
487 =head2 Generation of an ARRAY OF HASHES
488
489  # reading from file
490  # format: LEAD=fred FRIEND=barney
491  while ( <> ) {
492      $rec = {};
493      for $field ( split ) {
494          ($key, $value) = split /=/, $field;
495          $rec->{$key} = $value;
496      }
497      push @AoH, $rec;
498  }
499
500
501  # reading from file
502  # format: LEAD=fred FRIEND=barney
503  # no temp
504  while ( <> ) {
505      push @AoH, { split /[\s+=]/ };
506  }
507
508  # calling a function  that returns a key/value pair list, like
509  # "lead","fred","daughter","pebbles"
510  while ( %fields = getnextpairset() ) {
511      push @AoH, { %fields };
512  }
513
514  # likewise, but using no temp vars
515  while (<>) {
516      push @AoH, { parsepairs($_) };
517  }
518
519  # add key/value to an element
520  $AoH[0]{pet} = "dino";
521  $AoH[2]{pet} = "santa's little helper";
522
523 =head2 Access and Printing of an ARRAY OF HASHES
524
525  # one element
526  $AoH[0]{lead} = "fred";
527
528  # another element
529  $AoH[1]{lead} =~ s/(\w)/\u$1/;
530
531  # print the whole thing with refs
532  for $href ( @AoH ) {
533      print "{ ";
534      for $role ( keys %$href ) {
535          print "$role=$href->{$role} ";
536      }
537      print "}\n";
538  }
539
540  # print the whole thing with indices
541  for $i ( 0 .. $#AoH ) {
542      print "$i is { ";
543      for $role ( keys %{ $AoH[$i] } ) {
544          print "$role=$AoH[$i]{$role} ";
545      }
546      print "}\n";
547  }
548
549  # print the whole thing one at a time
550  for $i ( 0 .. $#AoH ) {
551      for $role ( keys %{ $AoH[$i] } ) {
552          print "elt $i $role is $AoH[$i]{$role}\n";
553      }
554  }
555
556 =head1 HASHES OF HASHES
557 X<hash of hashes> X<HoH>
558
559 =head2 Declaration of a HASH OF HASHES
560
561  %HoH = (
562         flintstones => {
563                 lead      => "fred",
564                 pal       => "barney",
565         },
566         jetsons     => {
567                 lead      => "george",
568                 wife      => "jane",
569                 "his boy" => "elroy",
570         },
571         simpsons    => {
572                 lead      => "homer",
573                 wife      => "marge",
574                 kid       => "bart",
575         },
576  );
577
578 =head2 Generation of a HASH OF HASHES
579
580  # reading from file
581  # flintstones: lead=fred pal=barney wife=wilma pet=dino
582  while ( <> ) {
583      next unless s/^(.*?):\s*//;
584      $who = $1;
585      for $field ( split ) {
586          ($key, $value) = split /=/, $field;
587          $HoH{$who}{$key} = $value;
588      }
589
590
591  # reading from file; more temps
592  while ( <> ) {
593      next unless s/^(.*?):\s*//;
594      $who = $1;
595      $rec = {};
596      $HoH{$who} = $rec;
597      for $field ( split ) {
598          ($key, $value) = split /=/, $field;
599          $rec->{$key} = $value;
600      }
601  }
602
603  # calling a function  that returns a key,value hash
604  for $group ( "simpsons", "jetsons", "flintstones" ) {
605      $HoH{$group} = { get_family($group) };
606  }
607
608  # likewise, but using temps
609  for $group ( "simpsons", "jetsons", "flintstones" ) {
610      %members = get_family($group);
611      $HoH{$group} = { %members };
612  }
613
614  # append new members to an existing family
615  %new_folks = (
616      wife => "wilma",
617      pet  => "dino",
618  );
619
620  for $what (keys %new_folks) {
621      $HoH{flintstones}{$what} = $new_folks{$what};
622  }
623
624 =head2 Access and Printing of a HASH OF HASHES
625
626  # one element
627  $HoH{flintstones}{wife} = "wilma";
628
629  # another element
630  $HoH{simpsons}{lead} =~ s/(\w)/\u$1/;
631
632  # print the whole thing
633  foreach $family ( keys %HoH ) {
634      print "$family: { ";
635      for $role ( keys %{ $HoH{$family} } ) {
636          print "$role=$HoH{$family}{$role} ";
637      }
638      print "}\n";
639  }
640
641  # print the whole thing  somewhat sorted
642  foreach $family ( sort keys %HoH ) {
643      print "$family: { ";
644      for $role ( sort keys %{ $HoH{$family} } ) {
645          print "$role=$HoH{$family}{$role} ";
646      }
647      print "}\n";
648  }
649
650
651  # print the whole thing sorted by number of members
652  foreach $family ( sort { keys %{$HoH{$b}} <=> keys %{$HoH{$a}} } keys %HoH ) {
653      print "$family: { ";
654      for $role ( sort keys %{ $HoH{$family} } ) {
655          print "$role=$HoH{$family}{$role} ";
656      }
657      print "}\n";
658  }
659
660  # establish a sort order (rank) for each role
661  $i = 0;
662  for ( qw(lead wife son daughter pal pet) ) { $rank{$_} = ++$i }
663
664  # now print the whole thing sorted by number of members
665  foreach $family ( sort { keys %{ $HoH{$b} } <=> keys %{ $HoH{$a} } } keys %HoH ) {
666      print "$family: { ";
667      # and print these according to rank order
668      for $role ( sort { $rank{$a} <=> $rank{$b} }  keys %{ $HoH{$family} } ) {
669          print "$role=$HoH{$family}{$role} ";
670      }
671      print "}\n";
672  }
673
674
675 =head1 MORE ELABORATE RECORDS
676 X<record> X<structure> X<struct>
677
678 =head2 Declaration of MORE ELABORATE RECORDS
679
680 Here's a sample showing how to create and use a record whose fields are of
681 many different sorts:
682
683      $rec = {
684          TEXT      => $string,
685          SEQUENCE  => [ @old_values ],
686          LOOKUP    => { %some_table },
687          THATCODE  => \&some_function,
688          THISCODE  => sub { $_[0] ** $_[1] },
689          HANDLE    => \*STDOUT,
690      };
691
692      print $rec->{TEXT};
693
694      print $rec->{SEQUENCE}[0];
695      $last = pop @ { $rec->{SEQUENCE} };
696
697      print $rec->{LOOKUP}{"key"};
698      ($first_k, $first_v) = each %{ $rec->{LOOKUP} };
699
700      $answer = $rec->{THATCODE}->($arg);
701      $answer = $rec->{THISCODE}->($arg1, $arg2);
702
703      # careful of extra block braces on fh ref
704      print { $rec->{HANDLE} } "a string\n";
705
706      use FileHandle;
707      $rec->{HANDLE}->autoflush(1);
708      $rec->{HANDLE}->print(" a string\n");
709
710 =head2 Declaration of a HASH OF COMPLEX RECORDS
711
712      %TV = (
713         flintstones => {
714             series   => "flintstones",
715             nights   => [ qw(monday thursday friday) ],
716             members  => [
717                 { name => "fred",    role => "lead", age  => 36, },
718                 { name => "wilma",   role => "wife", age  => 31, },
719                 { name => "pebbles", role => "kid",  age  =>  4, },
720             ],
721         },
722
723         jetsons     => {
724             series   => "jetsons",
725             nights   => [ qw(wednesday saturday) ],
726             members  => [
727                 { name => "george",  role => "lead", age  => 41, },
728                 { name => "jane",    role => "wife", age  => 39, },
729                 { name => "elroy",   role => "kid",  age  =>  9, },
730             ],
731          },
732
733         simpsons    => {
734             series   => "simpsons",
735             nights   => [ qw(monday) ],
736             members  => [
737                 { name => "homer", role => "lead", age  => 34, },
738                 { name => "marge", role => "wife", age => 37, },
739                 { name => "bart",  role => "kid",  age  =>  11, },
740             ],
741          },
742       );
743
744 =head2 Generation of a HASH OF COMPLEX RECORDS
745
746      # reading from file
747      # this is most easily done by having the file itself be
748      # in the raw data format as shown above.  perl is happy
749      # to parse complex data structures if declared as data, so
750      # sometimes it's easiest to do that
751
752      # here's a piece by piece build up
753      $rec = {};
754      $rec->{series} = "flintstones";
755      $rec->{nights} = [ find_days() ];
756
757      @members = ();
758      # assume this file in field=value syntax
759      while (<>) {
760          %fields = split /[\s=]+/;
761          push @members, { %fields };
762      }
763      $rec->{members} = [ @members ];
764
765      # now remember the whole thing
766      $TV{ $rec->{series} } = $rec;
767
768      ###########################################################
769      # now, you might want to make interesting extra fields that
770      # include pointers back into the same data structure so if
771      # change one piece, it changes everywhere, like for example
772      # if you wanted a {kids} field that was a reference
773      # to an array of the kids' records without having duplicate
774      # records and thus update problems.
775      ###########################################################
776      foreach $family (keys %TV) {
777          $rec = $TV{$family}; # temp pointer
778          @kids = ();
779          for $person ( @{ $rec->{members} } ) {
780              if ($person->{role} =~ /kid|son|daughter/) {
781                  push @kids, $person;
782              }
783          }
784          # REMEMBER: $rec and $TV{$family} point to same data!!
785          $rec->{kids} = [ @kids ];
786      }
787
788      # you copied the array, but the array itself contains pointers
789      # to uncopied objects. this means that if you make bart get
790      # older via
791
792      $TV{simpsons}{kids}[0]{age}++;
793
794      # then this would also change in
795      print $TV{simpsons}{members}[2]{age};
796
797      # because $TV{simpsons}{kids}[0] and $TV{simpsons}{members}[2]
798      # both point to the same underlying anonymous hash table
799
800      # print the whole thing
801      foreach $family ( keys %TV ) {
802          print "the $family";
803          print " is on during @{ $TV{$family}{nights} }\n";
804          print "its members are:\n";
805          for $who ( @{ $TV{$family}{members} } ) {
806              print " $who->{name} ($who->{role}), age $who->{age}\n";
807          }
808          print "it turns out that $TV{$family}{lead} has ";
809          print scalar ( @{ $TV{$family}{kids} } ), " kids named ";
810          print join (", ", map { $_->{name} } @{ $TV{$family}{kids} } );
811          print "\n";
812      }
813
814 =head1 Database Ties
815
816 You cannot easily tie a multilevel data structure (such as a hash of
817 hashes) to a dbm file.  The first problem is that all but GDBM and
818 Berkeley DB have size limitations, but beyond that, you also have problems
819 with how references are to be represented on disk.  One experimental
820 module that does partially attempt to address this need is the MLDBM
821 module.  Check your nearest CPAN site as described in L<perlmodlib> for
822 source code to MLDBM.
823
824 =head1 SEE ALSO
825
826 L<perlref>, L<perllol>, L<perldata>, L<perlobj>
827
828 =head1 AUTHOR
829
830 Tom Christiansen <F<tchrist@perl.com>>