Move Encode from ext/ to cpan/
[perl.git] / cpan / Encode / lib / Encode / Encoding.pm
1 package Encode::Encoding;
2
3 # Base class for classes which implement encodings
4 use strict;
5 use warnings;
6 our $VERSION = do { my @r = ( q$Revision: 2.5 $ =~ /\d+/g ); sprintf "%d." . "%02d" x $#r, @r };
7
8 require Encode;
9
10 sub DEBUG { 0 }
11
12 sub Define {
13     my $obj       = shift;
14     my $canonical = shift;
15     $obj = bless { Name => $canonical }, $obj unless ref $obj;
16
17     # warn "$canonical => $obj\n";
18     Encode::define_encoding( $obj, $canonical, @_ );
19 }
20
21 sub name { return shift->{'Name'} }
22
23 sub mime_name{
24     require Encode::MIME::Name;
25     return Encode::MIME::Name::get_mime_name(shift->name);
26 }
27
28 # sub renew { return $_[0] }
29
30 sub renew {
31     my $self = shift;
32     my $clone = bless {%$self} => ref($self);
33     $clone->{renewed}++;    # so the caller can see it
34     DEBUG and warn $clone->{renewed};
35     return $clone;
36 }
37
38 sub renewed { return $_[0]->{renewed} || 0 }
39
40 *new_sequence = \&renew;
41
42 sub needs_lines { 0 }
43
44 sub perlio_ok {
45     eval { require PerlIO::encoding };
46     return $@ ? 0 : 1;
47 }
48
49 # (Temporary|legacy) methods
50
51 sub toUnicode   { shift->decode(@_) }
52 sub fromUnicode { shift->encode(@_) }
53
54 #
55 # Needs to be overloaded or just croak
56 #
57
58 sub encode {
59     require Carp;
60     my $obj = shift;
61     my $class = ref($obj) ? ref($obj) : $obj;
62     Carp::croak( $class . "->encode() not defined!" );
63 }
64
65 sub decode {
66     require Carp;
67     my $obj = shift;
68     my $class = ref($obj) ? ref($obj) : $obj;
69     Carp::croak( $class . "->encode() not defined!" );
70 }
71
72 sub DESTROY { }
73
74 1;
75 __END__
76
77 =head1 NAME
78
79 Encode::Encoding - Encode Implementation Base Class
80
81 =head1 SYNOPSIS
82
83   package Encode::MyEncoding;
84   use base qw(Encode::Encoding);
85
86   __PACKAGE__->Define(qw(myCanonical myAlias));
87
88 =head1 DESCRIPTION
89
90 As mentioned in L<Encode>, encodings are (in the current
91 implementation at least) defined as objects. The mapping of encoding
92 name to object is via the C<%Encode::Encoding> hash.  Though you can
93 directly manipulate this hash, it is strongly encouraged to use this
94 base class module and add encode() and decode() methods.
95
96 =head2 Methods you should implement
97
98 You are strongly encouraged to implement methods below, at least
99 either encode() or decode().
100
101 =over 4
102
103 =item -E<gt>encode($string [,$check])
104
105 MUST return the octet sequence representing I<$string>. 
106
107 =over 2
108
109 =item *
110
111 If I<$check> is true, it SHOULD modify I<$string> in place to remove
112 the converted part (i.e.  the whole string unless there is an error).
113 If perlio_ok() is true, SHOULD becomes MUST.
114
115 =item *
116
117 If an error occurs, it SHOULD return the octet sequence for the
118 fragment of string that has been converted and modify $string in-place
119 to remove the converted part leaving it starting with the problem
120 fragment.  If perlio_ok() is true, SHOULD becomes MUST.
121
122 =item *
123
124 If I<$check> is is false then C<encode> MUST  make a "best effort" to
125 convert the string - for example, by using a replacement character.
126
127 =back
128
129 =item -E<gt>decode($octets [,$check])
130
131 MUST return the string that I<$octets> represents. 
132
133 =over 2
134
135 =item *
136
137 If I<$check> is true, it SHOULD modify I<$octets> in place to remove
138 the converted part (i.e.  the whole sequence unless there is an
139 error).  If perlio_ok() is true, SHOULD becomes MUST.
140
141 =item *
142
143 If an error occurs, it SHOULD return the fragment of string that has
144 been converted and modify $octets in-place to remove the converted
145 part leaving it starting with the problem fragment.  If perlio_ok() is
146 true, SHOULD becomes MUST.
147
148 =item *
149
150 If I<$check> is false then C<decode> should make a "best effort" to
151 convert the string - for example by using Unicode's "\x{FFFD}" as a
152 replacement character.
153
154 =back
155
156 =back
157
158 If you want your encoding to work with L<encoding> pragma, you should
159 also implement the method below.
160
161 =over 4
162
163 =item -E<gt>cat_decode($destination, $octets, $offset, $terminator [,$check])
164
165 MUST decode I<$octets> with I<$offset> and concatenate it to I<$destination>.
166 Decoding will terminate when $terminator (a string) appears in output.
167 I<$offset> will be modified to the last $octets position at end of decode.
168 Returns true if $terminator appears output, else returns false.
169
170 =back
171
172 =head2 Other methods defined in Encode::Encodings
173
174 You do not have to override methods shown below unless you have to.
175
176 =over 4
177
178 =item -E<gt>name
179
180 Predefined As:
181
182   sub name  { return shift->{'Name'} }
183
184 MUST return the string representing the canonical name of the encoding.
185
186 =item -E<gt>mime_name
187
188 Predefined As:
189
190   sub mime_name{
191     require Encode::MIME::Name;
192     return Encode::MIME::Name::get_mime_name(shift->name);
193   }
194
195 MUST return the string representing the IANA charset name of the encoding.
196
197 =item -E<gt>renew
198
199 Predefined As:
200
201   sub renew {
202     my $self = shift;
203     my $clone = bless { %$self } => ref($self);
204     $clone->{renewed}++;
205     return $clone;
206   }
207
208 This method reconstructs the encoding object if necessary.  If you need
209 to store the state during encoding, this is where you clone your object.
210
211 PerlIO ALWAYS calls this method to make sure it has its own private
212 encoding object.
213
214 =item -E<gt>renewed
215
216 Predefined As:
217
218   sub renewed { $_[0]->{renewed} || 0 }
219
220 Tells whether the object is renewed (and how many times).  Some
221 modules emit C<Use of uninitialized value in null operation> warning
222 unless the value is numeric so return 0 for false.
223
224 =item -E<gt>perlio_ok()
225
226 Predefined As:
227
228   sub perlio_ok { 
229       eval{ require PerlIO::encoding };
230       return $@ ? 0 : 1;
231   }
232
233 If your encoding does not support PerlIO for some reasons, just;
234
235  sub perlio_ok { 0 }
236
237 =item -E<gt>needs_lines()
238
239 Predefined As:
240
241   sub needs_lines { 0 };
242
243 If your encoding can work with PerlIO but needs line buffering, you
244 MUST define this method so it returns true.  7bit ISO-2022 encodings
245 are one example that needs this.  When this method is missing, false
246 is assumed.
247
248 =back
249
250 =head2 Example: Encode::ROT13
251
252   package Encode::ROT13;
253   use strict;
254   use base qw(Encode::Encoding);
255
256   __PACKAGE__->Define('rot13');
257
258   sub encode($$;$){
259       my ($obj, $str, $chk) = @_;
260       $str =~ tr/A-Za-z/N-ZA-Mn-za-m/;
261       $_[1] = '' if $chk; # this is what in-place edit means
262       return $str;
263   }
264
265   # Jr pna or ynml yvxr guvf;
266   *decode = \&encode;
267
268   1;
269
270 =head1 Why the heck Encode API is different?
271
272 It should be noted that the I<$check> behaviour is different from the
273 outer public API. The logic is that the "unchecked" case is useful
274 when the encoding is part of a stream which may be reporting errors
275 (e.g. STDERR).  In such cases, it is desirable to get everything
276 through somehow without causing additional errors which obscure the
277 original one. Also, the encoding is best placed to know what the
278 correct replacement character is, so if that is the desired behaviour
279 then letting low level code do it is the most efficient.
280
281 By contrast, if I<$check> is true, the scheme above allows the
282 encoding to do as much as it can and tell the layer above how much
283 that was. What is lacking at present is a mechanism to report what
284 went wrong. The most likely interface will be an additional method
285 call to the object, or perhaps (to avoid forcing per-stream objects
286 on otherwise stateless encodings) an additional parameter.
287
288 It is also highly desirable that encoding classes inherit from
289 C<Encode::Encoding> as a base class. This allows that class to define
290 additional behaviour for all encoding objects.
291
292   package Encode::MyEncoding;
293   use base qw(Encode::Encoding);
294
295   __PACKAGE__->Define(qw(myCanonical myAlias));
296
297 to create an object with C<< bless {Name => ...}, $class >>, and call
298 define_encoding.  They inherit their C<name> method from
299 C<Encode::Encoding>.
300
301 =head2 Compiled Encodings
302
303 For the sake of speed and efficiency, most of the encodings are now
304 supported via a I<compiled form>: XS modules generated from UCM
305 files.   Encode provides the enc2xs tool to achieve that.  Please see
306 L<enc2xs> for more details.
307
308 =head1 SEE ALSO
309
310 L<perlmod>, L<enc2xs>
311
312 =begin future
313
314 =over 4
315
316 =item Scheme 1
317
318 The fixup routine gets passed the remaining fragment of string being
319 processed.  It modifies it in place to remove bytes/characters it can
320 understand and returns a string used to represent them.  For example:
321
322  sub fixup {
323    my $ch = substr($_[0],0,1,'');
324    return sprintf("\x{%02X}",ord($ch);
325  }
326
327 This scheme is close to how the underlying C code for Encode works,
328 but gives the fixup routine very little context.
329
330 =item Scheme 2
331
332 The fixup routine gets passed the original string, an index into
333 it of the problem area, and the output string so far.  It appends
334 what it wants to the output string and returns a new index into the
335 original string.  For example:
336
337  sub fixup {
338    # my ($s,$i,$d) = @_;
339    my $ch = substr($_[0],$_[1],1);
340    $_[2] .= sprintf("\x{%02X}",ord($ch);
341    return $_[1]+1;
342  }
343
344 This scheme gives maximal control to the fixup routine but is more
345 complicated to code, and may require that the internals of Encode be tweaked to
346 keep the original string intact.
347
348 =item Other Schemes
349
350 Hybrids of the above.
351
352 Multiple return values rather than in-place modifications.
353
354 Index into the string could be C<pos($str)> allowing C<s/\G...//>.
355
356 =back
357
358 =end future
359
360 =cut