Use two colons for lexsub warning
[perl.git] / pod / perllexwarn.pod
1 =head1 NAME
2 X<warning, lexical> X<warnings> X<warning>
3
4 perllexwarn - Perl Lexical Warnings
5
6 =head1 DESCRIPTION
7
8 The C<use warnings> pragma enables to control precisely what warnings are
9 to be enabled in which parts of a Perl program. It's a more flexible
10 alternative for both the command line flag B<-w> and the equivalent Perl
11 variable, C<$^W>.
12
13 This pragma works just like the C<strict> pragma.
14 This means that the scope of the warning pragma is limited to the
15 enclosing block. It also means that the pragma setting will not
16 leak across files (via C<use>, C<require> or C<do>). This allows
17 authors to independently define the degree of warning checks that will
18 be applied to their module.
19
20 By default, optional warnings are disabled, so any legacy code that
21 doesn't attempt to control the warnings will work unchanged.
22
23 All warnings are enabled in a block by either of these:
24
25     use warnings;
26     use warnings 'all';
27
28 Similarly all warnings are disabled in a block by either of these:
29
30     no warnings;
31     no warnings 'all';
32
33 For example, consider the code below:
34
35     use warnings;
36     my @a;
37     {
38         no warnings;
39         my $b = @a[0];
40     }
41     my $c = @a[0];
42
43 The code in the enclosing block has warnings enabled, but the inner
44 block has them disabled. In this case that means the assignment to the
45 scalar C<$c> will trip the C<"Scalar value @a[0] better written as $a[0]">
46 warning, but the assignment to the scalar C<$b> will not.
47
48 =head2 Default Warnings and Optional Warnings
49
50 Before the introduction of lexical warnings, Perl had two classes of
51 warnings: mandatory and optional. 
52
53 As its name suggests, if your code tripped a mandatory warning, you
54 would get a warning whether you wanted it or not.
55 For example, the code below would always produce an C<"isn't numeric">
56 warning about the "2:".
57
58     my $a = "2:" + 3;
59
60 With the introduction of lexical warnings, mandatory warnings now become
61 I<default> warnings. The difference is that although the previously
62 mandatory warnings are still enabled by default, they can then be
63 subsequently enabled or disabled with the lexical warning pragma. For
64 example, in the code below, an C<"isn't numeric"> warning will only
65 be reported for the C<$a> variable.
66
67     my $a = "2:" + 3;
68     no warnings;
69     my $b = "2:" + 3;
70
71 Note that neither the B<-w> flag or the C<$^W> can be used to
72 disable/enable default warnings. They are still mandatory in this case.
73
74 =head2 What's wrong with B<-w> and C<$^W>
75
76 Although very useful, the big problem with using B<-w> on the command
77 line to enable warnings is that it is all or nothing. Take the typical
78 scenario when you are writing a Perl program. Parts of the code you
79 will write yourself, but it's very likely that you will make use of
80 pre-written Perl modules. If you use the B<-w> flag in this case, you
81 end up enabling warnings in pieces of code that you haven't written.
82
83 Similarly, using C<$^W> to either disable or enable blocks of code is
84 fundamentally flawed. For a start, say you want to disable warnings in
85 a block of code. You might expect this to be enough to do the trick:
86
87      {
88          local ($^W) = 0;
89          my $a =+ 2;
90          my $b; chop $b;
91      }
92
93 When this code is run with the B<-w> flag, a warning will be produced
94 for the C<$a> line:  C<"Reversed += operator">.
95
96 The problem is that Perl has both compile-time and run-time warnings. To
97 disable compile-time warnings you need to rewrite the code like this:
98
99      {
100          BEGIN { $^W = 0 }
101          my $a =+ 2;
102          my $b; chop $b;
103      }
104
105 The other big problem with C<$^W> is the way you can inadvertently
106 change the warning setting in unexpected places in your code. For example,
107 when the code below is run (without the B<-w> flag), the second call
108 to C<doit> will trip a C<"Use of uninitialized value"> warning, whereas
109 the first will not.
110
111     sub doit
112     {
113         my $b; chop $b;
114     }
115
116     doit();
117
118     {
119         local ($^W) = 1;
120         doit()
121     }
122
123 This is a side-effect of C<$^W> being dynamically scoped.
124
125 Lexical warnings get around these limitations by allowing finer control
126 over where warnings can or can't be tripped.
127
128 =head2 Controlling Warnings from the Command Line
129
130 There are three Command Line flags that can be used to control when
131 warnings are (or aren't) produced:
132
133 =over 5
134
135 =item B<-w>
136 X<-w>
137
138 This is  the existing flag. If the lexical warnings pragma is B<not>
139 used in any of you code, or any of the modules that you use, this flag
140 will enable warnings everywhere. See L<Backward Compatibility> for
141 details of how this flag interacts with lexical warnings.
142
143 =item B<-W>
144 X<-W>
145
146 If the B<-W> flag is used on the command line, it will enable all warnings
147 throughout the program regardless of whether warnings were disabled
148 locally using C<no warnings> or C<$^W =0>. This includes all files that get
149 included via C<use>, C<require> or C<do>.
150 Think of it as the Perl equivalent of the "lint" command.
151
152 =item B<-X>
153 X<-X>
154
155 Does the exact opposite to the B<-W> flag, i.e. it disables all warnings.
156
157 =back
158
159 =head2 Backward Compatibility
160
161 If you are used to working with a version of Perl prior to the
162 introduction of lexically scoped warnings, or have code that uses both
163 lexical warnings and C<$^W>, this section will describe how they interact.
164
165 How Lexical Warnings interact with B<-w>/C<$^W>:
166
167 =over 5
168
169 =item 1.
170
171 If none of the three command line flags (B<-w>, B<-W> or B<-X>) that
172 control warnings is used and neither C<$^W> nor the C<warnings> pragma
173 are used, then default warnings will be enabled and optional warnings
174 disabled.
175 This means that legacy code that doesn't attempt to control the warnings
176 will work unchanged.
177
178 =item 2.
179
180 The B<-w> flag just sets the global C<$^W> variable as in 5.005. This
181 means that any legacy code that currently relies on manipulating C<$^W>
182 to control warning behavior will still work as is. 
183
184 =item 3.
185
186 Apart from now being a boolean, the C<$^W> variable operates in exactly
187 the same horrible uncontrolled global way, except that it cannot
188 disable/enable default warnings.
189
190 =item 4.
191
192 If a piece of code is under the control of the C<warnings> pragma,
193 both the C<$^W> variable and the B<-w> flag will be ignored for the
194 scope of the lexical warning.
195
196 =item 5.
197
198 The only way to override a lexical warnings setting is with the B<-W>
199 or B<-X> command line flags.
200
201 =back
202
203 The combined effect of 3 & 4 is that it will allow code which uses
204 the C<warnings> pragma to control the warning behavior of $^W-type
205 code (using a C<local $^W=0>) if it really wants to, but not vice-versa.
206
207 =head2 Category Hierarchy
208 X<warning, categories>
209
210 A hierarchy of "categories" have been defined to allow groups of warnings
211 to be enabled/disabled in isolation.
212
213 The current hierarchy is:
214
215     all -+
216          |
217          +- closure
218          |
219          +- deprecated
220          |
221          +- exiting
222          |
223          +- experimental --+
224          |                 |
225          |                 +- experimental::lexical_subs
226          |
227          +- glob
228          |
229          +- imprecision
230          |
231          +- io ------------+
232          |                 |
233          |                 +- closed
234          |                 |
235          |                 +- exec
236          |                 |
237          |                 +- layer
238          |                 |
239          |                 +- newline
240          |                 |
241          |                 +- pipe
242          |                 |
243          |                 +- unopened
244          |
245          +- misc
246          |
247          +- numeric
248          |
249          +- once
250          |
251          +- overflow
252          |
253          +- pack
254          |
255          +- portable
256          |
257          +- recursion
258          |
259          +- redefine
260          |
261          +- regexp
262          |
263          +- severe --------+
264          |                 |
265          |                 +- debugging
266          |                 |
267          |                 +- inplace
268          |                 |
269          |                 +- internal
270          |                 |
271          |                 +- malloc
272          |
273          +- signal
274          |
275          +- substr
276          |
277          +- syntax --------+
278          |                 |
279          |                 +- ambiguous
280          |                 |
281          |                 +- bareword
282          |                 |
283          |                 +- digit
284          |                 |
285          |                 +- illegalproto
286          |                 |
287          |                 +- parenthesis
288          |                 |
289          |                 +- precedence
290          |                 |
291          |                 +- printf
292          |                 |
293          |                 +- prototype
294          |                 |
295          |                 +- qw
296          |                 |
297          |                 +- reserved
298          |                 |
299          |                 +- semicolon
300          |
301          +- taint
302          |
303          +- threads
304          |
305          +- uninitialized
306          |
307          +- unpack
308          |
309          +- untie
310          |
311          +- utf8 ----------+
312          |                 |
313          |                 +- non_unicode
314          |                 |
315          |                 +- nonchar
316          |                 |
317          |                 +- surrogate
318          |
319          +- void
320
321 Just like the "strict" pragma any of these categories can be combined
322
323     use warnings qw(void redefine);
324     no warnings qw(io syntax untie);
325
326 Also like the "strict" pragma, if there is more than one instance of the
327 C<warnings> pragma in a given scope the cumulative effect is additive. 
328
329     use warnings qw(void); # only "void" warnings enabled
330     ...
331     use warnings qw(io);   # only "void" & "io" warnings enabled
332     ...
333     no warnings qw(void);  # only "io" warnings enabled
334
335 To determine which category a specific warning has been assigned to see
336 L<perldiag>.
337
338 Note: In Perl 5.6.1, the lexical warnings category "deprecated" was a
339 sub-category of the "syntax" category. It is now a top-level category
340 in its own right.
341
342 =head2 Fatal Warnings
343 X<warning, fatal>
344
345 The presence of the word "FATAL" in the category list will escalate any
346 warnings detected from the categories specified in the lexical scope
347 into fatal errors. In the code below, the use of C<time>, C<length>
348 and C<join> can all produce a C<"Useless use of xxx in void context">
349 warning.
350
351     use warnings;
352
353     time;
354
355     {
356         use warnings FATAL => qw(void);
357         length "abc";
358     }
359
360     join "", 1,2,3;
361
362     print "done\n";
363
364 When run it produces this output
365
366     Useless use of time in void context at fatal line 3.
367     Useless use of length in void context at fatal line 7.  
368
369 The scope where C<length> is used has escalated the C<void> warnings
370 category into a fatal error, so the program terminates immediately it
371 encounters the warning.
372
373 To explicitly turn off a "FATAL" warning you just disable the warning
374 it is associated with.  So, for example, to disable the "void" warning
375 in the example above, either of these will do the trick:
376
377     no warnings qw(void);
378     no warnings FATAL => qw(void);
379
380 If you want to downgrade a warning that has been escalated into a fatal
381 error back to a normal warning, you can use the "NONFATAL" keyword. For
382 example, the code below will promote all warnings into fatal errors,
383 except for those in the "syntax" category.
384
385     use warnings FATAL => 'all', NONFATAL => 'syntax';
386
387 =head2 Reporting Warnings from a Module
388 X<warning, reporting> X<warning, registering>
389
390 The C<warnings> pragma provides a number of functions that are useful for
391 module authors. These are used when you want to report a module-specific
392 warning to a calling module has enabled warnings via the C<warnings>
393 pragma.
394
395 Consider the module C<MyMod::Abc> below.
396
397     package MyMod::Abc;
398
399     use warnings::register;
400
401     sub open {
402         my $path = shift;
403         if ($path !~ m#^/#) {
404             warnings::warn("changing relative path to /var/abc")
405                 if warnings::enabled();
406             $path = "/var/abc/$path";
407         }
408     }
409
410     1;
411
412 The call to C<warnings::register> will create a new warnings category
413 called "MyMod::Abc", i.e. the new category name matches the current
414 package name. The C<open> function in the module will display a warning
415 message if it gets given a relative path as a parameter. This warnings
416 will only be displayed if the code that uses C<MyMod::Abc> has actually
417 enabled them with the C<warnings> pragma like below.
418
419     use MyMod::Abc;
420     use warnings 'MyMod::Abc';
421     ...
422     abc::open("../fred.txt");
423
424 It is also possible to test whether the pre-defined warnings categories are
425 set in the calling module with the C<warnings::enabled> function. Consider
426 this snippet of code:
427
428     package MyMod::Abc;
429
430     sub open {
431         warnings::warnif("deprecated", 
432                          "open is deprecated, use new instead");
433         new(@_);
434     }
435
436     sub new
437     ...
438     1;
439
440 The function C<open> has been deprecated, so code has been included to
441 display a warning message whenever the calling module has (at least) the
442 "deprecated" warnings category enabled. Something like this, say.
443
444     use warnings 'deprecated';
445     use MyMod::Abc;
446     ...
447     MyMod::Abc::open($filename);
448
449 Either the C<warnings::warn> or C<warnings::warnif> function should be
450 used to actually display the warnings message. This is because they can
451 make use of the feature that allows warnings to be escalated into fatal
452 errors. So in this case
453
454     use MyMod::Abc;
455     use warnings FATAL => 'MyMod::Abc';
456     ...
457     MyMod::Abc::open('../fred.txt');
458
459 the C<warnings::warnif> function will detect this and die after
460 displaying the warning message.
461
462 The three warnings functions, C<warnings::warn>, C<warnings::warnif>
463 and C<warnings::enabled> can optionally take an object reference in place
464 of a category name. In this case the functions will use the class name
465 of the object as the warnings category.
466
467 Consider this example:
468
469     package Original;
470
471     no warnings;
472     use warnings::register;
473
474     sub new
475     {
476         my $class = shift;
477         bless [], $class;
478     }
479
480     sub check
481     {
482         my $self = shift;
483         my $value = shift;
484
485         if ($value % 2 && warnings::enabled($self))
486           { warnings::warn($self, "Odd numbers are unsafe") }
487     }
488
489     sub doit
490     {
491         my $self = shift;
492         my $value = shift;
493         $self->check($value);
494         # ...
495     }
496
497     1;
498
499     package Derived;
500
501     use warnings::register;
502     use Original;
503     our @ISA = qw( Original );
504     sub new
505     {
506         my $class = shift;
507         bless [], $class;
508     }
509
510
511     1;
512
513 The code below makes use of both modules, but it only enables warnings from 
514 C<Derived>.
515
516     use Original;
517     use Derived;
518     use warnings 'Derived';
519     my $a = Original->new();
520     $a->doit(1);
521     my $b = Derived->new();
522     $a->doit(1);
523
524 When this code is run only the C<Derived> object, C<$b>, will generate
525 a warning. 
526
527     Odd numbers are unsafe at main.pl line 7
528
529 Notice also that the warning is reported at the line where the object is first
530 used.
531
532 When registering new categories of warning, you can supply more names to
533 warnings::register like this:
534
535     package MyModule;
536     use warnings::register qw(format precision);
537
538     ...
539
540     warnings::warnif('MyModule::format', '...');
541
542 =head1 SEE ALSO
543
544 L<warnings>, L<perldiag>.
545
546 =head1 AUTHOR
547
548 Paul Marquess