perl5.002beta3
[perl.git] / INSTALL
1 =head1 NAME
2
3 Install - Build and Installation guide for perl5.
4
5 =head1 SYNOPSIS
6
7 The basic steps to build and install perl5 are:
8
9         rm -f config.sh
10         sh Configure
11         make
12         make test
13         make install
14
15 Each of these is explained in further detail below.
16
17 =head1 BUILDING PERL5
18
19 =head1 Start with a Fresh Distribution.
20
21 The results of a Configure run are stored in the config.sh file.  If
22 you are upgrading from a previous version of perl, or if you change
23 systems or compilers or make other significant changes, or if you are
24 experiencing difficulties building perl, you should probably I<not>
25 re-use your old config.sh.  Simply remove it or rename it, e.g.
26
27         mv config.sh config.sh.old
28
29 Then run Configure.
30
31 =head1 Run Configure.
32
33 Configure will figure out various things about your system.  Some
34 things Configure will figure out for itself, other things it will ask
35 you about.  To accept the default, just press C<RETURN>.   The default
36 is almost always ok.
37
38 After it runs, Configure will perform variable substitution on all the
39 F<*.SH> files and offer to run B<make depend>.
40
41 Configure supports a number of useful options.  Run B<Configure -h>
42 to get a listing.  To compile with gcc, for example, you can run
43
44         sh Configure -Dcc=gcc
45
46 This is the preferred way to specify gcc (or another alternative
47 compiler) so that the hints files can set appropriate defaults.
48
49 If you want to use your old config.sh but override some of the items
50 with command line options, you need to use B<Configure -O>.
51
52 If you are willing to accept all the defaults, and you want terse
53 output, you can run
54
55         sh Configure -des
56
57 By default, for most systems, perl will be installed in
58 /usr/local/{bin, lib, man}.  You can specify a different 'prefix' for
59 the default installation directory, when Configure prompts you or by
60 using the Configure command line option -Dprefix='/some/directory',
61 e.g.
62
63         sh Configure -Dprefix=/opt/perl
64
65 If your prefix contains the string "perl", then the directories
66 are simplified.  For example, if you use prefix=/opt/perl,
67 then Configure will suggest /opt/perl/lib instead of
68 /usr/local/lib/perl5/.
69
70 By default, Configure will compile perl to use dynamic loading, if
71 your system supports it.  If you want to force perl to be compiled
72 statically, you can either choose this when Configure prompts you or by
73 using the Configure command line option -Uusedl.
74
75 =head2 Extensions
76
77 By default, Configure will offer to build every extension which
78 appears to be supported.  For example, Configure will offer to build
79 GDBM_File only if it is able to find the gdbm library.  (See examples
80 below.)  DynaLoader and Fcntl are always built by default.  Configure
81 does not contain code to test for POSIX compliance, so POSIX is always
82 built by default as well.  If you wish to skip POSIX, you can set the
83 Configure variable useposix=false either in a hint file or from the
84 Configure command line.  Similarly, the Safe extension is always built
85 by default, but you can skip it by setting the Configure variable
86 usesafe=false either in a hint file for from the command line.
87
88 In summary, here are the Configure command-line variables you can set
89 to turn off each extension:
90
91     DB_File             i_db
92     DynaLoader          (Must always be included)
93     Fcntl               (Always included by default)
94     GDBM_File           i_gdbm
95     NDBM_File           i_ndbm
96     ODBM_File           i_dbm
97     POSIX               useposix
98     SDBM_File           (Always included by default)
99     Safe                usesafe
100     Socket              d_socket
101
102 Thus to skip the NDBM_File extension, you can use
103
104         sh Configure -Ui_ndbm
105
106 Again, this is taken care of automatically if you don't have the ndbm
107 library.
108
109 Of course, you may always run Configure interactively and select only
110 the Extensions you want.
111
112 Finally, if you have dynamic loading (most modern Unix systems do)
113 remember that these extensions do not increase the size of your perl
114 executable, nor do they impact start-up time, so you probably might as
115 well build all the ones that will work on your system.
116
117 =head2 GNU-style configure
118
119 If you prefer the GNU-style B<configure> command line interface, you can
120 use the supplied B<configure> command, e.g.
121
122         CC=gcc ./configure
123
124 The B<configure> script emulates several of the more common configure
125 options.  Try
126
127         ./configure --help
128
129 for a listing.
130
131 Cross compiling is currently not supported.
132
133 =head2 Including locally-installed libraries
134
135 Perl5 comes with interfaces to number of database extensions, including
136 dbm, ndbm, gdbm, and Berkeley db.  For each extension, if
137 Configure can find the appropriate header files and libraries, it will
138 automatically include that extension.  The gdbm and db libraries
139 are B<not> included with perl.  See the library documentation for
140 how to obtain the libraries.
141
142 I<Note:>  If your database header (.h) files are not in a
143 directory normally searched by your C compiler, then you will need to
144 include the appropriate B<-I/your/directory> option when prompted by
145 Configure.  If your database library (.a) files are not in a directory
146 normally searched by your C compiler and linker, then you will need to
147 include the appropriate B<-L/your/directory> option when prompted by
148 Configure.  See the examples below.
149
150 =head2 Examples
151
152 =over 4
153
154 =item gdbm in /usr/local.
155
156 Suppose you have gdbm and want Configure to find it and build the
157 GDBM_File extension.  This examples assumes you have F<gdbm.h>
158 installed in F</usr/local/include/gdbm.h> and F<libgdbm.a> installed in
159 F</usr/local/lib/libgdbm.a>.  Configure should figure all the
160 necessary steps out automatically.
161
162 Specifically, when Configure prompts you for flags for
163 your C compiler, you should include  C<-I/usr/local/include>.
164
165 When Configure prompts you for linker flags, you should include
166 C<-L/usr/local/lib>.
167
168 If you are using dynamic loading, then when Configure prompts you for
169 linker flags for dynamic loading, you should again include
170 C<-L/usr/local/lib>.
171
172 Again, this should all happen automatically.  If you want to accept the
173 defaults for all the questions and have Configure print out only terse
174 messages, then you can just run
175
176         sh Configure -des
177
178 and Configure should include the GDBM_File extension automatically.
179
180 This should actually work if you have gdbm installed in any of
181 (/usr/local, /opt/local, /usr/gnu, /opt/gnu, /usr/GNU, or /opt/GNU).
182
183 =item gdbm in /usr/you
184
185 Suppose you have gdbm installed in some place other than /usr/local/,
186 but you still want Configure to find it.  To be specific, assume  you
187 have F</usr/you/include/gdbm.h> and F</usr/you/lib/libgdbm.a>.  You
188 still have to add B<-I/usr/you/include> to cc flags, but you have to take
189 an extra step to help Configure find F<libgdbm.a>.  Specifically, when
190 Configure prompts you for library directories, you have to add
191 F</usr/you/lib> to the list.
192
193 It is possible to specify this from the command line too (all on one
194 line):
195
196         sh Configure -des \
197                 -Dlocincpth="/usr/you/include" \
198                 -Dloclibpth="/usr/you/lib"
199
200 C<locincpth> is a space-separated list of include directories to search.
201 Configure will automatically add the appropriate B<-I> directives.
202
203 C<loclibpth> is a space-separated list of library directories to search.
204 Configure will automatically add the appropriate B<-L> directives.  If
205 you have some libraries under F</usr/local/> and others under
206 F</usr/you>, then you have to include both, namely
207
208         sh Configure -des \
209                 -Dlocincpth="/usr/you/include /usr/local/include" \
210                 -Dloclibpth="/usr/you/lib /usr/local/lib"
211
212 =back
213
214 =head2 Installation Directories.
215
216 The installation directories can all be changed by answering the
217 appropriate questions in Configure.  For convenience, all the
218 installation questions are near the beginning of Configure.
219
220 By default, Configure uses the following directories for
221 library files  (archname is a string like sun4-sunos, determined
222 by Configure)
223
224         /usr/local/lib/perl5/archname/5.002
225         /usr/local/lib/perl5/
226         /usr/local/lib/perl5/site_perl/archname
227         /usr/local/lib/perl5/site_perl
228
229 and the following directories for manual pages:
230
231         /usr/local/man/man1
232         /usr/local/lib/perl5/man/man3
233
234 (Actually, Configure recognizes the SVR3-style
235 /usr/local/man/l_man/man1 directories, if present, and uses those
236 instead.) The module man pages are stuck in that strange spot so that
237 they don't collide with other man pages stored in /usr/local/man/man3,
238 and so that Perl's man pages don't hide system man pages.  On some
239 systems, B<man less> would end up calling up Perl's less.pm module man
240 page, rather than the B<less> program.
241
242 If you specify a prefix that contains the string "perl", then the
243 directory structure is simplified.  For example, if you Configure
244 with -Dprefix=/opt/perl, then the defaults are
245
246         /opt/perl/lib/archname/5.002
247         /opt/perl/lib
248         /opt/perl/lib/site_perl/archname
249         /opt/perl/lib/site_perl
250
251         /opt/perl/man/man1
252         /opt/perl/man/man3
253
254 The perl executable will search the libraries in the order given
255 above.
256
257 The  directories site_perl and site_perl/archname are empty, but are
258 intended to be used for installing local or site-wide extensions.  Perl
259 will automatically look in these directories.  Previously, most sites
260 just put their local extensions in with the standard distribution.
261
262 In order to support using things like #!/usr/local/bin/perl5.002 after
263 a later version is released, architecture-dependent libraries are
264 stored in a version-specific directory, such as
265 /usr/local/lib/perl5/archname/5.002/.  In 5.000 and 5.001, these files
266 were just stored in /usr/local/lib/perl5/archname/.  If you will not be
267 using 5.001 binaries, you can delete the standard extensions from the
268 /usr/local/lib/perl5/archname/ directory.  Locally-added extensions can
269 be moved to the site_perl and site_perl/archname directories.
270
271 Again, these are just the defaults, and can be changed as you run
272 Configure.
273
274 =head2 Changing the installation directory
275
276 Configure distinguishes between the directory in which perl (and its
277 associated files) should be installed and the directory in which it
278 will eventually reside.  For most sites, these two are the same; for
279 sites that use AFS, this distinction is handled automatically.
280 However, sites that use software such as B<depot> to manage software
281 packages may also wish to install perl into a different directory and
282 use that management software to move perl to its final destination.
283 This section describes how to do this.  Someday, Configure may support
284 an option C<-Dinstallprefix=/foo> to simplify this.
285
286 Suppose you want to install perl under the F</tmp/perl5> directory.
287 You can edit F<config.sh> and change all the install* variables to
288 point to F</tmp/perl5> instead of F</usr/local/wherever>.  You could
289 also set them all from the Configure command line.  Or, you can
290 automate this process by placing the following lines in a file
291 F<config.over> B<before> you run Configure (replace /tmp/perl5 by a
292 directory of your choice):
293
294     installprefix=/tmp/perl5
295     test -d $installprefix || mkdir $installprefix
296     test -d $installprefix/bin || mkdir $installprefix/bin
297     installarchlib=`echo $installarchlib | sed "s!$prefix!$installprefix!"`
298     installbin=`echo $installbin | sed "s!$prefix!$installprefix!"`
299     installman1dir=`echo $installman1dir | sed "s!$prefix!$installprefix!"`
300     installman3dir=`echo $installman3dir | sed "s!$prefix!$installprefix!"`
301     installprivlib=`echo $installprivlib | sed "s!$prefix!$installprefix!"`
302     installscript=`echo $installscript | sed "s!$prefix!$installprefix!"`
303     installsitelib=`echo $installsitelib | sed "s!$prefix!$installprefix!"`
304     installsitearch=`echo $installsitearch | sed "s!$prefix!$installprefix!"`
305
306 Then, you can Configure and install in the usual way:
307
308     sh Configure -des
309     make
310     make test
311     make install
312
313 =head2 Creating an installable tar archive
314
315 If you need to install perl on many identical systems, it is
316 convenient to compile it once and create an archive that can be
317 installed on multiple systems.  Here's one way to do that:
318
319     # Set up config.over to install perl into a different directory,
320     # e.g. /tmp/perl5 (see previous part).
321     sh Configure -des
322     make
323     make test
324     make install
325     cd /tmp/perl5
326     tar cvf ../perl5-archive.tar .
327     # Then, on each machine where you want to install perl,
328     cd /usr/local  # Or wherever you specified as $prefix
329     tar xvf perl5-archive.tar
330
331 =head2 What if it doesn't work?
332
333 =over 4
334
335 =item Running Configure Interactively
336
337 If Configure runs into trouble, remember that you can always run
338 Configure interactively so that you can check (and correct) its
339 guesses.
340
341 All the installation questions have been moved to the top, so you don't
342 have to wait for them.  Once you've handled them (and your C compiler &
343 flags) you can type   '&-d'  at the next Configure prompt and Configure
344 will use the defaults from then on.
345
346 If you find yourself trying obscure command line incantations and
347 config.over tricks, I recommend you run Configure interactively
348 instead.  You'll probably save yourself time in the long run.
349
350 =item Hint files.
351
352 The perl distribution includes a number of system-specific hints files
353 in the hints/ directory.  If one of them matches your system, Configure
354 will offer to use that hint file.
355
356 Several of the hint files contain additional important information.
357 If you have any problems, it is a good idea to read the relevant hint
358 file for further information.  See F<hints/solaris_2.sh> for an
359 extensive example.
360
361 =item Changing Compilers
362
363 If you change compilers or make other significant changes, you should
364 probably I<not> re-use your old config.sh.  Simply remove it or
365 rename it, e.g. mv config.sh config.sh.old.  Then rerun Configure
366 with the options you want to use.
367
368 This is a common source of problems.  If you change from B<cc> to
369 B<gcc>, you should almost always remove your old config.sh.
370
371 =item Propagating your changes
372
373 If you later make any changes to F<config.sh>, you should propagate
374 them to all the .SH files by running  B<sh Configure -S>.
375
376 =item config.over
377
378 You can also supply a shell script config.over to over-ride Configure's
379 guesses.  It will get loaded up at the very end, just before config.sh
380 is created.  You have to be careful with this, however, as Configure
381 does no checking that your changes make sense.
382
383 =item config.h
384
385 Many of the system dependencies are contained in F<config.h>.
386 F<Configure> builds F<config.h> by running the F<config_h.SH> script.
387 The values for the variables are taken from F<config.sh>.
388
389 If there are any problems, you can edit F<config.h> directly.  Beware,
390 though, that the next time you run B<Configure>, your changes will be
391 lost.
392
393 =item cflags
394
395 If you have any additional changes to make to the C compiler command
396 line, they can be made in F<cflags.SH>.  For instance, to turn off the
397 optimizer on F<toke.c>, find the line in the switch structure for
398 F<toke.c> and put the command C<optimize='-g'> before the C<;;>.  You
399 can also edit F<cflags> directly, but beware that your changes will be
400 lost the next time you run B<Configure>.
401
402 To change the C flags for all the files, edit F<config.sh>
403 and change either C<$ccflags> or C<$optimize>,
404 and then re-run  B<sh Configure -S ; make depend>.
405
406 =item No sh.
407
408 If you don't have sh, you'll have to copy the sample file config_H to
409 config.h and edit the config.h to reflect your system's peculiarities.
410 You'll probably also have to extensively modify the extension building
411 mechanism.
412
413 =back
414
415 =head1 make depend
416
417 This will look for all the includes.
418 The output is stored in F<makefile>.  The only difference between
419 F<Makefile> and F<makefile> is the dependencies at the bottom of
420 F<makefile>.  If you have to make any changes, you should edit
421 F<makefile>, not F<Makefile> since the Unix B<make> command reads
422 F<makefile> first.
423
424 Configure will offer to do this step for you, so it isn't listed
425 explicitly above.
426
427 =head1 make
428
429 This will attempt to make perl in the current directory.
430
431 If you can't compile successfully, try some of the following ideas.
432
433 =over 4
434
435 =item *
436
437 If you used a hint file, try reading the comments in the hint file
438 for further tips and information.
439
440 =item *
441
442 If you can't compile successfully, try adding a C<-DCRIPPLED_CC> flag.
443 (Just because you get no errors doesn't mean it compiled right!)
444 This simplifies some complicated expressions for compilers that
445 get indigestion easily.  If that has no effect, try turning off
446 optimization.  If you have missing routines, you probably need to
447 add some library or other, or you need to undefine some feature that
448 Configure thought was there but is defective or incomplete.
449
450 =item *
451
452 Some compilers will not compile or optimize the larger files without
453 some extra switches to use larger jump offsets or allocate larger
454 internal tables.  You can customize the switches for each file in
455 F<cflags>.  It's okay to insert rules for specific files into
456 F<makefile> since a default rule only takes effect in the absence of a
457 specific rule.
458
459 =item *
460
461 If you can successfully build F<miniperl>, but the process crashes
462 during the building of extensions, you should run
463
464         make minitest
465
466 to test your version of miniperl.
467
468 =item *
469
470 Some additional things that have been reported for either perl4 or perl5:
471
472 Genix may need to use libc rather than libc_s, or #undef VARARGS.
473
474 NCR Tower 32 (OS 2.01.01) may need -W2,-Sl,2000 and #undef MKDIR.
475
476 UTS may need one or more of B<-DCRIPPLED_CC>, B<-K> or B<-g>, and undef LSTAT.
477
478 If you get syntax errors on '(', try -DCRIPPLED_CC.
479
480 Machines with half-implemented dbm routines will need to #undef I_ODBM
481
482 SCO prior to 3.2.4 may be missing dbmclose().  An upgrade to 3.2.4
483 that includes libdbm.nfs (which includes dbmclose()) may be available.
484
485 If you get duplicates upon linking for malloc et al, say -DHIDEMYMALLOC.
486
487 If you get duplicate function definitions (a perl function has the
488 same name as another function on your system) try -DEMBED.
489
490 If you get varags problems with gcc, be sure that gcc is installed
491 correctly.  When using gcc, you should probably have i_stdarg='define'
492 and i_varags='undef' in config.sh.  The problem is usually solved
493 by running fixincludes correctly.
494
495 If you wish to use dynamic loading on SunOS or Solaris, and you
496 have GNU as and GNU ld installed, you may need to add B<-B/bin/> to
497 your $ccflags and $ldflags so that the system's versions of as
498 and ld are used.
499
500 If you run into dynamic loading problems, check your setting of
501 the LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable.  Perl should build
502 fine with LD_LIBRARY_PATH unset, though that may depend on details
503 of your local set-up.
504
505 If Configure seems to be having trouble finding library functions,
506 try not using nm extraction.  You can do this from the command line
507 with
508
509         sh Configure -Uusenm
510
511 =back
512
513 =head1 make test
514
515 This will run the regression tests on the perl you just made.  If it
516 doesn't say "All tests successful" then something went wrong.  See the
517 file F<t/README> in the F<t> subdirectory.  Note that you can't run it
518 in background if this disables opening of /dev/tty.  If B<make test>
519 bombs out, just B<cd> to the F<t> directory and run B<TEST> by hand
520 to see if it makes any difference.
521 If individual tests bomb, you can run them by hand, e.g.,
522
523         ./perl op/groups.t
524
525 B<NOTE>: one possible reason for errors is that some external programs
526 may be broken due to the combination of your environment and the way
527 C<make test> exercises them. This may happen for example if you have
528 one or more of these environment variables set:
529 C<LC_ALL LC_CTYPE LANG>. In certain UNIXes especially the non-English
530 locales are known to cause programs to exhibit mysterious errors.
531 If you have any of the above environment variables set, please try
532 C<setenv LC_ALL C> or <LC_ALL=C;export LC_ALL>, for C<csh>-style and
533 C<Bourne>-style shells, respectively, from the command line and then
534 retry C<make test>. If the tests then succeed, you may have a broken
535 program that is confusing the testing. Please run the troublesome test
536 by hand as shown above and see whether you can locate the program.
537 Look for things like:
538 C<exec, `backquoted command`, system, open("|...")> or C<open("...|")>.
539 All these mean that Perl is trying to run some external program.
540 =head1 INSTALLING PERL5
541
542 =head1 make install
543
544 This will put perl into the public directory you specified to
545 B<Configure>; by default this is F</usr/local/bin>.  It will also try
546 to put the man pages in a reasonable place.  It will not nroff the man
547 page, however.  You may need to be root to run B<make install>.  If you
548 are not root, you must own the directories in question and you should
549 ignore any messages about chown not working.
550
551 If you want to see exactly what will happen without installing
552 anything, you can run
553
554         ./perl installperl -n
555         ./perl installman -n
556
557 B<make install> will install the following:
558
559         perl,
560             perl5.nnn   where nnn is the current release number.  This
561                         will be a link to perl.
562         suidperl,
563             sperl5.nnn  If you requested setuid emulation.
564         a2p             awk-to-perl translator
565         cppstdin        This is used by perl -P, if your cc -E can't
566                         read from stdin.
567         c2ph, pstruct   Scripts for handling C structures in header files.
568         s2p             sed-to-perl translator
569         find2perl       find-to-perl translator
570         h2xs            Converts C .h header files to Perl extensions.
571         perlbug         Tool to report bugs in Perl.
572         perldoc         Tool to read perl's pod documentation.
573         pod2html,       Converters from perl's pod documentation format
574         pod2latex, and  to other useful formats.
575         pod2man
576
577         library files   in $privlib and $archlib specified to
578                         Configure, usually under /usr/local/lib/perl5/.
579         man pages       in the location specified to Configure, usually
580                         something like /usr/local/man/man1.
581         module          in the location specified to Configure, usually
582         man pages       under /usr/local/lib/perl5/man/man3.
583         pod/*.pod       in $privlib/pod/.
584
585 Installperl will also create the library directories $siteperl and
586 $sitearch listed in config.sh.  Usually, these are something like
587         /usr/local/lib/perl5/site_perl/
588         /usr/local/lib/perl5/site_perl/$archname
589 where $archname is something like sun4-sunos.  These directories
590 will be used for installing extensions.
591
592 Perl's *.h header files and the libperl.a library are also
593 installed under $archlib so that any user may later build new
594 extensions even if the Perl source is no longer available.
595
596 The libperl.a library is only needed for building new
597 extensions and linking them statically into a new perl executable.
598 If you will not be doing that, then you may safely delete
599 $archlib/libperl.a after perl is installed.
600
601 make install may also offer to install perl in a "standard" location.
602
603 Most of the documentation in the pod/ directory is also available
604 in HTML and LaTeX format.  Type
605
606         cd pod; make html; cd ..
607
608 to generate the html versions, and
609
610         cd pod; make tex; cd ..
611
612 to generate the LaTeX versions.
613
614 =head1 Coexistence with earlier versions of perl5.
615
616 You can safely install the current version of perl5 and still run
617 scripts under the old binaries.  Instead of starting your script with
618 #!/usr/local/bin/perl, just start it with #!/usr/local/bin/perl5.001
619 (or whatever version you want to run.)
620
621 The architecture-dependent files are stored in a version-specific
622 directory (such as F</usr/local/lib/perl5/sun4-sunos/5.002>) so that
623 they are still accessible.  I<Note:> perl5.000 and perl5.001 did not
624 put their architecture-dependent libraries in a version-specific
625 directory.  They are simply in F</usr/local/lib/perl5/$archname>.  If
626 you will not be using 5.000 or 5.001, you may safely remove those
627 files.
628
629 The standard library files in F</usr/local/lib/perl5>
630 should be useable by all versions of perl5.
631
632 Most extensions will not need to be recompiled to use with a newer
633 version of perl.  If you do run into problems, and you want to continue
634 to use the old version of perl along with your extension, simply move
635 those extension files to the appropriate version directory, such as
636 F</usr/local/lib/perl/archname/5.002>.  Then perl5.002 will find your
637 files in the 5.002 directory, and newer versions of perl will find your
638 newer extension in the site_perl directory.
639
640 =head1 Coexistence with perl4
641
642 You can safely install perl5 even if you want to keep perl4 around.
643
644 By default, the perl5 libraries go into F</usr/local/lib/perl5/>, so
645 they don't override the perl4 libraries in F</usr/local/lib/perl/>.
646
647 In your /usr/local/bin directory, you should have a binary named
648 F<perl4.036>.  That will not be touched by the perl5 installation
649 process.  Most perl4 scripts should run just fine under perl5.
650 However, if you have any scripts that require perl4, you can replace
651 the C<#!> line at the top of them by C<#!/usr/local/bin/perl4.036>
652 (or whatever the appropriate pathname is).
653
654 =head1 DOCUMENTATION
655
656 Read the manual entries before running perl.  The main documentation is
657 in the pod/ subdirectory and should have been installed during the
658 build process.  Type B<man perl> to get started.  Alternatively, you
659 can type B<perldoc perl> to use the supplied B<perldoc> script.  This
660 is sometimes useful for finding things in the library modules.
661
662 =head1 AUTHOR
663
664 Andy Dougherty <doughera@lafcol.lafayette.edu>, borrowing I<very> heavily
665 from the original README by Larry Wall.
666
667 =head 2 LAST MODIFIED
668
669 04 January 1996