Exporter-5.72 is now on the CPAN
[perl.git] / pod / perlapio.pod
1 =head1 NAME
2
3 perlapio - perl's IO abstraction interface.
4
5 =head1 SYNOPSIS
6
7     #define PERLIO_NOT_STDIO 0    /* For co-existence with stdio only */
8     #include <perlio.h>           /* Usually via #include <perl.h> */
9
10     PerlIO *PerlIO_stdin(void);
11     PerlIO *PerlIO_stdout(void);
12     PerlIO *PerlIO_stderr(void);
13
14     PerlIO *PerlIO_open(const char *path,const char *mode);
15     PerlIO *PerlIO_fdopen(int fd, const char *mode);
16     PerlIO *PerlIO_reopen(const char *path, const char *mode, PerlIO *old);  /* deprecated */
17     int     PerlIO_close(PerlIO *f);
18
19     int     PerlIO_stdoutf(const char *fmt,...)
20     int     PerlIO_puts(PerlIO *f,const char *string);
21     int     PerlIO_putc(PerlIO *f,int ch);
22     SSize_t PerlIO_write(PerlIO *f,const void *buf,size_t numbytes);
23     int     PerlIO_printf(PerlIO *f, const char *fmt,...);
24     int     PerlIO_vprintf(PerlIO *f, const char *fmt, va_list args);
25     int     PerlIO_flush(PerlIO *f);
26
27     int     PerlIO_eof(PerlIO *f);
28     int     PerlIO_error(PerlIO *f);
29     void    PerlIO_clearerr(PerlIO *f);
30
31     int     PerlIO_getc(PerlIO *d);
32     int     PerlIO_ungetc(PerlIO *f,int ch);
33     SSize_t PerlIO_read(PerlIO *f, void *buf, size_t numbytes);
34
35     int     PerlIO_fileno(PerlIO *f);
36
37     void    PerlIO_setlinebuf(PerlIO *f);
38
39     Off_t   PerlIO_tell(PerlIO *f);
40     int     PerlIO_seek(PerlIO *f, Off_t offset, int whence);
41     void    PerlIO_rewind(PerlIO *f);
42
43     int     PerlIO_getpos(PerlIO *f, SV *save);        /* prototype changed */
44     int     PerlIO_setpos(PerlIO *f, SV *saved);       /* prototype changed */
45
46     int     PerlIO_fast_gets(PerlIO *f);
47     int     PerlIO_has_cntptr(PerlIO *f);
48     SSize_t PerlIO_get_cnt(PerlIO *f);
49     char   *PerlIO_get_ptr(PerlIO *f);
50     void    PerlIO_set_ptrcnt(PerlIO *f, char *ptr, SSize_t count);
51
52     int     PerlIO_canset_cnt(PerlIO *f);              /* deprecated */
53     void    PerlIO_set_cnt(PerlIO *f, int count);      /* deprecated */
54
55     int     PerlIO_has_base(PerlIO *f);
56     char   *PerlIO_get_base(PerlIO *f);
57     SSize_t PerlIO_get_bufsiz(PerlIO *f);
58
59     PerlIO *PerlIO_importFILE(FILE *stdio, const char *mode);
60     FILE   *PerlIO_exportFILE(PerlIO *f, int flags);
61     FILE   *PerlIO_findFILE(PerlIO *f);
62     void    PerlIO_releaseFILE(PerlIO *f,FILE *stdio);
63
64     int     PerlIO_apply_layers(PerlIO *f, const char *mode, const char *layers);
65     int     PerlIO_binmode(PerlIO *f, int ptype, int imode, const char *layers);
66     void    PerlIO_debug(const char *fmt,...)
67
68 =head1 DESCRIPTION
69
70 Perl's source code, and extensions that want maximum portability,
71 should use the above functions instead of those defined in ANSI C's
72 I<stdio.h>.  The perl headers (in particular "perlio.h") will
73 C<#define> them to the I/O mechanism selected at Configure time.
74
75 The functions are modeled on those in I<stdio.h>, but parameter order
76 has been "tidied up a little".
77
78 C<PerlIO *> takes the place of FILE *. Like FILE * it should be
79 treated as opaque (it is probably safe to assume it is a pointer to
80 something).
81
82 There are currently three implementations:
83
84 =over 4
85
86 =item 1. USE_STDIO
87
88 All above are #define'd to stdio functions or are trivial wrapper
89 functions which call stdio. In this case I<only> PerlIO * is a FILE *.
90 This has been the default implementation since the abstraction was
91 introduced in perl5.003_02.
92
93 =item 2. USE_PERLIO
94
95 Introduced just after perl5.7.0, this is a re-implementation of the
96 above abstraction which allows perl more control over how IO is done
97 as it decouples IO from the way the operating system and C library
98 choose to do things. For USE_PERLIO PerlIO * has an extra layer of
99 indirection - it is a pointer-to-a-pointer.  This allows the PerlIO *
100 to remain with a known value while swapping the implementation around
101 underneath I<at run time>. In this case all the above are true (but
102 very simple) functions which call the underlying implementation.
103
104 This is the only implementation for which C<PerlIO_apply_layers()>
105 does anything "interesting".
106
107 The USE_PERLIO implementation is described in L<perliol>.
108
109 =back
110
111 Because "perlio.h" is a thin layer (for efficiency) the semantics of
112 these functions are somewhat dependent on the underlying implementation.
113 Where these variations are understood they are noted below.
114
115 Unless otherwise noted, functions return 0 on success, or a negative
116 value (usually C<EOF> which is usually -1) and set C<errno> on error.
117
118 =over 4
119
120 =item B<PerlIO_stdin()>, B<PerlIO_stdout()>, B<PerlIO_stderr()>
121
122 Use these rather than C<stdin>, C<stdout>, C<stderr>. They are written
123 to look like "function calls" rather than variables because this makes
124 it easier to I<make them> function calls if platform cannot export data
125 to loaded modules, or if (say) different "threads" might have different
126 values.
127
128 =item B<PerlIO_open(path, mode)>, B<PerlIO_fdopen(fd,mode)>
129
130 These correspond to fopen()/fdopen() and the arguments are the same.
131 Return C<NULL> and set C<errno> if there is an error.  There may be an
132 implementation limit on the number of open handles, which may be lower
133 than the limit on the number of open files - C<errno> may not be set
134 when C<NULL> is returned if this limit is exceeded.
135
136 =item B<PerlIO_reopen(path,mode,f)>
137
138 While this currently exists in all three implementations perl itself
139 does not use it. I<As perl does not use it, it is not well tested.>
140
141 Perl prefers to C<dup> the new low-level descriptor to the descriptor
142 used by the existing PerlIO. This may become the behaviour of this
143 function in the future.
144
145 =item B<PerlIO_printf(f,fmt,...)>, B<PerlIO_vprintf(f,fmt,a)>
146
147 These are fprintf()/vfprintf() equivalents.
148
149 =item B<PerlIO_stdoutf(fmt,...)>
150
151 This is printf() equivalent. printf is #defined to this function,
152 so it is (currently) legal to use C<printf(fmt,...)> in perl sources.
153
154 =item B<PerlIO_read(f,buf,count)>, B<PerlIO_write(f,buf,count)>
155
156 These correspond functionally to fread() and fwrite() but the
157 arguments and return values are different.  The PerlIO_read() and
158 PerlIO_write() signatures have been modeled on the more sane low level
159 read() and write() functions instead: The "file" argument is passed
160 first, there is only one "count", and the return value can distinguish
161 between error and C<EOF>.
162
163 Returns a byte count if successful (which may be zero or
164 positive), returns negative value and sets C<errno> on error.
165 Depending on implementation C<errno> may be C<EINTR> if operation was
166 interrupted by a signal.
167
168 =item B<PerlIO_close(f)>
169
170 Depending on implementation C<errno> may be C<EINTR> if operation was
171 interrupted by a signal.
172
173 =item B<PerlIO_puts(f,s)>, B<PerlIO_putc(f,c)>
174
175 These correspond to fputs() and fputc().
176 Note that arguments have been revised to have "file" first.
177
178 =item B<PerlIO_ungetc(f,c)>
179
180 This corresponds to ungetc().  Note that arguments have been revised
181 to have "file" first.  Arranges that next read operation will return
182 the byte B<c>.  Despite the implied "character" in the name only
183 values in the range 0..0xFF are defined. Returns the byte B<c> on
184 success or -1 (C<EOF>) on error.  The number of bytes that can be
185 "pushed back" may vary, only 1 character is certain, and then only if
186 it is the last character that was read from the handle.
187
188 =item B<PerlIO_getc(f)>
189
190 This corresponds to getc().
191 Despite the c in the name only byte range 0..0xFF is supported.
192 Returns the character read or -1 (C<EOF>) on error.
193
194 =item B<PerlIO_eof(f)>
195
196 This corresponds to feof().  Returns a true/false indication of
197 whether the handle is at end of file.  For terminal devices this may
198 or may not be "sticky" depending on the implementation.  The flag is
199 cleared by PerlIO_seek(), or PerlIO_rewind().
200
201 =item B<PerlIO_error(f)>
202
203 This corresponds to ferror().  Returns a true/false indication of
204 whether there has been an IO error on the handle.
205
206 =item B<PerlIO_fileno(f)>
207
208 This corresponds to fileno(), note that on some platforms, the meaning
209 of "fileno" may not match Unix. Returns -1 if the handle has no open
210 descriptor associated with it.
211
212 =item B<PerlIO_clearerr(f)>
213
214 This corresponds to clearerr(), i.e., clears 'error' and (usually)
215 'eof' flags for the "stream". Does not return a value.
216
217 =item B<PerlIO_flush(f)>
218
219 This corresponds to fflush().  Sends any buffered write data to the
220 underlying file.  If called with C<NULL> this may flush all open
221 streams (or core dump with some USE_STDIO implementations).  Calling
222 on a handle open for read only, or on which last operation was a read
223 of some kind may lead to undefined behaviour on some USE_STDIO
224 implementations.  The USE_PERLIO (layers) implementation tries to
225 behave better: it flushes all open streams when passed C<NULL>, and
226 attempts to retain data on read streams either in the buffer or by
227 seeking the handle to the current logical position.
228
229 =item B<PerlIO_seek(f,offset,whence)>
230
231 This corresponds to fseek().  Sends buffered write data to the
232 underlying file, or discards any buffered read data, then positions
233 the file descriptor as specified by B<offset> and B<whence> (sic).
234 This is the correct thing to do when switching between read and write
235 on the same handle (see issues with PerlIO_flush() above).  Offset is
236 of type C<Off_t> which is a perl Configure value which may not be same
237 as stdio's C<off_t>.
238
239 =item B<PerlIO_tell(f)>
240
241 This corresponds to ftell().  Returns the current file position, or
242 (Off_t) -1 on error.  May just return value system "knows" without
243 making a system call or checking the underlying file descriptor (so
244 use on shared file descriptors is not safe without a
245 PerlIO_seek()). Return value is of type C<Off_t> which is a perl
246 Configure value which may not be same as stdio's C<off_t>.
247
248 =item B<PerlIO_getpos(f,p)>, B<PerlIO_setpos(f,p)>
249
250 These correspond (loosely) to fgetpos() and fsetpos(). Rather than
251 stdio's Fpos_t they expect a "Perl Scalar Value" to be passed. What is
252 stored there should be considered opaque. The layout of the data may
253 vary from handle to handle.  When not using stdio or if platform does
254 not have the stdio calls then they are implemented in terms of
255 PerlIO_tell() and PerlIO_seek().
256
257 =item B<PerlIO_rewind(f)>
258
259 This corresponds to rewind(). It is usually defined as being
260
261     PerlIO_seek(f,(Off_t)0L, SEEK_SET);
262     PerlIO_clearerr(f);
263
264 =item B<PerlIO_tmpfile()>
265
266 This corresponds to tmpfile(), i.e., returns an anonymous PerlIO or
267 NULL on error.  The system will attempt to automatically delete the
268 file when closed.  On Unix the file is usually C<unlink>-ed just after
269 it is created so it does not matter how it gets closed. On other
270 systems the file may only be deleted if closed via PerlIO_close()
271 and/or the program exits via C<exit>.  Depending on the implementation
272 there may be "race conditions" which allow other processes access to
273 the file, though in general it will be safer in this regard than
274 ad. hoc. schemes.
275
276 =item B<PerlIO_setlinebuf(f)>
277
278 This corresponds to setlinebuf().  Does not return a value. What
279 constitutes a "line" is implementation dependent but usually means
280 that writing "\n" flushes the buffer.  What happens with things like
281 "this\nthat" is uncertain.  (Perl core uses it I<only> when "dumping";
282 it has nothing to do with $| auto-flush.)
283
284 =back
285
286 =head2 Co-existence with stdio
287
288 There is outline support for co-existence of PerlIO with stdio.
289 Obviously if PerlIO is implemented in terms of stdio there is no
290 problem. However in other cases then mechanisms must exist to create a
291 FILE * which can be passed to library code which is going to use stdio
292 calls.
293
294 The first step is to add this line:
295
296    #define PERLIO_NOT_STDIO 0
297
298 I<before> including any perl header files. (This will probably become
299 the default at some point).  That prevents "perlio.h" from attempting
300 to #define stdio functions onto PerlIO functions.
301
302 XS code is probably better using "typemap" if it expects FILE *
303 arguments.  The standard typemap will be adjusted to comprehend any
304 changes in this area.
305
306 =over 4
307
308 =item B<PerlIO_importFILE(f,mode)>
309
310 Used to get a PerlIO * from a FILE *.
311
312 The mode argument should be a string as would be passed to
313 fopen/PerlIO_open.  If it is NULL then - for legacy support - the code
314 will (depending upon the platform and the implementation) either
315 attempt to empirically determine the mode in which I<f> is open, or
316 use "r+" to indicate a read/write stream.
317
318 Once called the FILE * should I<ONLY> be closed by calling
319 C<PerlIO_close()> on the returned PerlIO *.
320
321 The PerlIO is set to textmode. Use PerlIO_binmode if this is
322 not the desired mode.
323
324 This is B<not> the reverse of PerlIO_exportFILE().
325
326 =item B<PerlIO_exportFILE(f,mode)>
327
328 Given a PerlIO * create a 'native' FILE * suitable for passing to code
329 expecting to be compiled and linked with ANSI C I<stdio.h>.  The mode
330 argument should be a string as would be passed to fopen/PerlIO_open.
331 If it is NULL then - for legacy support - the FILE * is opened in same
332 mode as the PerlIO *.
333
334 The fact that such a FILE * has been 'exported' is recorded, (normally
335 by pushing a new :stdio "layer" onto the PerlIO *), which may affect
336 future PerlIO operations on the original PerlIO *.  You should not
337 call C<fclose()> on the file unless you call C<PerlIO_releaseFILE()>
338 to disassociate it from the PerlIO *.  (Do not use PerlIO_importFILE()
339 for doing the disassociation.)
340
341 Calling this function repeatedly will create a FILE * on each call
342 (and will push an :stdio layer each time as well).
343
344 =item B<PerlIO_releaseFILE(p,f)>
345
346 Calling PerlIO_releaseFILE informs PerlIO that all use of FILE * is
347 complete. It is removed from the list of 'exported' FILE *s, and the
348 associated PerlIO * should revert to its original behaviour.
349
350 Use this to disassociate a file from a PerlIO * that was associated
351 using PerlIO_exportFILE().
352
353 =item B<PerlIO_findFILE(f)>
354
355 Returns a native FILE * used by a stdio layer. If there is none, it
356 will create one with PerlIO_exportFILE. In either case the FILE *
357 should be considered as belonging to PerlIO subsystem and should
358 only be closed by calling C<PerlIO_close()>.
359
360
361 =back
362
363 =head2 "Fast gets" Functions
364
365 In addition to standard-like API defined so far above there is an
366 "implementation" interface which allows perl to get at internals of
367 PerlIO.  The following calls correspond to the various FILE_xxx macros
368 determined by Configure - or their equivalent in other
369 implementations. This section is really of interest to only those
370 concerned with detailed perl-core behaviour, implementing a PerlIO
371 mapping or writing code which can make use of the "read ahead" that
372 has been done by the IO system in the same way perl does. Note that
373 any code that uses these interfaces must be prepared to do things the
374 traditional way if a handle does not support them.
375
376 =over 4
377
378 =item B<PerlIO_fast_gets(f)>
379
380 Returns true if implementation has all the interfaces required to
381 allow perl's C<sv_gets> to "bypass" normal IO mechanism.  This can
382 vary from handle to handle.
383
384   PerlIO_fast_gets(f) = PerlIO_has_cntptr(f) && \
385                         PerlIO_canset_cnt(f) && \
386                         'Can set pointer into buffer'
387
388 =item B<PerlIO_has_cntptr(f)>
389
390 Implementation can return pointer to current position in the "buffer"
391 and a count of bytes available in the buffer.  Do not use this - use
392 PerlIO_fast_gets.
393
394 =item B<PerlIO_get_cnt(f)>
395
396 Return count of readable bytes in the buffer. Zero or negative return
397 means no more bytes available.
398
399 =item B<PerlIO_get_ptr(f)>
400
401 Return pointer to next readable byte in buffer, accessing via the
402 pointer (dereferencing) is only safe if PerlIO_get_cnt() has returned
403 a positive value.  Only positive offsets up to value returned by
404 PerlIO_get_cnt() are allowed.
405
406 =item B<PerlIO_set_ptrcnt(f,p,c)>
407
408 Set pointer into buffer, and a count of bytes still in the
409 buffer. Should be used only to set pointer to within range implied by
410 previous calls to C<PerlIO_get_ptr> and C<PerlIO_get_cnt>. The two
411 values I<must> be consistent with each other (implementation may only
412 use one or the other or may require both).
413
414 =item B<PerlIO_canset_cnt(f)>
415
416 Implementation can adjust its idea of number of bytes in the buffer.
417 Do not use this - use PerlIO_fast_gets.
418
419 =item B<PerlIO_set_cnt(f,c)>
420
421 Obscure - set count of bytes in the buffer. Deprecated.  Only usable
422 if PerlIO_canset_cnt() returns true.  Currently used in only doio.c to
423 force count less than -1 to -1.  Perhaps should be PerlIO_set_empty or
424 similar.  This call may actually do nothing if "count" is deduced from
425 pointer and a "limit".  Do not use this - use PerlIO_set_ptrcnt().
426
427 =item B<PerlIO_has_base(f)>
428
429 Returns true if implementation has a buffer, and can return pointer
430 to whole buffer and its size. Used by perl for B<-T> / B<-B> tests.
431 Other uses would be very obscure...
432
433 =item B<PerlIO_get_base(f)>
434
435 Return I<start> of buffer. Access only positive offsets in the buffer
436 up to the value returned by PerlIO_get_bufsiz().
437
438 =item B<PerlIO_get_bufsiz(f)>
439
440 Return the I<total number of bytes> in the buffer, this is neither the
441 number that can be read, nor the amount of memory allocated to the
442 buffer. Rather it is what the operating system and/or implementation
443 happened to C<read()> (or whatever) last time IO was requested.
444
445 =back
446
447 =head2 Other Functions
448
449 =over 4
450
451 =item PerlIO_apply_layers(f,mode,layers)
452
453 The new interface to the USE_PERLIO implementation. The layers ":crlf"
454 and ":raw" are only ones allowed for other implementations and those
455 are silently ignored. (As of perl5.8 ":raw" is deprecated.)  Use
456 PerlIO_binmode() below for the portable case.
457
458 =item PerlIO_binmode(f,ptype,imode,layers)
459
460 The hook used by perl's C<binmode> operator.
461 B<ptype> is perl's character for the kind of IO:
462
463 =over 8
464
465 =item 'E<lt>' read
466
467 =item 'E<gt>' write
468
469 =item '+' read/write
470
471 =back
472
473 B<imode> is C<O_BINARY> or C<O_TEXT>.
474
475 B<layers> is a string of layers to apply, only ":crlf" makes sense in
476 the non USE_PERLIO case. (As of perl5.8 ":raw" is deprecated in favour
477 of passing NULL.)
478
479 Portable cases are:
480
481     PerlIO_binmode(f,ptype,O_BINARY,NULL);
482 and
483     PerlIO_binmode(f,ptype,O_TEXT,":crlf");
484
485 On Unix these calls probably have no effect whatsoever.  Elsewhere
486 they alter "\n" to CR,LF translation and possibly cause a special text
487 "end of file" indicator to be written or honoured on read. The effect
488 of making the call after doing any IO to the handle depends on the
489 implementation. (It may be ignored, affect any data which is already
490 buffered as well, or only apply to subsequent data.)
491
492 =item PerlIO_debug(fmt,...)
493
494 PerlIO_debug is a printf()-like function which can be used for
495 debugging.  No return value. Its main use is inside PerlIO where using
496 real printf, warn() etc. would recursively call PerlIO and be a
497 problem.
498
499 PerlIO_debug writes to the file named by $ENV{'PERLIO_DEBUG'} typical
500 use might be
501
502   Bourne shells (sh, ksh, bash, zsh, ash, ...):
503    PERLIO_DEBUG=/dev/tty ./perl somescript some args
504
505   Csh/Tcsh:
506    setenv PERLIO_DEBUG /dev/tty
507    ./perl somescript some args
508
509   If you have the "env" utility:
510    env PERLIO_DEBUG=/dev/tty ./perl somescript some args
511
512   Win32:
513    set PERLIO_DEBUG=CON
514    perl somescript some args
515
516 If $ENV{'PERLIO_DEBUG'} is not set PerlIO_debug() is a no-op.
517
518 =back