perl 5.003_07: lib/ExtUtils/xsubpp
[perl.git] / pod / perlbot.pod
1 =head1 NAME
2
3 perlbot - Bag'o Object Tricks (the BOT)
4
5 =head1 DESCRIPTION
6
7 The following collection of tricks and hints is intended to whet curious
8 appetites about such things as the use of instance variables and the
9 mechanics of object and class relationships.  The reader is encouraged to
10 consult relevant textbooks for discussion of Object Oriented definitions and
11 methodology.  This is not intended as a tutorial for object-oriented
12 programming or as a comprehensive guide to Perl's object oriented features,
13 nor should it be construed as a style guide.
14
15 The Perl motto still holds:  There's more than one way to do it.
16
17 =head1 OO SCALING TIPS
18
19 =over 5
20
21 =item 1
22
23 Do not attempt to verify the type of $self.  That'll break if the class is
24 inherited, when the type of $self is valid but its package isn't what you
25 expect.  See rule 5.
26
27 =item 2
28
29 If an object-oriented (OO) or indirect-object (IO) syntax was used, then the
30 object is probably the correct type and there's no need to become paranoid
31 about it.  Perl isn't a paranoid language anyway.  If people subvert the OO
32 or IO syntax then they probably know what they're doing and you should let
33 them do it.  See rule 1.
34
35 =item 3
36
37 Use the two-argument form of bless().  Let a subclass use your constructor.
38 See L<INHERITING A CONSTRUCTOR>.
39
40 =item 4
41
42 The subclass is allowed to know things about its immediate superclass, the
43 superclass is allowed to know nothing about a subclass.
44
45 =item 5
46
47 Don't be trigger happy with inheritance.  A "using", "containing", or
48 "delegation" relationship (some sort of aggregation, at least) is often more
49 appropriate.  See L<OBJECT RELATIONSHIPS>, L<USING RELATIONSHIP WITH SDBM>,
50 and L<"DELEGATION">.
51
52 =item 6
53
54 The object is the namespace.  Make package globals accessible via the
55 object.  This will remove the guess work about the symbol's home package.
56 See L<CLASS CONTEXT AND THE OBJECT>.
57
58 =item 7
59
60 IO syntax is certainly less noisy, but it is also prone to ambiguities which
61 can cause difficult-to-find bugs.  Allow people to use the sure-thing OO
62 syntax, even if you don't like it.
63
64 =item 8
65
66 Do not use function-call syntax on a method.  You're going to be bitten
67 someday.  Someone might move that method into a superclass and your code
68 will be broken.  On top of that you're feeding the paranoia in rule 2.
69
70 =item 9
71
72 Don't assume you know the home package of a method.  You're making it
73 difficult for someone to override that method.  See L<THINKING OF CODE REUSE>.
74
75 =back
76
77 =head1 INSTANCE VARIABLES
78
79 An anonymous array or anonymous hash can be used to hold instance
80 variables.  Named parameters are also demonstrated.
81
82         package Foo;
83
84         sub new {
85                 my $type = shift;
86                 my %params = @_;
87                 my $self = {};
88                 $self->{'High'} = $params{'High'};
89                 $self->{'Low'}  = $params{'Low'};
90                 bless $self, $type;
91         }
92
93
94         package Bar;
95
96         sub new {
97                 my $type = shift;
98                 my %params = @_;
99                 my $self = [];
100                 $self->[0] = $params{'Left'};
101                 $self->[1] = $params{'Right'};
102                 bless $self, $type;
103         }
104
105         package main;
106
107         $a = Foo->new( 'High' => 42, 'Low' => 11 );
108         print "High=$a->{'High'}\n";
109         print "Low=$a->{'Low'}\n";
110
111         $b = Bar->new( 'Left' => 78, 'Right' => 40 );
112         print "Left=$b->[0]\n";
113         print "Right=$b->[1]\n";
114
115 =head1 SCALAR INSTANCE VARIABLES
116
117 An anonymous scalar can be used when only one instance variable is needed.
118
119         package Foo;
120
121         sub new {
122                 my $type = shift;
123                 my $self;
124                 $self = shift;
125                 bless \$self, $type;
126         }
127
128         package main;
129
130         $a = Foo->new( 42 );
131         print "a=$$a\n";
132
133
134 =head1 INSTANCE VARIABLE INHERITANCE
135
136 This example demonstrates how one might inherit instance variables from a
137 superclass for inclusion in the new class.  This requires calling the
138 superclass's constructor and adding one's own instance variables to the new
139 object.
140
141         package Bar;
142
143         sub new {
144                 my $type = shift;
145                 my $self = {};
146                 $self->{'buz'} = 42;
147                 bless $self, $type;
148         }
149
150         package Foo;
151         @ISA = qw( Bar );
152
153         sub new {
154                 my $type = shift;
155                 my $self = Bar->new;
156                 $self->{'biz'} = 11;
157                 bless $self, $type;
158         }
159
160         package main;
161
162         $a = Foo->new;
163         print "buz = ", $a->{'buz'}, "\n";
164         print "biz = ", $a->{'biz'}, "\n";
165
166
167
168 =head1 OBJECT RELATIONSHIPS
169
170 The following demonstrates how one might implement "containing" and "using"
171 relationships between objects.
172
173         package Bar;
174
175         sub new {
176                 my $type = shift;
177                 my $self = {};
178                 $self->{'buz'} = 42;
179                 bless $self, $type;
180         }
181
182         package Foo;
183
184         sub new {
185                 my $type = shift;
186                 my $self = {};
187                 $self->{'Bar'} = Bar->new;
188                 $self->{'biz'} = 11;
189                 bless $self, $type;
190         }
191
192         package main;
193
194         $a = Foo->new;
195         print "buz = ", $a->{'Bar'}->{'buz'}, "\n";
196         print "biz = ", $a->{'biz'}, "\n";
197
198
199
200 =head1 OVERRIDING SUPERCLASS METHODS
201
202 The following example demonstrates how to override a superclass method and
203 then call the overridden method.  The B<SUPER> pseudo-class allows the
204 programmer to call an overridden superclass method without actually knowing
205 where that method is defined.
206
207         package Buz;
208         sub goo { print "here's the goo\n" }
209
210         package Bar; @ISA = qw( Buz );
211         sub google { print "google here\n" }
212
213         package Baz;
214         sub mumble { print "mumbling\n" }
215
216         package Foo;
217         @ISA = qw( Bar Baz );
218
219         sub new {
220                 my $type = shift;
221                 bless [], $type;
222         }
223         sub grr { print "grumble\n" }
224         sub goo {
225                 my $self = shift;
226                 $self->SUPER::goo();
227         }
228         sub mumble {
229                 my $self = shift;
230                 $self->SUPER::mumble();
231         }
232         sub google {
233                 my $self = shift;
234                 $self->SUPER::google();
235         }
236
237         package main;
238
239         $foo = Foo->new;
240         $foo->mumble;
241         $foo->grr;
242         $foo->goo;
243         $foo->google;
244
245
246 =head1 USING RELATIONSHIP WITH SDBM
247
248 This example demonstrates an interface for the SDBM class.  This creates a
249 "using" relationship between the SDBM class and the new class Mydbm.
250
251         package Mydbm;
252
253         require SDBM_File;
254         require Tie::Hash;
255         @ISA = qw( Tie::Hash );
256
257         sub TIEHASH {
258             my $type = shift;
259             my $ref  = SDBM_File->new(@_);
260             bless {'dbm' => $ref}, $type;
261         }
262         sub FETCH {
263             my $self = shift;
264             my $ref  = $self->{'dbm'};
265             $ref->FETCH(@_);
266         }
267         sub STORE {
268             my $self = shift; 
269             if (defined $_[0]){
270                 my $ref = $self->{'dbm'};
271                 $ref->STORE(@_);
272             } else {
273                 die "Cannot STORE an undefined key in Mydbm\n";
274             }
275         }
276
277         package main;
278         use Fcntl qw( O_RDWR O_CREAT );
279
280         tie %foo, "Mydbm", "Sdbm", O_RDWR|O_CREAT, 0640;
281         $foo{'bar'} = 123;
282         print "foo-bar = $foo{'bar'}\n";
283
284         tie %bar, "Mydbm", "Sdbm2", O_RDWR|O_CREAT, 0640;
285         $bar{'Cathy'} = 456;
286         print "bar-Cathy = $bar{'Cathy'}\n";
287
288 =head1 THINKING OF CODE REUSE
289
290 One strength of Object-Oriented languages is the ease with which old code
291 can use new code.  The following examples will demonstrate first how one can
292 hinder code reuse and then how one can promote code reuse.
293
294 This first example illustrates a class which uses a fully-qualified method
295 call to access the "private" method BAZ().  The second example will show
296 that it is impossible to override the BAZ() method.
297
298         package FOO;
299
300         sub new {
301                 my $type = shift;
302                 bless {}, $type;
303         }
304         sub bar {
305                 my $self = shift;
306                 $self->FOO::private::BAZ;
307         }
308
309         package FOO::private;
310
311         sub BAZ {
312                 print "in BAZ\n";
313         }
314
315         package main;
316
317         $a = FOO->new;
318         $a->bar;
319
320 Now we try to override the BAZ() method.  We would like FOO::bar() to call
321 GOOP::BAZ(), but this cannot happen because FOO::bar() explicitly calls
322 FOO::private::BAZ().
323
324         package FOO;
325
326         sub new {
327                 my $type = shift;
328                 bless {}, $type;
329         }
330         sub bar {
331                 my $self = shift;
332                 $self->FOO::private::BAZ;
333         }
334
335         package FOO::private;
336
337         sub BAZ {
338                 print "in BAZ\n";
339         }
340
341         package GOOP;
342         @ISA = qw( FOO );
343         sub new {
344                 my $type = shift;
345                 bless {}, $type;
346         }
347
348         sub BAZ {
349                 print "in GOOP::BAZ\n";
350         }
351
352         package main;
353
354         $a = GOOP->new;
355         $a->bar;
356
357 To create reusable code we must modify class FOO, flattening class
358 FOO::private.  The next example shows a reusable class FOO which allows the
359 method GOOP::BAZ() to be used in place of FOO::BAZ().
360
361         package FOO;
362
363         sub new {
364                 my $type = shift;
365                 bless {}, $type;
366         }
367         sub bar {
368                 my $self = shift;
369                 $self->BAZ;
370         }
371
372         sub BAZ {
373                 print "in BAZ\n";
374         }
375
376         package GOOP;
377         @ISA = qw( FOO );
378
379         sub new {
380                 my $type = shift;
381                 bless {}, $type;
382         }
383         sub BAZ {
384                 print "in GOOP::BAZ\n";
385         }
386
387         package main;
388
389         $a = GOOP->new;
390         $a->bar;
391
392 =head1 CLASS CONTEXT AND THE OBJECT
393
394 Use the object to solve package and class context problems.  Everything a
395 method needs should be available via the object or should be passed as a
396 parameter to the method.
397
398 A class will sometimes have static or global data to be used by the
399 methods.  A subclass may want to override that data and replace it with new
400 data.  When this happens the superclass may not know how to find the new
401 copy of the data.
402
403 This problem can be solved by using the object to define the context of the
404 method.  Let the method look in the object for a reference to the data.  The
405 alternative is to force the method to go hunting for the data ("Is it in my
406 class, or in a subclass?  Which subclass?"), and this can be inconvenient
407 and will lead to hackery.  It is better to just let the object tell the
408 method where that data is located.
409
410         package Bar;
411
412         %fizzle = ( 'Password' => 'XYZZY' );
413
414         sub new {
415                 my $type = shift;
416                 my $self = {};
417                 $self->{'fizzle'} = \%fizzle;
418                 bless $self, $type;
419         }
420
421         sub enter {
422                 my $self = shift;
423         
424                 # Don't try to guess if we should use %Bar::fizzle
425                 # or %Foo::fizzle.  The object already knows which
426                 # we should use, so just ask it.
427                 #
428                 my $fizzle = $self->{'fizzle'};
429
430                 print "The word is ", $fizzle->{'Password'}, "\n";
431         }
432
433         package Foo;
434         @ISA = qw( Bar );
435
436         %fizzle = ( 'Password' => 'Rumple' );
437
438         sub new {
439                 my $type = shift;
440                 my $self = Bar->new;
441                 $self->{'fizzle'} = \%fizzle;
442                 bless $self, $type;
443         }
444
445         package main;
446
447         $a = Bar->new;
448         $b = Foo->new;
449         $a->enter;
450         $b->enter;
451
452 =head1 INHERITING A CONSTRUCTOR
453
454 An inheritable constructor should use the second form of bless() which allows
455 blessing directly into a specified class.  Notice in this example that the
456 object will be a BAR not a FOO, even though the constructor is in class FOO.
457
458         package FOO;
459
460         sub new {
461                 my $type = shift;
462                 my $self = {};
463                 bless $self, $type;
464         }
465
466         sub baz {
467                 print "in FOO::baz()\n";
468         }
469
470         package BAR;
471         @ISA = qw(FOO);
472
473         sub baz {
474                 print "in BAR::baz()\n";
475         }
476
477         package main;
478
479         $a = BAR->new;
480         $a->baz;
481
482 =head1 DELEGATION
483
484 Some classes, such as SDBM_File, cannot be effectively subclassed because
485 they create foreign objects.  Such a class can be extended with some sort of
486 aggregation technique such as the "using" relationship mentioned earlier or
487 by delegation.
488
489 The following example demonstrates delegation using an AUTOLOAD() function to
490 perform message-forwarding.  This will allow the Mydbm object to behave
491 exactly like an SDBM_File object.  The Mydbm class could now extend the
492 behavior by adding custom FETCH() and STORE() methods, if this is desired.
493
494         package Mydbm;
495
496         require SDBM_File;
497         require Tie::Hash;
498         @ISA = qw(Tie::Hash);
499
500         sub TIEHASH {
501                 my $type = shift;
502                 my $ref = SDBM_File->new(@_);
503                 bless {'delegate' => $ref};
504         }
505
506         sub AUTOLOAD {
507                 my $self = shift;
508
509                 # The Perl interpreter places the name of the
510                 # message in a variable called $AUTOLOAD.
511
512                 # DESTROY messages should never be propagated.
513                 return if $AUTOLOAD =~ /::DESTROY$/;
514
515                 # Remove the package name.
516                 $AUTOLOAD =~ s/^Mydbm:://;
517
518                 # Pass the message to the delegate.
519                 $self->{'delegate'}->$AUTOLOAD(@_);
520         }
521
522         package main;
523         use Fcntl qw( O_RDWR O_CREAT );
524
525         tie %foo, "Mydbm", "adbm", O_RDWR|O_CREAT, 0640;
526         $foo{'bar'} = 123;
527         print "foo-bar = $foo{'bar'}\n";