Re: [MacOS X] consider useshrplib='false' by default
[perl.git] / pod / perldebug.pod
1 =head1 NAME
2
3 perldebug - Perl debugging
4
5 =head1 DESCRIPTION
6
7 First of all, have you tried using the B<-w> switch?
8
9
10 If you're new to the Perl debugger, you may prefer to read
11 L<perldebtut>, which is a tutorial introduction to the debugger .
12
13 =head1 The Perl Debugger
14
15 If you invoke Perl with the B<-d> switch, your script runs under the
16 Perl source debugger.  This works like an interactive Perl
17 environment, prompting for debugger commands that let you examine
18 source code, set breakpoints, get stack backtraces, change the values of
19 variables, etc.  This is so convenient that you often fire up
20 the debugger all by itself just to test out Perl constructs
21 interactively to see what they do.  For example:
22
23     $ perl -d -e 42
24
25 In Perl, the debugger is not a separate program the way it usually is in the
26 typical compiled environment.  Instead, the B<-d> flag tells the compiler
27 to insert source information into the parse trees it's about to hand off
28 to the interpreter.  That means your code must first compile correctly
29 for the debugger to work on it.  Then when the interpreter starts up, it
30 preloads a special Perl library file containing the debugger.
31
32 The program will halt I<right before> the first run-time executable
33 statement (but see below regarding compile-time statements) and ask you
34 to enter a debugger command.  Contrary to popular expectations, whenever
35 the debugger halts and shows you a line of code, it always displays the
36 line it's I<about> to execute, rather than the one it has just executed.
37
38 Any command not recognized by the debugger is directly executed
39 (C<eval>'d) as Perl code in the current package.  (The debugger
40 uses the DB package for keeping its own state information.)
41
42 For any text entered at the debugger prompt, leading and trailing whitespace
43 is first stripped before further processing.  If a debugger command
44 coincides with some function in your own program, merely precede the
45 function with something that doesn't look like a debugger command, such
46 as a leading C<;> or perhaps a C<+>, or by wrapping it with parentheses
47 or braces.
48
49 =head2 Debugger Commands
50
51 The debugger understands the following commands:
52
53 =over 12
54
55 =item h
56
57 Prints out a summary help message
58
59 =item h [command]
60
61 Prints out a help message for the given debugger command.
62
63 =item h h
64
65 The special argument of C<h h> produces the entire help page, which is quite long.
66
67 If the output of the C<h h> command (or any command, for that matter) scrolls
68 past your screen, precede the command with a leading pipe symbol so
69 that it's run through your pager, as in
70
71     DB> |h h
72
73 You may change the pager which is used via C<o pager=...> command.
74
75
76 =item p expr
77
78 Same as C<print {$DB::OUT} expr> in the current package.  In particular,
79 because this is just Perl's own C<print> function, this means that nested
80 data structures and objects are not dumped, unlike with the C<x> command.
81
82 The C<DB::OUT> filehandle is opened to F</dev/tty>, regardless of
83 where STDOUT may be redirected to.
84
85 =item x [maxdepth] expr
86
87 Evaluates its expression in list context and dumps out the result in a
88 pretty-printed fashion.  Nested data structures are printed out
89 recursively, unlike the real C<print> function in Perl.  When dumping
90 hashes, you'll probably prefer 'x \%h' rather than 'x %h'.
91 See L<Dumpvalue> if you'd like to do this yourself.
92
93 The output format is governed by multiple options described under
94 L<"Configurable Options">.
95
96 If the C<maxdepth> is included, it must be a numeral I<N>; the value is
97 dumped only I<N> levels deep, as if the C<dumpDepth> option had been
98 temporarily set to I<N>.
99
100 =item V [pkg [vars]]
101
102 Display all (or some) variables in package (defaulting to C<main>) 
103 using a data pretty-printer (hashes show their keys and values so
104 you see what's what, control characters are made printable, etc.).
105 Make sure you don't put the type specifier (like C<$>) there, just
106 the symbol names, like this:
107
108     V DB filename line
109
110 Use C<~pattern> and C<!pattern> for positive and negative regexes.
111
112 This is similar to calling the C<x> command on each applicable var.
113
114 =item X [vars]
115
116 Same as C<V currentpackage [vars]>.
117
118 =item y [level [vars]]
119
120 Display all (or some) lexical variables (mnemonic: C<mY> variables)
121 in the current scope or I<level> scopes higher.  You can limit the
122 variables that you see with I<vars> which works exactly as it does
123 for the C<V> and C<X> commands.  Requires the C<PadWalker> module
124 version 0.08 or higher; will warn if this isn't installed.  Output
125 is pretty-printed in the same style as for C<V> and the format is
126 controlled by the same options.
127
128 =item T
129
130 Produce a stack backtrace.  See below for details on its output.
131
132 =item s [expr]
133
134 Single step.  Executes until the beginning of another
135 statement, descending into subroutine calls.  If an expression is
136 supplied that includes function calls, it too will be single-stepped.
137
138 =item n [expr]
139
140 Next.  Executes over subroutine calls, until the beginning
141 of the next statement.  If an expression is supplied that includes
142 function calls, those functions will be executed with stops before
143 each statement.
144
145 =item r
146
147 Continue until the return from the current subroutine.
148 Dump the return value if the C<PrintRet> option is set (default).
149
150 =item <CR>
151
152 Repeat last C<n> or C<s> command.
153
154 =item c [line|sub]
155
156 Continue, optionally inserting a one-time-only breakpoint
157 at the specified line or subroutine.
158
159 =item l
160
161 List next window of lines.
162
163 =item l min+incr
164
165 List C<incr+1> lines starting at C<min>.
166
167 =item l min-max
168
169 List lines C<min> through C<max>.  C<l -> is synonymous to C<->.
170
171 =item l line
172
173 List a single line.
174
175 =item l subname
176
177 List first window of lines from subroutine.  I<subname> may
178 be a variable that contains a code reference.
179
180 =item -
181
182 List previous window of lines.
183
184 =item v [line]
185
186 View a few lines of code around the current line.
187
188 =item .
189
190 Return the internal debugger pointer to the line last
191 executed, and print out that line.
192
193 =item f filename
194
195 Switch to viewing a different file or C<eval> statement.  If I<filename>
196 is not a full pathname found in the values of %INC, it is considered 
197 a regex.
198
199 C<eval>ed strings (when accessible) are considered to be filenames:
200 C<f (eval 7)> and C<f eval 7\b> access the body of the 7th C<eval>ed string
201 (in the order of execution).  The bodies of the currently executed C<eval>
202 and of C<eval>ed strings that define subroutines are saved and thus
203 accessible.
204
205 =item /pattern/
206
207 Search forwards for pattern (a Perl regex); final / is optional.
208 The search is case-insensitive by default.
209
210 =item ?pattern?
211
212 Search backwards for pattern; final ? is optional.
213 The search is case-insensitive by default.
214
215 =item L [abw]
216
217 List (default all) actions, breakpoints and watch expressions
218
219 =item S [[!]regex]
220
221 List subroutine names [not] matching the regex.
222
223 =item t
224
225 Toggle trace mode (see also the C<AutoTrace> option).
226
227 =item t expr
228
229 Trace through execution of C<expr>.
230 See L<perldebguts/"Frame Listing Output Examples"> for examples.
231
232 =item b
233
234 Sets breakpoint on current line
235
236 =item b [line] [condition]
237
238 Set a breakpoint before the given line.  If a condition
239 is specified, it's evaluated each time the statement is reached: a
240 breakpoint is taken only if the condition is true.  Breakpoints may
241 only be set on lines that begin an executable statement.  Conditions
242 don't use C<if>:
243
244     b 237 $x > 30
245     b 237 ++$count237 < 11
246     b 33 /pattern/i
247
248 =item b subname [condition]
249
250 Set a breakpoint before the first line of the named subroutine.  I<subname> may
251 be a variable containing a code reference (in this case I<condition>
252 is not supported).
253
254 =item b postpone subname [condition]
255
256 Set a breakpoint at first line of subroutine after it is compiled.
257
258 =item b load filename
259
260 Set a breakpoint before the first executed line of the I<filename>,
261 which should be a full pathname found amongst the %INC values.
262
263 =item b compile subname
264
265 Sets a breakpoint before the first statement executed after the specified
266 subroutine is compiled.
267
268 =item B line
269
270 Delete a breakpoint from the specified I<line>.  
271
272 =item B *
273
274 Delete all installed breakpoints.
275
276 =item a [line] command
277
278 Set an action to be done before the line is executed.  If I<line> is
279 omitted, set an action on the line about to be executed.
280 The sequence of steps taken by the debugger is
281
282   1. check for a breakpoint at this line
283   2. print the line if necessary (tracing)
284   3. do any actions associated with that line
285   4. prompt user if at a breakpoint or in single-step
286   5. evaluate line
287
288 For example, this will print out $foo every time line
289 53 is passed:
290
291     a 53 print "DB FOUND $foo\n"
292
293 =item A line
294
295 Delete an action from the specified line.  
296
297 =item A *
298
299 Delete all installed actions.
300
301 =item w expr
302
303 Add a global watch-expression.  We hope you know what one of these
304 is, because they're supposed to be obvious.  
305
306 =item W expr
307
308 Delete watch-expression
309
310 =item W *
311
312 Delete all watch-expressions.
313
314 =item o
315
316 Display all options
317
318 =item o booloption ...
319
320 Set each listed Boolean option to the value C<1>.
321
322 =item o anyoption? ...
323
324 Print out the value of one or more options.
325
326 =item o option=value ...
327
328 Set the value of one or more options.  If the value has internal
329 whitespace, it should be quoted.  For example, you could set C<o
330 pager="less -MQeicsNfr"> to call B<less> with those specific options.
331 You may use either single or double quotes, but if you do, you must
332 escape any embedded instances of same sort of quote you began with,
333 as well as any escaping any escapes that immediately precede that
334 quote but which are not meant to escape the quote itself.  In other
335 words, you follow single-quoting rules irrespective of the quote;
336 eg: C<o option='this isn\'t bad'> or C<o option="She said, \"Isn't
337 it?\"">.
338
339 For historical reasons, the C<=value> is optional, but defaults to
340 1 only where it is safe to do so--that is, mostly for Boolean
341 options.  It is always better to assign a specific value using C<=>.
342 The C<option> can be abbreviated, but for clarity probably should
343 not be.  Several options can be set together.  See L<"Configurable Options"> 
344 for a list of these.
345
346 =item < ? 
347
348 List out all pre-prompt Perl command actions.
349
350 =item < [ command ]
351
352 Set an action (Perl command) to happen before every debugger prompt.
353 A multi-line command may be entered by backslashing the newlines.  
354
355 =item < * 
356
357 Delete all pre-prompt Perl command actions.
358
359 =item << command
360
361 Add an action (Perl command) to happen before every debugger prompt.
362 A multi-line command may be entered by backwhacking the newlines.
363
364 =item > ?
365
366 List out post-prompt Perl command actions.
367
368 =item > command
369
370 Set an action (Perl command) to happen after the prompt when you've
371 just given a command to return to executing the script.  A multi-line
372 command may be entered by backslashing the newlines (we bet you
373 couldn't've guessed this by now). 
374
375 =item > * 
376
377 Delete all post-prompt Perl command actions.
378
379 =item >> command
380
381 Adds an action (Perl command) to happen after the prompt when you've
382 just given a command to return to executing the script.  A multi-line
383 command may be entered by backslashing the newlines.
384
385 =item { ?
386
387 List out pre-prompt debugger commands.
388
389 =item { [ command ]
390
391 Set an action (debugger command) to happen before every debugger prompt.
392 A multi-line command may be entered in the customary fashion.  
393
394 Because this command is in some senses new, a warning is issued if
395 you appear to have accidentally entered a block instead.  If that's
396 what you mean to do, write it as with C<;{ ... }> or even 
397 C<do { ... }>.
398
399 =item { * 
400
401 Delete all pre-prompt debugger commands.
402
403 =item {{ command
404
405 Add an action (debugger command) to happen before every debugger prompt.
406 A multi-line command may be entered, if you can guess how: see above.
407
408 =item ! number
409
410 Redo a previous command (defaults to the previous command).
411
412 =item ! -number
413
414 Redo number'th previous command.
415
416 =item ! pattern
417
418 Redo last command that started with pattern.
419 See C<o recallCommand>, too.
420
421 =item !! cmd
422
423 Run cmd in a subprocess (reads from DB::IN, writes to DB::OUT) See
424 C<o shellBang>, also.  Note that the user's current shell (well,
425 their C<$ENV{SHELL}> variable) will be used, which can interfere
426 with proper interpretation of exit status or signal and coredump
427 information.
428
429 =item source file
430
431 Read and execute debugger commands from I<file>.
432 I<file> may itself contain C<source> commands.
433
434 =item H -number
435
436 Display last n commands.  Only commands longer than one character are
437 listed.  If I<number> is omitted, list them all.
438
439 =item q or ^D
440
441 Quit.  ("quit" doesn't work for this, unless you've made an alias)
442 This is the only supported way to exit the debugger, though typing
443 C<exit> twice might work.
444
445 Set the C<inhibit_exit> option to 0 if you want to be able to step
446 off the end the script.  You may also need to set $finished to 0 
447 if you want to step through global destruction.
448
449 =item R
450
451 Restart the debugger by C<exec()>ing a new session.  We try to maintain
452 your history across this, but internal settings and command-line options
453 may be lost.
454
455 The following setting are currently preserved: history, breakpoints,
456 actions, debugger options, and the Perl command-line
457 options B<-w>, B<-I>, and B<-e>.
458
459 =item |dbcmd
460
461 Run the debugger command, piping DB::OUT into your current pager.
462
463 =item ||dbcmd
464
465 Same as C<|dbcmd> but DB::OUT is temporarily C<select>ed as well.
466
467 =item = [alias value]
468
469 Define a command alias, like
470
471     = quit q
472
473 or list current aliases.
474
475 =item command
476
477 Execute command as a Perl statement.  A trailing semicolon will be
478 supplied.  If the Perl statement would otherwise be confused for a
479 Perl debugger, use a leading semicolon, too.
480
481 =item m expr
482
483 List which methods may be called on the result of the evaluated
484 expression.  The expression may evaluated to a reference to a 
485 blessed object, or to a package name.
486
487 =item M
488
489 Displays all loaded modules and their versions
490
491
492 =item man [manpage]
493
494 Despite its name, this calls your system's default documentation
495 viewer on the given page, or on the viewer itself if I<manpage> is
496 omitted.  If that viewer is B<man>, the current C<Config> information
497 is used to invoke B<man> using the proper MANPATH or S<B<-M>
498 I<manpath>> option.  Failed lookups of the form C<XXX> that match
499 known manpages of the form I<perlXXX> will be retried.  This lets
500 you type C<man debug> or C<man op> from the debugger.
501
502 On systems traditionally bereft of a usable B<man> command, the
503 debugger invokes B<perldoc>.  Occasionally this determination is
504 incorrect due to recalcitrant vendors or rather more felicitously,
505 to enterprising users.  If you fall into either category, just
506 manually set the $DB::doccmd variable to whatever viewer to view
507 the Perl documentation on your system.  This may be set in an rc
508 file, or through direct assignment.  We're still waiting for a
509 working example of something along the lines of:
510
511     $DB::doccmd = 'netscape -remote http://something.here/';
512
513 =back
514
515 =head2 Configurable Options
516
517 The debugger has numerous options settable using the C<o> command,
518 either interactively or from the environment or an rc file.
519 (./.perldb or ~/.perldb under Unix.)
520
521
522 =over 12
523
524 =item C<recallCommand>, C<ShellBang>
525
526 The characters used to recall command or spawn shell.  By
527 default, both are set to C<!>, which is unfortunate.
528
529 =item C<pager>
530
531 Program to use for output of pager-piped commands (those beginning
532 with a C<|> character.)  By default, C<$ENV{PAGER}> will be used.
533 Because the debugger uses your current terminal characteristics
534 for bold and underlining, if the chosen pager does not pass escape
535 sequences through unchanged, the output of some debugger commands
536 will not be readable when sent through the pager.
537
538 =item C<tkRunning>
539
540 Run Tk while prompting (with ReadLine).
541
542 =item C<signalLevel>, C<warnLevel>, C<dieLevel>
543
544 Level of verbosity.  By default, the debugger leaves your exceptions
545 and warnings alone, because altering them can break correctly running
546 programs.  It will attempt to print a message when uncaught INT, BUS, or
547 SEGV signals arrive.  (But see the mention of signals in L<BUGS> below.)
548
549 To disable this default safe mode, set these values to something higher
550 than 0.  At a level of 1, you get backtraces upon receiving any kind
551 of warning (this is often annoying) or exception (this is
552 often valuable).  Unfortunately, the debugger cannot discern fatal
553 exceptions from non-fatal ones.  If C<dieLevel> is even 1, then your
554 non-fatal exceptions are also traced and unceremoniously altered if they
555 came from C<eval'd> strings or from any kind of C<eval> within modules
556 you're attempting to load.  If C<dieLevel> is 2, the debugger doesn't
557 care where they came from:  It usurps your exception handler and prints
558 out a trace, then modifies all exceptions with its own embellishments.
559 This may perhaps be useful for some tracing purposes, but tends to hopelessly
560 destroy any program that takes its exception handling seriously.
561
562 =item C<AutoTrace>
563
564 Trace mode (similar to C<t> command, but can be put into
565 C<PERLDB_OPTS>).
566
567 =item C<LineInfo>
568
569 File or pipe to print line number info to.  If it is a pipe (say,
570 C<|visual_perl_db>), then a short message is used.  This is the
571 mechanism used to interact with a slave editor or visual debugger,
572 such as the special C<vi> or C<emacs> hooks, or the C<ddd> graphical
573 debugger.
574
575 =item C<inhibit_exit>
576
577 If 0, allows I<stepping off> the end of the script.
578
579 =item C<PrintRet>
580
581 Print return value after C<r> command if set (default).
582
583 =item C<ornaments>
584
585 Affects screen appearance of the command line (see L<Term::ReadLine>).
586 There is currently no way to disable these, which can render
587 some output illegible on some displays, or with some pagers.
588 This is considered a bug.
589
590 =item C<frame>
591
592 Affects the printing of messages upon entry and exit from subroutines.  If
593 C<frame & 2> is false, messages are printed on entry only. (Printing
594 on exit might be useful if interspersed with other messages.)
595
596 If C<frame & 4>, arguments to functions are printed, plus context
597 and caller info.  If C<frame & 8>, overloaded C<stringify> and
598 C<tie>d C<FETCH> is enabled on the printed arguments.  If C<frame
599 & 16>, the return value from the subroutine is printed.
600
601 The length at which the argument list is truncated is governed by the
602 next option:
603
604 =item C<maxTraceLen>
605
606 Length to truncate the argument list when the C<frame> option's
607 bit 4 is set.
608
609 =item C<windowSize>
610
611 Change the size of code list window (default is 10 lines).
612
613 =back
614
615 The following options affect what happens with C<V>, C<X>, and C<x>
616 commands:
617
618 =over 12
619
620 =item C<arrayDepth>, C<hashDepth>
621
622 Print only first N elements ('' for all).
623
624 =item C<dumpDepth>
625
626 Limit recursion depth to N levels when dumping structures.
627 Negative values are interpreted as infinity.  Default: infinity.
628
629 =item C<compactDump>, C<veryCompact>
630
631 Change the style of array and hash output.  If C<compactDump>, short array
632 may be printed on one line.
633
634 =item C<globPrint>
635
636 Whether to print contents of globs.
637
638 =item C<DumpDBFiles>
639
640 Dump arrays holding debugged files.
641
642 =item C<DumpPackages>
643
644 Dump symbol tables of packages.
645
646 =item C<DumpReused>
647
648 Dump contents of "reused" addresses.
649
650 =item C<quote>, C<HighBit>, C<undefPrint>
651
652 Change the style of string dump.  The default value for C<quote>
653 is C<auto>; one can enable double-quotish or single-quotish format
654 by setting it to C<"> or C<'>, respectively.  By default, characters
655 with their high bit set are printed verbatim.
656
657 =item C<UsageOnly>
658
659 Rudimentary per-package memory usage dump.  Calculates total
660 size of strings found in variables in the package.  This does not
661 include lexicals in a module's file scope, or lost in closures.
662
663 =back
664
665 After the rc file is read, the debugger reads the C<$ENV{PERLDB_OPTS}>
666 environment variable and parses this as the remainder of a `O ...'
667 line as one might enter at the debugger prompt.  You may place the
668 initialization options C<TTY>, C<noTTY>, C<ReadLine>, and C<NonStop>
669 there.
670
671 If your rc file contains:
672
673   parse_options("NonStop=1 LineInfo=db.out AutoTrace");
674
675 then your script will run without human intervention, putting trace
676 information into the file I<db.out>.  (If you interrupt it, you'd
677 better reset C<LineInfo> to F</dev/tty> if you expect to see anything.)
678
679 =over 12
680
681 =item C<TTY>
682
683 The TTY to use for debugging I/O.
684
685 =item C<noTTY>
686
687 If set, the debugger goes into C<NonStop> mode and will not connect to a TTY.  If
688 interrupted (or if control goes to the debugger via explicit setting of
689 $DB::signal or $DB::single from the Perl script), it connects to a TTY
690 specified in the C<TTY> option at startup, or to a tty found at
691 runtime using the C<Term::Rendezvous> module of your choice.
692
693 This module should implement a method named C<new> that returns an object
694 with two methods: C<IN> and C<OUT>.  These should return filehandles to use
695 for debugging input and output correspondingly.  The C<new> method should
696 inspect an argument containing the value of C<$ENV{PERLDB_NOTTY}> at
697 startup, or C<"/tmp/perldbtty$$"> otherwise.  This file is not 
698 inspected for proper ownership, so security hazards are theoretically
699 possible.
700
701 =item C<ReadLine>
702
703 If false, readline support in the debugger is disabled in order
704 to debug applications that themselves use ReadLine.
705
706 =item C<NonStop>
707
708 If set, the debugger goes into non-interactive mode until interrupted, or
709 programmatically by setting $DB::signal or $DB::single.
710
711 =back
712
713 Here's an example of using the C<$ENV{PERLDB_OPTS}> variable:
714
715     $ PERLDB_OPTS="NonStop frame=2" perl -d myprogram
716
717 That will run the script B<myprogram> without human intervention,
718 printing out the call tree with entry and exit points.  Note that
719 C<NonStop=1 frame=2> is equivalent to C<N f=2>, and that originally,
720 options could be uniquely abbreviated by the first letter (modulo
721 the C<Dump*> options).  It is nevertheless recommended that you
722 always spell them out in full for legibility and future compatibility.
723
724 Other examples include
725
726     $ PERLDB_OPTS="NonStop LineInfo=listing frame=2" perl -d myprogram
727
728 which runs script non-interactively, printing info on each entry
729 into a subroutine and each executed line into the file named F<listing>.
730 (If you interrupt it, you would better reset C<LineInfo> to something
731 "interactive"!)
732
733 Other examples include (using standard shell syntax to show environment
734 variable settings):
735
736   $ ( PERLDB_OPTS="NonStop frame=1 AutoTrace LineInfo=tperl.out"
737       perl -d myprogram )
738
739 which may be useful for debugging a program that uses C<Term::ReadLine>
740 itself.  Do not forget to detach your shell from the TTY in the window that
741 corresponds to F</dev/ttyXX>, say, by issuing a command like
742
743   $ sleep 1000000
744
745 See L<perldebguts/"Debugger Internals"> for details.
746
747 =head2 Debugger input/output
748
749 =over 8
750
751 =item Prompt
752
753 The debugger prompt is something like
754
755     DB<8>
756
757 or even
758
759     DB<<17>>
760
761 where that number is the command number, and which you'd use to
762 access with the built-in B<csh>-like history mechanism.  For example,
763 C<!17> would repeat command number 17.  The depth of the angle
764 brackets indicates the nesting depth of the debugger.  You could
765 get more than one set of brackets, for example, if you'd already
766 at a breakpoint and then printed the result of a function call that
767 itself has a breakpoint, or you step into an expression via C<s/n/t
768 expression> command.
769
770 =item Multiline commands
771
772 If you want to enter a multi-line command, such as a subroutine
773 definition with several statements or a format, escape the newline
774 that would normally end the debugger command with a backslash.
775 Here's an example:
776
777       DB<1> for (1..4) {         \
778       cont:     print "ok\n";   \
779       cont: }
780       ok
781       ok
782       ok
783       ok
784
785 Note that this business of escaping a newline is specific to interactive
786 commands typed into the debugger.
787
788 =item Stack backtrace
789
790 Here's an example of what a stack backtrace via C<T> command might
791 look like:
792
793     $ = main::infested called from file `Ambulation.pm' line 10
794     @ = Ambulation::legs(1, 2, 3, 4) called from file `camel_flea' line 7
795     $ = main::pests('bactrian', 4) called from file `camel_flea' line 4
796
797 The left-hand character up there indicates the context in which the
798 function was called, with C<$> and C<@> meaning scalar or list
799 contexts respectively, and C<.> meaning void context (which is
800 actually a sort of scalar context).  The display above says
801 that you were in the function C<main::infested> when you ran the
802 stack dump, and that it was called in scalar context from line
803 10 of the file I<Ambulation.pm>, but without any arguments at all,
804 meaning it was called as C<&infested>.  The next stack frame shows
805 that the function C<Ambulation::legs> was called in list context
806 from the I<camel_flea> file with four arguments.  The last stack
807 frame shows that C<main::pests> was called in scalar context,
808 also from I<camel_flea>, but from line 4.
809
810 If you execute the C<T> command from inside an active C<use>
811 statement, the backtrace will contain both a C<require> frame and
812 an C<eval>) frame.
813
814 =item Line Listing Format
815
816 This shows the sorts of output the C<l> command can produce:
817
818     DB<<13>> l
819   101:                @i{@i} = ();
820   102:b               @isa{@i,$pack} = ()
821   103                     if(exists $i{$prevpack} || exists $isa{$pack});
822   104             }
823   105
824   106             next
825   107==>              if(exists $isa{$pack});
826   108
827   109:a           if ($extra-- > 0) {
828   110:                %isa = ($pack,1);
829
830 Breakable lines are marked with C<:>.  Lines with breakpoints are
831 marked by C<b> and those with actions by C<a>.  The line that's
832 about to be executed is marked by C<< ==> >>.
833
834 Please be aware that code in debugger listings may not look the same
835 as your original source code.  Line directives and external source
836 filters can alter the code before Perl sees it, causing code to move
837 from its original positions or take on entirely different forms.
838
839 =item Frame listing
840
841 When the C<frame> option is set, the debugger would print entered (and
842 optionally exited) subroutines in different styles.  See L<perldebguts>
843 for incredibly long examples of these.
844
845 =back
846
847 =head2 Debugging compile-time statements
848
849 If you have compile-time executable statements (such as code within
850 BEGIN and CHECK blocks or C<use> statements), these will I<not> be
851 stopped by debugger, although C<require>s and INIT blocks will, and
852 compile-time statements can be traced with C<AutoTrace> option set
853 in C<PERLDB_OPTS>).  From your own Perl code, however, you can
854 transfer control back to the debugger using the following statement,
855 which is harmless if the debugger is not running:
856
857     $DB::single = 1;
858
859 If you set C<$DB::single> to 2, it's equivalent to having
860 just typed the C<n> command, whereas a value of 1 means the C<s>
861 command.  The C<$DB::trace>  variable should be set to 1 to simulate
862 having typed the C<t> command.
863
864 Another way to debug compile-time code is to start the debugger, set a
865 breakpoint on the I<load> of some module:
866
867     DB<7> b load f:/perllib/lib/Carp.pm
868   Will stop on load of `f:/perllib/lib/Carp.pm'.
869
870 and then restart the debugger using the C<R> command (if possible).  One can use C<b
871 compile subname> for the same purpose.
872
873 =head2 Debugger Customization
874
875 The debugger probably contains enough configuration hooks that you
876 won't ever have to modify it yourself.  You may change the behaviour
877 of debugger from within the debugger using its C<o> command, from
878 the command line via the C<PERLDB_OPTS> environment variable, and
879 from customization files.
880
881 You can do some customization by setting up a F<.perldb> file, which
882 contains initialization code.  For instance, you could make aliases
883 like these (the last one is one people expect to be there):
884
885     $DB::alias{'len'}  = 's/^len(.*)/p length($1)/';
886     $DB::alias{'stop'} = 's/^stop (at|in)/b/';
887     $DB::alias{'ps'}   = 's/^ps\b/p scalar /';
888     $DB::alias{'quit'} = 's/^quit(\s*)/exit/';
889
890 You can change options from F<.perldb> by using calls like this one;
891
892     parse_options("NonStop=1 LineInfo=db.out AutoTrace=1 frame=2");
893
894 The code is executed in the package C<DB>.  Note that F<.perldb> is
895 processed before processing C<PERLDB_OPTS>.  If F<.perldb> defines the
896 subroutine C<afterinit>, that function is called after debugger
897 initialization ends.  F<.perldb> may be contained in the current
898 directory, or in the home directory.  Because this file is sourced
899 in by Perl and may contain arbitrary commands, for security reasons,
900 it must be owned by the superuser or the current user, and writable
901 by no one but its owner.
902
903 You can mock TTY input to debugger by adding arbitrary commands to
904 @DB::typeahead. For example, your F<.perldb> file might contain:
905
906     sub afterinit { push @DB::typeahead, "b 4", "b 6"; }
907
908 Which would attempt to set breakpoints on lines 4 and 6 immediately
909 after debugger initilization. Note that @DB::typeahead is not a supported
910 interface and is subject to change in future releases.
911
912 If you want to modify the debugger, copy F<perl5db.pl> from the
913 Perl library to another name and hack it to your heart's content.
914 You'll then want to set your C<PERL5DB> environment variable to say
915 something like this:
916
917     BEGIN { require "myperl5db.pl" }
918
919 As a last resort, you could also use C<PERL5DB> to customize the debugger
920 by directly setting internal variables or calling debugger functions.
921
922 Note that any variables and functions that are not documented in
923 this document (or in L<perldebguts>) are considered for internal
924 use only, and as such are subject to change without notice.
925
926 =head2 Readline Support
927
928 As shipped, the only command-line history supplied is a simplistic one
929 that checks for leading exclamation points.  However, if you install
930 the Term::ReadKey and Term::ReadLine modules from CPAN, you will
931 have full editing capabilities much like GNU I<readline>(3) provides.
932 Look for these in the F<modules/by-module/Term> directory on CPAN.
933 These do not support normal B<vi> command-line editing, however.
934
935 A rudimentary command-line completion is also available.
936 Unfortunately, the names of lexical variables are not available for
937 completion.
938
939 =head2 Editor Support for Debugging
940
941 If you have the FSF's version of B<emacs> installed on your system,
942 it can interact with the Perl debugger to provide an integrated
943 software development environment reminiscent of its interactions
944 with C debuggers.
945
946 Perl comes with a start file for making B<emacs> act like a
947 syntax-directed editor that understands (some of) Perl's syntax.
948 Look in the I<emacs> directory of the Perl source distribution.
949
950 A similar setup by Tom Christiansen for interacting with any
951 vendor-shipped B<vi> and the X11 window system is also available.
952 This works similarly to the integrated multiwindow support that
953 B<emacs> provides, where the debugger drives the editor.  At the
954 time of this writing, however, that tool's eventual location in the
955 Perl distribution was uncertain.
956
957 Users of B<vi> should also look into B<vim> and B<gvim>, the mousey
958 and windy version, for coloring of Perl keywords.  
959
960 Note that only perl can truly parse Perl, so all such CASE tools
961 fall somewhat short of the mark, especially if you don't program
962 your Perl as a C programmer might.
963
964 =head2 The Perl Profiler
965
966 If you wish to supply an alternative debugger for Perl to run, just
967 invoke your script with a colon and a package argument given to the
968 B<-d> flag.  The most popular alternative debuggers for Perl is the
969 Perl profiler.  Devel::DProf is now included with the standard Perl
970 distribution.  To profile your Perl program in the file F<mycode.pl>,
971 just type:
972
973     $ perl -d:DProf mycode.pl
974
975 When the script terminates the profiler will dump the profile
976 information to a file called F<tmon.out>.  A tool like B<dprofpp>,
977 also supplied with the standard Perl distribution, can be used to
978 interpret the information in that profile.
979
980 =head1 Debugging regular expressions
981
982 C<use re 'debug'> enables you to see the gory details of how the Perl
983 regular expression engine works. In order to understand this typically
984 voluminous output, one must not only have some idea about how regular
985 expression matching works in general, but also know how Perl's regular
986 expressions are internally compiled into an automaton. These matters
987 are explored in some detail in
988 L<perldebguts/"Debugging regular expressions">.
989
990 =head1 Debugging memory usage
991
992 Perl contains internal support for reporting its own memory usage,
993 but this is a fairly advanced concept that requires some understanding
994 of how memory allocation works.
995 See L<perldebguts/"Debugging Perl memory usage"> for the details.
996
997 =head1 SEE ALSO
998
999 You did try the B<-w> switch, didn't you?
1000
1001 L<perldebtut>,
1002 L<perldebguts>,
1003 L<re>,
1004 L<DB>,
1005 L<Devel::DProf>,
1006 L<dprofpp>,
1007 L<Dumpvalue>,
1008 and
1009 L<perlrun>.
1010
1011 =head1 BUGS
1012
1013 You cannot get stack frame information or in any fashion debug functions
1014 that were not compiled by Perl, such as those from C or C++ extensions.
1015
1016 If you alter your @_ arguments in a subroutine (such as with C<shift>
1017 or C<pop>), the stack backtrace will not show the original values.
1018
1019 The debugger does not currently work in conjunction with the B<-W>
1020 command-line switch, because it itself is not free of warnings.
1021
1022 If you're in a slow syscall (like C<wait>ing, C<accept>ing, or C<read>ing
1023 from your keyboard or a socket) and haven't set up your own C<$SIG{INT}>
1024 handler, then you won't be able to CTRL-C your way back to the debugger,
1025 because the debugger's own C<$SIG{INT}> handler doesn't understand that
1026 it needs to raise an exception to longjmp(3) out of slow syscalls.