Provide defined value for $TODO only where test is still failing.
[perl.git] / pod / perllol.pod
1 =head1 NAME
2
3 perllol - Manipulating Arrays of Arrays in Perl
4
5 =head1 DESCRIPTION
6
7 =head2 Declaration and Access of Arrays of Arrays
8
9 The simplest two-level data structure to build in Perl is an array of
10 arrays, sometimes casually called a list of lists.  It's reasonably easy to
11 understand, and almost everything that applies here will also be applicable
12 later on with the fancier data structures.
13
14 An array of an array is just a regular old array @AoA that you can
15 get at with two subscripts, like C<$AoA[3][2]>.  Here's a declaration
16 of the array:
17
18     use 5.010;  # so we can use say()
19
20     # assign to our array, an array of array references
21     @AoA = (
22            [ "fred", "barney", "pebbles", "bambam", "dino", ],
23            [ "george", "jane", "elroy", "judy", ],
24            [ "homer", "bart", "marge", "maggie", ],
25     );
26     say $AoA[2][1];
27   bart
28
29 Now you should be very careful that the outer bracket type
30 is a round one, that is, a parenthesis.  That's because you're assigning to
31 an @array, so you need parentheses.  If you wanted there I<not> to be an @AoA,
32 but rather just a reference to it, you could do something more like this:
33
34     # assign a reference to array of array references
35     $ref_to_AoA = [
36         [ "fred", "barney", "pebbles", "bambam", "dino", ],
37         [ "george", "jane", "elroy", "judy", ],
38         [ "homer", "bart", "marge", "maggie", ],
39     ];
40     say $ref_to_AoA->[2][1];
41   bart
42
43 Notice that the outer bracket type has changed, and so our access syntax
44 has also changed.  That's because unlike C, in perl you can't freely
45 interchange arrays and references thereto.  $ref_to_AoA is a reference to an
46 array, whereas @AoA is an array proper.  Likewise, C<$AoA[2]> is not an
47 array, but an array ref.  So how come you can write these:
48
49     $AoA[2][2]
50     $ref_to_AoA->[2][2]
51
52 instead of having to write these:
53
54     $AoA[2]->[2]
55     $ref_to_AoA->[2]->[2]
56
57 Well, that's because the rule is that on adjacent brackets only (whether
58 square or curly), you are free to omit the pointer dereferencing arrow.
59 But you cannot do so for the very first one if it's a scalar containing
60 a reference, which means that $ref_to_AoA always needs it.
61
62 =head2 Growing Your Own
63
64 That's all well and good for declaration of a fixed data structure,
65 but what if you wanted to add new elements on the fly, or build
66 it up entirely from scratch?
67
68 First, let's look at reading it in from a file.  This is something like
69 adding a row at a time.  We'll assume that there's a flat file in which
70 each line is a row and each word an element.  If you're trying to develop an
71 @AoA array containing all these, here's the right way to do that:
72
73     while (<>) {
74         @tmp = split;
75         push @AoA, [ @tmp ];
76     }
77
78 You might also have loaded that from a function:
79
80     for $i ( 1 .. 10 ) {
81         $AoA[$i] = [ somefunc($i) ];
82     }
83
84 Or you might have had a temporary variable sitting around with the
85 array in it.
86
87     for $i ( 1 .. 10 ) {
88         @tmp = somefunc($i);
89         $AoA[$i] = [ @tmp ];
90     }
91
92 It's important you make sure to use the C<[ ]> array reference
93 constructor.  That's because this wouldn't work:
94
95     $AoA[$i] = @tmp;   # WRONG!
96
97 The reason that doesn't do what you want is because assigning a
98 named array like that to a scalar is taking an array in scalar
99 context, which means just counts the number of elements in @tmp.
100
101 If you are running under C<use strict> (and if you aren't, why in
102 the world aren't you?), you'll have to add some declarations to
103 make it happy:
104
105     use strict;
106     my(@AoA, @tmp);
107     while (<>) {
108         @tmp = split;
109         push @AoA, [ @tmp ];
110     }
111
112 Of course, you don't need the temporary array to have a name at all:
113
114     while (<>) {
115         push @AoA, [ split ];
116     }
117
118 You also don't have to use push().  You could just make a direct assignment
119 if you knew where you wanted to put it:
120
121     my (@AoA, $i, $line);
122     for $i ( 0 .. 10 ) {
123         $line = <>;
124         $AoA[$i] = [ split " ", $line ];
125     }
126
127 or even just
128
129     my (@AoA, $i);
130     for $i ( 0 .. 10 ) {
131         $AoA[$i] = [ split " ", <> ];
132     }
133
134 You should in general be leery of using functions that could
135 potentially return lists in scalar context without explicitly stating
136 such.  This would be clearer to the casual reader:
137
138     my (@AoA, $i);
139     for $i ( 0 .. 10 ) {
140         $AoA[$i] = [ split " ", scalar(<>) ];
141     }
142
143 If you wanted to have a $ref_to_AoA variable as a reference to an array,
144 you'd have to do something like this:
145
146     while (<>) {
147         push @$ref_to_AoA, [ split ];
148     }
149
150 Now you can add new rows.  What about adding new columns?  If you're
151 dealing with just matrices, it's often easiest to use simple assignment:
152
153     for $x (1 .. 10) {
154         for $y (1 .. 10) {
155             $AoA[$x][$y] = func($x, $y);
156         }
157     }
158
159     for $x ( 3, 7, 9 ) {
160         $AoA[$x][20] += func2($x);
161     }
162
163 It doesn't matter whether those elements are already
164 there or not: it'll gladly create them for you, setting
165 intervening elements to C<undef> as need be.
166
167 If you wanted just to append to a row, you'd have
168 to do something a bit funnier looking:
169
170     # add new columns to an existing row
171     push @{ $AoA[0] }, "wilma", "betty";   # explicit deref
172
173 =head2 Access and Printing
174
175 Now it's time to print your data structure out.  How
176 are you going to do that?  Well, if you want only one
177 of the elements, it's trivial:
178
179     print $AoA[0][0];
180
181 If you want to print the whole thing, though, you can't
182 say
183
184     print @AoA;         # WRONG
185
186 because you'll get just references listed, and perl will never
187 automatically dereference things for you.  Instead, you have to
188 roll yourself a loop or two.  This prints the whole structure,
189 using the shell-style for() construct to loop across the outer
190 set of subscripts.
191
192     for $aref ( @AoA ) {
193         say "\t [ @$aref ],";
194     }
195
196 If you wanted to keep track of subscripts, you might do this:
197
198     for $i ( 0 .. $#AoA ) {
199         say "\t elt $i is [ @{$AoA[$i]} ],";
200     }
201
202 or maybe even this.  Notice the inner loop.
203
204     for $i ( 0 .. $#AoA ) {
205         for $j ( 0 .. $#{$AoA[$i]} ) {
206             say "elt $i $j is $AoA[$i][$j]";
207         }
208     }
209
210 As you can see, it's getting a bit complicated.  That's why
211 sometimes is easier to take a temporary on your way through:
212
213     for $i ( 0 .. $#AoA ) {
214         $aref = $AoA[$i];
215         for $j ( 0 .. $#{$aref} ) {
216             say "elt $i $j is $AoA[$i][$j]";
217         }
218     }
219
220 Hmm... that's still a bit ugly.  How about this:
221
222     for $i ( 0 .. $#AoA ) {
223         $aref = $AoA[$i];
224         $n = @$aref - 1;
225         for $j ( 0 .. $n ) {
226             say "elt $i $j is $AoA[$i][$j]";
227         }
228     }
229
230 When you get tired of writing a custom print for your data structures,
231 you might look at the standard L<Dumpvalue> or L<Data::Dumper> modules.
232 The former is what the Perl debugger uses, while the latter generates
233 parsable Perl code.  For example:
234
235  use v5.14;     # using the + prototype, new to v5.14
236
237  sub show(+) {
238         require Dumpvalue;
239         state $prettily = new Dumpvalue::
240                             tick        => q("),
241                             compactDump => 1,  # comment these two lines
242                                                # out
243                             veryCompact => 1,  # if you want a bigger
244                                                # dump
245                         ;
246         dumpValue $prettily @_;
247  }
248
249  # Assign a list of array references to an array.
250  my @AoA = (
251            [ "fred", "barney" ],
252            [ "george", "jane", "elroy" ],
253            [ "homer", "marge", "bart" ],
254  );
255  push @{ $AoA[0] }, "wilma", "betty";
256  show @AoA;
257
258 will print out:
259
260     0  0..3  "fred" "barney" "wilma" "betty"
261     1  0..2  "george" "jane" "elroy"
262     2  0..2  "homer" "marge" "bart"
263
264 Whereas if you comment out the two lines I said you might wish to,
265 then it shows it to you this way instead:
266
267     0  ARRAY(0x8031d0)
268        0  "fred"
269        1  "barney"
270        2  "wilma"
271        3  "betty"
272     1  ARRAY(0x803d40)
273        0  "george"
274        1  "jane"
275        2  "elroy"
276     2  ARRAY(0x803e10)
277        0  "homer"
278        1  "marge"
279        2  "bart"
280
281 =head2 Slices
282
283 If you want to get at a slice (part of a row) in a multidimensional
284 array, you're going to have to do some fancy subscripting.  That's
285 because while we have a nice synonym for single elements via the
286 pointer arrow for dereferencing, no such convenience exists for slices.
287
288 Here's how to do one operation using a loop.  We'll assume an @AoA
289 variable as before.
290
291     @part = ();
292     $x = 4;
293     for ($y = 7; $y < 13; $y++) {
294         push @part, $AoA[$x][$y];
295     }
296
297 That same loop could be replaced with a slice operation:
298
299     @part = @{$AoA[4]}[7..12];
300
301 or spaced out a bit:
302
303     @part = @{ $AoA[4] } [ 7..12 ];
304
305 But as you might well imagine, this can get pretty rough on the reader.
306
307 Ah, but what if you wanted a I<two-dimensional slice>, such as having
308 $x run from 4..8 and $y run from 7 to 12?  Hmm... here's the simple way:
309
310     @newAoA = ();
311     for ($startx = $x = 4; $x <= 8; $x++) {
312         for ($starty = $y = 7; $y <= 12; $y++) {
313             $newAoA[$x - $startx][$y - $starty] = $AoA[$x][$y];
314         }
315     }
316
317 We can reduce some of the looping through slices
318
319     for ($x = 4; $x <= 8; $x++) {
320         push @newAoA, [ @{ $AoA[$x] } [ 7..12 ] ];
321     }
322
323 If you were into Schwartzian Transforms, you would probably
324 have selected map for that
325
326     @newAoA = map { [ @{ $AoA[$_] } [ 7..12 ] ] } 4 .. 8;
327
328 Although if your manager accused you of seeking job security (or rapid
329 insecurity) through inscrutable code, it would be hard to argue. :-)
330 If I were you, I'd put that in a function:
331
332     @newAoA = splice_2D( \@AoA, 4 => 8, 7 => 12 );
333     sub splice_2D {
334         my $lrr = shift;        # ref to array of array refs!
335         my ($x_lo, $x_hi,
336             $y_lo, $y_hi) = @_;
337
338         return map {
339             [ @{ $lrr->[$_] } [ $y_lo .. $y_hi ] ]
340         } $x_lo .. $x_hi;
341     }
342
343
344 =head1 SEE ALSO
345
346 L<perldata>, L<perlref>, L<perldsc>
347
348 =head1 AUTHOR
349
350 Tom Christiansen <F<tchrist@perl.com>>
351
352 Last update: Tue Apr 26 18:30:55 MDT 2011