our $TODO should be local $::TODO, revealing a bug in the de-commenting regexp.
[perl.git] / lib / bytes.pm
1 package bytes;
2
3 our $VERSION = '1.03';
4
5 $bytes::hint_bits = 0x00000008;
6
7 sub import {
8     $^H |= $bytes::hint_bits;
9 }
10
11 sub unimport {
12     $^H &= ~$bytes::hint_bits;
13 }
14
15 sub AUTOLOAD {
16     require "bytes_heavy.pl";
17     goto &$AUTOLOAD if defined &$AUTOLOAD;
18     require Carp;
19     Carp::croak("Undefined subroutine $AUTOLOAD called");
20 }
21
22 sub length (_);
23 sub chr (_);
24 sub ord (_);
25 sub substr ($$;$$);
26 sub index ($$;$);
27 sub rindex ($$;$);
28
29 1;
30 __END__
31
32 =head1 NAME
33
34 bytes - Perl pragma to force byte semantics rather than character semantics
35
36 =head1 SYNOPSIS
37
38     use bytes;
39     ... chr(...);       # or bytes::chr
40     ... index(...);     # or bytes::index
41     ... length(...);    # or bytes::length
42     ... ord(...);       # or bytes::ord
43     ... rindex(...);    # or bytes::rindex
44     ... substr(...);    # or bytes::substr
45     no bytes;
46
47
48 =head1 DESCRIPTION
49
50 The C<use bytes> pragma disables character semantics for the rest of the
51 lexical scope in which it appears.  C<no bytes> can be used to reverse
52 the effect of C<use bytes> within the current lexical scope.
53
54 Perl normally assumes character semantics in the presence of character
55 data (i.e. data that has come from a source that has been marked as
56 being of a particular character encoding). When C<use bytes> is in
57 effect, the encoding is temporarily ignored, and each string is treated
58 as a series of bytes. 
59
60 As an example, when Perl sees C<$x = chr(400)>, it encodes the character
61 in UTF-8 and stores it in $x. Then it is marked as character data, so,
62 for instance, C<length $x> returns C<1>. However, in the scope of the
63 C<bytes> pragma, $x is treated as a series of bytes - the bytes that make
64 up the UTF8 encoding - and C<length $x> returns C<2>:
65
66     $x = chr(400);
67     print "Length is ", length $x, "\n";     # "Length is 1"
68     printf "Contents are %vd\n", $x;         # "Contents are 400"
69     { 
70         use bytes; # or "require bytes; bytes::length()"
71         print "Length is ", length $x, "\n"; # "Length is 2"
72         printf "Contents are %vd\n", $x;     # "Contents are 198.144"
73     }
74
75 chr(), ord(), substr(), index() and rindex() behave similarly.
76
77 For more on the implications and differences between character
78 semantics and byte semantics, see L<perluniintro> and L<perlunicode>.
79
80 =head1 LIMITATIONS
81
82 bytes::substr() does not work as an lvalue().
83
84 =head1 SEE ALSO
85
86 L<perluniintro>, L<perlunicode>, L<utf8>
87
88 =cut